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Michelle Ridder

Mrs. Jennifer Brunk


Kindergarten, River Bend Elementary School
Date of Presentation: Monday, September 26, 2016

LESSON PLAN OUTLINE


JMU Elementary Education Program
TITLE OF LESSON
What Do You Do With A Problem? By: Kobi Yamada Read Aloud
CONTEXT OF LESSON

Children will be confronted with a problem at some point in their life. This book gives
problems a face and teaches children that problems can get worse if they are not addressed.
This book also shows the positive outcomes that come from problems. It is developmentally
appropriate because students can start to critically think about how to solve problems and
what positive things can come out of solving them.
OBJECTIVES AND ASSESSMENT
Developmental Objectives
1. The students will follow along with the
teacher during a read aloud activity.
2. The students will create a class
problem plan for solving problems.
3. The students will draw their own
versions of problems and how to tackle it,
using the ideas we came up with as a
class.

Plan for Assessment


I will observe how well they are paying attention to the story by seeing
how engaged they are with the book. I will also consistently have them
interact with the story by asking open-ended questions throughout the
reading.
I will ask the students to give me ideas on how to solve problems that
may arise in the classroom and I will create a list of them to be posted in
the classroom for the students reference.
I will collect the students pictures and see which ideas they decided to
draw and ask a few of them why they decided to draw that particular idea.

COLLECTION OF ASSESSMENT DATA


To assess what the students have gained from my lesson, I will attach a photo of our final product of
the problem plan and include copies of their pictures in the hard copy submission.
RELATED VIRGINIA STANDARDS OF LEARNING (K & 1) OR FOUNDATION BLOCKS
(Preschool)
English
K.1: The student will demonstrate growth in the use of oral language
a) Listen to a variety of literary forms, including stories and poems
b) Participate in a variety of oral language activities including choral and echo speaking and
recitation of short poems, rhymes, songs, and stories with repeated word order patterns.
c) Participate in oral generation of language experience narratives.
d) Participate in creative dramatics
e) Use complete sentences that include subject, verb, and object.
K.2: The student will expand understanding and use of word meanings
a) Increase listening and speaking vocabularies
b) Use number words
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Michelle Ridder
Mrs. Jennifer Brunk
Kindergarten, River Bend Elementary School
Date of Presentation: Monday, September 26, 2016

K.3:

K.5:

K.6:

K.8:
K.9:

c) Use words to describe/name people, places, and things


d) Use words to describe/name location, size, color, and shape
e) Use words to describe/name actions
f) Ask about words not understood
g) Use vocabulary from other content areas
The student will build oral communication skills
a) Express ideas in complete sentences and express needs through direct requests
b) Begin to initiate conversations.
c) Begin to follow implicit rules for conversation, including taking turns and staying on topic
d) Listen and speak in informal conversations with peers and adults
e) Participate in group and partner discussions about various texts and topics
f) Begin to use voice level, phrasing, and intonation appropriate for various language situations
g) Follow one- and two-step directions
h) Begin to ask how and why questions
The student will understand how print is organized and read.
a) Hold print materials in the correct position
b) Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book
c) Distinguish between print and pictures
d) Follow words from left to right and from top to bottom on a printed page
e) Match voice with print (concept of word)
The student will demonstrate an understanding that print conveys meaning
a) Identify common signs and logos
b) Explain that printed materials provide information
c) Read and explain own writings and drawings
d) Read his/hear name and read fifteen meaningful, concrete words
The student will expand vocabulary
a) Discuss meanings of words
b) Develop vocabulary by listening to a variety of texts read aloud
The student will demonstrate comprehension of fictional texts
a) Identify what an author does and what an illustrator does
b) Relate previous experiences to what is read
c) Use pictures to make predictions
d) Begin to ask and answer questions about what is read
e) Use story language in discussions and retellings
f) Retell familiar stories, using beginning, middle, and end
g) Discuss characters, setting and events

MATERIALS NEEDED
What Do You Do With A Problem? Book (Provided by Michelle)
Markers (Provided by Mrs. Brunk)
Chart paper (Provided by Mrs. Brunk)
Worksheet (Provided by Mrs. Brunk)
Color boxes (Provided by Mrs. Brunk)

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Michelle Ridder
Mrs. Jennifer Brunk
Kindergarten, River Bend Elementary School
Date of Presentation: Monday, September 26, 2016

PROCEDURE
PREPARATION OF THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
In preparation of this activity, I will make sure that I have different colored markers next to my seat
and chart paper taped to a board for after the book has been read to the class.

INTRODUCTION AND ORGANIZATION


To introduce this book to the students, I will begin by asking the students what a problem is, which
will activate their prior knowledge with problems and sets the stage for the book. After I have called
on a few students, I will ask if any of the students have had to go through a really big problem. I will
call on a few different students to answer the question. I will have the students look at the cover of the
book and ask the students if it looks like the little boy on the cover looks like he has a problem. After
that, I will point out and read the title, author and illustrator on the cover of the book.
IMPLEMENTATION
After introducing the book, I will begin to read the book. I will read the first page and ask the students
to identify the little boys problem for me. I will continue the discussion by asking what the little boys
problem could be. As I progress through the book, I will ask my students if they notice the problem
getting bigger as I turn the pages. When the little boy begins to build a device to tackle his problem, I
will ask my students to take guesses on what the boy may be building based on the pictures in the
book. The book then introduces the term opportunity which will lead me to ask my students if they
know what the word means. At the end of the story, I will say something about how the books
illustrations got brighter after the boy solved his problem and refer back to how there is always
something good that comes out of solving a problem.
I will then transition into the class problem plan activity. I will ask my students if they want to
create a plan to tackle problems like the boy did in the book. I will then ask my students to raise their
hands to share different ways they would tackle problems in the classroom. As they share their ideas, I
will write the idea on the chart paper and their name next to it so I know who participated in the
activity.
CLOSURE
When we finish writing down our ideas on how to solve problems in the classroom, I will then ask the
students to go back to their seats and draw their own version of a problem and them tackling it with
some of the ideas we had come up with as a class. These pages will then be kept in their writing
folders for future reference.
CLEAN-UP
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Michelle Ridder
Mrs. Jennifer Brunk
Kindergarten, River Bend Elementary School
Date of Presentation: Monday, September 26, 2016

