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Learning Experience Plan Day 1

Subject: Global History


Grade level: 9th Grade
Unit: Global Interactions, ca. 1400-1750
Length of LEP (days/periods/minutes): 3 Days
Topic: The Ottoman Empire and the Ming Dynasty
Content Standards: Standard 9.7b- The dominant belief systems and the ethnic and

religious compositions of the Ottoman Empire and the Ming Dynasty affected their
social, political, and economic structures and organizations.
Literacy Standards:
Learning Experience Outcomes
(knowledge/skills)

Students will:
1. Students will complete an entrance ticket in
order to get their minds thinking of far away
places, not just limiting them to the Ottoman
Empire.
2. Students will observe a map of the Ottoman
Empire, covering the years 1300 to 1566 in
order to visualize the growth and changes that
occurred in the Ottoman Empire over a period
of ~250 years.
3. Students will complete The Rise of the
Ottoman Empire in order to chronologically
organize the events, and growth of the
Ottoman Empire.

Learning Experience Assessments


1. Entrance Ticket
2. The Rise of the Ottoman Empire
3. Tools for Empire Building
4. Map of the Ottoman Empire (1300-1566)

Differentiation (What will you do to meet the needs of students at these different levels?)
Approaching
On-level
Beyond
Curriculum Integration
Materials
Worksheet
for
students.
Powerpoin
t following
worksheet
.

Procedures/Strategies
Day 1 (add additional days as needed)
Sponge Activity (activity that will be done as students enter the room to get them into the mindset of the
concept to be learned)
As the students walk in, an entrance ticket will be located at each desk. The entrance
ticket asked students the following: Before the internet and television, if you wanted
to learn about a far away place to which you could not travel, how could you find out
what this place was like? The goal of this activity is to get students in the mind set of
thinking about a land they may seem far away and foreign to them. They may not
know anything about the Ottoman Empire specifically, but the entrance ticket will get
them in the mindset of thinker further than they may be used to.
Anticipatory Set (focus question/s that will be used to get students thinking about the days lesson)
Following the completion of the entrance ticket, students will discuss with their
tablemates their responses. Then, each table will share with the class what they
noted and the responses will be recorded on the board.

Activating Prior Knowledge (what information will be shared with/among students to connect to prior
knowledge/experience)
The entrance ticket will activate prior knowledge because it asks students what they
already know, in regards to how someone would know about a far away place before
the invention of the internet or television.
Direct Instruction (input, modeling, check for understanding)
Following the entrance ticket, the teacher will lead discussion on the worksheet The
Rise of the Ottoman Empire. The teacher will call on students to read the passage,
another student to read the question, and another student to answer the question.
The Rise of the Ottoman Empire activates prior knowledge by asking questions
regarding the Crusades, and gives a good introduction regarding how the Ottoman
Empire was able to grow through the year 1555. Students will turn in the worksheet at
the end of the lesson in order to receive full or partial credit.
Guided Practice (how students will demonstrate their grasp of new learning)
Students will be responsible for reading allowed the questions proposed in The Rise
of the Ottoman Empire and answering them aloud for the class.
Independent Practice (what students will do to reinforce learning of the lesson)
For homework students will complete Tools for Empire Building.
Closure (action/statement by teacher designed to bring lesson presentation to an appropriate close)
At the end of the class, students will examine 6 maps depicting the Ottoman Empire
from the year 1300 to 1566. As a class, students will discuss the 2 questions listed at
the bottom of the map worksheet: 1. How did the geographic extent of the Ottoman
Empire change over time? and 2. At the height of its power, the Ottoman Empire
under Suleiman (1520-1566) controlled large territory in three continents: _________,
___________, and ___________.
References: (e.g. Book, course packet, pg #, complete web address URL)
http://globalhistory.newvisions.org/units-curriculum-home/2015-16-9th-curriculum/09-03

The Rise of the Ottoman Empire


The OTTOMANS were a Muslim Turkish-speaking nomadic people who
migrated from Central Asia in northwestern Asia Minor. They quickly
conquered other societies and expanded their empire.

1096-1290s:

The Crusades were fought


between Muslims and Christians.
Using your prior knowledge, what sparked
the Crusades?

How did the Crusades affect the relationship


between Christians and Muslims?
The Battle of Ager Sanguinis,
medieval miniature

1326:

A leader named Osman and his Turkish


warriors (Ottomans) took over areas of Asia
Minor and the Balkan Peninsula in Eastern Europe
near the Byzantine Empire.
How might Christian leaders of the Byzantine
Empire feel about the Muslim Ottomans
taking over territory so close to the
Byzantine Empire? Explain.

1453:

Under the leader, Mehmet II, the


Ottomans continue to expand and capture the
capital
of
the
Byzantine
Empire,
Constantinople. Constantinople was renamed
Istanbul and became the new capital of the
Ottoman Empire. Hagia Sophia, a church, was
turned into a mosque.
Mehmet II is said to have ridden into
Constantinople on a white horse. After a 54 days
and using a 27-foot cannon hauled by oxen and
an advanced army with muskets [guns],
Constantinople fell to the Ottomans.

Sultan Mehmed II's entry into


Constantinople, painting by Fausto
Zonaro (1854-1929)

What message did the conquest of the


Byzantine Empire send to the rest of Europe?

Why did the Ottomans convert the Hagia


Sophia into a mosque?

Why was this conquest a turning point in


global history?

Source: Farah and Karls, World History, The Human Experience, Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
(adapted) from the NYS Global History and Geography Regents Examination, August 2007.

