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Page 65 Artificial intelligence

Scheme and Syllabus of


B.E. (Computer Science and Engineering)
3rd TO 8th Semester 2015-2016

University Institute of Engineering and


Technology,
Panjab University, Chandigarh

DEPARTMENT: COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


VISION:
To be recognized as an international leader in Computer Science and Engineering education and research to
benefit society globally.
MISSION:

To move forward as frontiers of human knowledge to enrich the citizen, the nation, and the world.
To excel in research and innovation that discovers new knowledge and enables new technologies and systems.
To develop technocrats, entrepreneurs, and business leaders of future who will strive to improve the quality of
human life.
To create world class computing infrastructure for the enhancement of technical knowledge in field of Computer
Science and Engineering.

PROGRAMME:B.E. CSE (UG PROGRAMME)


PROGRAMME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
I. Graduates will work as software professional in industry of repute.
II. Graduates will pursue higher studies and research in engineering and management disciplines.
III. Graduates will work as entrepreneurs by establishing startups to take up projects for societal and environmental
cause.
PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:
A. Ability to effectively apply knowledge of computing, applied sciences and mathematics to computer science &
engineering problems.
B. Identify, formulate, research literature, and analyze complex computer science & engineering problems reaching
substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering sciences.
C. Design solutions for computer science & engineering problems and design system components or processes that meet
the specified needs with appropriate consideration for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal, and
environmental considerations.
D. Conduct investigations of complex problems using research-based knowledge and research methods including design
of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of the information to provide valid conclusions.
E. Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools including prediction
and modeling to different computer science & Engineering activities with an understanding of the limitations.
F. Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal, and cultural issues and
the consequent responsibilities relevant to the professional engineering practice.
G. Understand the impact of the professional engineering solutions in societal and environmental contexts and
demonstrate the knowledge of and need for the sustainable development.
H. Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of the engineering practice.
I.

Ability to function effectively as a member of a team assembled to undertake a common goal in multidisciplinary
settings.

J.

Ability to communicate effectively to both technical and non-technical audiences.

K. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the engineering and management principles and apply these to ones
own work, as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.
L. Recognition of the need for and the ability to engage in life-long learning. The ability to successfully pursue
professional development.

EXAMINATION NOTE:
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks. First question, covering the
whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each part.

2.0
Credit System :
2.1 All B.E / integrated B.E-M.B.A programmes are organised
around semester-based credit system of study. The credit system
is based on continuous evaluation of a students
performance/progress and includes flexibility to allow a student
to progress at an optimum pace suited to his/her ability or
convenience, subject to fulfilling minimum requirements for
continuation.
2.2 Performance/progress of a student is measured by the number
of credits that he/she has earned (completed satisfactorily). Based
on the course credits and grades obtained by the student, grade
point average is calculated. A minimum grade point average is
required to be maintained for satisfactory progress and
continuation in the programme. Also a minimum number of
earned credits and a minimum grade point average should be
acquired in order to qualify for the degree.
2.3
Course Credit Assignment:
Each course has a certain number of credits assigned to it
depending on the associated number of lecture, tutorials and
laboratory contact hours in a week. A few courses are without
credit and are referred to as non-credit (NC) courses.
Lectures and Tutorials: One lecture hour or one tutorial hour per
week per semester is assigned one credit.
Practical / Laboratory Work: One laboratory hour per week per
semester is assigned half credit.
The credits are rounded off to the nearest whole number
For each lecture or tutorial the self study component is 1
hour/week.
2.4
Earning Credits :
At the end of every course, a letter grade is awarded in each
course for which a student had registered. On obtaining a pass
grade (at least D grade), the student accumulates the course
credits as earned credits. Performance of a student is measured
by the number of credits that he/she has earned and by the
weighted grade point average. A student has the option of
auditing some courses. Grades obtained in these audit courses
are not counted towards the calculation of grade point average.
However, a pass grade (Dgrade) is essential for earning
credits from an audit course.
3.0 Grading System :
3.1 Relative standing of the student in the class shall be clearly
indicated by his/her grades. The process of awarding grades shall
be based upon fitting performance of the class to a defined
statistical model.
3.2 The grades and their respective description , along with grade
points are listed in the table given below in Table-1
Table-1
Grade
A+
A
B+
B
C+
C

Grade Point
10
9
8
7
6
5

Description
Outstanding
Excellent
Very Good
Good
Average
Below average

2.0
Credit System :
2.1 All B.E / integrated B.E-M.B.A programmes are organised
around semester-based credit system of study. The credit system is
based on continuous evaluation of a students performance/progress
and includes flexibility to allow a student to progress at an optimum
pace suited to his/her ability or convenience, subject to fulfilling
minimum requirements for continuation.
2.2 Performance/progress of a student is measured by the number of
credits that he/she has earned (completed satisfactorily). Based on
the course credits and grades obtained by the student, grade point
average is calculated, subject to his qualification of minimum grade
in each subject.
2.3Course Credit Assignment:
Each course has a certain number of credits assigned to it depending
on the associated number of lecture, tutorials and laboratory contact
hours in a week. A few courses are without credit and are referred to
as non-credit (NC) courses.
Lectures and Tutorials: One lecture hour or one tutorial hour per
week per semester is assigned one credit.
Practical / Laboratory Work: One laboratory hour per week per
semester is assigned half credit.
The credits are rounded off to the nearest whole number.
For each lecture or tutorial the self study component is 1 hour/week
2.4
Earning Credits :
At the end of every course, a letter grade is awarded in each course
for which a student had registered. On obtaining a pass grade (at
least D grade), the student accumulates the course credits as earned
credits. Performance of a student is measured by the number of
credits that he/she has earned and by the weighted grade point
average. Grades obtained in audit courses are not counted towards
the calculation of grade point average. However, a pass grade (D
grade) is essential for earning credits from an audit course.
3.0
Grading System :
3.1
The grades and their respective description , along with
grade points are listed in the table given below in Table-1
Table-1
Grade
A+
A
B+
B
C+
C
D
F
I
NP
NF

Grade Point
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
0
-

Description
Outstanding
Excellent
Very Good
Good
Average
Below average
Marginal
Very Poor
Incomplete
Audit Pass
Audit Fail

D
E
F
I
NP
NF
W
X
S

4
2
0
-

Marginal
Poor
Very Poor
Incomplete
Audit Pass
Audit Fail
Withdrawal
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory
Completion
Course continuation

Z
4.0 Evaluation System:
4.1 Continuous Assessment :
There shall be continuous evaluation of the student during the
semester. For evaluation purpose, total marks assigned to each
subject shall be distributed as :
Two Mid semester Examination (Minor-1 and Minor-2) with 30
% of total marks assigned to the subject.

Assignments/Class projects/ short class tests/MCQ based


quizzes/projects/presentations/group discussions with 20 % of
total marks assigned to the subject.
One End Semester Examination (Major Examination) with 50 %
of total marks assigned to the subject.
Total score on a scale of 100 i.e. in % obtained by a student in a
subject shall be hence forth referred as raw score in that subject.
Following the concept of relative grading, before assigning the
letter grades, scientific normalization method shall be used to
standardize the raw score.
4.2 Statistical Method for the Award of Grades:
For the award of grades in a course, all component wise
evaluation shall be done in terms of marks. The components
include:
Midterm-1
and
Midterm-2
examinations,
Assignments/projects/class presentations/Attendance, and End
semester examination as per regulation 4.1. After converting the
marks obtained in percentage , the grades will be assigned as per
the guidelines given below :
4.2.1
For less than 15 students in a course, the grades shall be
awarded on the basis of cutoff in the absolute marks as shown in
Table-2.
Table-2
Absolute
marks in
%
91
82
73
64
55
46
40
35

Grade
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<

Absolute marks in %

A+ <
100
A <
90
B+ <
81
B <
72
C+ <
63
C <
54
D <
45
E
<
39
F <
35
4.2.2
For more than 30 students in a course, the statistical
method shall be used for the award of grades. After expressing
the score obtained by the students in a course in percentage (X),

W
X
S

Withdrawal
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory
Completion

4.0 Evaluation System:


4.1 Continuous Assessment :
There shall be continuous evaluation of the student during the
semester. For evaluation purpose, total marks assigned to each
subject shall be distributed as :
Two Mid semester Examination (Minor-1 and Minor-2) with 30 %
of total marks assigned to the subject. Best Marks of one of these
two will be considered for award of sessional.
Assignments/Class projects/ short class tests/MCQ based
quizzes/projects/presentations/group discussions/ Attendance with 20
% of total marks assigned to the subject.
One End Semester Examination (Major Examination) with 50 % of
total marks assigned to the subject. It is compulsory to appear in
End Semester Examination and secure at least 20% marks of total
End semester exam marks.
If a candidate secures less than 20% marks of total End semester
exam marks, he/she will be awarded F grade.
4.2 Method for the Award of Grades:
For the award of grades in a course, all component wise evaluation
shall be done in terms of marks. The components include: Midterm1 and Midterm-2 examinations, Assignments/projects/class
presentations/Attendance, and End semester examination as per
regulation 4.1. After converting the marks obtained in percentage ,
the grades will be assigned as per the guidelines given below :

Table-2
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Marks
90
80 &< 90
70 &< 80
60 &< 70
50 &< 60
45 &< 50
40 &< 45
<40

Grade
A+
A
B+
B
C+
C
D
F

Grade Point
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
0
4.2.2 NOT

REQUIRED

the class mean (

) and class standard deviation ( S) of the

marks shall be calculated and grades shall be awarded to a


student as shown in Table-3
If X is the raw score in % ;
is class mean in %

and S is class standard deviation in % (based on raw


score) , N is the number of students in a course , then for
the course :
4.2.3 NOT REQUIRED
4.3 NOT REQUIRED

Table-3
Lower Range of
Marks(%)

Grade Assigned

Upper Range of Marks (%)

A+
A <
B+ <
B <
C+ <
C <
D <
E <
<

F <

4.2.3
In case, class student strength in a course lies between
15 and 30, any of the above methods (given in 4.2.1 and 4.2.2)
may be used for the award of grades.
4.3 Finalization of Grades:
Finalization of the grades shall be done by the Board of Control
of the department/ institute or appropriate body/committee
approved by the university for the purpose.
In order to maintain a normal distribution in grades, following
recommendations of UGC shall be kept in view and considered
as broad guidelines by the Board of Control of the department/

5.0
Evaluation of Performance :
5.1
The performance of a student shall be evaluated in terms of
two indices, viz. Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) and
Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA).
SGPA is the grade point average for the semester, and CGPA is the
cumulative grade point average for all the completed semesters at
any point in time.
The earned credits (E.C) are defined as the sum of course credits for
course in which A+ to D grade has been obtained. For U.G students
(B.E), credits from courses in which NP or S grade has been
obtained are also added.
Points earned in a semester =

institute or appropriate body/committee approved by the


university for the purpose.

The SGPA is calculated on the basis of grades obtained in all


courses, except audit courses and courses in which S/Z grade is
awarded, registered for the particular semester.

Grade
% of Population
Remarks
A
7
Includes A+ and A
B
24
Includes B+ and B
C
38
Includes C+ and C
D
24
F
7
*
Note: In case Board of Control of the department/ institute or
appropriate body/committee approved by the university for the
purpose, is convinced on broad variations in grade distribution in
a class for a particular subject, B.O.C may make some minor
variations in

while maintaining the grade distribution as

recommended by the UGC.


5.0
Evaluation of Performance :
5.1
The performance of a student shall be evaluated in terms
of two indices, viz. Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) and
Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA).
SGPA is the grade point average for the semester, and CGPA is
the cumulative grade point average for all the completed
semesters at any point in time.
The earned credits (E.C) are defined as the sum of course credits
for course in which A+ to D grade has been obtained. For U.G
students (B.E) , credits from courses in which NP or S grade has
been obtained are also added.
Points earned in a semester =

SGPA

Course Credits Grade Po int s

SGPA

Semester

Course Credits

except audit and S / Z grade Courses

Course Credits

except audit and S / Z grade Courses

Semester

The CGPA is calculated as given below :

Course Credits Grade Po int s

for all courses with pass grade except audit and S / Z grade

All Semester

CGPA

for all courses except audit and S / Z grade Courses

Semester

for all courses except audit and S / Z grade Course

The SGPA is calculated on the basis of grades obtained in all


courses, except audit courses and courses in which S/Z grade is
awarded, registered for the particular semester.

Course Credits Grade Po int s

Semester

All Semester

Course Credits earned

except audit and S / Z grade Courses

The CGPA is calculated on the basis of all pass grades, except


audit courses and courses in which S/Z grade is awarded,
obtained in all completed semesters.

Scheme of Examination of B.E. in Computer Science & Engineering


Second Year - Third Semester

Sr.No

Paper
Code

Subject Title

Scheme of Teaching
L

T P

Hrs

Credits

University Internal
External
Sessional
Marks
Marks

Total

1. CS301

Data Structures

1 0

50

50

100

2. CS351

Data Structures (Practical)

0 3

50

50

3. CS302

Database Systems

1 0

50

50

100

Database Systems
4. CSE352 (Practical)

0 3

50

50

5. CS303

Discrete Structures

1 0

50

50

100

6. CS304

Microprocessors

1 0

50

50

100

7. CS354

Microprocessors
(Practical)
Economics

0 3

50

50

0 0

50

50

100

15

4 09

28

25

250

400

650

8. AS 201
Total

Second Year -Fourth Semester


Sr.No

Paper
Code

Subject Title

1.

CS401

2.

CS 451

3.

CS402

Analysis & Design of


Algorithms
Analysis & Design of
Algorithms (Practical)
Web Technologies

4.

CS452

5.

CS403

6.

CS453

7.
8.

CS 404
CS 454

9.

CS 405

Total

Scheme of Teaching

University
External
Credit
Marks
4
50

Internal Total
Sessional
Marks
50
100

L
3

T
1

P
0

Hrs
4

50

50

50

50

100

Web Technologies
(Practical)
Operating Systems

50

50

50

50

100

Operating Systems
(Practical)

50

50

3
0

1
0

0
3

4
3

4
2

50
-

50
50

100
50

50

50

100

15

12

32

28

250

450

700

Software Engineering
Software Engineering
(Practical)
Computer Architecture
And Organization

Scheme of Examination of B.E. in Computer Science & Engineering


Third Year - Fifth Semester
Sr.No Paper
Code

Subject Title

Scheme of Teaching
L

Hrs

University Internal
External Sessional
Credit Marks
Total
Marks

1. CSE511

Operating System

2. CSE561

Operating System
(Practical)
Software Engineering
Software Engineering
(Practical)
Computer Network
Computer Network
(Practical)
Principle of
Programming
Languages
Discrete Structures
and Computational
Logic
Industrial Training
th
(After 4 Sem)

3
0

1
0

0
3

4
3

4
2

3
0

1
0

0
3

4
3

4
2

3. CSE512
4. CSE562
5. CSE513
6. CSE563
7. CSE514
8. CSE517
9. CSE566

Total

15

50

100

50

50

50

50
50

100
50

50

50
50

100
50

50

50

100

50

50

100

50

50

9 29

28

50

250

450

700

Third Year - Sixth Semester


Sr.No

Paper
Code

Subject Title

Scheme of Teaching
L

Hrs

Internal Total
Sessional
Marks

1. CSE611

Web Technologies

50

50

100

2. CSE661

Web Technologies
(Practical)
Distributed Systems
Computer Graphics

50

50

3
3

1
1

0
0

4
4

4
4

50
50

50
50

100
100

Computer Graphics
(Practical)
Artificial
Intelligence
Artificial
Intelligence
(Practical)
Modelingand
Simulation
Modeling and
Simulation
(Practical)

50

50

50

50

100

50

50

50

50

100

50

50

15

12 32

28

250

450

700

3. CSE612
4. CSE613
5. CSE663
6. CSE614
7. CSE664
8. CSE615
9. CSE665
Total

T P

University
External
Credit Marks

Scheme of Examination of B.E. in Computer Science & Engineering


Fourth Year - Seventh Semester
Sr.
No

Paper
Code

Subject Title

Scheme of Teaching
L

Hrs

Credit

University
External
Marks

Internal Total
Sessional
Marks

1. CSE711

Compiler Design

50

50

100

2. CSE761

Compiler Design
(Practical)

50

50

3. CSE712
4. CSE713

Multimedia System Design


Software Testing & Quality
Assurance
Software Testing & Quality
Assurance (Practical)

3
3

1
1

0
0

4
4

4
4

50
50

50
50

100
100

50

50

6.

Elective -I

50

50

100

7. CSE767

Project I

100

100

8. CSE768

Seminar

50

50

9. CSE769

Industrial Training (After


6th Semester)

100

100

26

200

550

750

5. CSE763

Total

12

Elective -I
CSE 714

Information Security

CSE 715

Business Intelligence

CSE 716

Mobile Computing

14 30

Fourth Year - Eighth Semester


Sr. Paper
No Code

Subject Title

Scheme of Teaching

1. CSE811
2. CSE812

Option
1

3. CSE862

Advanced Database
Systems
Digital
Image
Processing
Digital
Image
Processing (Practical)

External

Hr

Credit Marks

Internal
Sessional

Total

Marks

50

50

100

50

50

100

50

50
100

4.

Elective II

50

50

5.

Elective II
(Practical)

50

50

6.