To clean up, I will put all markers away that were used to write on the chart paper and clean up the rug
area. I will also help to make sure that all of the students color boxes are put back into their bins once
they have finished their drawings.
DIFFERENTIATION
If some students struggle with explaining in writing why they picked a specific idea to draw, I can
have them verbally tell me why they chose to draw that idea.
If there are a few students who did not participate in the group activity, I could ask them to think of a
different idea to draw about that wasnt mentioned already.
I could give the students a problem and ask them how they would solve it.
WHAT COULD GO WRONG WITH THIS LESSON AND WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT IT?
Icouldmessupawordwhilereadingduetonerves,inwhichcaseIwilljustcorrectmyselfandkeep
reading.
AstudentcouldinterruptmewhileIamreadingbypointingoutafunnyobjectononeofthepages,
andIwillacknowledgeitandtieitintothetheme,dependingontheobjectthatispointedout.
Astudentcouldgetdistractedorcauseasceneinthemiddleofmyreadaloud,inwhichcaseIwill
askthatstudenttoeitherparticipateorasktheteachertohelpdissolvetheissue.
Thestudentscouldloseinterest,inwhichcaseIwilljustdotheclassactivityandnotdothe
independentactivity,orviceversa.
Therecouldbeafiredrillduringmyreadaloud,inwhichcaseIwillbeginwhereIleftoffwhenwe
returntotheclassroom,timepermitting.

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Michelle Ridder
Mrs. Jennifer Brunk
Kindergarten, River Bend Elementary School
Date of Presentation: Monday, September 26, 2016

REFLECTION
Mylessonplanwentsurprisinglywell!Iwasveryproudathowwellthestudentsresponded
tomylessonandIwaspleasedwiththeresults.MycooperatingteacherandIhadnotdiscussedat
whattimeduringthedayIwouldbeconductingmylessonplan,soitcaughtmeoffguardwhenshe
askedmetodomyreadaloudfirstthinginthemorning.Ofcourse,asafutureteacher,wehaveto
learntobequickonourfeetandadaptablesoIhadnoproblemjumpinginfirstthing.Mystudents
werealittleconfused,buttheywentalongwithit.Theywereabletoanswerallofmyquestions
duringthebookanditwentverysmoothly.Ionlystumbledovermywordsonceortwice.IfIam
beinghonest,IwasntfullypreparedwhenIstartedbecauseIhadnotgottenmarkersormypaper
readyforafterthebookwasdonebeingread,soIwastedsometimefumblingforthoseitemsafter
readingthebook.Ifirstranovertogetthepaperandthencouldnotgetittostandupcorrectly,soI
woundupsittingonthefloorwithmystudentstowriteourproblemplan.Then,themarkerIhad
chosendidnotwork,andmycooperatingteacherbegantonoticemystruggleandpanicsoshe
broughtmeoverafreshpackofmarkerstouse.Ihadntthoughtmyproblemplanideaalltheway
through.InoticedasIwascallingonstudentstogivemeideasonhowtosolveproblems,their
ideaswereallovertheplace.Theywereallreallygoodideas,buttheywerenotalldealingwiththe
sameproblem(referencethephotooftheproblemplan).IfIweretoimplementthislessonagain,I
wouldprobablygivethestudentsaproblemtheymightencounterandaskfordifferentwaysof
solvingtheproblem.Ithinkthatwouldnarrowdownmyresultsalittlebit.Thatwasmybiggest
hiccupduringthelesson.Afterwehadfinishedtheplan,Ihadthestudentsgobacktotheirseats
anddrawmeaproblemthattheyhavehadtosolveandhowtheysolvedtheproblem.Thisworked
reallywell!Notonlywerestudentscomingupwithreallygoodproblemsthatneededtobesolved,
butIfoundmanyofthemcrowdingaroundtheplanwehadmadetoknowhowtospellsomeofthe
wordsbecausetheyhadusedoneofourproblemplanideasItheirdrawing.
IlovedinteractingwiththestudentsduringmylessonandIthinkithelpedmetobetter
understandthemintheclassroom.Iwasabletopickuponwhowaspayingattentionandwho
neededsomeextrahelp.ItwasagreatexperienceandIwouldconsideritasuccessformyfirst
lessonplanandimplementationintheclassroom.

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Michelle Ridder
Mrs. Jennifer Brunk
Kindergarten, River Bend Elementary School
Date of Presentation: Monday, September 26, 2016

DATACOLLECTION
Problem Plan Activity

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Michelle Ridder
Mrs. Jennifer Brunk
Kindergarten, River Bend Elementary School
Date of Presentation: Monday, September 26, 2016

**NOTE: The papers that the students drew pictures on will be submitted via hard copy, but they
are useful in the data section when looking at this lesson plan.

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