1520-1566:

The Ottoman Empire What are common


characteristics of golden ages?
had a golden age under the sultan
named Suleiman. The Ottomans
called Suleiman The Lawgiver and
Europeans
called
him
The
Magnificent.
Suleiman also developed laws and
enforced the Islamic law of sharia. How did Suleiman rule his
Suleiman
had
several government?
accomplishments:
Took on bold military campaigns that
increased
the
amount
of
territory
controlled by the Ottoman
Increased naval strength allowed them to
conquer parts of North Africa
Oversaw
achievements
of
Ottoman What were some of Suleimans
civilization in the fields of law, literature, achievements?
art, and architecture
Built strong fortresses to defend his
territories
Adorned and modernized the cities of the
Islamic world (including Mecca, Damascus,
and Baghdad) with mosques, bridges,
aqueducts, and other public works

1529:

Suleimans
army How might the siege of Vienna
affect how Europe viewed the
besieged Vienna. This sent fear Ottoman Empire?
throughout
Europe
because
Europe learned of the strength of
the Ottoman Empire. They were
unsuccessful
in
conquering
Vienna, but they continued to be
seen as a threatening empire
seeking to conquer Europe.

1555:

Ogier Ghiselin de
Busbecq was sent as an
ambassador to the Ottoman
Empire to negotiate a border
treaty between the Holy Roman
Emperor and Suleiman over a
disputed territory. During his time
in the Ottoman Empire, he wrote
The Turkish Letters. The Turkish
Letters provided insight on nonTurkish views of the Ottoman
Empire.

Evaluative Criteria for The Rise of the Ottoman Empire


Full Credit (3 points):
- Student completed the worksheets
- Student participated in class
- Read aloud and/ or
- Answered a question and/ or
- Proposed a question
- Student was clearly following along in class
- Was not sleeping and
- Was not talking to friends and
- Was not working on something else
Partial Credit (1 point):
- Student did not complete the worksheet or only completed part of
the worksheet
- Student did not participate in class
- Did not read aloud or
- Did not answer a question or
- Did not propose a question
- Student was not following along in class
- Was sleeping or
- Was talking to friends or
- Was working on something else

Entrance Ticket: Before the internet and television, if you


wanted to learn about a far away place to which you could
not travel, how could you find out what this place was like?
Provide 2-3 examples.

Entrance Ticket: Before the internet and television, if you


wanted to learn about a far away place to which you could
not travel, how could you find out what this place was like?
Provide 2-3 examples.

Evaluative Criteria for Entrance Ticket


Full Credit (3 points):
- Student completes the entrance ticket.
- Student gives 2-3 examples, or even more.
- The students responses are appropriate, and relate to the prompt.
Partial Credit (1.5 points):
- Student does completes entrance ticket partially.
- Student does not give a minimum of 2 examples.
- The students responses are not appropriate, or does not relate to
the prompt.
No Credit (0 points):
- Student does not complete the entrance ticket.
- Student gives no examples to answer the question.
- The student gives no response and does not relate
anything to the prompt.

Tools for Empire Building:


How did the Ottoman Empire successfully hold
such a diverse empire together? How did they
maintain Muslim influence?

The Ottomans ruled a vast area that included many diverse peoples with many
religions. Nevertheless, the Ottomans held their empire together successfully for
hundreds of years, thus making Islam the dominant cultural force throughout the
region.
Non-Muslims in the Ottoman Empire were organized into religious communities
called millets. Each millet was allowed to maintain its own religious traditions and
educate its people as long as it obeyed Ottoman law.
Ottoman leaders furthered Muslim influence by recruiting military and government
officers from conquered groups. Some Christian families in the Balkans were required
to turn their young sons over to the government. The boys were raised as Muslims
and trained for service [in the Ottoman bureaucracy]. The best soldiers became
janissaries, the elite shock troops in the Ottoman army.
Source: Adapted & Excerpted from Goldberg/Dupre, 2012 Prentice Hall Brief Review: Global
History & Geography, pg 118.

1. According to the document above, what are millets?


_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
a. How did these millets help the Ottoman Empire hold their diverse empire together?
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
b. If you were a non-Muslim in the Ottoman Empire, would you like or dislike the
millets? Explain.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_______
2. According to the document above, what are janissaries?
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________

_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
a. How did the janissaries help the Ottoman Empire maintain Muslim influence?
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
b. If you were a non-Muslim in the Ottoman Empire, would you like or dislike the
janissaries system? Explain.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
________

Evaluative Criteria for Tools for Empire Building

Full Credit (3 points):


- Student completes all questions answered to the best of their ability
- Answers are relevant to the text and
- Relate back to the text
- Worksheet is turned in on time (the following day)
- Worksheet was completed individually
Partial Credit (1.5 points):
- Student does not complete all questions to the best of their ability or
only complete some of the questions
- Answers are not relevant to the text or
- Answers do not relate back to the text
- Worksheet is not turned in on time
- Worksheet was completed with a partner or was plagiarized
No Credit (0 points):
- Student does not complete any questions and clearly shows they
did not do the reading
- Student copied homework from another student and did not
complete on their own

How did the geographic extent of the Ottoman Empire change over time?

At the height of its power, the Ottoman Empire under Suleiman (15201566) controlled large territory in three continents:
____________________________, _______________________________ and

___________________________________.
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottoman_Greece#/media/File:Territorial_changes_of_the_Ottoman_Empire_
1566.jpg