Elective III

50

50

100

7. CSE858

Project II

100

100

12

12

27

22

200

400

600

22

200

400

600

22

200

400

600

Totall
Option
2

University

1. CSE860

Industrial Training

Tota
l

Elective II (Theory)

Elective II (Practical)

Elective III (Theory)

CSE 813

Network
Programming

CSE 863

Network
Programming
(Practical)

CSE
816

Soft Computing

CSE814

Visual Programming

CSE864

Visual Programming
(Practical)

CSE
817

Embedded Systems

CSE815

Java Technologies

CSE865

Java Technologies
(Practical)

CSE
818

Building Enterprise
Applications

Second Year - Third Semester


Branch: Computer Science and Engineering
Title
DATA STRUCTURES
Credits
04
Code
CSE 311
Semester: - 3rd
LTP
310
Max. Marks
External: - 50
Internal: - 50
Elective
N
Pre-requisites
Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering(CS102), Programming
Fundamentals(CS101/201),Object Oriented Programming(CS202)
Contact Hours
45
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
1. To develop proficiency in the specification, representation, and implementation of data types and
data structures.
2. To understand the basic concepts of the fundamentals of different types of data structures.
3. To demonstrate the ways of implementation of different types of data structures.
4. To learn the techniques to solve problems like sorting, searching, insertion and deletion of data etc.
related to data structures.
Note for Examiner
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks. First
question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest
of the paper will be divided into two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required to
attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Complexity Analysis: Time and Space complexity of algorithms, asymptotic analysis, big O and other
notations, importance of efficient algorithms, program performance measurement, data structures and
algorithms.
4
Linear Lists: Abstract data type, sequential and linked representations, comparison of insertion, deletion
and search operations for sequential and linked lists, list and chain classes, doubly linked lists, circular
linked lists, applications of lists in bin sort, radix sort, sparse tables.
8
Stacks and Queues: Abstract data types, sequential and linked implementations, representative
applications such as parenthesis matching, towers of Hanoi.

4
Sorting: Bubble sort, selection sort, insertion sort, Shell sort; Quick sort; Heapsort; Merge sort; Radix sort;
Analysis of the sorting methods, Selecting the top k elements.
7
SECTION-B
Trees: Binary trees and their properties, terminology, sequential and linked implementations, tree traversal
methods and algorithms, Heap data structure and its applicationsas priority queues, heap implementation,
insertion and deletion operations, Heapsort.
7
Search & Multi-way Trees: Binary search trees, search efficiency, insertion and deletion operations,
importance of balancing, AVL trees, red-black trees, B-trees, B+trees, 2-3 trees, search insert and delete
operations and their comparisons.
7
Graphs: Definition, terminology, directed and undirected graphs, properties, connectivity in graphs,
applications, implementation adjacency matrix and linked adjacency chains, graph traversal breadth
first and depth first, spanning trees.
5
Hashing: hashing as a search structure, hash table, collision avoidance, linear open addressing, chaining.
3
Suggested Books
1. Y. Langsam, M. J. Augenstein, A. M. Tanenbaum: Data Structures using C and ++,
2ndEdition, Pearson Education
2. R. Kruse, C. L. Tondo, B. Leung, S. Mogalla: Data Structures & Program Design n C.
2ndEdition, Pearson Education
References:
1. E. Horowitz, S. Sahni, D. Mehta :Fundamentals of Data Structures in C++, 2ndEdition,
Universities Press
2. Donald E. Knuth::Art of Computer Programming, Volume 1: Fundamental algorithms,
3rd Edition, Addison-Wesley
Art of Computer Programming, Volume 3: Sorting and Searching, 2ndEdition, AddisonWesley
Course Assessment Methods
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
Course Outcomes
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Understand common data structures (such as arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, priority queues,
trees, heaps, hash tables, associative containers).
2. Understand the algorithms that build and manipulate different types of data structures including
various sorting, searching, and hashing algorithms.
3. Decide, apply and implement the appropriate data type and data structure for a given problem.

C
o
u
rs
e
O
ut
co
m
es
I
II
III
IV

*
*
*
*

*
*
*

*
*
*
*

POs
F

*
*
*
*

L
4. Make appropriate data
structure and algorithm
design
decisions
with
respect to program size,
execution
speed,
and
storage efficiency.
Mapping of Course Outcomes
with POs
*
*

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

DATA STRCTURES (PRACTICAL)


CSE 351
Semester: - 3rd
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:

02
003
N
3 Hours

1. Implementation of array operations: Traversal, Insertion & Deletion at and from a


given location
2. Stacks: Implementation of Push, Pop; Conversion of Infix expression to Postfix,
Evaluation of Postfix expressions.
3. Queues: Circular Queue: Adding & deleting elements.
4. Linked list: inserting, deleting, implementation of stacks & queues using linked
lists; Polynomial addition.
5. Trees: Implementation of Binary & Binary Search Trees, Recursive and Nonrecursive traversal of Trees.
6. Implementation of Graphs
7. Implementation of sorting and searching algorithms
8. Hash tables implementation: searching, inserting and deleting

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

DATABASE SYSTEMS
CS 302
External: - 50

th

Semester: - 4
Internal: - 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
310
N

Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering(CS102),


Programming Fundamentals(CS101/201)

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives The main objective of this course is to provide students with the background to design,
implement, and use database management systems. This course offers a good
understanding of database systems concepts and prepares the student to be in a position
to use and design databases for different applications. Behind the development and
design of this course is to know.
How to design, manipulate and manage databases.
The course participants are exposed to the various forms, types and models of
database systems to enable them make viable choices.
Supportive and complimentary concepts of managing data and documents are
thoroughly examined to give a wholesome view of data/information
management.
The ultimate aim is to encourage the usage of database management systems for
effective data management.
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
Examiner equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction to Database Systems:
6
File Systems Versus a DBMS, Advantages of a DBMS, Describing and Storing Data in a
DBMS, Database System Architecture, DBMS Layers, Data independence.
Physical Data Organization:
6
File Organization and Indexing, Index Data Structures, Hashing, B-trees, Clustered
Index, Sparse Index, Dense Index, Fixed length and Variable Length Records.
Data Models:
5
Relational Model, Network Model, Hierarchical Model, ER Model: Entities, Attributes
and Entity Sets, Relationships and Relationship Sets, Constraints, Weak Entities, Class
Hierarchies, Aggregation, Conceptual Database Design with the ER Model, Comparison
of Models.
The Relational Model:
Introduction to the Relational Model, ER to Relational Model Conversion, Integrity
Constraints over Relations, Enforcing Integrity Constraints, Relational Algebra, 5
Relational Calculus, Querying Relational Data.
SECTION-B

Relational Query Languages:


SQL: Basic SQL Query, Creating Table and Views, SQL as DML, DDL and DCL, SQL
Algebraic Operations, Nested Queries, Aggregate Operations, Cursors, Dynamic SQL,
Integrity Constraints in SQL, Triggers and Active Database, Relational Completeness,
Basic Query Optimization Strategies, Algebraic Manipulation and Equivalences.
Database Design:
Functional Dependencies, Reasoning about Functional Dependencies, Normal Forms,
Schema Refinement, First, Second and Third Normal Forms, BCNF, Multi-valued
Dependency, Join Dependency, Fourth and Fifth Normal Forms, Domain Key Normal
Forms, Decompositions.
Transaction Management:
ACID Properties, Serializability, Two-phase Commit Protocol, Concurrency Control,
Lock Management, Lost Update Problem, Inconsistent Read Problem, Read-Write Locks,
Deadlocks Handling, 2PL protocol.
Database Protection:
Threats, Access Control Mechanisms, Discretionary Access Control, Grant and Revoke,
Mandatory Access Control, Bell LaPadula Model, Role Based Security, Firewalls,
Encryption and Digital Signatures.
Suggested
Books

Course

S.
Authors
No.
1.
RamezElmasri
,
ShamkantNav
athe
References:
1.
C.J. Date

Title

Publishe
r
Fundamentals
of Pearson
Database Systems
Educatio
n

Edition

Year

Fifth
Edition

2007

An Introduction to Pearson
Eighth
Database Systems
Educatio Edition
n
2.
Alexis Leon,
Database
Mathews Leon Management
Systems
3.
S. K. Singh
Database Systems Pearson
Concepts, Design Educatio
and Applications
n
4.
Raghu
Database
Tata
Ramakrishnan Management
McGraw, Johannes
Systems
Hill
Gehrke
5.
Abraham
System Concepts
Tata
Silberschatz,
McGrawHenry F.
Hill
Korth, S.
Sudarshan
Assessment will consists of following components

6
5

Assessment
Methods

Course
Outcomes

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Two Minors (30% Weightage )


Quiz (7.5%)
Assignment (7.5%)
Attendance (5%)
Final Exam (50%)

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand basic database concepts, its physical organization including the
structure and operation of ER model, Relational data model along with
normalizing relational data.
2. Construct simple and moderately advanced database queries using Structured
Query Language (SQL) and Procedural SQL (PL/SQL).
3. Understand the concept of a database transactions and related database
facilities, including concurrency control through serializability and locking
protocols.
4. Learn about protection issues for databases including various integrity and
security methods.

Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO
1
2
3
4

A
X

B
X

PO
E F
X
X

X
X
X

X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

DATABASE SYSTEM (PRACTICAL)


CS 352
Semester: - 4th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:

02
003
N
3 Hours

1. Introduction to SQL and installation of SQL Server / Oracle.


2. Data Types, Creating Tables, Retrieval of Rows using Select Statement,
Conditional Retrieval of Rows, Alter and Drop Statements.
3. Working with Null Values, Matching a Pattern from a Table, Ordering the Result of
a Query, Aggregate Functions, Grouping the Result of a Query, Update and Delete
Statements.
4. Set Operators, Nested Queries, Joins, Sequences.
5. Views, Indexes, Database Security and Privileges: Grant and Revoke Commands,
Commit and Rollback Commands.
6. PL/SQL Architecture, Assignments and Expressions, Writing PL/SQL Code,
Referencing Non-SQL parameters.
7. Stored Procedures and Exception Handling.
8. Triggers and Cursor Management in PL/SQL.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
DISCRETE STRUCTURES
Code
CS 303
Semester: - 3rd
Max. Marks
External: 50
Internal: 50
Pre-requisites

Objectives

Note for
Examiner

Credits
4
LTP
310
Elective
N
Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
To get familiar and understand the fundamental notions in discrete
mathematics.
To introduce the knowledge of core mathematical foundation of computer
science.
Be exposed to concepts and properties of algebraic structures such
as semi groups, monoids and groups.
Be aware of the counting principles.
To introduce the basic properties of graphs and trees and model simple
applications.
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions
of equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions
of conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into
two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at
least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A

Set theory:
Paradoxes in set theory; inductive definition of sets and proof by induction; Peono
postulates; Relations; representation of relations by graphs; properties of relations;
equivalence relations and partitions; Partial orderings; Posets; Linear and well-ordered
sets.
Functions:
Mappings; injection and surjections; composition of functions; inverse functions;
special functions; Peono postulates; pigeonhole principle; recursive function theory.
Mathematical reasoning:
Propositions; negation disjunction and conjuction; implication and equivalence; truth
tables; predicates; quantifiers; natural deduction; rules of Inference; methods of proofs;
use in program proving; resolution principle;
SECTION-B
Combinatorics:
Elementary combinatorics; counting techniques; recurrence relation; generating
functions.

Hrs
9

Graph Theory:
Introduction, Graphs Multigraph, Isomorphic Graph, Homeomorphic Graphs, Paths
and Circuits, Shortest Paths In waited Graphs, Eulerian and Hamiltonial Paths and
Circuits, Konigsberg Bridge, Complete , Regular, Bipartite Graphs, Planner Graphs,
Graph Coloring, Graph Traversal Techniques.Trees, Binary Search Trees,
Complete & Extended Binary Trees.
Groups:
Definition and elementary properties of groups, semigroups, monoids, rings, fields,
vector spaces and lattices.

Suggested
Books

S.
Authors
No.
1.
C.L.Liu, D P
Mohapatra
2.

K.H.Rosen,

3.

Lipschutz

4.

Course
Assessment
Methods

Course
Outcomes

Title

Publisher

Edition

Year

Elements of
Discrete
Mathematics
Discrete
Mathematics
and
applications
Discrete
Mathematics,
McGraw
Hill,
Discrete
Mathematical
Structures ,

Tata
McGraw
Hill
Tata
McGraw
Hill

Third
Edition

2012

Seventh
Edition

2012

McGraw
Hill,

Latest
Edition

2012

10

Other
Details

B. Kolman,
PHI
latest
2004
R. C. Busby
Edition
and S. C.
Ross
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (10%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Get familiar and understand the fundamental notions in discrete
mathematics.
2. Acquire the knowledge of core mathematical foundation of computer
science.
3. Exposed to concepts and properties of algebraic structures such as semi

groups, monoids and groups.


4. Aware of the counting principles, basic properties of graph, trees and
model simple applications.
Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO

PO
A

1.

2.

3.

4.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

MICROPROCESSORS
CS 304
External: - 50

rd

Semester: - 3
Internal: - 50

Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering(CS102),


Programming Fundamentals(CS101/201)

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
310
N

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives Provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in microprocessor-based system
design, assembly language programming, and I/O interfacing to microprocessors. This
course is intended as a first level course for microcomputer and embedded system design.
Designer of an embedded system must have a thorough understanding of hardware,
software and system integration. In view of this, various aspects of hardware design, such
as interfacing of memory and different types of I/O devices, will be covered in details. As
it is customary to write software in machine or assembly language for embedded system
applications, laboratory assignments will be on assembly language programming of 8085.
1. This course contains fundamental principles of 8085 microprocessor, its hardware
interfacing and programming.
2. After completion of this course the student must be able to use 8085
microprocessor and its peripherals in small applications.
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examiner
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each
part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Microprocessor Architecture and Microcomputer Systems:
4
Microprocessor Architecture Memory, Input and Output Devices, the 8085 MPU, Example
of an 808S-Based Microcomputer, Memory Interfacing, The SDK-85 Memory System.
Interfacing I/O Devices:
4
Basic Interfacing Concepts, Interfacing Output Displays, Interfacing Input Devices,
Memory7" Mapped I/O, Testing and Troubleshooting, I/O Interfacing Circuits.
Programming the 8085:
7
Introduction to 8085 Assembly Language Programming, The 8085 Programming Model,
Instruction Classification, Instruction format. Data Transfer (Copy) Operations, Arithmetic
Operations, Logic Operations Branch Operations, Writing Assembly Language Programs.
8
Programming Techniques with Additional Instructions:
Programming Techniques Looping, Counting and Indexing, Additional Data Transfer -'arid
16-Bit Arithmetic Instructions, Arithmetic Operations Related to Memory, Logic
Operations.
SECTION-B
Counters and Time Delays:
4
Counters and Time Delays, Hexadecimal Counter, Modulo: Ten Counter, Generating Pulse
Waveforms, Debugging Counter and Time-Delay Programs.

Stack and Subroutines:


Stack, Subroutine, Conditional Call and Return Instructions.
Interrupts:
The 8085 Interrupt 8085 Vectored interrupts.
Interfacing Data Converters:
Digital- to- Analog(01 A) Converters, Analog- to- Digital (A/D) Converters.
General -Purpose Programmable Peripheral Devices:
The 82S5A Programmable Peripheral Interface, Illustration: Interfacing Keyboard and
Seven- Segment Display, Illustration: Bi- directional-Data Transfer between Two
Microcomputers, The 8254 Programmable Interval Timer, The 8259 A Programmable
Interrupt Controllers, and Direct Memory. Access (DMA) and the 8257 DMA Controller,
serial communication, Programmable communications interface 8251.
Suggested
Books

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

4
4
4

S.
Authors
Title
Publisher Edition Year
No.
1.
Ramesh S. Microprocessor
Pearson
third
Gaonkar
Programming
edition
and Architecture,
Applications
with the 8085
References:
1.
Charles
Microprocessor
Tata
M.Gilmore Principles and McGraw
Applications,
Hill.
2.
Douglas V. Microprocessors Tata
second
Hall
and Interfacing
McGraw edition
programming
Hill.
and Hardware
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Identify the basic element and functions of microprocessor, describing the
architecture of microprocessor and its peripheral devices, memory interfacing.
2. Demonstrate the fundamental understanding on the operation between the
microprocessor and its interfacing devices, testing and troubleshooting, circuit
diagrams along with description.
3. Apply the programming techniques in developing the assembly language program
for microprocessor application, types of instructions and its uses, 8-bit as well as
16-bit programming, looping, counter delay executions, issues related to
debugging.
4. Understand the concepts of stack and subroutines, its need in microprocessors,

various types of interrupts, interrupt handling, instructions related to interrupts and


related programming, interfacing data convertors and brief introduction to various
general purpose programmable peripheral devices and its interfacing with 8085
microprocessor.
Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO
1
2
3
4

A
X
X
X
X

B
X

PO
E F

X
X

X
X

X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

MICROPROCESSORS (PRACTICAL)
CSE 354
Semester: - 3rd
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:

0
002
N
3 Hours

1. Familiarization of 8085 kits..Verification of arithmetic and logic operations using


above kits.(At least 5 programs)
2. Development of interfacing circuits of various control applications based on 8085.
3. Application of assembly language using 8085 instructions set to develop various
Programs.
4. Applications of data movement instructions to develop relevant programs.

Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

ECONOMICS
HSS 201
External: - 50

rd

Semester: - 3
Internal: - 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

03
300
N

Contact
Hours

45

Time
Objectives

3 Hours

1. To make students understand how society manages its scarce resources for achieving
maximum satisfaction.
2. To make students learn about economic aspects related to a consumer, firm, market and
economy.

