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Table of Contents

1. Background of Civil Engineering ......................................................................................... 1


2. Rationale of the Civil Engineering Program ........................................................................ 2
3. Program Objective .............................................................................................................. 5
4. Professional Profile ............................................................................................................. 6
5. Graduate Profile ................................................................................................................ 10
6. Module Competencies ...................................................................................................... 11
7. ProgramDEPARTMENT
Requirement ......................................................................................................
16
OF CIVIL ENGINEERING
7.1. Admission Requirement ........................................................................................... 16

NATIONALLY HARMONIZED
CURRICULUM
7.3. Grading
.........................................................................................................
18
StudySystem
Program
for the Degree of Bachelor of Science
7.2. Graduation Requirement .......................................................................................... 18

(B.Sc.)
in Civil Engineering
7.4. Degree
Nomenclature
.............................................................................................. 18
8. Teaching Learning Method ............................................................................................... 19
8.1. Method of Teaching.................................................................................................. 19
8.2. Attendance Policy ..................................................................................................... 19
8.3. Assessment ............................................................................................................... 19
9. Module Selection and Sequence ...................................................................................... 20
9.1. Coding of Modules and Courses ............................................................................... 20
9.1.1. Module Coding ................................................................................................ 20
9.1.2. Course Coding ................................................................................................. 20
9.2. Module Details .......................................................................................................... 20
10. Quality Assurance............................................................................................................. 21
Appendix A
Module Handbook.................................................................................................................. 22

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia


7/20/2013

iii

1. Background of Civil Engineering


Infrastructure is the thing that supports our daily life-access to drinking water and shelter
from the weather, roads and harbors, railways and airports, hospitals, sports stadiums and
schools. Infrastructure adds to our quality of life, and because it works, we take it for
granted. Only when parts of it fail, or are taken away, do we realize its value. Civil engineers
worldwide endeavor to overcome the challenges of creating and maintaining infrastructure
for today, and for future generations.

Civil Engineering as defined by the London based Institute of Civil Engineers (ICE) is a great
art, on which the wealth and well-being of the whole of society depends. Its essential
feature, as distinct from science and the arts, is the exercise of imagination to fashion the
products, processes and people needed to create a sustainable physical and natural built
environment. It requires a broad understanding of scientific principles, knowledge of
materials and the art of analysis and synthesis. It also requires research, team working,
leadership and business skills. A Civil Engineer is someone who practices all or part of this
art.

Civil Engineering concerns the study of conception, design, construction and maintenance
of large public and private projects. Civil engineers build and maintain bridges, highways,
railways, tunnels, airports, dams, water treatment and distribution systems and large
buildings, along with many other structures. Environmental considerations, such as water
supply, pollution control and preservation of soil quality, are also a part of the course of
study. With thorough knowledge of both the principles of construction and the possible
environmental consequences of a structure, the Civil engineer's expertise is one that is
essential to our present Civilization and one that will become ever more valuable in the
future.

In a developing country like Ethiopia, Civil Engineering has great role and contribution to the
economic development and improvement of the living standard of the people. As
infrastructure developments are indicators of improved livelihood and ways of investment
attractions and tourism, contribution of Civil Engineering in this regard is very crucial.
Therefore, this area of study by which many Ethiopians would be produced to serve our
country must have clear focus areas that enable speeded up and sustainable achievements
in improving the countrys infrastructure facilities.

2. Rationale of the Civil Engineering Program


Civil Engineers are Leaders in the conception, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of the
Infrastructure on which the society depends. Civil engineers build and maintain bridges,
highways, railways, tunnels, airports, dams, water treatment and distribution systems and
large buildings, along with many other structures. Civil engineers work on environmental
projects, such as ecological restoration, waste containment, and soil remediation sites or
design of a safe and efficient transportation system. With thorough knowledge of both the
principles of construction and the possible environmental consequences of a structure, the
Civil engineer's expertise is one that is essential to our present Civilization and one that will
become ever more valuable in the future.

The biggest challenge for the Development of Africa in general and Ethiopia in specific is the
lack of sufficient infrastructures which inhibit further growth & development. And as part of
the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), all African nations including Ethiopia are
investing large sum of budget on building infrastructures.

In the Growth and Transformation Plan, Ethiopias development efforts will be pursued
through seven strategic pillars. The GTP sees rapid growth as key to achieving the
ambitious targets in employment and poverty eradication. Investment in growth-oriented
sectors will be expanded. The contribution of Civil Engineering Graduates is immense to
accomplish the GTP pillars. As indicated below;

Growth and Transformation Plan Pillars


1.

Sustain rapid and equitable economic growth


In a developing country like Ethiopia, Civil Engineering has great role and
contribution to the economic development and improvement of the living
standard of the people.
Infrastructure developments are indicators of improved livelihood and ways
of investment attractions and tourism, contribution of Civil Engineering in
this regard is very crucial.
Enable speeded up and sustainable achievements in improving the countrys
infrastructure facilities.

2. Preserve agriculture as a major source of economic growth;


Construction of road network connecting different Regions, Zones, Woredas
and kebeles so as to help the farmers bring agricultural products to the
nearby market.

3. Create favorable conditions for industry to play a key role in the economy;
Building roads, water supply and sewer system, power supply creating
favorable condition for establishment of Industry zones.
Building main roads, railways, runways that connect Ethiopia with the
international market and promote export of Industries.
Constructing the Industrial and related Buildings.

4. Infrastructure development;
Civil Engineers design and build Ethiopia's infrastructures such as rail ways,
highways, runways, bridges, water supply, irrigation and power dams,
treatment plants, different purpose buildings etc
Clients include private industries, municipal government, regional and
federal government agencies, and multinational conglomerates.
At the local level, Civil Engineers help communities plan for future
development by designing and building residential areas, business centers,
commercial districts, industrial parks, sports c
Complexes and high-tech manufacturing facilities. Working on multidisciplinary projects that touch upon the lives of the general public is one of
the distinguishing characteristics of a career in Civil Engineering.

5. Expand provision and quality of social services;


Build water supply system bringing closer water supply to society
Build Sewerage systems in urban areas.
Build health centers, Educational buildings, and other government offices
6. Build public institutional capacities and deepen good governance; and
Currently government is investing a large amount of its budget on
infrastructures. Hence the construction industry needs to be efficient and
transparent. Ethical Civil Engineering graduates contribute towards good
governance of Ethiopia.
7. Promote women, ensure youth empowerment and broaden social inclusion.
Build the capacity of Women by Building Infrastructures and increasing the
accessibility of women to public services.
Creating job opportunity for women thereby they can contribute towards

GTP.
The Civil Engineering department aims to produce professionals equipped with relevant
knowledge, skills and attitude that would contribute to the development of the country.
Therefore, this is profession by which many Ethiopians would be produced to serve the
country.

Specific Rationale for the Harmonized Modular Curricula

The concern on competence and competence based education has been advocated
more widely in the 21st century than ever before. Quality education, education
relevance and international competition are among the typical features of the
century that are challenging the educational institutions and their curricula.

In view of that, the higher education sector has been internationalized; hence,
institutions and disciplines are expected to compete on a global level.

Creating strong link between professional practice, institutional design, program


curriculum and implementation are the key attempts that institutions are striving as
part of the response. This, in turn, implies that the move towards competency based
education is very essential for curriculum organization and, students centered
learning-teaching strategy is a must for classroom instruction.