Note for
Examiner

The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each
part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction to Economics
5
Nature of Economics, Economic Thoughts, Economic Activities, Relationship of Economics with
other Social Sciences and Engineering
Theory of Consumer Behaviour
Demand: Types, Law of Demand, Determinants of Demand and Change in Demand
Elasticity of Demand: Nature, Degrees, Types, Measurement and Factors Affecting Elasticity of
Demand and its Application
Laws of Consumption: Concept and Applicability of Law of Diminishing Marginal Utility and Law
of Equi-Marginal Utility

10

9
Theory of Production and Cost
Cost: Types of Costs, Production: Law of Variable Proportion, Returns to Factor and Returns to
Scale, Economies and Diseconomies of Scale

SECTION-B
8
Theory of Market
Nature and Relevance of Perfect Competition, Monopoly and Monopolistic Competition
Basic Concepts of Macro Economics
National Income: Concept and Measurement, Determination of Equilibrium of Income
Inflation: Concept, Causes and Effect of Inflation, Measures to Control Inflation
Economics of Software:-Why should software be valued? Principles of valuation. Cost versus
value. Market value of software companies. Examples of estimation of the value of software.
Sales expectations and discounting. Alternate business models. Risks when outsourcing and
offshoring development.

Suggested
Books

8
5

1. Ahuja H. L., Modern Economics, S. Chand & Co. Ltd


2. Gupta M. L. & Gupta S. P., Economics For Engineers, ESS PEE Publications
3. GioWiederhold: Valuing Intellectual Capital, Multinationals and Taxhavens; Springer
Verlag, August 2013.

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Ahuja H. L., Business Economics, S. Chand & Co. Ltd


Jhingan M.L., Macro Economic Theory, Konark Publisher Pvt. Ltd.
Stiglitz J. & Walsh Carl E., Principles of Microeconomics, W.W. Norton & Company
Stiglitz J. & Walsh Carl E., Principles of Macroeconomics, W.W. Norton & Company
Mankiw N Gregory, Principles of Economics, Cengage Learning

9.
10.
11.
12.

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

Kreps A., Course in Micro Economics Theory, Prentice Hall


Samuelson Paul A. &Nordhaus William D., Economics, Tata McGraw Hill
Gravelle H. & Reiss R., Microeconomics, Pearson Education
Ahuja H. L., Macro Economics: Theory and Practice, S. Chand & Co. Ltd.

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Apply engineering knowledge to maximize profit, satisfaction and welfare.
2. Identify the forces that affect the economy.
3. Students shall be able to apply concepts of economy to software development.

CO
1
2
3
4

A
X
X
X
X

B
X

PO
E F

X
X

X
X

X
X

Second Year -Fourth Semester


Branch: Computer Science and Engineering
Title
ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ALGORITHMS
Code
CSE 401
Semester: - 4th
Max.
External: - 50
Internal: - 50
Marks
PreIntroduction
to
Computer
Science
requisites Engineering(CS102),Data Structures (CS301)

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
313
N

and Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives To understand the different algorithms design techniques and to understand the
algorithm analysis approach.
Note for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
Examiner equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction:-Revisiting space/time complexity and asymptotic notations; Recurrences: 08
writing recurrences, solving recurrences: iterative substitution, recursion-tree method,
Masters theorem, substitution method.
Divide and Conquer:- General method,Analysis of divide and conquer based solutions 07
to: Binary Search, Merge sort, Quick sort, Selection sort; finding maximum and
minimum using divide and conquer, Strassens matrix multiplication.
Greedy Algorithms:-Elements of Greedy strategy, Activity Selection Problem, Knapsack 08
problem, Single source Shortest paths problem, Minimum Spanning tree problem and
analysis of these problems.
SECTION-B
Dynamic Programming:- Elements of dynamic programming, Assembly-line 12
scheduling problem, Matrix-chain multiplication, Multistage Graph, All Pairs Shortest
paths, Longest common subsequence, 0/1 Knap Sack.
Back Tracking: - General method, N-Queen's problem, Graph coloring problem, Sum of 06
subsets Problem
NP-Completeness:- Polynomial Time, polynomial-time verification, NP-completeness &
reducibility, NP-complete problems
Suggested
Books

S.
Authors
Title
No.
1.
Thomas
H. Introduction
Cormen,
Algorithms
Charles
E.
Leiserson,
Ronald
L.

Publishe
r
to -

Edition

Year

04

Rivest
References:
1.
Ellis
Horowitz,
SartajSahni
2.
Aho A.V.,
Hopcroft
J.E.,
Ullman
J.D.
3.
Goodman
S.E.
&Hedetnie
mi
Course
Outcomes

of Galgotia
Pearson
Edu
cation

Introduction to the
McGrawDesign and Analysis Hill
of
Algorithms

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1
2
3

Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

Fundamentals
Computer
Algorithms
The Design and
Analysis of
Computer
Algorithms

Understand different measures for time and space complexities.


Understand the different algorithm design approaches including Divide and
Conquer, Greedy, Dynamic Programming, Backtracking and Branch and
Bound.
Understand P and NP class of problems.
CO
1
2
3

A
X
X
X

B
X
X
X

C
X
X

D
X
X
X

PO
E F
X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

ANALYSIS AND
(PRACTICAL)
CSE451
50

DESIGN

OF

ALGORITHMS Credits

Semester: - 4th

LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Divide & Conquer
2. Greedy Method
3. Dynamic Programming
4. Backtracking

02
003
N
3 Hours

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites
Objectives

Note for
Examiner

WEB TECHNOLOGIES
CSE 402
External: 50

Semester: - 4th
Internal: 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

4
310
N

Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering(CS102),


Programming Fundamentals(CS101/201

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Aim of this course is to familiarize the students with current technologies used in Web
development and maintenance
1. To introduce the concepts of Internet ,WWW and underlying technologies
2. To enable the student to use of HTML, DHTML, CSS for Static Webpage
creation.
3. To introduce the concept of JavaScript for Client Side programming.
4. To introduce the concept of byte code and Java Programming to develop
architecture (Platform) neutral application.
5. To study the concept of XML for data interchange across different platforms
6. To introduce the concept of PHP for various web servers
7. To demonstrate the concept of integrating AJAX and PHP with MySQL.

The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of


equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
INTERNET AND WORLD WIDE WEB:
Introduction, Internet addressing, ISP, types of Internet connections, introduction to
WWW, web browsers, web servers, URL, HTTP, DNS, web applications, tools for web
site creation.
4
HTML: Introduction to HTML, lists, adding graphics to HTML page, creating tables,
linking documents, frames, DHTML and cascading style sheets.
7
Java Script: Introduction, programming constructs: variables, operators and
expressions, conditional checking, functions and dialog boxes, JavaScript DOM,
creating forms, objects like Window, Navigator, History, Location, introduction to
cookies,
11
SECTION-B
XML: Why XML, XML syntax rules, XML elements, XML attributes, XML DTD
displaying XML with CSS.
6
PHP: Introduction, syntax, variables, statements, operators, decision making, loops,
arrays, strings, forms, get and post methods, functions, cookies, sessions.
11
PHP and MySQL: Introduction to MySQL, connecting to MySQL database, creation,
insertion, deletion and retrieval of MySQL data using PHP, PHP and XML, XML
parsers, XML DOM.
6
Suggested

Books

S.
No
.
1

Authors

Title

Publisher

Deitel,Deitel,Niet
o, and Sandhu

XML How to
Program,

Herbert Scheldt

Java 2: The Complete


Reference

Pearson
Education
.
TMH

Ivan Bayross
Commercial,

Schafer
Textbooks.

: Web Enabled
Development
Application

Editio
n

Year

Fifth
Editio
n

BPB

HTML,CSS,
JavaScript,Perl,
Python and PHP

Wiley
India

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand the core principle on which Internet and WWW operates and ability
to create static web pages using HTML, CSS and DHTML.
2. Create dynamic and interactive web contents using the concept of JavaScript,
Session and Cookies in Software development.
3. Understand the basic principle of Object Oriented Technology and ability to
create powerful but robust standalone application using Java.
4. Understand the concept of add on technologies like AJAX, XML and ability to
develop WebPages using PHP and AJAX and MySQL for server side scripting

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO

PO
A

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

WEB TECHNOLOGIES (Practical)


CSE 452
Semester: - 4th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Creation of Web pages using: HTML, DHTML
2. Creation of Web pages using JavaScript
3. Implementing basic concepts of Java
4. Creation of Web pages using AJAX
5. Database and AJAX
6. XML
7. PHP

02
003
N
3 Hours

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title

OPERATING SYSTEM

Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

CS 403
External: - 50

Objective
s

Semester: - 4th
Internal: - -50

Credits

04

LTP
Elective

310
N

Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering (CS102), Contact


Programming Fundamentals (CS101/201), Data Structures Hours
(CS301).
Time

45
3 Hours

To introduce design and implementation issues of various Operating Systems:


batch, multi-programmed, time sharing, real time, distributed, parallel
Operating System structural Components, layered structure, functions
To understand concept of processes, CPU Scheduling Algorithms: FCFS, SJF,
RR and Priority, Inter Process Communication, Process Synchronization,
Critical Sections, Semaphores and Monitors.
To introduce Deadlocks Detection , Recovery, Avoidance and Prevention
To familiarize with Memory Management using contiguous memory
allocation, paging, segmentation, segmentation with paging.
To introduce Virtual Memory, demand paging and page replacement
algorithms (FIFO, Optimal, LRU), Thrashing.
To understand File Systems, directory structure, allocation methods
(contiguous, linked, indexed), free-space management (bit vector, linked list,
grouping) and Protection mechanisms.
To discuss Disk Structure, Disk Scheduling (FCFS, SSTF, SCAN, C-SCAN,
and LOOK), Disk Management (Disk Formatting, Boot Blocks, and Bad
Blocks), Swap Space Management (Swap Space use, Swap Space Location,
Swap Space Management).
To explore case Studies: Brief introduction of MS-DOS, Windows, UNIX and
LINUX.
Note for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
Examiner equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two
parts having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction: What is an O.S., O.S. Functions; Different types of O.S.: batch, multiprogrammed, time sharing, real time, distributed, parallel; General structure of
operating system, O/S services, system calls.
5
Process Management: Introduction to processes - Concept of processes, process 10
scheduling, operations on processes; Inter Process Communication, Critical Sections,
Mutual Exclusion with Busy Waiting, Sleep and Wakeup, Semaphores, Message

passing; CPU scheduling- scheduling criteria, pre-emptive & non-pre-emptive


scheduling, Scheduling Algorithms: FCFS, SJF, RR and priority, Threads.
Deadlocks: Introduction to deadlocks, Conditions for deadlock, Resource allocation
graphs, Deadlock Detection and Recovery, Deadlock Avoidance, Deadlock Prevention
SECTION-B
Memory Management: background, logical vs. physical address space, memory
management without swapping; swapping; contiguous memory allocation, paging,
segmentation, segmentation with paging; Virtual Memory, demand paging,
performance, page replacement, page replacement algorithms (FIFO, Optimal ,LRU);
Thrashing.
File Systems: Files - file concept, file structure, file types, access methods, File
attributes, file operations; directory structure, allocation methods (contiguous, linked,
indexed), free-space management (bit vector, linked list, grouping), Protection
mechanisms.
Secondary Storage : Disk Structure, Disk Scheduling ( FCFS, SSTF, SCAN, CSCAN, LOOK), Disk Management (Disk Formatting, Boot Blocks, Bad Blocks),
Swap Space Management (Swap Space use, Swap Space Location, Swap Space
Management)
Case Studies: Brief introduction of MS-DOS, Windows, UNIX and LINUX.
Suggested
Books

Course
Assessme
nt
Methods

Course
Outcomes

S.
No.
1

Authors

Title

Publisher

Editio
n

Year

Other
Details

Silbersehatz Operating
Addison
and Galvin System
Wesley Inc.
Concepts
2
Tanenbaum Operating
Pearson
A.S
System Design Education.
&
Implementation
3
Bhatt and An introduction Prentice
Chandra
to
Operating Hall
of
Systems
India
Concepts and Publication
Practice,
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Learn various types of operating systems along with detailed knowledge of
process management and handling of deadlocks for processes.
2. Learn and understand theconcepts of memory management, Secondary
storage management and File system management.
3. Familiarize withvarious case studies like MS-DOS, Windows, UNIX and

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

LINUX.
CO
1
2
3

A
X

B
X

C
X

PO
E F

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

OPERATING SYSTEM (PRACTICAL )


CS 453
Semester: - 4th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:

02
003
N
3 Hours

1. Learning Basic Features and Operating Environment of UNIX and LINUX.


2. Introduction to Shell and Shell Commands.
3. Shell programming: creating a script, making a script executable, shell syntax
(variables, conditions, control structures, functions, commands.
4. Process: starting new process, replacing a process image, duplicating a process
image, waiting for a process.
5. Programming with semaphores.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
Code
CS 404
Semester: -4th
Max. Marks
External: - 50
Internal: - 50
Pre-requisites Introduction to Computer Science and
Engineering(CS102), Programming Fundamentals
(CS101/201)
Objectives

Note for
Examiner

Credits
LTP
Elective
Contact
Hours

4
310
N
45

Time
3 Hours
This course aims to give students a theoretical foundation in software engineering.
Students will learn about the principles and methods of software engineering, including
current and emerging software engineering practices and support tools.
To understand the concept and need of Software Engineering principles, SDLC,
process models and tools.
To understand project management as an umbrella activity for software
development including schedule and cost estimations.
To study the concept of software requirements and their changing nature
To understand various software architectures and design principle in software
Engineering.
Understanding good coding practices, including documentation, contracts,
regression tests and daily builds.
To understand various quality assurance and testing techniques, including unit
testing, functional testing and automated testing.
To study various CASE tools and understand the methodologies working behind
these tools.
To understand model based software development using UML.
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.

SECTION-A
Introduction:
4
Introduction to Software Engineering, System Engineering Vs Software Engineering,
Software Evolution, Software Characteristics, Cost of Software Production, Software
Components, Crisis Problem and Causes, Challenges in Software Engineering.
Software Process Models:
8
SDLC, Waterfall Model, Incremental Model, Prototyping Model, Evolutionary Model,
Spiral Model, Rapid Application Development Model, Rational Unified process
Model, Agile Methods, Xtreme programming, SEI Capability Maturity Model
Software Requirements Analysis and Specification Concepts:
4
Requirement Engineering, Requirement Elicitation Techniques, Requirements
Documentation, Characteristics and Organization of SRS,

Hrs

Software Analysis and Design:


Design Principles, Design issues and Approaches, Abstraction, modularity, Coupling,
Cohesion, Structured Analysis and Design, DFD, Object oriented Design, Data Design,
Architectural design, Interface Design, Component Level Design, Object Oriented
Design Concepts, Structured vs. Object Oriented Analysis.
SECTION-B
Project Management Concepts:
Management Activities, Project Planning, Project Scheduling, Size Estimation LOC,
FP; Cost Estimation Models COCOMO, COCOMO-II.
Coding &Testing:
Coding, Coding Standards, Coding Conventions, Programming Style, Verification and
Validation, Testing Process, Design of Test Cases, Software Testing Strategies, Unit
Testing, Integration Testing, Top Down and Bottom Up Integration Testing, Alpha &
Beta Testing, System Testing and Debugging.
Technical Metrics for Software:
Software Measurements: What and Why, A Framework for Technical Software
Metrics, Metrics for the Analysis Model, Metrics for Design Model, Metrics for Source
Code, Metrics for Testing, Metrics for Software Quality, Metrics for Maintenance.
CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering) and Introduction to UML:
CASE and its Scope, Building blocks of CASE, CASE Tools, CASE Environment,
UML Concepts, Use Case Diagrams, Sequence Diagrams, Collaboration Diagrams,
Class Diagrams, State Transition Diagrams, Component and Deployment Diagrams.
Suggested
Books

Course

S.
No.
1

Authors

6
5

Title

Publisher

Edition Year

Ian
Sommervill
e
References
1
R.S.
Pressman
2
Pfleeger,
J.M. Atlee

Software Engineering

Pearson
Education.

Seventh
Edition,

Software Engineering: A
Practitioner's Approach
Software Engineering:
Theory and Practice, ,

McGraw
Hill.
Pearson
Education

Sixth
Edition
Second
Edition

Douglas
Bell

Software Engineering for


Students.

Pearson
Education

Fourth
Edition

PankajJalot
e

An Integrated Approach to
Software Engineering,

Narosa

Second
Edition

K.K.Aggar
wal, Yogesh
Singh

Software Engineering

New Age Second


Internation Edition
al.

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )

Assessment
Methods

2.
3.
4.
5.

Quiz (7.5%)
Assignment (7.5%)
Attendance (5%)
Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Demonstrate an understanding of various process models and be able to select
appropriate process model for a particular project.
2. Use software cost estimation and scheduling techniques for small programs.
3. Understand SRS and create architecture design for software systems using CASE
tools.
4. Devise test plan, test case and test suit using Black Box and White Box Testing.
Mapping of
CO
PO
Course
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Outcomes
1
*
*
with POs
2
*
*
*
3

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (PRACTICAL)


CSE 454
Semester: - 4th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:

02
003
N
3 Hours

1. Study the features of MS-Project.


2. Use MS-Project/OpenProj/similar tool to draft project plan for a particular project
case study.
3. Use MS-Project/OpenProj/similar tool to generate various reports like Gantt chart,
Network diagram, Resource usage sheet.
4. Use MS-Project/OpenProj/similar tool to track the progress of a project.
5. Study the concepts of UML modeling.
6. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar tool to generate use case diagrams.
7. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar too to generate sequence diagrams.
8. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar too to generate class diagrams.
9. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar too to generate collaboration diagrams.
10. Study the features of a particular CASE tool for requirements specification,
analysis, design and cost estimation.
11. Apply each of the above tools to a particular case study.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Computer Architecture & Organization
Credits
04
Code
CS405
Semester: - 4th
LTP
310
Max. Marks
External: - -50
Internal: 50
Elective
N
Prerequisites
Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering(CS102)
Contact Hours
45
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
This course offers a good understanding of the various functional units of a computer system and
prepares the student to be in a position to design a basic computer system.
Note for Examiner
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks. First
question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be compulsory.
Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three questions each and the candidate is
required to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Module 1: Basic organization of computers, Block level description of the functional units as related
to the execution of a program; Fetch, decode and execute cycle.
6
Module 2: Machine instructions, Instruction set architectures, Assembly language programming,
addressing modes, instruction cycles, registers and storage, addressing modes; discussions about RISC
versus CISC architectures; Inside a CPU:
6
Module 3:Information representation, Floating point representation (IEEE 754), \computer arithmetic
and their implementation; Fixed-Point Arithmetic: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division,

Arithmetic Logic Units control and data path, data path components, design of ALU and data path,
controller design; Hardwired and Micro programmed Control .
10
SECTION-B
Module 4: Memory Technology, static and dynamic memory, Random Access and Serial Access
Memories, Cache memory and Memory Hierarchy, Address Mapping, Cache updation schemes,
Virtual memory and memory management unit.
8
Module 5: I/O subsystems: Input-Output devices such as Disk, CD-ROM, Printer etc.; Interfacing
with IO devices, keyboard and display interfaces; Basic concepts Bus Control, Read Write operations,
Programmed IO, Concept of handshaking, Polled and Interrupt-driven I/O, DMA data transfer;
8
Module 6: Pipeline Processing, Instruction and Arithmetic Pipeline, Pipeline hazards and their
resolution, Parallel Processing.
7
S. No.