The purpose of national harmonization is to:

Avoid confusion of graduates and the job market

Make degrees comparable and readable

Increase international competitiveness

Share resources of all types

Improve the relationship among stakeholders

leverage national economy through human capital

Serve the purpose of National Qualification Framework (NQF)

Therefore, courses are clustered in to different module having identified competencies.


There are a total of 24 modules with total 307 EtCTS credit point in the program.

3. Program Objective
This program is aimed at training manpower required for the realization of the countrys
untouched Civil Engineering works. Well qualified Civil engineers with adequate knowledge
in the area of structural, highway, geotechnical and water resources and who can be
actively engaged in the planning, development and management of Civil Engineering
projects will be produced through this program. Specifically, the trainees will be equipped
with the knowledge that enables them to execute the following tasks:

Undertake project identification, pre-feasibility and feasibility study and detail


design of Civil Engineering works.
Prepare complete contract documents and terms of references for Civil Engineering

projects
Plan, manage, monitor and evaluate the operation and maintenance of Civil
Engineering works.
Remodeling and rehabilitation of existing Civil Engineering works.

Generally, graduates of the program will


Be knowledgeable of the historical context, the state-of-the-art, and emerging issues
in the field of Civil Engineering and its role in contemporary society;
Demonstrate critical reasoning and requisite quantitative skills to identify,

formulate, and resolve Civil Engineering problems, and to create designs that reflect
economic, environmental, and social sensitivities;
Display a systems viewpoint, critical thinking, effective communication and
interpersonal skills, a spirit of curiosity, and conduct reflecting a professional and
ethical manner;
Exhibit a commitment to lifelong learning and professional development,
involvement in professional activity and public service, and achievement of
professional licensure;
Reflect a broad intellectual training for success in multidisciplinary professional
practice, in Civil Engineering or diverse related careers, and toward achieving
leadership roles in industry, government, and academia.

4. Professional Profiles
1. In General
Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and Engineering.
Ability to design, construct, and supervise different Civil Engineering works, as well
as to analyze and interpret data.
Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
Ability to identify, formulates, analyze and solve Engineering problems.
Understand professional and ethical responsibility.
Ability to communicate effectively.
Knowledge of up to date issues.
Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern Engineering tools necessary for
Engineering practice.
Understanding and working knowledge of safety and environmental aspects of Civil
Engineering practices.
Able to develop effective planning systems and project management to improve
productivity.
Be able to conduct experiments, basic and applied research in relation to
construction industries to solve various organizational and social problems.
Ability to teach the fundamentals of Civil Engineering courses
Keep abreast of new technologies in Civil Engineering and provide orientation
and/or training to subordinates as required.
2. In particular
A. Consultancy of New Construction Proposals
Undertaking Project identification, feasibility Study, Location, Cost Estimation,
Bank loan, Interest
Prepare and administer of Term of Reference of Projects.
Prepare and administer design bid documents.
B. Contract Administration
Review and approve contractors program, method and schedule using schedule
software, Primavera MS Project.
Supervise projects to ensure that drawings, specifications, materials and
workmanship are as specified in the contract.
Check and approve measurement of work executed.
Administer claims and disputes.
Issue Engineering instruction and variation order, check and approve variation
order.
Conduct provisional and final acceptance.


Conduct
studies on cost of construction, materials, labor, equipment and
productivity.
Manage construction activities and available resources including planning,
scheduling, controlling and reporting.
Supervise technicians and technologists.
Plan and organize the maintenance and repair of existing Civil Engineering
construction works.
C. Analysis and Design
Review and approve designs.
Develop design standards, design aids, guidelines and hand books.
Consult with architects and specialized design engineers to integrate design in
terms of aesthetic and technical requirements.
I. Structural Analysis and Design Activities:
Pre design study
Project program development
Topographic survey
Scheme Analysis and design
Preliminary Analysis and design
Final Analysis and design using software ETABS, Sap.
Preparation of bill of quantities and specifications using Excel sheet.
Cost estimation
II. Water Works Analysis and Design Activity:
Pre feasibility and feasibility study
Water supply scheme for urban and rural areas
Sewerage and sanitation facilities
Storm water drainage and flood mitigation schemes
Dams and other hydraulic structures
Hydropower development
Irrigation and related Infrastructure
Solid waste management
Environmental protection works
Water resource development and management
Use software, GIS, water CAD.
D. Transportation Facilities Design:
Feasibility studies
Photogram metric and desktop study
Soil and material investigation
Environmental impact assessment

Traffic count and axle load study


Detailed geometric design
Pavement design
Preparation of bill of quantities and Engineering cost estimate
Provisional and final acceptance
Railway route design
Design of airfields
Bridge design
Use Software, Sap, Eagle Point, Ealroads.

E. Material Testing

Project site exploration


Identification and classification of material in the field
Conducting field tests
Laboratory tests on soils, rocks and construction materials

F. Construction Supervision

Deciding method of construction


Devising temporary works
Selecting appropriate equipment
Manage construction activities and available resources including planning,
scheduling, cost estimating, controlling and reporting.

Principles of Professionalism
Society has high expectations of construction technologists. The services they provide
requires commitment, confidence, consideration of others, a sense of fairness, honesty,
integrity, intuition, sound judgement, sensitivity, thoughtfulness, thoroughness and
impartiality. They are also expected to be dedicated to the protection of public health,
safety, welfare and environment.

Ethics and Conduct


The Ethiopian Association of Civil Engineers (EACE) has adopted a standard Code of Ethics
based on international experience to enable construction technologists adhere and
preserve the highest principles of ethical conduct on behalf of the profession.

Fundamental Principles
Engineers uphold and advance the integrity, honor and dignity of the Engineering
profession by:
Using their knowledge and skill for the enhancement of human welfare and the
environment.
Being honest and impartial and serving with fidelity the public, their employers and

clients.
Striving to increase the competence and prestige of the profession and
Supporting the professional and technical societies of other disciplines

Fundamental Canons
1.

2.
3.
4.

5.
6.

Engineers shall hold paramount the safety, health and welfare of the public and shall
strive to comply with the principles of sustainable development3 in the performance
of their professional duties.
Engineers shall perform services only in areas of their competence.
Engineers shall issue public statements only in an objective and truthful manner.
Engineers shall act in professional matters for each employer or client as faithful
agents or trustees, and shall avoid conflicts of interest.
Engineers shall build their professional reputation on the merit of their services and
shall not compete unfairly with others.
Engineers shall act in such a manner as to uphold and enhance the honor, integrity,
and dignity of the Engineering profession.
Engineers shall continue their professional development throughout their careers,
and shall provide opportunities for the professional development of those engineers
under their supervision.

7.

5. Graduate Profiles (Competencies)


The developed professional profile clearly indicates that Civil engineers need a good grasp
of mathematics and design, and the ability to manage and liaise with a wide variety of
people. They need to be able to think in all dimensions and communicate ideas effectively.
This kind of Engineering is suited to people who are practical with a creative characteristic.
Hence, the graduate from the Civil Engineering Department has the following profile:

The Graduate will have


a.
b.

c.

d.
e.
f.

g.

h.

i.
j.