Authors

V. Carl
Hamacher,
Safwat G.
Zaky and
Zvonko G.
Vranesic

David
Patterson and
John
Hennessey,
M. Morris
Mano

3.
4

J.P. Hays

William
stallings

Title

Publishe Edition
r
Computer
Tata
Organization
McGraw
-Hill
series
(2002)
Computer
Organization
and Design

Elsevier
(2008)

Computer
System
Architecture
Computer
Architecture
and
Organization
Computer
Organization
and Archtecture

Pearson

Other
Details

Third
Edition

Tata
McGraw Third
-Hill
Edition
Pearson

Seventh
Edition

Suggested Books

Course Assessment Methods


Assessment will consists of
following components
1. Two Minors (30%
Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
Course Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand principles and implementation of computer arithmetic.
2. Develop assembly programs that accomplish basic computational and I/O operations.
3. Understand working of modern CPUs including pipelining, memory systems andbuses
4. Demonstrate wide variety of memory technologies and concepts of memory management.
5. Evaluate and design of a basic computer system
Mapping of Course Outcomes with POs
CO
PO
A
B C D E F G H I
J
K L
1
X
X X
X X
2
X X
X
3
X
X
X
4
X
X
5
X
X

Third Year - Fifth Semester


Branch: Computer Science and Engineering
Title

OPERATING SYSTEM

Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

CSE 511
External: - 50

Objectives

Computer Fundamentals

Semester: - 5th
Internal: - -50

Credits

04

LTP
Elective

310
N

Contact
Hours
Time

45
3 Hours

To introduce design and implementation issues of various Operating


Systems: batch, multi-programmed, time sharing, real time, distributed,
parallel Operating System structural Components, layered structure,
functions
To understand concept of processes, CPU Scheduling Algorithms: FCFS,
SJF, RR and Priority, Inter Process Communication, Process
Synchronization, Critical Sections, Semaphores and Monitors.
To introduce Deadlocks Detection , Recovery, Avoidance and Prevention
To familiarize with Memory Management using contiguous memory
allocation, paging, segmentation, segmentation with paging.
To introduce Virtual Memory, demand paging and page replacement
algorithms (FIFO, Optimal, LRU), Thrashing.
To understand File Systems, directory structure, allocation methods
(contiguous, linked, indexed), free-space management (bit vector, linked list,
grouping) and Protection mechanisms.
To discuss Disk Structure, Disk Scheduling (FCFS, SSTF, SCAN, C-SCAN,
and LOOK), Disk Management (Disk Formatting, Boot Blocks, and Bad
Blocks), Swap Space Management (Swap Space use, Swap Space Location,
Swap Space Management).
To explore case Studies: Brief introduction of MS-DOS, Windows, UNIX
and LINUX.
Note
for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
Examiner
equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two
parts having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least
two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction: What is an O.S., O.S. Functions; Different types of O.S.: batch, multiprogrammed, time sharing, real time, distributed, parallel; General structure of
operating system, O/S services, system calls.
5
Process Management: Introduction to processes - Concept of processes, process 10
scheduling, operations on processes; Inter Process Communication, Critical Sections,
Mutual Exclusion with Busy Waiting, Sleep and Wakeup, Semaphores, Message
passing; CPU scheduling- scheduling criteria, pre-emptive & non-pre-emptive
scheduling, Scheduling Algorithms: FCFS, SJF, RR and priority. Circuit Switching &
Packet Switching.
Memory Management: background, logical vs. physical address space, memory

management without swapping; swapping; contiguous memory allocation, paging,


segmentation, segmentation with paging; Virtual Memory, demand paging,
performance, page replacement, page replacement algorithms (FIFO, Optimal ,LRU);
Thrashing.
SECTION-B
File Systems: Files - file concept, file structure, file types, access methods, File
attributes, file operations; directory structure, allocation methods (contiguous, linked,
indexed), free-space management (bit vector, linked list, grouping), Protection
mechanisms.
Secondary Storage : Disk Structure, Disk Scheduling ( FCFS, SSTF, SCAN, CSCAN, LOOK), Disk Management (Disk Formatting, Boot Blocks, Bad Blocks),
Swap Space Management (Swap Space use, Swap Space Location, Swap Space
Management)
Deadlocks: Introduction to deadlocks, Conditions for deadlock, Resource allocation
graphs, Deadlock Detection and Recovery, Deadlock Avoidance, Deadlock Prevention
Case Studies: Brief introduction of MS-DOS, Windows, UNIX and LINUX.
Suggested
Books

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

S. No.

Authors

Silberseh
atz and
Galvin
Tanenbau
m A.S

Title

Publisher

Edition

Year

6
6
Other
Details

Operatin Addison
g System Wesley
Concepts Inc.
2
Operatin Pearson
g System Educatio
Design & n.
Impleme
ntation
3
Bhatt and An
Prentice
Chandra introducti Hall of
on
to India
Operatin Publicati
g
on
Systems
Concepts
and
Practice,
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1.Learn various types of operating systems along with detailed knowledge of
process management and handling of deadlocks for processes.
2.Learn and understand theconcepts of memory management, Secondary
storage management and File system management.
3.Familiarize withvarious case studies like MS-DOS, Windows, UNIX and
LINUX.

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO
1
2
3

A
X

B
X

C
X

PO
E F

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

OPERATING SYSTEM (PRACTICAL )


CSE 561
Semester: - 5th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:

02
003
N
3 Hours

1. Learning Basic Features and Operating Environment of UNIX and LINUX.


2. Introduction to Shell and Shell Commands.
3. Shell programming: creating a script, making a script executable, shell syntax
(variables, conditions, control structures, functions, commands.
4. Process: starting new process, replacing a process image, duplicating a process
image, waiting for a process.
5. Programming with semaphores.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
Code
CSE 512
Semester: -5th
Max. Marks
External: - 50
Internal: - 50
Pre-requisites Programming Fundamentals (CS101/201)
Objectives

Note for
Examiner

Credits
4
LTP
310
Elective
N
Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
This course aims to give students a theoretical foundation in software engineering.
Students will learn about the principles and methods of software engineering, including
current and emerging software engineering practices and support tools.
To understand the concept and need of Software Engineering principles, SDLC,
process models and tools.
To understand project management as an umbrella activity for software
development including schedule and cost estimations.
To study the concept of software requirements and their changing nature
To understand various software architectures and design principle in software
Engineering.
Understanding good coding practices, including documentation, contracts,
regression tests and daily builds.
To understand various quality assurance and testing techniques, including unit
testing, functional testing and automated testing.
To study various CASE tools and understand the methodologies working behind
these tools.
To understand model based software development using UML.
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.

SECTION-A
Introduction:
5
Introduction to Software Engineering, System Engineering Vs Software Engineering,
Software Evolution, Software Characteristics, Cost of Software Production, Software
Components, Crisis Problem and Causes, Challenges in Software Engineering.
Software Process Models:
6
SDLC, Waterfall Model, Incremental Model, Prototyping Model, Evolutionary Model,
Spiral Model, Rapid Application Development Model, Formal Methods, Open Source
Development, Object Oriented Life Cycle Model, Agile Methods.

Hrs

Project Management Concepts:


Management Activities, Project Planning, Project Scheduling, Size Estimation LOC,
FP; Cost Estimation Models COCOMO, COCOMO-II.

Software Requirements Analysis and Specification Concepts:


5
Requirement Engineering, Requirement Elicitation Techniques, Requirements
Documentation, Characteristics and Organization of SRS, Analysis Principles, Analysis
Modeling Data Modeling, Functional Modeling and BehavioralModeling; Structured
vs. Object Oriented Analysis.
SECTION-B
Software Design and Coding Concepts:
6
Design Principles, Data Design, Architectural design, Interface Design, Component
Level Design, Object Oriented Design Concepts, Cohesion and Coupling and their
classification, top-down, bottom-up and middle-out design, Coding, Coding Standards,
Coding Conventions, Programming Style.
Testing:
5
Verification and Validation, Testing Process, Design of Test Cases, Software Testing
Strategies, Unit Testing, Integration Testing, Top Down and Bottom Up Integration
Testing, Alpha & Beta Testing, System Testing and Debugging.
Technical Metrics for Software:
6
Software Measurements: What and Why, A Framework for Technical Software
Metrics, Metrics for the Analysis Model, Metrics for Design Model, Metrics for Source
Code, Metrics for Testing, Metrics for Software Quality, Metrics for Maintenance.
CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering) and Introduction to UML:
6
CASE and its Scope, Building blocks of CASE, CASE Tools, CASE Environment,
UML Concepts, Use Case Diagrams, Sequence Diagrams, Collaboration Diagrams,
Class Diagrams, State Transition Diagrams, Component and Deployment Diagrams.
Suggested
Books

Course

S.
No.
1

Authors

Title

Publisher

Edition Year

Ian
Sommervill
e
References
1
R.S.
Pressman
2
Pfleeger,
J.M. Atlee

Software Engineering

Pearson
Education.

Seventh
Edition,

Software Engineering: A
Practitioner's Approach
Software Engineering:
Theory and Practice, ,

McGraw
Hill.
Pearson
Education

Sixth
Edition
Second
Edition

Douglas
Bell

Software Engineering for


Students.

Pearson
Education

Fourth
Edition

PankajJalot
e

An Integrated Approach to
Software Engineering,

Narosa

Second
Edition

K.K.Aggar
wal, Yogesh
Singh

Software Engineering

New Age Second


Internation Edition
al.

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )

Assessment
Methods

2.
3.
4.
5.

Quiz (7.5%)
Assignment (7.5%)
Attendance (5%)
Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Demonstrate an understanding of various process models and be able to select
appropriate process model for a particular project.
2. Use software cost estimation and scheduling techniques for small programs.
3. Understand SRS and create architecture design for software systems using
CASE tools.
4. Devise test plan, test case and test suit using Black Box and White Box
Testing.
Mapping of
CO
PO
Course
A B C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Outcomes
1
*
*
with POs
2
*
*
*
3

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (PRACTICAL)


CSE 562
Semester: - 5th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:

02
003
N
3 Hours

1. Study the features of MS-Project.


2. Use MS-Project/OpenProj/similar tool to draft project plan for a particular
project case study.
3. Use MS-Project/OpenProj/similar tool to generate various reports like Gantt
chart, Network diagram, Resource usage sheet.
4. Use MS-Project/OpenProj/similar tool to track the progress of a project.
5. Study the concepts of UML modeling.
6. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar tool to generate use case diagrams.
7. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar too to generate sequence diagrams.
8. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar too to generate class diagrams.
9. Use Rational Rose/StarUML/similar too to generate collaboration diagrams.
10. Study the features of a particular CASE tool for requirements specification,
analysis, design and cost estimation.
11. Apply each of the above tools to a particular case study.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

COMPUTER NETWORK
CSE 513
External: - 50

Semester: - 5th
Internal: - 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
310
N

Computer network (CSE513)

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives To introduce the data communication components, data flow and network
categories and reference models.
To introduce the concepts of analog and digital signals, multiplexing, transmission
media and switching techniques
To introduce different techniques for error detection and correction, media access
and flow control protocols.
To introduce concepts of logical addressing, routing algorithms and congestion
control algorithms.
To introduce the techniques for buffering, crash recovery, network security and
application protocols.
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
Examiner
equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction:
Data Communication: Components, Data Flow; Network Categories: LAN, MAN, WAN
(Wireless / Wired); Network Software: Concept of layers, protocols, interfaces and 6
services; Reference Model: OSI, TCP/IP and their comparison.
Physical Layer :
Concept of Analog& Digital Signal; Bit rate, Bit Length; Transmission Impairments:
Attenuation, Distortion, Noise; Data rate limits: Nyquist formula, Shannon Formula;
8
Multiplexing: Frequency Division, Time Division, Wavelength Division; Transmission
media: Twisted pair, coaxial cable, fiber optics, wireless transmission (radio, microwave,
infrared); Circuit Switching & Packet Switching.
Data Link Layer:
Error correction & Detection; Flow & Error Control;
Sliding window protocols: Stop & Wait ARQ, Go back n ARQ, Selective repeat ARQ;
Examples of DLL Protocols-HDLC, PPP;
10
Medium Access Sub layer: Channel Allocation; Random Access: ALOHA, CSMA
protocols; Controlled Access: Polling, Reservation, Token Passing;
Examples of IEEE 802.3, 802.11 standards.
SECTION--B
Network Layer:
10
Logical Addressing: IPv4 and IPv6; Packet Formats & their comparison: IPv4 and IPv6;
Routing algorithms: Distance vector, Link State Routing, Hierarchical Routing, Broadcast
& Multicast Routing.
Congestion Control: Principles of Congestion Control, Congestion prevention policies,
Leaky bucket & Token bucket algorithms.
Transport Layer:
8

Addressing, flow control & buffering, multiplexing & de-multiplexing, crash recovery;
Example transport protocols: TCP, SCTP and UDP.
Application Layer:
3
Network Security; Domain Name System; Simple Network Management Protocol;
Electronic Mail.
Suggested
Books
S. Authors
Title
Publish Editi Yea Other
N
er
on
r
Details
o.
1
Andrew
Computer
Pearson 5th
201 ISBN:
S.
Networks
Educati Editi 2
9788131787
Tanenbau
on
on
571
m
2

Behrouz
A
Forouzan

William
Stallings

Douglas
e. Comer

5
James
F.
Kurose
and
Keith
W. Ross

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

Mapping

Data
Communicati
ons and
Networking
Data and
Computer
Communicati
ons
Computer
Networks
and Internets
with Internet
Applications
Computer
Networking:
A top down
approach

5th
Editi
on

201 ISBN:
3
9781259064
753

Pearson 8th
Educati Editi
on
on

200 ISBN:
7
9788131715
369

Pearson 4th
Educati Editi
on
on

200 ISBN:
8
9788177589
276

Pearson 6th
Educati Editi
on
on

201 ISBN-10:
2
0132856204

Tata
Mcgra
w Hill

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1 Understand fundamental concepts of computer networks and apply them to solve
different networking problems.
2 Able to apply different concepts of physical layer, data link layer and network layer
to solve different networking problems.
3 Understand different concepts of transport layer, session layer, presentation layer
and application layer and apply them to networks.
CO
PO

of Course
Outcomes
with POs

1
2
3

A
X
X
X

B
X
X

E
X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

COMPUTER NETWORK (Practical)


CSE 563
Semester: - 5th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

02
003
N

Time
3 Hours
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. To familiarize with the various basic tools (crimping, krone etc.) used in establishing a
LAN.
2. To study various topologies for establishing computer networks.
3. To familiarize with switch , hub, connecters, cables (cabling standards) used in
networks
4. To familiarize with routers & bridges
5. To use some basic commands like ping, trace-root, ipconfig for trouble shooting
network related problems.
6. To use various utilities for logging in to remote computer and to transfer files from / to
remote computer.
7. To develop a program to compute the Hamming Distance between any two code words.
8. To develop a program to compute checksum for an m bit frame using a generator
polynomial.
9. To develop a program for implementing / simulating the sliding window protocol
10. To develop a program for implementing / simulating a routing algorithm
11 To study various IEEE standards (802.3, 802.11, 802.16)

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
Credits
04
Code
CSE-504
Semester: - 5th
LTP
310
Max. Marks
External: - 50
Internal: 50
Elective
N
Pre-requisites
Programming Fundamentals (CS101/201), Object Oriented Programming (CSE414)
Contact Hours
45
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
This course should provide the students with a fairly good concept of fundamental concepts and design
issues of programming languages and become familiar with major programming paradigms. Understand
similarities and differences between models and know when to use them and also learn programming
techniques appropriate for each model.
Note for Examiner
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks. First
question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be compulsory.
Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required
to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction:
Study of principles and major concepts in various programming paradigms like imperative, functional,
object-oriented and logic programming. Introduction to various phases of compilers, Formal translation
models: BNF Grammars.
5
Imperative programming:
Location, reference and expressions, assignment and control, data types, blocks, procedures and modules.
Object Oriented Programming: Classes and objects, abstraction and encapsulation, inheritance,
Polymorphism, virtual functions and classes, abstract classes.
7
Logic Programming:
Unification, SLD-resolution, Backtracking, Cuts.
Concepts Of Concurrent Programming: Processes, synchronization primitives.
8
SECTION-B

Functional Programming:
Functions as first class objects, higher order functions, polymorphic data types, type checking and type
inference
10
Introduction to storage management:
Static storage management, Heap storage management.
10
Illustration of the above concepts using representative languages: C++, Java, and Prolog etc.
5
Suggested Books
S. No.
Authors Title
Publishe Edition
Year
Other
Other
r
Details
Recommended
1.
Prattt&Zelk Programming
Pearson
5th
Text/Material
owrtz,
Languages:
Education
1. Programming
Design &
in Standard
Implementatio
ML 97: A
n
Tutorial
2
Friedman,
Essentials of
MIT Press
Latest
Introduction
Wand, and Programming
2001, ISBN
by Stephen
Haynes
Languages,
0262062178,
Gilmore,
9780262062176
Laboratory
3
Bruce J.
Principles of
Oxford
Latest
for
MacLennan Programming
University
Foundations
Languages:
Press US, 1999,
of Computer
Design,
ISBN
Science, The
Evaluation, and 0195113063,
University of
Implementatio 9780195113068
Edinburgh ,
n
September
1997 (Revised: July 1998, April 2000, Jan 2003) Available at : http://www.dcs.ed.ac.uk/home/stg
Course Assessment Methods
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
Course Outcomes
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Understand different language concepts and how various operations and principles are
implemented by different programming languages.
2. Demonstrate use of syntaxrelated concepts including contextfree grammars, parse trees ,
recursive descent parsing, printing and interpretation.
3. Analyze, design, implement and test various language paradigms and understanding importance
of each for various applications
4. Analyzing semantic issues associated with function implementations, including variable binding, s
coping rules, parameter passing, and exception handling.
5. Improve skills in programming techniques for development of new applications.
Mapping of Course Outcomes with POs

CO
1
2
3
4
5

A B
X X

X
X

X
X

PO
F
G

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
DISCRETE STRUCTURES AND
COMPUTATIONAL LOGIC
Code
CS 517
Semester: - 5th
Max. Marks
External: 50
Internal: 50
Pre-requisites

Objectives

Note for
Examiner

Credits

LTP
310
Elective
N
Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
To get familiar and understand the fundamental notions in discrete
mathematics.
To introduce the knowledge of core mathematical foundation of computer
science,
To introduce some basic foundation of Artificial Intelligence.
To introduce the basic properties of graphs and trees and model simple
applications.
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two
parts having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.