An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science in a specialized area related


to Civil Engineering
An ability to design and conduct laboratory experiments, to critically analyze and
interpret data, in major Civil Engineering areas, Structures, Transportation, Water
resources, and Environmental.
An ability to Analysis and design a system, component, or process to meet desired
needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political,
ethical, health and safety, constructability, and sustainability, in selected major
Civil Engineering area, such as Structures, Transportation, Water Resources, or
Environmental.
An ability to function in multidisciplinary teams,
An ability to communicate effectively, orally and in writing..
An ability to identify, formulates, and solves Civil Engineering problems in a
minimum of four recognized major Civil Engineering areas.
An understanding of professional and Ethical responsibilities of Civil engineers in
relation to public and private institutions and in the context of Civil Engineering
infrastructure systems.
Recognize of the need for professional licensure and life-long learning. A broad
education necessary to understand the impact of Engineering solutions in a global,
economic, environmental, and societal context.
Knowledge of contemporary issues.
An ability to use the Techniques, skills, modern Engineering Tools and software
necessary in selectedmajor Civil Engineering area, such as Structures,
Transportation, Water Resources, or Environmental.
An understanding of professional practice issues such as project management and
interactions between the development, design, and construction professions.
An understanding of business and public policy and administration fundamentals.
An understanding of the role of the leader and leadership principles and attitudes.

k.
l.
m.

10

6. Modules Competencies
A. List of competency areas
The competency areas in Civil Engineering program are very critical in analyzing the
students capabilities in that area. This helps potential employers to identify graduates
potential and assign them to required jobs. List of competence areas in undergraduate
regular Civil Engineering program are categorized under the focus areas

1. Competency areas in Communication and Social Studies


a. Humanities & Social Studies
i. Improve normative interaction with engineers and other
professionals; and develop awareness of professional ethics
ii. Develop the skills required to construct sound arguments and
critically evaluate the arguments of others.
iii. Develop civic skills such as accurate decision making, expression of
oneself clearly and logically, Conflict resolution etc.
iv. Develop graduate of good citizenship and with democratic thinking.
b. Communicative Skills
i. Participate effectively in group discussions and team assignments,
and oral and written communication.
ii. Express their ideas and present their projects successfully.
iii. Develop good communicative skills and good in preparation of
technical proposals and presentations.
2. Competency areas in General Science and Engineering
a. Basic Engineering Mechanics
i.apply basic principles of forces and equations of motions under static
and dynamic loading conditions
ii.develop appropriate mathematical models that represent physical
systems
b. Basic Engineering Mathematics
Model and analyze Engineering problems by applying concepts of
calculus and vector algebra.
c. Basic Engineering Skill
i.Prepare Engineering drawing manually.
ii.Able to make basic computer programming.
iii.Able to make informed decision in choice of Engineering discipline.
iv. Develop general workshop safety and practice skill.
d. Advanced Engineering mathematics and Numerical methods

11

i.
ii.

Apply appropriate advanced mathematical and numerical method to


analyze problems related to Civil Engineering.
be able to plan analyze and write computer programs for numerical
methods and basic Engineering applications

Apply
iii.concepts of probability and statistics to problem solving in
Engineering systems.
3. Competency areas in Construction Technology and Management
a. Building Engineering
i. Get basic knowledge on construction materials for Civil Engineering
infrastructures;
ii. Identify elements of building; and understand architectural drawings.
iii. Abel to prepare Drawings with computer aid focusing on Civil
Engineering infrastructures;

b. Construction Management
i. Develop skill on selecting appropriate construction technologies and
machineries.
ii. Perform economic analysis and evaluation of infrastructural projects.
iii. comprehends basic guideline and application of contract formulation
and administration; and planning and management techniques/tools
of construction projects
iv. Comprehend the principles of contract administration, bidding
theories, writing specifications, quantity surveying & BOQ, project
cost estimation and construction supervision.
4. Competency areas in Surveying

Surveying
i. Accurately measure distances and angles using high precision and upto-date surveying equipments.
ii. Perform quantity of general earth work based on available surveying
data.
iii. Analyze and interpret data independently and come up with contour
maps for a given plot
iv. Knowledge of mapping procedures and photogrammetric digitizing.

12

5. Competency areas in Structural Design


a. Fundamental Structural Engineering Theories
i. get basic knowledge on properties and strength of main construction
materials;
ii. can carry out basic structural frame analysis with various loading
conditions using different methods of structural analysis
b. Concrete Structure
i. comprehends structural mechanics of reinforced structure and apply
the knowledge in the design of basic RC structural elements
ii. analyze and dimension reinforced concrete structural members with
the use of Ethiopian and other Building Code Standards
iii. Master the principles of building execution for concrete and
reinforced concrete structural members.
iv. Ability to apply basic design procedures to reinforced concrete
structural members in a manner which ensures the safety and utility
of the structure.
v. Demonstrate ability to analyze and design typical reinforced concrete
beams, slabs, columns, and footings and develop an appreciation of
issues involved in reinforced concrete construction.
vi. solve dimensioning and design problems for ordinary building
construction
c. Design of Structures
i. Design lateral-load resisting system
ii. Carry out plastic analysis of steel and timber frames structures
iii. Design detailing and connections of steel and timber framed
structures
iv. Demonstrate familiarity with different types of bridges & selection,
bridge loadings, design of RCC bridges, and the use of Ethiopian
bridge design codes.
d. Advanced Structural Engineering
i. apply structural analysis and design methods for the design of
buildings and other infrastructures
ii. Apply Ethiopian Building Code Standards for lateral loading, Plastic
analysis of frames, Composite steel concrete structures, elastic
stability theory and detailing and connections in analysis and design
of building structures.
iii. Analyze and design of complex structural elements (shells /
continuous structures).

13

6. Competency areas in Geotechnical Engineering


a. Fundamental of Geotechnical Engineering
i. Understand and demonstrate the behavior of soil/rock and
geotechnical laboratory techniques.
ii. Estimate Engineering properties of soil; determine the bearing
capacity, lateral earth pressure and stability of slopes of soil.
b. Geotechnical Design
i. Analyze and design different types of shallow and deep foundations
using different technique.
ii. Design earth retaining structures, coffer dams and caissons.
iii. Understand & interpret the behavior of expansive soils and be able to
design foundations on expansive soils.
iv. Understand the environmental issues in geotechnical Engineering.

7. Competency areas in Road and Transport Engineering


a. Road and Transport Engineering
Understand transportation systems and demonstrate ability to plan, analyze, and design the
i. basic elements of an integrated surface transportation system for safe and efficient
movement.
Collect, Analyze and interpret traffic flow data.
Acquainted with the principles of pavement analysis and design and help them acquire
ii. basic knowledge and practical prospective of highway materials, construction practice and
iii. quality control.
Understand and apply the different geometric design control criteria, and be able to
evaluate and modify the condition of an existing highway system.
b. Advanced transport Engineering
i. Design and maintain Highways,
iv.
ii. Comprehend advanced topics on road construction, maintenance,
rehabilitation and pavement management.
iii. Analysis and elementary design of Rail ways
8. Competency areas in Environmental & Sanitary Engineering

Sanitary & Environmental Engineering


i. Comprehend the basic principles of planning, design and construction
of water supply and sewerage systems.

14

ii. comprehend the interaction between natural and human


environment and environmental design of infrastructure projects and
can apply this knowledge in the design of infrastructures
9. Competency areas in Water resource Engineering
a. Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics
i. Comprehends fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics and be able
to understand the basic laws of physical science which govern the
mechanics of fluid flow with hydraulic laboratory experiments
ii. understand the fundamental principles & assumptions involved in
pipe flow, flow through turbines and pumps, and dimensional analysis
& model studies
iii. Analyze hydrologic data, perform the hydrological evaluation of
watersheds for design purposes and perform hydrological design for a
variety of Civil Engineering projects.
iv. Understand the basic principle of flow through open-channels and
determine water surface profile of open channel.

b. Design of Hydraulic Structures & Irrigation


i. Analyze and design hydraulic structures such as dams, spillways, and
flood control structures.
ii. Understand the fundamental techniques used in the analysis and
design of hydraulic structures for water resources development
projects such as reservoirs, dams & appurtenant structures, diversion
weirs, river and watershed management schemes.
iii. Understand the fundamental theories of river morphology and be
able to design and analyze river erosion protection works, flood
protection structures, and silt exclusion devises.
iv. Understand the relationship between soil, water and plant,
optimization of water for irrigation and the design criteria for
irrigation structures.

c. Water Resource Engineering


i. Select appropriate site for hydropower development and design
hydropower systems
ii. Comprehend the construction, operation and maintenance aspect of
hydropower systems and infrastructure.
iii. Comprehend the water resources system and optimize available
water resource

15

iv. Examine the opportunities and challenges associated with the


planning, project formulation, sustainability; and environmental
impact assessment.
10. Design projects and internship
a. Integrated Civil Engineering Design
i. Perform a comprehensive design project using a team approach
requiring interaction with practitioners development of a team
project report and a formal presentation.
ii. Comprehend research methods: their use, analyses and applications;
and develop professional reports.
b. Industry Practice and Entrepreneurship
i. Integrate classroom learning with field experience
ii. Gain work experience in the students career field
iii. Develop foundation for workplace competencies
iv. Broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship development,
commercialization of technology based innovation in existing firms,
and the formation, development and growth of technology based
new enterprises.
c. BSc Thesis/ Project
i. Develop and demonstrates independent methodological abilities on
practical study, analysis and design of a relevant and practical Civil
Engineering project.

7. Program Requirements
7.1 Admission Requirements
Admissions to all regular undergraduate programs are processed through the Ministry of
Education (MoE) of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. This is currently true for all
public Universities across the whole nation. Admissions to the continuing education
program (CEP) are processed through the University registrar office based on the criteria set
by the University.

16

Admission to Regular Program:


a) Admission following Preparatory Education
Students who have successfully completed the 10 plus 2 years preparatory and have scored
the minimum cut-off point set by the Ministry of Education in the entrance exam could
apply for admission to the Civil Engineering Department.

In view of the high number of applicants, admission to the Department is rather


competitive at the moment.
b) Admission with Advance Standing
Depending on available spaces, diploma graduates from TVET (Technical Vocational
Education and Training) in the fields related to Civil Engineering will be admitted based on
grades on competitive basis.

c) Admission of International Students


Applicants with a minimum cut-off point and with high scores in Physics and Mathematics in
foreign countries examinations equivalent to the 10+2 preparatory program are also
eligible. The equivalence is determined by the department.

Admission to Continuing Education Program


The criteria set for admission to the regular program will be employed as the criteria for
admission to the continuing education program.
Candidates who are 10 + 3 diploma graduates from an Engineering School, TVET or similar
recognized college in the fields of Construction Technology, surveying technology, Drafting
Technology, and other related programs with a minimum cut-off point and having
certificate of competition/COC/ will be admitted based on space availability, and
competitive basis.

Limited numbers of junior staff such as technical assistants in relevant field may be
admitted each year based on non-competitive basis provided that he/she:

has served the University for a minimum of 2 consecutive years;


meet the minimum admission requirement set for the program;
obtain letter of recommendation from the business & development vice president;
Signs undertaking to serve the University after graduation, at least two years of
service for one complete year of study.

17

7.2Teaching-Learning
8.
Graduation Requirements
Methods
8.1student
A
Method
is of
required
Teaching:
to take courses that will bring the total credit point of 305 ECTS for
graduation with the Degrees of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. Student must take
and
pass all the
required courses to
requirement
for graduation.
A minimum
Presentation
of modules/Courses
is satisfy
throughthe
lectures,
tutorials,
self-study (project
works),
cumulative
grade
point
average
of
2.00
is
required
in
all
courses
taken.
In
addition,
a and
problem solving, class and group discussions, assignments, laboratory demonstrations
minimum exercises
grade point
average
of 2.00 and
is required
the core
coursesassessment
of the Program.
hands-on
as well
as quizzes
tests to in
insure
continuous
and Other
requirements arecantered
same asapproach.
those of the
University
graduation
requirements
student/learner
Module/
Course
specific teaching
methods will be
given for each course.

7.3 Grading System


8.2 Attendance Policy:
The Grading Scale and Letter Grade System is given in table below as per academic policy.
A student is required to attend all lecture, laboratory and practical sessions as well as field
work of Raw
courses,
except Letter
for courses in which
earning of credits
Mark
Grade
Statusthrough examination
Classalone is
accepted. Except for extenuating
circumstances,
students
are
required
to
maintain
a
Grades
Points
Description
Description
minimum of 80% attendance
to
earn
credit
in
the
given
course.
However
academic
A+
4.00
Excellent
Firstunits
class
100]
may not[90,
allow
the 20% non-attendance
provision
for
certain
portion
of
a
course,
such as
A
4.00
[85,or90)
laboratory
field experiences
judged academically
indispensable for the student.
A3.75
[80, 85)
B+
3.50
[75, 80)
B
3.00
Very Good
[70, 75)
B2.75
[65, 70)
C+
2.50
8.3 Assessment:
[60, 65)
Good
C
2.00
[50, 60)
Second class
C1.75
[45, 50)
Assignments,
report, end-of-semester examinations, dissertations,
projects, etc. with their
Satisfactory
D
1.00
[40,contribution
45)
percentage
to the final assessment is providedUnsatisfactory
in each course with a
Fx
0.00
Lower class
[30, 40)outline (which will be available
module/course
to students Very
before
the module begins).
Poor
F
0.00
<30
Fail
Continuous assessment accounts for a minimum of 50% and final exam (summative) 50%,
continuous assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.

7.4 Degree Nomenclature


Amharic: '' ''
English: Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering

18
19

9. Module Selection and Sequencing


In selecting and sequencing the courses in each module the following points were taken
into account.
The basis for clustering of courses is the Harmonized Civil Engineering BSc Program.
The clustered modules are presumed to be forerunners of the fully integrated modules
The descriptions and expected outcome and time budget of each course is to be
referred from the Harmonized BSc Civil Engineering curriculum.

9.1 Coding of Modules and Courses


9.1.1 Module Coding
Modules are coded by four letters taken from Civil Engineering (CEng appended by -M)
followed by four digits:
The first digit indicate the level of the module in terms of the year:
The middle two digits indicate the serial number of the module in the program 01,
02, 03, . . .
The last digit indicate for type of the module:
1 for core modules
2 for elective modules
3 for general modules

9.1.2 Course Coding


Courses are also coded by four letters taken from Civil Engineering (CEng) followed by
four digits:
The first digit indicates the level of the course in terms of the year:
The middle two digits indicate the serial number of the module in the program 01, 02, 03,.
The last digit indicate for serial number of the course in the module
9.2 Module Details
All modules offered in the program are described and detailed outline is given with
approximate allotted time.
The various entries for a given module description is as follows:
Title: The descriptive title of the module.
Module Category: It describes the type of the module with respect to the relevance
for the program.
Module Number
Module Code

20

Total study hour


Module Rational: Why the module is designed in the program.
Module Objective: What a student will be expected to have learned, as a result of
successful completion of a module.
Module Competency: Describes the skills and capabilities achieved by the student

after completion of the module.