SECTION-A
Set Theory, Relations & Functions:
Set Theory, Relations & Functions: Sets, Algebra of Sets, Finite Sets, Power Sets,
Partitions, Counting Principles, Product sets , Relations, Type Of Relations, Closure
Properties, Equivalence Relations, Partial ordering Relations & Lattice, Functions,
Type of Functions, Recursive Functions.
Graph Theory & Trees:
Graph Theory & Trees: Introduction, Graphs Multigraph, Isomorphic Graph,
Homeomorphic Graphs, Paths & Circuits, Shortest Paths In waited Graphs,
Eulerian&Hamiltonial Paths & Circuits, Konigsberg Bridge, Complete , Regular,
Bipartite Graphs, Planner Graphs, Graph Coloring, Graph Traversal Techniques.Trees,
Binary Search Trees , Complete & Extended Binary Trees.
SECTION-B
Propositional Logic:
Introduction, propositions, compound propositions, basic logical operations, ,
propositions and truth tables, tautologies and contradiction, logical equivalence,
algebra of propositions, conditional and biconditional statements, arguments, logical
implications, functions, quantifiers.
Predicate logic:
Representing- simple facts, instance, and Isa relationship. Computable functions and
predicates resolution: conversion to clause form, unification algorithm, resolution in
proposition and predicate logic.
Computational Theory:
Finite Automata: NFA, DFA, NFA to DFA, state minimization, Moore and Mealy
Machines, Regular expressions, grammars, Pushdown automata, Turing Machines

10 hrs

10 hrs

8hrs

7 hrs

10 hrs

Suggested
Books

S. No.

Authors

Title

Publisher Edition

Year

1.

C.L.Liu

Tata
McGraw
Hill

Latest
Edition

2012

2.

Elaine
Rich,
Knight
Hopcroft
. J.E.,
Ullman
J.D.

Elements
of
Discrete
Mathema
tics
Artificial
Intellige
nce
Introduct
ion to
automata
theory,
Languag
es and
computat
ion
Discrete
Mathema
tics,
McGraw
Hill,
Introduct
ion to
language
s and the
theory of
computat
ion,

McGraw
Hill

Third
Edition

2010

Narosa,

First
Edition

1979

McGraw
Hill,

Latest
Edition

2012

McGraw
-Hill,

internati
onal
Editions,

1991

3.

4.

Lipschut
z

5.

Martin.
J.C.

6.

Course
Assessment
Methods

Course
Outcomes

Other
Details

B.
Discrete PHI
latest
2004
Kolman, Mathema
Edition
R. C.
tical
Busby
Structure
and S. C. s ,
Ross
Assessment will consists of following components
Two Minors (30% Weightage )
Quiz (7.5%)
Assignment (7.5%)
Attendance (10%)
Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Understand fundamental discrete mathematical concepts used in computer

science will apply them in problem solving and analysis.


2. Understand many aspects of graph theory and its applications.
3. Familiarize with formal mathematical reasoning, e.g. logic, proofs used in
Artificial Intelligence.
4. Demonstrate and understand the theoretical foundations of computer science.
Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO

PO
A

1.

2.

3.

4.

Third Year - Sixth Semester


Branch: Computer Science and Engineering
Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites
Objectives

WEB TECHNOLOGIES
CSE 611
External: 50

Semester: - 6th
Internal: 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

4
310
N

Computer Network (CSE513), Programming


Fundamentals (CS101/201)

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Aim of this course is to familiarize the students with current technologies used in Web
development and maintenance
1. To introduce the concepts of Internet ,WWW and underlying technologies
2. To enable the student to use of HTML, DHTML, CSS for Static Webpage
creation.
3. To introduce the concept of JavaScript for Client Side programming.
4. To introduce the concept of byte code and Java Programming to develop
architecture (Platform) neutral application.
5. To study the concept of XML for data interchange across different platforms
6. To introduce the concept of PHP for various web servers
7. To demonstrate the concept of integrating AJAX and PHP with MySQL.

Note for
Examiner

The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of


equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
INTERNET AND WORLD WIDE WEB:
4
Introduction, Internet Addressing, ISP, types of Internet Connections, Introduction to
WWW, WEB Browsers, WEB Servers, URLS, http, WEB applications, Tools for WEB
site creation.
HTML: Introduction to HTML, Lists, adding graphics to HTML page, creating tables, 6
linking documents, frames, DHTML and Style sheets.
Java Script: Introduction, programming constructs: variables, operators and 11
expressions, conditional checking, functions and dialog boxes, JavaScript DOM,
creating forms, introduction to Cookies.
SECTION-B
JAVA: Introduction to java objects and classes, control statements, arrays, inheritance, 6
polymorphism, Exception handling.
XML: Why XML, XML syntax rules, XML elements, XML attributes, XML DTD 6
displaying XML with CSS.
AJAX: Introduction, HTTP request, XMHttpRequest, AJAX Server Script, AJAX 6
Database.
PHP: Introduction, syntax, statements, operators, sessions, E-mail, PHP and MySQL, 6
PHP and AJAX.
Suggested
Books
S. Authors
Title
Publisher Editio Year
No
n
.

Deitel,Deitel,Niet
o, and Sandhu

XML How to
Program,

Herbert Scheldt

Java 2: The Complete


Reference

Ivan Bayross
Commercial,

Schafer
Textbooks.

Pearson
Education
.
TMH

: Web Enabled
Development
Application

Fifth
Editio
n

BPB

HTML,CSS,
JavaScript,Perl,
Python and PHP

Wiley
India

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand the core principle on which Internet and WWW operates and
ability to create static web pages using HTML, CSS and DHTML.
2. Ability to create dynamic and interactive web contents using the concept of
JavaScript, Session and Cookies in Software development.
3. Understand the basic principle of Object Oriented Technology and ability to
create powerful but robust standalone application using Java.
4. Understand the concept of add on technologies like AJAX, XML and ability
to develop WebPages using PHP and AJAX and MySQL for server side
scripting

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO

PO
A

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

WEB TECHNOLOGIES (Practical)


CSE 661
Semester: - 6th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Creation of Web pages using: HTML, DHTML
2. Creation of Web pages using JavaScript
3. Implementing basic concepts of Java
4. Creation of Web pages using AJAX
5. Database and AJAX
6. XML
7. PHP

02
003
N
3 Hours

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS
CSE612
External: 50

Objectives

1.

Semester: 6
Internal: 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

4
310
N

Operating System (CSE 511), Computer Networks


(CSE513)

2.
3.
4.
5.

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
To introduce distributed systems, their architecture, types and enabling
technologies
To make them understand how communication takes place in a distributed
environment
To introduce issues related to process execution, naming and security in distributed
systems
To make them understand distributed systems by studying existing systems
To make them familiar with the design and implementation issues of distributed
systems

Note for
Examiner

The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of


equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction to Distributed Systems
6
Definition of distributed systems, their objectives, types, architecture, self management
in distributed systems, introduction to XML, SOAP, service oriented architecture.
Communication
6
Interprocess communication, Remote Procedure Call (RPC), Remote Method
Invocation (RMI), Remote Object Invocation, Message Oriented Communication.
Processes
6
Introduction to threads, threads in distributed and non distributed systems,
virtualization, client side software, design issues for servers, software agents.
Naming
5
General issues with respect to naming, flat naming structured naming, name resolution,
implementation of a name space, domain name system, X.500 name space.
SECTION-B
Security
6
Introduction to security in distributed systems, general issues in authentication and
access control, security management: key management, secure group management,
authorization management; examples: kerberos, x.509 certificates.
Distributed Object-based Systems
6
Introduction to distributed object based systems, overview of CORBA and DCOM and
their comparison.
Distributed File Systems

Introduction to distributed file systems, their examples: SUN network file system,
CODA file system, comparison of distributed file systems.
Document-based Systems
5
Introduction to document-based systems, their examples, World Wide Web (WWW),
LOTUS NOTES, comparison of WWW and LOTUS NOTES.
Suggested
Books

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

S. No.

Authors

Title

Publisher

Edition Year

Andrew S. Distribute Pearson


Second
Tanenbaum d Systems- Education Edition
Principles
and
Paradigms

George
Coulouris,
Jean
Dollimore,
Tim
Kindberg

William
Buchanan

Other
Details

Distribute Pearson
Fourth
d Systems Education Edition
Concepts
and
Design

Distribute McGrawd Systems Hill


and
Networks
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Differentiate between a distributed and a network system and understand how
communication takes place in a distributed environment.
2. Understand how process execution in distributed systems is different from process
execution in non-distributed systems and design and implement of a Name-Space.
3. Identify Security Risks and their handling mechanisms in Distributed Environment.
4. Understand and design distributed object based systems, distributed file based
systems and document based systems.
CO
PO
1

A
*

B
*

F
*

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites
Objectives

Note for
Examiner

COMPUTER GRAPHICS
CSE 613
External: - 50

th

Semester: - 6
Internal: - 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
310
N

Object Oriented Programming (CSE414)

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
This course offers a good understanding of computer graphics concepts and prepares the
students to be in a position to understand the working principle of different Video display
monitors. The detailed description of graphics based algorithms enables students to draw the
various geometric shapes as well as to perform 2-D & 3-D transformations. This course
further discusses the application of computer graphics concepts in the development of
various applications. The detailed objectives of this course as follows:
Application areas of Computer Graphics
Working of CRT and LCD based monitors
Drawing of geometric output primitives
2-D transformation and viewing system
3-D transformation and viewing system
Splines curve, their types and representation
Computer Animations, Classification of visible surface detection methods.
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each part.

SECTION-A
Overview of Graphics Systems:
7
Video Display Devices, Direct View Storage Tubes, Flat Panel Displays: Emissive and
NonEmissive Displays; Plasma Panel, Thin Film Electroluminescent and Liquid Crystal
Displays, Color Display Techniques: Shadow Mask and Beam-penetration Methods, Three
Dimensional Viewing Devices, Raster Scan Systems, Display Processor, Random Scan
Systems, Co-ordinate Representations, Screen Coordinates. Language Basics
Output Primitives:
7
Points and Lines, Line Drawing Algorithms: DDA Algorithm, Bresenhams Line Algorithm,
Circle Generating Algorithm: Mid point circle algorithm, Ellipse Generating Algorithms:
mid point ellipse algorithm, Pixel Addressing and Object Geometry, Boundary Fill
Algorithms, Flood Fill Algorithms, Character Generation, Line, Area-Fill and Character
Attributes.
Two Dimensional Geometric Transformations and Viewing:
8
Basic Transformations: Translation, Rotation and Scaling, Matrix Representations,
Composite Transformations, Viewing Pipeline, Window to Viewport Coordinate
Transformation, Clipping Operations: Line, Polygon, Curve and Text Clipping.
SECTION-B

Hrs

Three Dimensional Concepts, Transformations and Viewing:


8
Three Dimensional Display Methods, Three Dimensional Transformations; Three
Dimensional Viewing Pipeline; Viewing Coordinates; Specifying the View Plane,
Projections: Parallel Projections, Perspective Projections.
Splines and Curves:
8
Curved Lines and Surfaces, Spline Representations, Cubic Splines, Bezier Curves and their
properties, B-Spline Curves.
Visible Surface Detection Methods:
7
Classification of Visible Surface Detection Methods, Back Face Detection, Depth Buffer, ABuffer, Scan Line and Depth-Sorting Methods, Wireframe Methods, Concepts of Computer
Animation, Design of Animation Sequences.
Suggested
Books
1. Donald Hearn, M.P. Baker : Computer Graphics C Version, Second Edition, Pearson
Education.
References:
1. J.D. Foley, A. van Dam, S.K. Feiner, J.F. Hughes : Computer Graphics: principles and
practice, Second Edition, Pearson Education.
2. Z. Xiang, R.A. Plastock : Computer Graphics, Second Edition, Schaums Outlines, Tata
McGraw-Hill.
3. N. Krishnamurthy: Introduction to Computer Graphics, Tata McGraw-Hill.
4. David F. Rogers, James Alan Adams : Mathematical Elements for Computer
Graphics,Tata McGraw-Hill.
S. Harrington : Computer Graphics: A Programming Approach, Tata McGraw-Hill.
Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand the basic preliminaries and role of computer graphics in different areas.
2. Classify, Compare and demonstrate the working of video display monitors based on
CRT and Flat Panel displays.
3. Study the various geometric shapes (lines, curves, circle, polygon etc) and analysing
the different algorithms to plot pixel points corresponding to each. Apply individual
algorithm to a variety of numerical problems.
4. Define the simple and composite transformations in 2-D and 3-D system and then
map the same to solve the transformations problems. Analysing the spline curves and
their variants for visible surface detection methods.
CO
PO
A
B C
D E F
G H I
J
K L
1
X
X
X X
2
X
X
3
X
X
X
X X
4
X
X
X
X

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

COMPUTER GRAPHICS (Practical)


CSE 663
Semester: - 6th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Introduction to graphics programming in C/C++.
2. Initializing graphics system. Basic graphics functions.
3. Drawing lines, circles, ellipses and other common objects.

02
003
N
3 Hours

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites
Objectives

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
CS 614
Semester: - 6th
External: 50
Internal: 50

4
310
N

Discrete Structures (CSE517)

Note for
Examiner

Credits
LTP
Elective

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
To introduce the AI techniques to solve problems and search strategies to find
optimal solution paths from start to goal state.
To introduces different knowledge representation methods in AI Programs.
To introduce different design techniques for Game Playing Programs.
To introduce the AI Agents their design, planning and learning techniques.
To introduce the natural language processing and expert systems.

The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each
part.

SECTION-A
Introduction:
Artificial Intelligence and its applications, Artificial Intelligence Techniques, criteria of
success, Intelligent Agents, Nature and structure of Agents, Learning Agents
Problem solving techniques:
State space search, control strategies, heuristic search, problem characteristics, production
system characteristics., Generate and test, Hill climbing, best first search, A* search,
Constraint satisfaction problem, Mean-end analysis, Min-Max Search, Alpha-Beta
Pruning, Additional refinements, Iterative Deepening
Knowledge representation:
Mapping between facts and representations, Approaches to knowledge representation,
procedural vs declarative knowledge, Forward vs. Backward reasoning, Matching, conflict
resolution, Non-monotonic reasoning, Default reasoning, statistical reasoning, fuzzy logic
Weak and Strong filler structures, semantic nets, frame, conceptual dependency, scripts.
SECTION-B
Planning:
The Planning problem, planning with state space search, partial order planning, planning
graphs, planning with propositional logic, Analysis of planning approaches, Hierarchical
planning, conditional planning, Continuous and Multi Agent planning.
Learning :
Forms of Learning, inductive learning, Decision trees, Computational learning theory,
Logical formulation, knowledge in learning, Explanation based and relevance based
learning, statistical learning, Learning with complete data and hidden variables, instance
based learning.
Introduction to Natural Language processing and Expert system:
Basic Tasks of Natural Language processing, Expert systems, Expert system examples,
Expert System Architectures, Rule base Expert systems, Non Monotonic Expert Systems,
Decision tree base Expert Systems.

Hrs
6
9

10

Suggested
Books

S.
No.
1.

2.
3.
4.
5.

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

Authors

Title

Publisher

Stuart
J.Russel,
Peter
Norvig
Elaine
Rich,
Knight
SarojKaus
hik

AI: A
Modern
Approach

Pearson
Education

Artificial
Intelligen
ce
Artificial
Intelligen
ce,
Artificial
Intelligen
ce,
Artificial
Intelligen
ce
Introducti
on to AI
and
Expert
Systems, ,
Principles
of AI,

McGraw
Hill

Partick
Henry
Winston
George
Luger

6.

DAN, W.
Patterson

7.

A.J.
Nillson

Cengage
Learning,
Addison
Wesley
Pearson
Education
PHI

Editi
on
Latest
Editio
n

Year

Third
Editio
n
First
Editio
n
Latest
Editio
n
Latest
Editio
n
latest
Editio
n

2010

Other
Details

2012

2011
2012
2010
2011

Narosa
latest 2010
publicatio Editio
ns,
n
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Understand fundamental AI concepts and and identify a range of symbolic and nonsymbolic AI techniques including search and planning procedures.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of various searching algorithms such as adversarial
search and game-playing commonly used in artificial intelligence software.
3. Use different knowledge representation techniques used in AI Applications.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of agent-based AI architectures and an
understanding of Planning and logic-based agents.

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO

PO
A

1.

2.

3.

4.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (Practical)


CSE 663
Semester: - 6th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

02
003
N

Time
3 Hours
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Program Related to Problem Solving techniques of AI
Breadth First Search
Depth First Search
Heuristic Search
Best Search
Min-Max Search with alpha-beta pruning
Tic-Tac-Toe problem
N-Queens and N-Knight problem
Unification Algorithm
2. Introduction To AI Languages such as LISP, PROLOG
3. Representing Knowledge using RuleML
4. Using semantic Web
5. Knowledge of using Neural Networks, Fuzz logic, genetic algorithms
6. Other new AI Techniques

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title

MODELING & SIMULATION

Credits

04

Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

CSE 615
External: - 50

LTP
Elective

310
N

Contact Hours

45

Semester: - 6th
Internal: - 50

Data Structures (CSE 311) and Discrete Structures and


Computational Logic (CSE 517)

Time
3 Hours
To introduce the simulation techniques to solve real time problems where experimentation on
the actual system is very risky.
To introduce different discrete event and continuous simulation methods.
To introduce different techniques for generating random numbers and random variates
following various distributions.
To introduce different queuing techniques for single server and multi server systems.
To introduce the different simulation languages like MATLAB and GPSS.
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks.
Examiner
First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be
compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three questions each and the
candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction:
What ismodeling and simulation, application areas, definition and types of system, model and 5
simulation, introduction to discrete-event and continuous simulation.
Simulation Methods:
Discrete-event Simulation, Time advance Mechanisms, Components and organization of 10
Discrete-event simulation, Flowchart of next-event time advance approach, Continuous
Simulation, Monte Carlo Simulation.
Queuing Models:
Single server queuing system, introduction to arrival and departure time, flowcharts for arrival 10
and departure routine. Event graphs of queuing model. Determining the events and variables,
Event graphs for inventory model.
SECTION-B
Random Numbers:
Introduction to Random Numbers, Importance of Random Numbers in Simulation, Mid-Square 5
random number generator, Residue method, Arithmetic Congruential generator, Testing
Numbers for Randomness, Chi-Square Test.
Distribution Functions:
Stochastic activities, Discrete probability functions, Cumulative distribution function,
Continuous probability functions. Generation of random numbers following binomial 10
distribution, Poisson distribution, continuous distribution, normal distribution, exponential
distribution, uniform distribution.
Simulation Languages:
5
Basic Introduction to Special Simulation Languages:-GPSS/ MATLAB/ Network Simulators.
Objectives

Suggested
Books

S.
No.
1

Authors

Title

Averill
M. Law

Simulati
on

Publish
er
Tata
Mcgra

Editi Year Other Details


on
4th
200 ISBN: 9780070
Editi 7
667334

2
3

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

Geoffer
y
Gordon
D.S.
Hira
Stephen
J.
Chapma
n

Modelin
g and
Analysis
System
Simulati
on
System
Simulati
on

MATLA
B
Program
ming for
Engineer
s
Jerry
DiscreteBanks,
Event
John S. System
Carson, Simulati
Barry L. on
Nelson
and
David
M.
Nicol
RudraPr Getting
atap
Started
with
MATLA
B: A
Quick
Introduct
ion for
Scientists
and
Engineer
s

w Hill

on

Prentic
e-Hall
of India
S.
Chand
Publica
tion
Thoms
on
Learnin
g

2nd
Editi
on
1st
Editi
on

200
1

ISBN: 81-2030140-4

200
1

ISBN: 81-2192059-0

3rd
200
Editi 5
on

ISBN-981-254893-9

Prentic 5th
200
e-Hall
Editi 9
of India on

ISBN-10:
0136062121

8th
200
Editi 9
on

ISBN0199731241

Oxford
Univer
sity
Press.

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Understand the continuous and discrete event simulation techniques and apply them suitably
to real time problems where experimentation on actual system is risky.
2. Analysing different procedures to generate random numbers and apply them for
implementation of different simulation systems.
3. Understand different simulation languages like MATLAB and GPSS and apply them to
simulate different systems.

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO
1
2
3

A
X

E
X

PO
F

X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

MODELING AND SIMULATION (Practical )


CSE 665
Semester: - 6th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

02
003
N

Time
3 Hours
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Programming in MATLAB: Introduction, Branching statements, loops,
functions, additional data types, plots, arrays, inputs/outputs etc.
2. Introduction regarding usage of any Network Simulator.
3. Practical Implementation of Queuing Models using C/C++.

Fourth Year - Seventh Semester


Branch: Computer Science and Engineering
Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

COMPILER DESIGN
CSE711
Semester: -7th
External:-50
Internal: -50

Credits
LTP
Elective

4
310
N

Programming Fundamentals (CS101/201), Contact


45
microprocessor (EC317), operating system Hours
(CSE511)
Time
3 Hours
Objectiv This course will provide the in-depth knowledge of different concepts involved while
es
designing a compiler.
Note for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examine marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
r
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each
part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction:
5
Compilers and Translators; The phases of the compiler Lexical Analysis,
Syntax Analysis, Intermediate Code Generation, Optimization, Code
generation, Bookkeeping, Error handling.
Lexical Analysis:
5
The role of the lexical analyzer, Tokens, Patterns, Lexemes, Input buffering,
Specifications of a token, Recognition of a tokens, Finite automata: Regular
expressions, NFA, DFA, Design of a lexical analyzer generator.
Syntax Analysis:
12
The role of a parser, Context free grammars, Writing a grammar, Top down
Parsing: Recursive decent parser, Predictive parser, Bottom up Parsing:
Handles, Viable prefixes, Operator precedence parsing, LR parsers: SLR,
LALR, CLR. Parser generator (YACC).Error Recovery techniques for different
parsers
SECTION-B
Hrs
Syntax directed translation:
4
Syntax directed definitions, Synthesized and inherited attributes, Construction
of syntax trees.
Run time environments:
6
Source language issues (Activation trees, Control stack, scope of declaration,
Binding of names), Storage organization (Subdivision of run-time memory,
Activation records), Storage allocation strategies, Symbol tables: storage, data
structures used
Intermediate code generation:
3
Intermediate languages, Graphical representation, Three-address code,
Implementation of three address statements (Quadruples, Triples, Indirect
triples)
Code optimization and code generation:
10
Introduction, Basic blocks & flow graphs, DAG, principle sources of
optimization: loop optimization, eliminating induction variable, eliminating
common sub-expression, loop unrolling, loop jamming etc. Peephole
optimization, Issues in the design of code generator, a simple code generator,

Register allocation & assignment.


Suggeste
d Books

S.
Authors
No.
1
Aho,
Ullman
2

Course
Outcome
s

Mapping
of
Course
Outcome
s with
POs

Title

Publisher

Principles
Compiler
Design

Edition Year

Other
Details

of Nar
osa
Publication

Dhamdhere

Compiler
Macmillan,
ConstructionIndia 198
Principles a
nd Practice
3
Holub
Compiler
PHI
Latest
Design in C
Edition
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. To understand the functioning of different phases of a compiler.
2. To understand the implementation details and concepts behind each phase of the
compiler by stressing more on the syntax analysis and further on different parsing
techniques.
3. To understand need of intermediate code generation, code optimization and
actual machine code generation techniques.
CO
1
2
3

A
X
X
X

B
X
X
X

C
X
X
X

D
X
X
X

E
X
X
X

PO
F
X

G
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

COMPILER DESIGN (PRACTICAL)


CSE 761
Semester: - 7th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Implementation of lexical analyzer for a hypothetical language.
2. Implementation of LL parser.
3. Implementation of SLR parser.
4. Implementation of CLR parser.
5. Implementation of LALR parser.

02
003
N
3 Hours

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Multimedia System Design
Credits
4
Code
CSE712
Semester: -7th
LTP
310
Max. Marks
External: -50
Internal: - 50
Elective
N
Pre-requisites
Peripheral Device Interface (CSE313), Computer Graphics (CSE613)
Contact Hours
45
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
To provide an in-depth understanding of Multimedia system design Enabling technologies and standards.
Note for Examiner
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks. First
question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be compulsory.
Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required
to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction:
Multimedia and its types, Introduction to Hypermedia, Hyper Text, Multimedia Systems and their
Characteristics, Challenges, Desirable Features, Components and Applications, Trends in Multimedia
4
Multimedia Technology:
Multimedia Systems Technology , Multimedia Hardware devices, Multimedia software development
tools, Multimedia Authoring Tools, Multimedia Standards for Document Architecture, SGML, ODA,
Multimedia Standards for Document interchange, MHEG, Multimedia Software for different media.
6
Storage Media :
Magnetic and Optical Media, RAID and its levels, Compact Disc and its standards, DVD and its
standards, Multimedia Servers
4
Audio:
Basics of Digital Audio, Application of Digital Audio, Digitization of Sound, Sample Rates and Bit Size,
Nyquist's Sampling Theorem Typical Audio Formats Delivering Audio over a Network , Introduction to
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface), Components of a MIDI System Hardware Aspects of MIDI
,MIDI Messages. Audio Compression, Simple Audio Compression Methods, Psychoacoustics ,MPEG
Audio Compression

8
SECTION-B
Basics of Compression :
Classifying Compression Algorithms, Lossless Compression Algorithms, Entropy Encoding, Run-length
Encoding, Pattern Substitution, Basics of Information theory, Huffman Coding, Adaptive Huffman
Coding, Arithmetic Coding, Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) Algorithm, Source Coding Techniques: Transform
Coding, Frequency Domain Methods, Differential Encoding.
6
Image and Graphics Compression :
Color in Images, Types of Color Models, Graphic/Image File Formats: TIFF, RIFF, BMP, PNG, PDF,
Graphic/Image Data, and JPEG Compression, GIF Compression.
6
Video Compression:
Basics of Video, Video Signals, Analog Video, Digital Video, TV standards, H. 261 Compression, Intra
Frame Coding, Inter-frame (P-frame) Coding, MPEG Compression, MPEG Video, The MPEG Video Bit
stream, Decoding MPEG Video in Software.
6
Multimedia Communication:
Building Communication network, Application Subsystem, Transport Subsystem, QOS, Resource
Management, and Distributed Multimedia Systems.
5
Suggested Books
S.
No
.
1

Authors

Title

Publisher

Ralf Steinmetz
amdKlaraNahrste
dt

Pearson
Education
s

ParagHavaldar,
Gerard Medioni

Multimedia
Computing
Communications
and Applications
Multimedia
Systems

Prabhat K.
Andleigh,
KranThakkar
Fred Halsall

Multimedia
System Design
Multimedia
Communications

Cengage
Learning
publicatio
n
PHI
Pearson
Education

Course Assessment Methods


Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
Course Outcomes
On completion of this course, a student must be able to

Editio
n

Latest
Edition

Year Other
Detail
s

C
O

PO
A B C D E
*
*
*
*
*
*

1. Demonstrate
1
Multimedia
2
2. Understand
3
3. Understand
4
multimedia
4. Familiarize
multimedia communication systems
Mapping of Course Outcomes with POs

G H I

K L

*
*
*

Knowledge
of
Tools and Standards
Compression standards
current technologies in
with

issues

in

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

SOFTWARE TESTING AND QUALITY ASSURANCE


CSE713
Semester: -7th
External: 50
Internal: 50
Programming Fundamentals (CS101/201)

Credits
LTP
Elective

4
310
N

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
This course offers a good understanding of the concepts, methods and techniques of
software testing and quality assurance and prepares students to be in a position to develop
error free and quality software.
1. To study the concept of quality control and quality assurance.
2. To study risk management and technique to manage changing requirement of
software.
3. To study change control management process to tackle changing requirement of
system
4. To study various software testing strategies for testing different type of system
under test.
5. To enable the student to extend their testing concept to real scenarios and
specialized systems.
6. To study the concepts of quality metrics and reporting formats.
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examiner
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each
part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction:
7
Overview of Software Engineering, Software Process, Characteristics of a Software Process,
Process Models, Project Management Process and its Phases, Software Measurements, Metrics,
Scheduling, Estimation.
Software Quality Assurance Concepts and Standards :
8
Quality Concepts, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, SQA Activities, Software Reviews,
Formal Technical Reviews, Review Guidelines, Software Reliability, Software Safety, Quality
Assurance Standards, ISO 9000, ISO 9001:2000, ISO 9126 Quality Factors, CMM, TQM, Six
Sigma, SPICE, Software Quality Assurance Metrics.
Risk Management and Change Management:
7
Software Risks, Risk Identification, Risk Projection, Risk Refinement, The RMMM Plan,
Software Configuration Management, Baselines, Software Configuration Items, SCM Process:
Version Control, Change Control, Configuration Audit, Configuration Management for Web
Engineering.
SECTION-B
Software Testing:
7
Testing, Verification and Validation, Test Strategies for Conventional and Object Oriented
Software, Unit Testing, Integration Testing, Validation Testing, Alpha and Beta Testing, System
Testing, Recovery Testing, Security Testing, Stress Testing, Performance Testing, Metrics for
Source Code, Metrics for Testing, Debugging Process, Debugging Strategies.

Testing Techniques: Software Testing Fundamentals, Black Box and White Box Testing, Basis
Path Testing, Flow Graph Notation, Independent Program Paths, Graph Matrices, Control 8
Structure Testing, Condition Testing, Data Flow Testing, Loop Testing, Graph Based Testing
Methods, Equivalence Partitioning, Boundary Value Analysis, Object Oriented Testing
Methods: Applicability of Conventional Test Case Design Methods, Fault-Based Testing,
Scenario-Based Testing, Random Testing and Partition Testing for Classes, Interclass Test Case
Design.
Testing Process and Specialized Systems Testing:
8
Test Plan Development, Requirement Phase, Design Phase and Program Phase Testing, Testing
Client/Server Systems, Testing Web based Systems, Testing Off-the-Shelf Software, Testing in
Multiplatform Environment, Testing for Real Time Systems, Testing Security
Suggested
Books
S. No.
Authors
Title
Publisher
Edition
Year
1
Ian
Software
Pearson
Seventh
Somerville Engineerin Education. Edition
g
2
Pressman Software
TataMcGr Sixth
Engineerin aw- Hill.
Edition,
g: A
Practitione
r's
Approach
3
William E. Effective
John
Second
Perry
Methods
Wiley
Edition
for
Software
Testing
References
1.
Pfleeger
Software
Pearson
Second
Engineerin Education Edition
g: Theory
and
Practice
2
K..Aggarw Software
New.Age
Second
al, Yogesh Engineerin Internation Edition
Singh.
g
al
.
3
PankajJalo An
Narosa
Second
te
Integrated
Edition
Approach
to
Software
Engineerin
g
4
.Nina S
Software
Narosa
Second
Godbole : Quality
Narosa.
Assurance

Principles
and
Practice,
5
Boris
Software
Second

Beizer

Course
Assessment
Methods

Course
Outcomes

Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

Testing
Technique
s
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Edition,

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand the concept of Software Testing and Quality Assurance to develop cost
effective software system.
2. Understand the essence of risk management and control management and ability to
develop RMMM plan to mitigate risk and manage the artifacts of software system..
3. Ability to tests the system at various levels and dimensions to control error
generation and propagation which ultimately makes debugging successful and cost
effective.
4. Ability to extend the testing concept to real scenarios and specialized systems like
multiplatform, Real Time system, Client-Server system.
CO

PO
A

*
*

*
*

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

SOFTWARE TESTING AND QUALITY ASSURANCE Credits


(Practical)
CSE 763
Semester: - 7th
LTP
50
Elective

02

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Study of different quality assurance and software testing tools.
2. Use of black box testing techniques to test programs.
3. Use of white box testing techniques to test programs.
4. Use of Object Oriented Testing Techniques to test programs.
5. Use of a software testing tool.
6. Use of a quality assurance tool.
7. Testing a web based system.
8. Design and Implementation of a quality assurance / software testing tool.