Module mode of delivery
Module learning and teaching method
Module assessment technique
Total ECTS of the module
Credits: The breakdown of the credit in terms of Lecture, Tutorial or Laboratory
hours.

Quality Assurance mechanism


The quality aspect of this curriculum will be insured by both internal and external bodies.
The external bodies will include quality assurance auditors from the ministry of education
and different stakeholders, while the curriculum will be assured internally by the quality
assurance office of the university.

21

Appendix A
Module Handbook
LIST AND DISTRIBUTION OF PROGRAM
MODULES
22

List and distribution of Program modules


Course

Module

Year/Semester
234

1
No Category

Module
No

Module Name

CP Module Code

Course
No

Course Title

Communicative
Skill

10 GEng-M1013

1
2

Communicative Skill
Basic Writing Skill

Civics & Ethical


Education

5 GEng-M1023

Reasoning
Skill(Logic)

3 GEng-M1033

Basic Engineering
10 GEng-M1043
Mechanics

Basic Engineering
12 GEng-M1053
Mathematics

1
2
1
2
1

Basic Engineering
13 GEng-M1063
Skill

2
3
4

Advanced
Engineering
15 GEng-M2073
mathematics and
Numerical

Course Code Pre-requisite

Corequisite

CP

CH

EnLa1012

None
EnLa1011

5
5

3
3

Civics & Ethical


Education

CvEt1021

None

Reasoning Skill(Logic)

Phil1031

None

CEng1041

None

MEng1042

CEng1041

Math1051

None

Math1052

Math1051

MEng1061

None

GEng1062

None

CEng1063

None

Comp2064

None

Stat2071

None

Math2072

Math1052

EnLa1011

Engineering
Mechanics I
Engineering
Mechanics II
Applied Mathematics I
Applied Mathematics
II
Engineering Drawing
Introduction to
Engineering
profession
Workshop Practice
Computer
Programming
Probability and
Statistics
Applied Mathematics
III

23

II

II

II

5
I

II

I II

methods

Surveying

3
1
2
12 CEng-M1081
3
1

Building
Engineering

15 CEng-M2091

2
3

Numerical Methods
Surveying I
Surveying II
Surveying Field
Practice
Computer Aided
Drafting(CAD)
Construction Material
Building Construction
Fundamental of
Archtecture

10

12

Concrete
Structure

Design of
Structures

13

CEng2083

CEng2082

CEng2091

MEng1061

CEng2092
CEng3093

None
CEng2092

5
5

3
3

CEng3094

CEng2091 CEng3083

CEng1041
and
Math1051

CEng2103

CEng1101
CEng2102

5
5

3
3

CEng3111

CEng2103

CEng3112

CEng3111

CEng5121

CEng3112 &
CEng3154

CEng4122

CEng2103

CEng5123

CEng3112

CEng2151 &
CEng1101

None
CEng2131

3
5

3
3

CEng2082

Strength of Materials

CEng1101

2
3

Theory of Structures I
Theory of Structures II
Reinforced Concrete
Structures I
Reinforced Concrete
Structures II

CEng2102

1
10 CEng-M3111
2

Fundamental of
Bridge Design

Steel and Timber


Structures
Structural Design

14 CEng-M5121

2
Fundamental of
Geotechnical
Engineering

3
3
3

16 CEng-M1101

Core
11

5
5
5

CEng1081

4
Fundamental
Structural
Engineering
Theories

Comp2064
None
CEng1081

CEng2073

Soil Mechanics I

CEng2131

2
3

Engineering Geology
Soil Mechanics II

CEng2132

13 CEng-M2131
CEng3133

24

14

15

Geotechnical
Design

Engineering
Hydrology &
Hydraulics

Foundation
Engineering I

CEng3141

CEng3133 &
CEng3111

Foundation
Engineering II

CEng4142

CEng3141

Hydraulics I

CEng2151

Math1051
& CEng1041

Hydraulics II
Open Channel
Hydraulics
Engineering Hydrology

CEng2152

CEng2151

CEng3153

CEng2152

CEng3154

CEng2151

Hydraulic Structures I

CEng3161

CEng3133,
CEng3153 &
CEng3154

2
3

Hydraulic Structures II
Irrigation Engineering
Water Supply and
Urban Drainage
Water Treatment
Sewage Treatment
Transport Engineering

CEng4162
CEng5163

CEng3161
CEng4161

5
4

3
2

CEng3171

CEng3154

CEng4172

CEng3171
CEng3171
None

4
4
5

3
3
3

CEng3182

CEng2083
& CEng3181

CEng4183

CEng3182

CEng5191

None

CEng3192

EnLa1012

10 CEng-M3141

20 CEng-M2151

3
4

16

17

18

Design of
Hydraulic
Structures &
Irrigation

Sanitary &
Environmental
Engineering

Road and
Transport
Engineering

14 CEng-M3161

1
13 CEng-M3171

15 CEng-M3181

2
3
1

3
1
19

Integrated Civil
Engineering
Design

9 CEng-M3191
2

CEng4173
CEng3181

Highway Engineering I
Highway Engineering
II
Integrated Civil
Engineering Design
Technical report &
Research
methodology for
Engineers

25

20

Contract
Management

CEng5201

None

CEng5202

CEng3093

CEng5203

CEng2092

CEng5204

CEng5202

CEng5211

None

CEng4212

None

30

CEng3222

None

CEng5231

CEng2103

CEng5233

CEng3112

CEng5241

CEng4183

CEng5242

CEng3182

2
17 CEng-M5201
3
4

21

22

23

24

Elective

25

Industry Practice
and34 CEng-M4211
Entrepreneurship
Environmental
Engineering

1
2
5 CEng-M3221

10 CEng-M5232

Advanced
transport
Engineering

10 CEng-M5242

Water Resource
Engineering

27

Water Resource
Development

CEng5251

CEng2152 &
CEng3154

Hydro Power
Development

CEng5252

CEng4162

CEng5261

CEng3221 &
CEng2082

CEng5262

CEng3221

9 CEng-M5252

26

1
1

Advanced
Structural
Engineering

Advanced
Environmental
Engineering

10 CEng-M5261

Advanced
Geotechnical
Engineering

10 CEng-M5271

Engineering
Economics
Contract, specification
& Quantity Survey
Construction
Equipment
Construction
Management
Entrepreneurship for
Engineers
Internship
Environmental
Engineering
Theory of Structures
III
Reinforced Concrete
Structures III
Highway Engineering
III
Rail way Engineering

GIS & Environmental


Modelling
Environmental Impact
Assessment
Introduction to
seismology &
Earthquake
Engineering
Engineering
Properties of Tropical

CEng5271

CEng5272

26

CEng3133

Soils
1

Core

28

BSc Thesis/
Project
Total
Student load

12 CEng-M5281
346
307

BSC thesis

CEng5281

Total
Total

27

None

12

346 188
305

Mode of Delivery
Considering nature of courses and competency areas, the Parallel- application of one course in
other course and limitation of resources, the Mode of Delivery is basically semester based with
special block is possible for some courses.