3 Hours

003
N

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

INFORMATION SECURITY
CSE 714
Semester: - 7th
External: - 100
Internal: - 50
Computer Network (CSE513)

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
300
Y

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives The subject Information Security aims at providing essential concepts and methods for
providing and evaluating security in information processing systems (operating systems and
applications, networks, protocols, and so on). In addition to its technical content, the course
touches on the importance of following:
Develop a security mindset: learn how to critically analyze situations of computer
and network usage from a security perspective, identifying the salient issues,
viewpoints, and trade-offs.
Basic Encryption and Decryption Algorithms, security threats, challenges in
Information Security
Security management which describes access control, secure group management and
authorization management.
Various Key management protocols
Security in Networks and Web
Firewalls
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examiner
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Basic Encryption and Decryption:
6
Attackers and Types of threats, challenges for information security, Encryption Techniques,
Classical Cryptographic
Algorithms: Monoalphabetic Substitutions such as the Caesar Cipher, Cryptanalysis of
Monoalphabetic ciphers, Polyalphabetic Ciphers such as Vigenere, Vernam Cipher.
Stream, Block, Symmetric Key and Asymmetric Key Ciphers:
7
Rotor based system and shift register based systems. Block cipher: principles, modes of
operations. The Data encryption Standard (DES), Analyzing and Strengthening of DES,
Introduction to Advance Encryption Standard (AES), Concept and Characteristics of Public
Key Encryption system, Rivets Shamir-Adlman (RSA) Encryption, Digital Signature
Algorithms and authentication protocols, The Digital Signature Standard (DSA).
Number theory and basic Algebra: Modular Arithmetic, Euclidean algorithm, Random 5
number generation
Key Management Protocols: Solving Key Distribution Problem, Diffie-Hellman 6
Algorithm, Key Exchange with Public Key Cryptography.
SECTION-B
Message Authentication and Hash Functions
5
Authentication Requirements, Authentication Functions, Message Authentication codes,
Hash Functions, Hash Algorithms (MD-5 and SHA-1), Key Management Algorithms.
Network Security: Kerberos, IP security: Architecture, Authentication Header, 5
Encapsulating Security Payload, Digital Signatures and Digital Signature Standards.
Web Security: Web security consideration, secure socket Layer protocol, Transport Layer 6
Security Secure Electronic Transaction Protocol.

Firewalls: Firewall Design principles, Characteristics, Types of Firewall, trusted systems,


Virtual Private Networks.
5
Suggested
S.
Authors
Title
Publisher Edition/ISB
Year
Books
No.
N
1.
William Stallings
Network
Pearson
Security
Education.38
Essentials,
Applications
and Standards
References:
1
William Stallings
Cryptography
Pearson
and Network
Education.
Security
Principles and
practice
2
. Bishop, Matt
Introduction to
Pearson
(2005)
Computer
Education,
Security.
Inc./ ISBN: 0Addison321-24744-2.
Wesley
3
Michael. E. Whitman Principles of
and Herbert J.
Information
Mattord
Security
4.
AtulKahate
Cryptography
2nd Edition
& Network
Security,
TMH,
Course
Assessment will consists of following components
Assessmen
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
t Methods
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
Course
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
Outcomes
1. Understand data encryption and decryption techniques (such as caesar Cipher,
Monoalphabetic ciphers, Polyalphabetic Ciphers such as Vigenere, Vernam Cipher
etc.)
2. Apply these techniques on given data by using various softwares like:- RSA
Cryptosystem, Proxy Crypt, Packet Tracer, WireShark etc.
3. Understand methods which authenticates and secure the messages.
4. Contribute towards network security and web security.
Mapping
CO
PO
of Course
A B C D E F G H I J K L
Outcomes
1
* *
*
* *
*
*
with POs
2
* * * *
*
*
3
4

*
*

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE
CSE 715
Semester: - 7th
External: - 100
Internal: - 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
310
Y

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
To introduce the concepts of Business process their requirements, key performance
indicators and their evaluation in a typical Business houses.
To introduces the concept of data warehouses and use of multi dimensional databases
and Online Analytical processing.
To introduce the basic data mining concepts like Association Rule Analysis,
classification, clustering and their use in different application domains.
Note
for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examiner
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction to Business Intelligence:
8
Introduction to OLTP and OLAP, BI Definitions & Concepts, Business Applications of BI,
BI Framework, Role of Data Warehousing in BI, BI Infrastructure Components BI
Process, BI Technology, BI Roles & Responsibilities
Basics of Data Integration (Extraction Transformation Loading)
8
Concepts of data integration need and advantages of using data integration, introduction to
common data integration approaches, introduction to ETL, Introduction to data quality, data
profiling concepts and applications.
Introduction to Multi-Dimensional Data Modeling,
8
Introduction to data and dimension modeling, multidimensional data model, ER Modeling
vs. multi dimensionalmodeling, concepts of dimensions, facts, cubes, attribute, hierarchies,
star and snowflake schema, introduction to business metrics and KPIs, creating cubes using
SSAS
SECTION-B
Basics of Enterprise Reporting
6
Introduction to enterprise reporting, concepts of dashboards, balanced scorecards, and
overall architecture
Data Mining Functionalities:
15
Association rules mining, Mining Association rules from single level, multilevel transaction
databases, Classification and prediction, Decision tree induction, Bayesian classification, knearest neighbor classification, Cluster analysis, Types of data in clustering, categorization
of clustering methods
Suggested
Books

Database Management System (CSE412)

S.
No.
1.

Authors

Title

Publisher

Editio Year
n
First
2011
Edition

R N Prasad,
SeemaAchary
a

Fundamental
s of Business
Analytics

Wiley
India

2.

.Han and M.
Kamber

Data Mining: Morgan


Latest 2010
Concepts
Kaufman
Edition
and
publishers,

Other
Details

Techniques
3.

David Loshin

4.

Larissa
Terpeluk
Moss,
ShakuAtre
CindiHowson

5.

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Course
Outcomes

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

Harcourt
India pvt.
Ltd
Business
Knowledg Latest 2011
Intelligence: e
Edition
The Savvy Enterprise.
Manager's
Guide.
Business
Addison
Latest 2012
Intelligence
Wesley
Edition
roadmap

Successful
Tata
Business
McGraw
Intelligence: Hill
Secrets to
making
Killer BI
Applications
6.
Mike Biere
Business
Addison
intelligence
Wesley
for
the
enterprise
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Latest 2012
Edition

Latest 2010
Edition

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand fundamental Business processes, their requirements, evaluation using key
performance indicators,
2. Demonstrate an understanding of BI framework and its implementation using open
source tools.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of various concepts related to data warehousing and
OLAP.
4. Use different data mining representation techniques used in different domains.
CO

PO
A

1.
2.

K
*

3.

4.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
MOBILE COMPUTING
Code
CSE716
Semester: - 7th
Max.
External: - 100
Internal: - 50
Marks
PreComputer Networks (CSE513)
requisites

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
310
Y

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives To impart knowledge of mobile and wireless computing systems and techniques.
Note
for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examiner
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Mobility:
6
Issues, challenges, and benefits; Review of mobile and cellular communication technology;
Review of distributed/network operating systems, ubiquitous computing.
Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) System Overview:
4
GSM Architecture, Mobility Management, Network Signaling, GPRS
Mobile IP Networks:
4
Physical mobility, challenges, limits and connectivity, mobile IP and cellular IP in mobile
computing.
Mobile Transport Layer:
6
Transport layer issues in wireless, Indirect TCP, Snoop TCP, Mobile TCP
SECTION-B
Wireless LANs:
5
Introduction to IEEE 802.11, Bluetooth technologies and standards.
Mobile Adhoc Networks:
7
Hidden and exposed terminal problems; Routing protocols: DSDV, DSR, AODV.
Mobile Devices and OS:
7
Various types of Devices, Operating System: PalmOS, WindowsCE, Windows Mobile.
Application Development:
6
WWW programming model, Development Environment for MobileDevices
Suggested
Books

S.
No.
1.

Authors

Title

Publisher

Mobile
Pearson
Communication, Education.
2.
U. Hansman and L. Principles
of Springer
Merck.
Mobile
Computing
References:
1
A. S. Tanenbaum
Computer
Pearson
Networks
Education
2
D.
Milojicic,
F. Mobility
Addison
Douglis.
Processes,
Wesley
Computers and
Agents,
3
Raj Kamal
Mobile
Oxford
Computing
University
Press

Edition/ISBN Year

Jochen Schiller

2nd Ed

4th Ed

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Familiarize with mobile computing and networks.
2. Possess working knowledge of GSM architecture.
3. Learn about mobility issues on TCP/IP.
4. Understand wireless mobile ad-hoc networks.
5. Learn about operating system for mobile devices and applications.

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO

PO
A

1.

2.

3.

4.

Fourth Year - Eighth Semester


Branch: Computer Science and Engineering
Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS


CSE811
Semester: - 8th
External:-50
Internal: - -50

Credits
LTP
Elective

04
310
N

Database Management System (CSE412)

Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives To review various Database concepts, Data models and their architectures.
To introduce Advanced Strategies for implementation of Transaction processing,
concurrency control and Recovery management.
To learn how to optimize query processing.
To familiarize with concepts of Distributed databases and their implementation concepts.
To elaborate Significance of Data warehouses and their setup strategies.
To understand role of Data mining, OLAP, OLTP in databases and their implementation
strategies.
To familiarize with Object oriented databases and their significance.
To expose to various databases like oracle, Sql server, DB2, MySqletc through case
studies.
Note
for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examiner
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each
part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction to Database Systems:
Database System Concepts and Architecture, Data Models, Data Independence, SQL: DDL,
DML, DCL, Normalization: 1NF, 2NF, 3NF, BCNF, 4NF, 5NF.
Query Processing and Optimization:
Query Processing, Syntax Analyzer, Query Decomposition, Query Optimization, Heuristic
Query Optimization, Cost Estimation, Cost Functions for Select, Join, Query Evaluation Plans.
Transaction Processing and Concurrency Control:
Transaction Processing Concepts, Concurrency Control Techniques: Two-phase Locking,
Timestamp Ordering, Multiversion, Validation, Multiple Granularity Locking.
Object Oriented and Object Relational Databases:
Object Oriented Concepts, Object Oriented Data Model, Object Definition Language, Object
Query Language, Object Relational Systems, SQL3, ORDBMS Design.

6
6
5
5

SECTION-B
Distributed Databases:
6
Distributed Database Concepts, Advantages and Disadvantages, Types of Distributed Database
Systems, Data Fragmentation, Replication and Allocation Techniques for Distributed Database
Design, Five Level Schema Architecture, Query Processing, Concurrency Control and Recovery
in Distributed Databases.
Backup and Recovery:
5
Types of Database Failures, Types of Database Recovery, Recovery Techniques: Deferred
Update, Immediate Update, Shadow Paging, Checkpoints, Buffer Management.
Introduction to Data Warehousing and Data Mining:
5

Introduction to OLAP, OLTP, Data Warehouse, Data Marts, Data Mining, Data Mining Process.
Commercial Databases:
7
Commercial Database Products, Familiarity with IBM DB2 Universal Database, Oracle,
Microsoft SQL Server, MySql, their features.
Suggested
Books
S.
Authors
Title
Publisher Edition Year Other
No.
Details
1
RamezElmasri,
Fundamentals Pearson
Fifth
2007
ShamkantNavath of Database Education Edition
e
Systems
2
Raghu
Database
Tata
Ramakrishnan,
Management
McGrawJohannes Gehrke Systems,
Hill
3
C.J. Date
An
Pearson
Eighth
Introduction
Education Edition
to Database
Systems
4
Alexis
Leon, Database
Leon
Mathews Leon
Management
Press
Systems
5
Abraham
Database
Tata
Silberschatz,
System
McGrawHenry F. Korth, Concepts
Hill
S. Sudarshan
6
S. K. Singh
Database
Pearson
Systems
Education
Concepts,
Design
and
Applications
Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
Course
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
Outcomes
1. Recall various Database concepts with discovery of advanced strategies for
Transaction processing, Concurrency control, Recovery management and Query
Processing.
2. Understand Object Oriented and Distributed databases.
3. Learn significance of Data ware housing, Data mining, OLAP and OLTP.
4. Examine various Case studies: Oracle, Sqlsever, DB2, MySql etc.
Mapping
CO
PO
of Course
A
B C
D E F
G H I
J
K L
Outcomes
1
X
X
with POs
2
X
X
3
X
X X X
4
X
X X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max. Marks
Prerequisites
Objectives

Digital Image Processing


CSE812
Semester: -8th
External: -50
Internal: - 50
Computer Graphics (CSE613)

Credits
LTP
Elective
Contact Hours

4
310
N
45

Time
3 Hours
To introduce the various image processing techniques and their applications in different
domains. To get students acquainted with computer vision.

Note for
Examiner

The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of


equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction to Image Processing:
6
Digital Image representation, Sampling & Quantization, Steps in image Processing,
Image acquisition, color image representation
Image Transformation & Filtering:
12
Intensity transform functions, histogram processing, Spatial filtering, fourier transforms
and its properties, frequency domain filters, , color models, Pseudo coloring, color
transforms, Basics of Wavelet Transforms.
Image Restoration:
7
Image degradation and restoration process, Noise Models, Noise Filters, degradation
function, Inverse Filtering, Homomorphism Filtering
.
SECTION-B
Image Compression:
8
Coding redundancy, Interpixel redundancy, Psychovisual redundancy, Huffman Coding,
Arithmetic coding, Lossy compression techniques, JPEG Compression.
Image Segmentation & Representation:
12
Point, Line and Edge Detection, Thresholding, Edge and Boundary linking, Hough
transforms, region Based Segmentation, Boundary representation,Boundary Descriptors,
Regional Descriptors.
Suggested
Books
S. Authors
Title
Publishe Editio Year Other
No
r
n
Details
.
1
Gonzalez Digital Image Addison
1992
and
Processing
Wesley
Woods
2

Boyle and
Thomas

Computer
Vision,

Blackwel
l Science

Pakhira
Malay K

Digital Image PHI


Processing
and Pattern

2nd
1995
Edition

Recogination
Course
Assessment
Methods

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand the basic terms related to imaging, types of images, image
conversions, matrix calculations, steps involved in image processing, its need in
real time applications, state of art, color models and color image processing,
various domains.
2. Understand and develop various image enhancement filters both in spatial and
frequency domain, restoration process after discussing degradation functions,
role of image enhancement and restoration in any image processing application.
The implementation of same is also required to be done practically.
3. Discuss the role and need of image compression and its techniques,
morphological operations, role and need of segmentation, types of
segmentation, edge segmentation, various segmentation algorithms like region
growing, region splitting and merging, watershed etc., calculations and practice
of numerical related to segmentation.
4. Discuss various boundary and regional descriptor methods, equation related to
boundary detection, various types of image features and methods defined for
object recognition.

Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO
1
2
3
4

A
X
X
X
X

B
X
X
X

PO
E F

X
X

X
X
X

J
X

X
X
X

X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING (Practical)


CSE 862
Semester: - 8th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

02
003
N

Time
3 Hours
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Reading and displaying images in different formats using different color models.
2. Converting color images into monochrome images, Image color enhancements using
pseudo coloring techniques.
3.Images enhancements using grey level transformations and spatial and frequency
domain filters
5.Image Noise removal and inverse filtering of images
6.Point, Line, Edge and Boundary Detections in images
7.Histogram Matching and specification on images
8.Boundary Linking, Representation and Description techniques on images
9.Thresholding& Magnification of Images
10. Image Morphological Operations
11. Object Recognition Techniques

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
NETWORK PROGRAMMING
Code
CSE813
Semester: 8
Max. Marks
External: 50
Internal: 50
Pre-requisites Computer Networks (CSE513)

Credits
4
LTP
310
Elective
Y
Contact
45
Hours
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
To familiarize students with advanced concepts of networks, network
programming in UNIX environment.
Note
for The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions
Examiner
of equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions
of conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into
two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at
least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
OSI model, client server model, TCP/IP protocols, Introduction to Unix; Process,
groups, job control and non-job control shells, reliable and unreliable signals, shell
Programming.
Inter process communication in Unix, pipes, half duplex and full duplex pipes, FIFOs,
properties of pipes and FIFOs, POSIX message queues, system Vmessage queues,
semaphores, shared memory, mmap function and its use, RPC, authentication, timeout
and retransmission, call semantics, XDR. .
Communication Protocol Introduction, TCP, IP, XNS, SNA, NetBIOS, OSI
protocols, comparisons
SECTION-B
Introduction to Berkeley sockets, socket addressing, TCP and UDP socket functions,
sockets and Unix signals, socket implementation, client and server examples for TCP
and UDP and their behaviour under abnormal conditions.
Socket options, IPv4, IPv6, TCP, I/O multiplexing, Unix I/O models, select and poll
functions
System V Transport Layer, interface Introduction Transport End Point address, TLI
Overview of Ping Routines, FTP, Remote Login
Suggested
Books
S.
Authors
Title
Publish Editio Year
Other
No.
er
n
Details
1
W. R.,
Unix
Pearson Vol. I,
Stevens,
Networ Educati 3rd
B. Fenner k
on
Ed.
and A.
Progra
M.,
mming
Rudoff
2

W.
R., Unix
Stevens
Networ
k
Progra
mming,
W.
R., Advanc
Stevens
ed
Progra

Pearson
Educati
on
Pearson
Educati
on

Vol. II,
2
nd
Ed.,

Hrs
6
10

5
10
5
5
4

mming
in Unix
Environ
ment,

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. To demonstrate the working of TCP/IP and its role in networks.
2. To learn about inter-process communication in unix environment.
3. To study about socket programming.
4. To learn about programming for Unix operating system
CO
A

PO
E F
*

G
*

C
*

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

NETWORK PROGRAMMING (Practical)


CSE 863
Semester: - 8th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
Students will learn to implement programs in UNIX.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

To study and implement various network commands like telnet, ftp, etc.
To study various system calls.
Programs related to inter-process communication
Programs related to message queues
Programs related to pipes
Programs related to file handling
Programs related to process control
Programs using Socket Programming

02
003
Y
3 Hours

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max. Marks
Pre-requisites

VISUAL PROGRAMMING
CSE814
Semester: 8
External: 50
Internal: 50
Object Oriented Programming (CSE414)