Course Breakdown per Semester


Year I Semester I

Module
No

EtCTS

No

Course Name

Code

PreRequisite

CH

CP

02
01

1
2

Communicative skill
Civics and Ethical Education

EnLa1011
CvEt1021

None
None

3
3

5
5

05

Engineering Drawing

MEng1061

None

04
03

4
5

Applied Mathematics I
Engineering Mechanics I
Introduction to Engineering
profession

Math1051
CEng1041

None
None

GEng1062

None

05

6
Total

LP

Tu

HS

4
3

6
5

3
2

0
0

3
3

4
3

17

28

11

Year I Semester II

Module
No
No

Course Name

Code

EtCTS
PreRequisite

CH

CP

LP

Tu

HS

01

Reasoning Skill (Logic)

Phil1031

None

05

Workshop Practice

CEng1063

None

05

Math1052

Math1051 4

03

Applied Mathematics II
Engineering Mechanics
II
Strength of Materials

09

07

02

MEng1042 CEng1041

CEng1101

CEng1041

Surveying I

CEng1081

None

Basic writing Skill

EnLa1012

EnLa1011

52
1
32 3

Total

21

28

16

Module
No

Year II Semester I
No

06

Course Name

Code

Probability and
Statistics
Applied
Mathematics III

1
06
2
14
07
09

Pre-Requisite

Stat2071

None

Math2072

Math1052
Math1052 &
CEng1041
CEng1081

Hydraulics I

CEng2151

Surveying II
Theory of
Structures I
Computer
Programming
Total

CEng2082

5
05
6

EtCTS

CEng2102

CEng1101

Comp2064 None

CH

CP

LP

Tu

42
1
29 3

19

Module
07

(*)

Module
No

No
7

Course Name

Code

Surveying Field
Practice

CEng2083

PreRequisite
CEng2082

CH

CP

07 10

Course Name
Computer Aided
Drafting
Theory of Structures II
Numerical Method
Construction
Materials
Engineering Geology

Code

08

09
06

2
3

08

12

12

Soil Mechanics I

CEng2131

14

Hydraulics II

CEng2152

18

LP

TU

HS

Year II Semester II
No

Hs

EtCTS
PreRequisite

CH

CP

LP

TU

HS

CEng2091

MEng1061

CEng2103
CEng2073

CEng2102
Comp2064

3
3

5
5

2
2

0
2

3
2

3
2

CEng2092

None

CEng2132

None
CEng2151
&
CEng1101
CEng2151

3
21

5221
33 14 16 6

Total
29

3
18

(*) The course will be given at inter-semester break.


Year III Semester I

Module
No
No
14
08

1
2

08

12

14
17
10

Module
No

5
6

Course Name

EtCTS

Pre-

Code
CH CP
Requisite
Engineering Hydrology CEng3154 CEng2152 35
Building Construction CEng3093 CEng2092 35
Fundamentals of
CEng3094 CEng2091 23
Architecture
Soil Mechanics IICEng3133 CEng2131 35
Open Chanel
CEng3153 CEng2152
Hydraulics35
Transport Engineering CEng3181 None35
Reinforced Concrete
CEng3111 CEng2103
Structures I35
Total20 33

LP

Course Name

Code

HS

2
2

0
0

3
3

3
3

2
2

0
0

3
3

3
3

20
13 6

15

Year III Semester II


No

Tu

20

EtCTS
PreRequisite

CH

CP

LP

Tu

HS

16

Water Supply & Urban


Drainage

CEng3171

CEng3154

17

Highway Engineering I

CEng3182

CEng2083
3
& CEng3181

10

CEng3112

CEng3111

18

CEng3192

EnLa1012

13

Foundation Engineering I

CEng3141

15

Hydraulic structures I

CEng3161

16

Environmental
Engineering

CEng3221

Reinforced Concrete
Structures II
Technical Report Writing
& Research Methodology

30

CEng3133 &
3
CEng3111
CEng3133,
CEng3153 & 3
CEng3154
None

Total
Module
No

19

No

Course Name

PreCode
Requisite
CEng4173 CEng3171
CEng4142 CEng3141
CEng4183 CEng3182

Sewage Treatment
Foundation Engineering II
Highway Engineering II

15

CEng4162 CEng3161

18

Hydraulic Structures II
Steel and Timber
Structures

16

Water Treatment

CEng4172 CEng3171

CEng4122 CEng2103

Total

CH

CP

LP

Tu

Course Name
Internship

Code

31

HS

4
5
5

2
2
2

1
0
1

2
3
3

3
3
3

18

28

10 8

14

19

EtCTS
PreRequisite

CEng4212 None
Total

21

3
3
3

Year IV Semester II
No

19
EtCTS

1
2
3

20

14 0

Year IV Semester I

16
13
17

Module
No

32

CH

CP

30

30

LP

Tu

HS

Year V Semester I

Modu
le No No

Course Name

EtCTS
PreRequisite

Code

CH

CP

LP

Tu

H
S

19

Engineering Economics

CEng5201

None

15

Irrigation Engineering

CEng5163

CEng4161

11

Structural Design

CEng5123

CEng3112

11

CEng5121

CEng3112 &
CEng3154

4
4/5

18

2
2/3

18

CEng5191

None

19

CEng5202

None

18/19

32/33

10

12

3
1
9

Fundamental of Bridge
Design
Elective
Integrated Civil
Engineering Design
Contract Specification &
Quantity Survey
Total

Module
No

Year V Semester II
No

24

19

19

20

4
5

Course Name
BSC thesis

PreRequisite

Code
CEng5281

Construction
Management
Construction
Equipment
Entrepreneurship for
Engineers

EtCTS

None
CEng520
2
CEng209
2

CEng5204
CEng5203
CEng5211

None

Elective
Total

32

CH

CP

LP

Tu

HS

12

14

2/3

4/5

15/16

28/29 6

13

23

Elective

Module
No
No

Name

EtCTS

Code

PreRequisite

CEng5251

CEng2152 &
CEng3154

CH

CP

LP

Tu

HS

1. Water Resource Engineering Specialty


Water Recourse
1
Development

CEng5252 CEng4162

CEng5231 CEng2103

CEng5213 CEng3112

23
Hydropower
2
Development
2. Structural Engineering Specialty
Theory
1
of Structures III
21Reinforced Concrete
2
structures III
3. Transport Engineering Specialty

CEng5242 CEng3182
221Railway Engineering
2Highway Engineering III CEng5241 CEng4183
4. Advanced Environmental Engineering
GIS & Environmental
Modeling

CEng5262

0
0

3
3

3
3

CEng5271

1
Engineering Properties of
Tropical Soils

2
2

CEng3221

2
5. Advanced Geotechnical Engineering
Introduction to seismology
& Earthquake Engineering

5
5

CEng3221 &
CEng2082

CEng5261

1
Environmental Impact
Assessment

3
3

CEng5272

CEng3133

33

Module and Course Profiles

34

MODULE 01
COMMUNICATION SKILLS MODULE [10ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Name
Module Category
Module Number
Module Code
Total EtCTS of the Module
Total Study Hour
Module Objectives

Module Competencies

Module Mode of Delivery

Communicative Skills
General
02
EnLa-M1013
10
270
Civil Engineers need to be able to communicate ideas effectively. The
objective of this module is to equip students with written and oral skills
needed for their studies, and in their working life later on.
i. Participate effectively in group discussions and team assignments,
and oral and written communication.
ii. Express their ideas and present their projects successfully.
iii. Develop good communicative skills and good in preparation of
technical proposals and presentations.

Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach


The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as
follows:
Lecture
Class room discussion
Lectures supported by Audio and Videos

Module Learning and


Teaching Method

Case studies
Group Discussions
Intensive Role play
Debates
Home Works

Module Assessment
Techniques

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.
Courses of the Module

Course Number
EnLa1011
EnLa1012

Course Name
Communicative Skill
Basic Writing Skill
Total ECTS

35

EtCTS
5
5
10

Communicative Skill
Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

EnLa1011
Communicative Skill
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Communication Skills

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Students Working Load


Objectives
Competencies

Lecture ...25 hrs.


Class discussion, group work and presentation...45 hrs.
Assessment 15 hrs.
Home Study ................. 50 hrs.
Total 135 hrs.
Practice or
LectureTutorialHome study Total Hour
Laboratory
256050135

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the skills of effective
communication, listening skills and basic sets of managerial skills.
Students shall develop:
Good communication skills.
Verbal and non-verbal communication skill.
Communicating skills useful at work.
Leadership, participation and conflict management skills.
Basic skill-sets of a manager.
Listening skill.
Oral presentation and public speech skills.
Course Description/ Course Contents

Contents

Reference

1. Understanding communication.

TBA

2.

TBA

Communication channels and self-communication.

36

Assessment
TBA
TBA

Week
Week 1
Week

3.

Verbal and non-verbal communication.

TBA

4.

Communicating at work.

TBA

5.

Group leadership, participation and conflict

TBA

management.
6.

Basic skill-sets of a manager.

TBA

7.

The listening skill.

TBA

8.

Oral presentation of project outcome and public speech.

TBA

Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the Course
Learning Teaching
Methods

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System

Course policy

Literature

TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA

Week
Week
Week
Week
Week
Week 16

None
I
Compulsory
Lectures, class works, assignments, group discussions, presentations

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests.5%
Quizzes.....5%
Project Work.10%
Assignments..10%
Presentations.20%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
1. Venables, J. (2002), Communication Skills for Engineers and Scientists, 3rd
edition, Institution of Chemical Engineers.
2. Sharma, S.D. (2006), A Text Book of Professional Communication Skills and
ESP for Engineers and Professionals, Sarup & Sons.
3. Hirsch, H.L. (2000), The Essence of Technical Communication for Engineers:

37

Writing, Presentation, and Meeting Skills, IEEE Computer Society.


Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

38

Basic Writing Skill


Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

EnLa1012
Basic Writing Skill
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Communication Skills

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

EtCTS Credits
Course Weight
Study Hour

Objectives

5
Lecture

Tutorial

Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the Course
Learning Teaching
Methods

Home
study
50

Total Hour

2560135
Lecture ...25 hrs.
Class discussion, group work and presentation .45 hrs.
Assessment 15 hrs.
Home Study ................. 50 hrs.
Total 135 hrs.
The objective of the course is to improve and enhance writing skills in English. The
student will develop advanced writing skills with emphases given to paragraph
development by employing definition, exemplification, classification, cause and effect
as well as comparison and contrast methods.
Students shall be able familiar with the basic writing skills.

Competencies
Course Description/
Course Contents

Practice or
Laboratory

1. Basic writing skills.


2. Principles of writing.
3. Patterns of paragraph development.
4. Mechanics of writing.
5. Essays of different discourse.
EnLa1011
I
Compulsory
Gapped Lecture
Assignments
Brainstorming
Group/Pair Work
Presentation

39

Assessment
Techniques

Course policy

Literature

Continuous Assessment 50%


Classroom Active Participation 10%
Sentence Level Quizzes 10%
Paragraph Level Writing 20%
Essay Level Writing 10%
Final Exam 50%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
1. Baker, B. A. and Baker, C. (2000), Writing with Contemporary Readings, Emc
Pub.
2. Strong, W. and Lester, M. (1996), Writer's Choice Grammar and Composition,
Student edition, McGraw-Hill/Glencoe.
3. Lanny, L. and Resnick, J. (2002), Text & Thought: An Integrated Approach to
College Reading and Writing, 2nd edition, Longman.
4. Camp, S.C. and Satterwhite, M.L. (2004), College English and Communication,
8th edition, McGraw-Hill College.
5. John S. (2000). The Oxford Guide to Writing and SjJeaking. Oxford: OUP Oshima. A.

and Hogue, A. (1991).College Writing Skills: McGraw Hill

6. Rudolph, F and Lass, A.H. ( 1996). The Classic Guide to Better Writing. New York
7. Solomon G/giorgis. (1991). Writing for Academic Purpose. AA U' printing press
8. Axelrod, B. and Cooper, R. (2001). The St. Martin's Guide to Writing.6 ed. Boston:
Bedford/St. Martin's

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

40

MODULE 02
CIVICS AND ETHICAL EDUCATION
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

Civics & Ethical Education

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

General (3)
[02]
CvEt-M10231

Total Study Hours in


the Module per
Semester

Lec.

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

810054135
The objectives of this module equip Engineering students to help develop
democratic and ethical behaviors. Students also get equipped with the
knowledge of civics and ethical education.
The main objectives of the module are to:
Develop fundamentals for civics and professional ethics
Understand the relationships among state, citizens and governing laws
and a constitution.
Understand about the idea of Morality, Ethics and Civic virtues and
professionalism

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


i. Improve normative interaction with Engineers and other professionals;
and develop awareness of professional ethics
Module Competencies
ii. Develop civic skills such as accurate decision making, expression of
oneself clearly and logically, Conflict resolution etc.
iii. Participate effectively in group discussions and team works.
iv. Develop graduate of good citizenship and with democratic thinking.
Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approachModule Mode of Delivery
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Module Learning andLecture, Class room discussion
Teaching MethodCase studies,Group Discussions
Intensive Role play,Debates, Home Works
Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessmentModule Assessment
Techniquesshould comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
5 Credit PointTotal ECTS of the module
Module Description
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course NumberCourse NameECTS
CvEt1021Civics & Ethical Education5
Total ECTS5
.

41

Civics & Ethical Education

Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CvEt1021
Civics & Ethical Education
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Humanities & Social Studies

Module No

01

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students
Workload

Lecture
81

Competences to
be
Acquired/course
level
competences

Course
Objectives

Course
Description

Total ECTS
Tutorial

Practice or
Laboratory
0

5 CP
Home studyTotal Hour
54

135

Objective
Students learn Core values of a democratic society and ethics in this course.
Outcome
Students will acquire concepts of a democratic society, values of citizenship and
forms of governance in a given state.