Credits
LTP
Elective
Contact
Hours
Time

4
310
Y
45

3 Hours
1. To introduce Visual C# and its programming model
2. To enable them write applications using Visual C#
3. To make them understand and use various controls to create GUI
4. To enable them handle exceptions and write multithreaded programs
5. To make them understand and use file and data access techniques
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions
Examiner
of equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions
of conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into
two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at
least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction
8
Introduction to Programming: Variables, Functions, Visual Programming, and Object
Oriented Concepts: Abstraction, Inheritance, Polymorphism, Classes, Collections,
Debugging.
Graphical User Interface Concepts - I
5
Windows Forms, Control Properties and Layout, Using Common Dialogs, Event
Handling: Mouse and Keyboard, Labels, Textboxes, Buttons, GroupBoxes, Panels,
CheckBoxes and RadioButtons, PictureBoxes, ToolTips.
3. Graphical User Interface Concepts IIMenus, Controls:
4
MonthCalendar,DateTimePicker,LinkLabel,ListBox,CheckedListBox, ComboBox,
TreeView, ListView,Datagrid, Gridview, TabControl, Multiple Document Interface
(MDI) Windows.
Multithreading and Exception Handling
5
Thread States, Lifecycle of a Thread, Thread Priorities and Scheduling, Creating and
Executing Threads, Thread Synchronization and Class Monitor, Exception Handling.
SECTION-B
Graphics and Multimedia
5
Drawing Classes and the Coordinate System, Graphics Contexts and Graphics Objects,
Color and Font Control, Drawing Lines, Rectangles, Ovals, Arcs, Loading, Displaying
and Scaling Images, Animating a Series of Images.
File Processing and Streams
5
Data Hierarchy, Files and Streams, Classes File and Directory, Reading and Writing
Sequential Access Files, Serialization.
Data Access
8
Data Access Techniques, XML, LINQ, SQL, ADO.NET Object Model, LINQ to SQL,
ADO.NET and LINQ, LINQ to XML.
Additional Techniques
5
XML Documentation, Networking, Security, Web Services, Introduction to GDI+.
Suggested
Books
S.
Authors
Title
Publishe Editio Year
Other
No.
r
n
Details
1
Deitel
Visual
Deitel
Secon 2005
Objectives

C#
2005
How to
Progra
m
Beginni Wrox
ng
Microso
ft
Visual
C#

Karli
2008
Watson,
Christian
Nagel,
Jacob
Hammer,
et al.
3
Christian Professi Wrox
2008
Nagel,
onal C#
Bill
Evjen, Jay
Glynn,
Morgan
Skinner,
Karli
Watson
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
2

Course
Assessment
Methods

Course
Outcomes

Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

d
Editio
n

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand the fundamentals of visual programming
2. Apply the concept of multithreading, exception handling, file handling and
data access while developing applications
3. Develop applications involving use of graphics controls, multithreading,
exception handling and file handling.
4. Examine visual applications involving use of graphics controls, multithreading,
exception handling and file handling.
CO
A
1
2
3
4

B
X

X
X
X

E
X
X

PO
F

J
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

VISUAL PROGRAMMING (Practical)


CSE 864
Semester: - 8th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

02
003
Y

Time
3 Hours
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Writing basic C# programs demonstrating the concepts of functions, arrays, classes,
inheritance, polymorphism etc.
2. Writing graphical programs demonstrating the concepts of event handling, Labels,
Textboxes, Buttons, GroupBoxes, Panels, CheckBoxes and RadioButtons, PictureBoxes,
ToolTips.
3. Writing MDI Applications and demonstration of controls like: MonthCalendar,
DateTimePicker, LinkLabel, ListBox, CheckedListBox, ComboBox, TreeView, ListView,
TabControl.
4. Writing programs demonstrating the concepts of Multithreading and Exception
Handling.
5. Writing programs demonstrating Graphics and Multimedia concepts.
6. Writing programs for reading and writing text files.
7. Writing programs demonstrating Database Access, Networking and Security.
8. Writing Web Services.

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites
Objectives

JAVA TECHNOLOGIES
CSE815
External: 50

Semester: 8
Internal: 50

Object Oriented Programming (CSE414)

Credits
LTP
Elective

4
310
Y

Contact
Hours
Time

45
3 Hours

1.To introduce Java and its programming model


2. To make them write desktop applications and applets in Java
3. To enable them handle exceptions in Java and write multithreaded programs
4. To give an overview of J2EE and JDBC
5. To make them understand and write JSP, Servlets and Java Beans.
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of
Examiner
equal marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of
conceptual nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts
having three questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two
questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Java Methods, Classes and Inheritance
8
Introduction; classes; methods; constructors; overloading methods; arrays; recursion;
passing arrays and objects to methods; Inheritance; method overriding; abstract classes;
using final; packages; interfaces.
I/O, Applets and Graphics:
8
I/O basics; stream classes; byte and character streams; reading and writing files; Applet
fundamentals; Applet class; Applet initialization and termination; event handling;
keyboard and mouse events; AWT class; Layout managers; panels; canvases; Frame
windows; drawing lines, rectangles, ellipses.
Exceptional Handling and Multithreaded Programming:
8
Exception handling fundamentals; exception types; uncaught exceptions; try and catch;
creating exception classes; throwing exceptions; Java thread model; thread priorities;
creating a thread; inter-thread communication; thread synchronization; suspending,
resuming and stopping threads.
SECTION-B
Overview of J2EE and working with JDBC:
7
What is J2EE, component based architecture of J2EE: Web, Business and Application
component, commonly used classes and interfaces of java.sql package, connecting java
application to a database, prepared statements.
Servlets and JSP:
7
Java Servlets, compilation, deployment, and testing a servlet, session management,
request dispatching, Java Server Pages, deploying and testing a JSP, using java beans in
JSP.
Enterprise Java Beans(EJB):
7
Architecture of EJB, creating a stateless-session EJB, statefull-session bean, Life Cycle
of session beans, Entity beans, life cycle of entity beans.
Suggested
S.
Authors Title
Publishe Edition
Year Other Details
Books
No.
r
1
Deitel
Java: How Pearson 6th
to Program Educatio Edition
n

Herbert
Schildt

The
McGraw
Complete
-Hill
Reference
Java2
J2EE: The
complete
Reference

Course
Assessment
Methods

Course
Outcomes

Mapping of
Course
Outcomes
with POs

James
Edward
Keogh,
Jim
Keogh
Assessment will consists of following components
1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)
On completion of this course, a student must be able to
1. Understand the fundamentals of object-oriented programming and the technologies
of Java Enterprise Edition Software.
2. Study and Develop coding conventions of importing packages and use of interfaces.
Demonstrate the runtime exception, multi-threaded event-driven programming.
3. Apply the use of applet programming. Show competence in the use of the pure
object oriented Java language in the development of small to medium-sized
applications.
4. Examine the enterprise components including Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB)
technology, servlets, and Java Server Pages (JSP) technology, JDBC.
CO
1
2
3
4

A
X
X
X
X

B
X
X
X

C
X
X

PO
F

J
X

K
X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Note
List

JAVA TECHNOLOGIES (PRACTICAL)


CSE 865
Semester: - 8th
50

Credits
LTP
Elective

Time
Practical should be covered based on the following directions:
1. Implementation of classes, inheritance, overloading.
2. Implantation of packages and interfaces
3. Implantation of threads.
4. Implementation of Applets, mouse events, and keyboard events.
5. Connecting to Database using JDBC.
6. Deployment of Servlets, JSP and EJB.

02
003
Y
3 Hours

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
SOFT COMPUTING
Credits
04
Code
CSE806
Semester: - 8th
LTP
310
Max. Marks
External: - 50
Internal: 50
Elective
Y
Pre-requisites
Artificial Intelligence (CSE614)
Contact Hours
45
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
To understand the basic soft computing techniques available and to apply these concepts as applicable to
different problems in real life.
Note for Examiner
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks. First
question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be compulsory.
Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required
to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Intelligent Agents:
Agents Behavior and Environments, Structure of Agents, Planning Problem, Planning with state Space
Search, Partial order Planning, GRAPHPLAN, Planning in logic, Planning in non-deterministic domains,
hierarchical task planning, Multi agent planning, execution.
9
Probabilistic Reasoning Fuzzy Logic:
Knowledge representation under uncertainty, Bayesian theorem, Bayesian Networks, Dempster Shafer
theory, Representing vagueness, Fuzzy sets, operation on fuzzy sets, reasoning with fuzzy logic, Fuzzy
Automata, Fuzzy Control methods, Fuzzy decision making, inference in temporal models, Hidden
Markov Models, Kalman Filters
12
SECTION-B
Neural Networks:
Basic concepts, Single layer perception, Multilayer Perception, Supervised and Unsupervised learning Backpropagation networks - Kohnen'sself organizing networks - Hopfield network.
Introduction to Artificial Neural Systems - Perceptron - Representation - Linear separability - Learning
Training algorithm -Adaptive networks based Fuzzy interface systems - Classification and Regression

Trees - Data clustering algorithms - Rule based structure identification - Neuro-Fuzzy controls Simulated annealing
16
Genetic Algorithms:
Evolutionary computation. Survival of the Fittest - Fitness Computations - Cross over Mutation,
Reproduction - Rank method - Rank space method.
8
S. No.
1.
2.

3.

4.

5.

Authors

Stuart
J.Russel,
Norvig
Michael
Negnevitsky

Title

Publishe Edition
Year
r
AI: A Modern Pearson
Latest
Approach
Publications

Artificial
Intelligence: A
Guide to
Intelligent
Systems
James
Neural
Freeman A.
Networks and David
Algorithms,
Skapura M
Applications
&
Programming
Techniques
Yegnanarayan Artificial
aB
Neural
Networks
Goldberg,
David E

Addison
Wesley

2nd

Other
Details

Course Assessment
Methods

2005

Addison
Wesley

1992

Prentice
Hall of
India
Private Ltd
Addison
Wesley

1999

Suggested Books

Assessment
will
consists of following
components
1. Two
Minors
(30%
Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment
(7.5%)
4. Attendance
(5%)
5. Final
Exam
(50%)
Course Outcomes
On completion of this
course, a student must
be able to
1. Illustrate
different soft
computing
techniques and

Genetic
latest
algorithms in
search,
optimization
and machine
learning
their relation to artificial intelligence
2. Describe, argue for and critique Soft Computing discipline. Students will be able to use at least
two of the Soft Computing techniques
3. Apply fuzzy logic and reasoning to handle uncertainty and solve engineering problems
4. Apply genetic algorithms to combinatorial optimization problems
5. Apply neural networks to pattern classification and regression problems
6. Analyze and study the problem in question conceptually and mathematically and solve the
problem using any of soft computing techniques
Mapping of Course Outcomes with POs
CO
A
1
2
3
4

B
X
X
X
X

C
X
X
X

X
X
X

PO
F
G

5
6

X
X

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
EMBEDDED SYSTEMS
Credits
03
Code
CSE817
Semester: - 8th
LTP
300
Max. Marks
External: - 50
Internal: 50
Elective
Y
Pre-requisites
Microprocessors (EC317)
Contact Hours
45
Time
3 Hours
Objectives
To get the basic knowledge of all the peripheral device controllers and to work on PIC Microcontroller
Note for Examiner
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal marks. First
question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual nature, will be compulsory.
Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three questions each and the candidate is required
to attempt at least two questions from each part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction Review of Embedded Hardware
Memory Microprocessors Buses Direct Memory Access Interrupts Built ins on the
Microprocessor, Conventions used on Schematic, Microprocessor Architecture Interrupt Basic Shared
Data Problems Interrupt Latency.
10
PIC Micro controller & Interfacing
Introduction, CPU Architecture, Register file structure, Instruction Set, Programs, Timers and Interrupts
Interrupt Service Routine features of Interrupts Interrupt vector & Priority, Timing Generation &
Measurements, Compare mode, Capture mode, Event counter, PWM, Frequency Measurement
Interfacing Methods, I/O Interface, SPI, LCD interfacing, Seven segment interfacing, I2 C Bus, DAC,
Serial EEPROM, ADC, UART
15
SECTION-B
Software Development & Tools:
Software architectures, Round Robin, Round-Robin with Interrupts, Function
Queue Scheduling architecture, Introduction to assembler Compiler n Cross compilers and Integrated
Development Environment IDE, Linker/ Locators, Simulators, Getting Embedded software into target
System Debugging Strategies
8

Introduction to Real Time Operating Systems:


Task And Task States, Tasks and Data, Semaphores and shared data
5
Operating System Services:
Message queues, Mailboxes and Pipes, Timer Function, Events, Memory Management, Interrupt Routines
in an RTOS Environment, Basic Design Using RTOS.
7
Suggested Books
S. No.
Authors Title
Publishe Edition
Year
Other
r
Details
1.
David
E. An Embedded Pearson
Course Outcomes
Simon
Software
Education,
On completion of this
Primer,
Latest
course, a student must
Edition
be able to
2.

John
Peatman

3.

D. D. Gajski,
F. Vahid, S.
Narayan, J.
Gong

4.

Steve Heath

5.

F.
Balarin, Hardware
Chiodo
Software Codesign
of Embedded
Systems, et
al., Kluwer
3
4

B. PIC
Pearson
Microcontrolle Education,
r
Latest
Edition
S
pecification
and Design of
Embedded
Systems
Embedded
systems
design,
Newnes,
1997.

Prenti
ce
Hall.

Academic
Publishers,
May 1997

Microcontroller
Understand the architectures and development of embedded
implement it for target system.
Learn about real-time operating systems and their services.
.

Mapping of Course Outcomes with POs


CO
PO
A B C D E F
G
X
X
1
2
3
4

X
X

X
X

Learn about
embedded
hardware.
Learn
and
understand
the
features,
architecture,
memory
organization,
instructions,
addressing
Modes of PIC

systems

and

Branch: Computer Science and Engineering


Title
Code
Max.
Marks
Prerequisites

Building Enterprise Applications


CSE 818
Semester: - 8th
External: 50
Internal: 50

Credits
LTP
Elective

3
300
Y

Database Systems (CSE412)

Contact Hours

45

Time
3 Hours
Objectives
To introduce the concepts of Enterprise applications and different issues related to
their implementation
To introduces the architecture of different Enterprise applications and different
design modeling techniques for construction.
To introduce the different testing techniques for Enterprise application and
methodologies used to roll out these applications.
Note for
The Semester question paper of a subject will be of 50 marks having 7 questions of equal
Examiner
marks. First question, covering the whole syllabus and having questions of conceptual
nature, will be compulsory. Rest of the paper will be divided into two parts having three
questions each and the candidate is required to attempt at least two questions from each
part.
SECTION-A
Hrs
Introduction to Enterprise application
8
Introduction to enterprise applications and their types, software engineering
methodologies, life cycle of raising an enterprise application, introduction to skills
required to build an enterprise application, key determinants of successful enterprise
applications, and measuring the success of enterprise applications.
Incepting enterprise application and business process modelling
7
Inception of enterprise applications, enterprise analysis, business modelling, requirements
elicitation, use case modelling, prototyping, non functional requirements, requirements
validation, planning and estimation.
Enterprise Architecture and designing enterprise application
8
Concept of architecture, views and viewpoints, enterprise architecture, logical
architecture, technical architecture - design, different technical layers, best practices, data
architecture and design relational, XML, and other structured data representations,
Infrastructure architecture and design elements - Networking, Internetworking, and
Communication Protocols, IT Hardware and Software, Middleware, Policies for
Infrastructure Management, Deployment Strategy, Documentation of application
architecture and design.
SECTION-B
Constructing enterprise application
12
Construction readiness of enterprise applications - defining a construction plan, defining a
package structure, setting up a configuration management plan, setting up a development
environment, introduction to the concept of Software Construction Maps, construction of
technical solutions layers, methodologies of code review, static code analysis, build and
testing, dynamic code analysis code profiling and code coverage.
Testing and rolling out enterprise application
10
Types and methods of testing an enterprise application, testing levels and approaches,
testing environments, integration testing, performance testing, penetration testing,
usability testing, globalization testing and interface testing, user acceptance testing,
rolling out an enterprise application.

Suggested
Books

S. No.

Authors

Title

1.

AnubhavP
radhan,
Satheesha
B.
Nanjappa,
Senthil
K.
Nallasamy
,
Veerakum
arEsakim
uthu
Brett
McLaughl
in

2.

3.

SorenLau
esen

4.

Brian
Berenbac
h, Daniel
J. Paulish,
Juergen
Kazmeier,
Arnold
Rudorfer
Dean
Leffingwe
ll, Don
Widrig

5.

6.

7.

Publisher

Edition

Year

Raising
Wiley
Enterprise India
Applicatio
ns

First
Edition

2012

Building
Java
Enterprise
Applicatio
ns,
Software
Requirem
ents:
Styles &
Technique
s.
Software
Systems
Requirem
ents
Engineeri
ng: In
Practice

O Reily
Media

Latest
Edition

2010

Addison
Wesley

Latest
Edition

2012

McGrawHill/Osbo
rne
Media,

Latest
Edition

2009

First
Edition

2003

First
Edition

2009

First
Edition

2006

Managing Pearson
Software
Requirem
ents: A
Use Case
Approach,
VasudevV Software
Pearson
erma
Architectu
re: A Case
Based
Approach
Srinivasan SOFTWA Pearson
Desikan,
RE
Gopalasw TESTING
amy
Principles
Ramesh
and
Practices,

Other
Details

Course
Assessmen
t Methods

Assessment will consists of following components


1. Two Minors (30% Weightage )
2. Quiz (7.5%)
3. Assignment (7.5%)
4. Attendance (5%)
5. Final Exam (50%)

Course
Outcomes

On completion of this course, a student must be able to


1. Understand fundamental of Enterprise applications and key determinants to measure
the success.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of different modelling techniques used to design
Enterprise applications.
3. Construct applications by understanding the design..
4. Test and roll out the enterprise applications in real environment.

Mapping
of Course
Outcomes
with POs

CO

PO
A

1.

K
*

2.

3.

4.