To help students to better understand the relationships among state, citizens and
governing laws and a constitution.
It will also help students to understand about the idea of Morality, Ethics and
Civic virtues and professionalism

The state , government and citizenship


Learning about constitutions
Constitutional Experience in Ethiopia
Morality, Ethics and Civic virtues
Professional ethics

Content

Course outline
Reference

42

Assessment

Date

Chapter One: Introduction to Civic and Ethical


Education
1.1 Basic definitions of civic and ethical education,
1.2 Basic objectives of learning civic and ethical
education
Chapter Two: Ethics
2.1 Examine ethical issues in the context of business
theory and practice
2.2 Jointly examine thoughtfully ideas and perspectives
in the field ofbusiness ethics and
extend these ideas/perspectives to
administrative practice and decision making,
Enhance our moral sensibility and expand our
capacity for moral inquiry, dialogue, and
decision.
2.3 making in ways that will be useful in our
professional and civic lives
Chapter Three: Society, State and Government
3.1 Society and its engagement with the state,
3.2 Society and government policies,
3.3 State and government relations
Chapter Four: Democracy
4.1 History and development of democracy
4.2 Types of Democracy,
4.3 Values of Democracy.
Chapter Five: Citizenship and Civic Participation
5.1 Types of getting citizenship,
5.2Active participation of civic societies in the affairs
of their state.
Chapter Six: Constitution and Constitutionalism
6.1 Basic definitions of constitution and
constitutionalism,
6.2 History and principles of Ethiopian constitution

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Chapter Seven: Human Rights


7.1 Basic concepts and features of Human Rights,
7.2 Human Rights in the Ethiopian constitution.

TBA

Chapter Eight: Applied Ethics and Civic Virtues


8.1 More concepts on Ethics,
8.2 Types and Principles of civic Virtues

TBA

Chapter Nine: International Relations and


Contemporary Global Issues
9.1 Rules that govern international relations,

TBA

43

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Week 1

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week 16

9.2 Important factors and instruments in external


relations, Ethiopias policy in international
relations.
Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of
delivery

None
Year 1, Semester I
Compulsory
The mode of the delivery of the course combines the following methodologies:
Lecture
Case studies
Group Discussions
Intensive Role play
Debates
Based on the above methodologies of teaching the course should have the following
features:
Right balance between descriptive and normative contents
Highly Participatory and Competitive
Integration of the civic and ethic portions

Right balance between inductive and deductive Approaches

Mode of
assessment

Course policy

Literature

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests.10%
Quizzes.....10%
Project Work..10%
Assignments..10%
Presentations.5%
Attendance....5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
Suggested Course Reference Materials
The reference materials of this course comprises selected and policy
documents Policy/legal Documents
44

The FDRE Constitution, 1995


The FDRE Nationality Law, 2003
Criminal Code of Ethiopia, 2005
Civil Code
Election Law (the Revised one)
Investment Code (revised)
Ethics and Anti-corruption Law
AOLI, PASDEP,
Law of Civil Societies and NGOs
Establishing Proclamations of Human Rights Commissions, and Ombudsman
Institution
International Human Rights Declarations and Conventions accepted by Ethiopia
Policies and Strategies on Education and Training of the FDRE
Ethical Codes of each Profession like Business ethics, medical ethics, legal
ethics, public relations ethics, media ethics etc.,
Note: Some important and highly relevant parts of the above documents must be
attached, with the teaching material of Civics and Ethics common course as
appendices.

Reference Books:
1. Fasil Nahum, (1997) Constitution for the nation 0.( nations: the Ethiopian
Prospect. The red sea press: Asmara
2. Kinfe Abraham (2004) Ethiopia from Empire to Federation. EHPD Press: Addis
Ababa
3. Merara Guidina (2003) Competing Ethnic Nationalism: Quest for democracy
1960- 2000, Chamber printing house: Addis Ababa
4. Johari, J.C (1987) Principle of Politics. New Delhi: Stirling publishers
5. Roskin, MG and et al, (1994) Political science: an Introduction.

Engelwood Cliffs, New Jerey


6. What Is Democracy? by Touraine, Alain
7. Globalizing Democracy: Power, Legitimacy, and the Interpretation of Democratic
Ideas by Fierlbeck, Katherine
Approval
Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

45

MODULE 03
REASONING SKILL

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title
Module Category
Module Number

Reasoning Skill
General (3)
[03]
Phil-M1033

Module Code
Total Study Hours in
the Module per
Semester
Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Module Competencies

Lec.

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

54002781
The objectives of this module equip Engineering students with efficient
reasoning skills, and To develop the ability to evaluate critically
The main objectives of the module are to:
Introduce the fundamental concepts of logic and logical reasoning
To develop the skills required to construct arguments
To develop the ability to evaluate critically
To cultivate the habits of critical thinking

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


v. Develop the skills required to construct sound arguments and critically
evaluate the arguments of others.
vi. Develop civic skills such as accurate decision making, expression of
oneself clearly and logically, Conflict resolution etc.
vii. Participate effectively in group discussions and team works..

Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approachModule Mode of Delivery


The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Module Learning andLecture, Class room discussion
Teaching MethodCase studies, Group Discussions
Intensive Role play, Debates, Home Works
Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessmentModule Assessment
Techniquesshould comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
Total ECTS of the
8 Credit Point
module
Module Description
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course NumberCourse NameECTS
Phil1031Reasoning Skill(Logic)3
Total ECTS3
.

46

Reasoning Skill(Logic)

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

Phil1031
Reasoning Skill(Logic)
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Humanities & Social Studies

Name:

Course
Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

3 CP
Lecture

Course Weight

Course
Objectives

Competences to
be
Acquired/Course
level
competences

Course
Description

54

Tutorial
0

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

27

81

Objective
Introduce the fundamental concepts of logic and logical reasoning
To develop the skills required to construct arguments
To develop the ability to evaluate critically
To cultivate the habits of critical thinking
Outcome
Be able to critical thinking;
Be able to construct sound arguments;
Develop sensitivity to the clear and accurate use of languages.

The nature of arguments


Definitions
Informal fallacies
Syllogistic logic
Propositional logic
Induction

Course Outline

47

Contents

Reference

Chapter One
Introduction:
1.1. What is logic and its uses. Nature of Arguments:
1.2. Define arguments
1.3. Non argument expressions
1.4. Type of arguments (Deductive and Inductive)\
1.5. Validity and Invalidity: Truth and Falsity
1.6. Sound and Unsound Arguments
1.7. Strength and weakness: Truth and Falsity
1.8. Cogent and unclogging arguments
1.9. Evaluating an arguments

TBA

Chapter Two
Definitions:
2.1 Cognitive and Emotive meaning of terms Intension
and Extension of term
2.2 Definitions and their purposes
2.3 Definitional Techniques
2.4 Criteria for lexical definition

TBA

Chapter Three
Informal Fallacies:
3.1 Fallacies of Relevance
3.2 Fallacies of Weak Induction
3.3 Fallacies of Presumptions
3.4 Fallacies of Ambiguity
3.5 Fallacies of Grammatical Analogy

TBA

Chapter Four
Syllogistic Logic:
4.1 Categorical Propositions: Standard Form and
Types
4.2 Square of Oppositions: Traditional and Modern
4.3 Role of Immediate Inference and Formal
fallacies
4.4 Categories Syllogism: Standard Form, Mood
and Figure
4.5 Syllogistic Rules and Formal Fallacies
4.6 Methods of Testing Validity
Chapter Five
Prepositional Logic:
5.1 Compound propositions and Prepositional
Connectives
5.2 Truth Functional Connectives & the Truth
Values of Propositions
5.3 Prepositional Type arguments and formal
fallacies
5.4 Symbolizing Prepositions and prepositional

TBA

TBA

48

Assessment

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week

arguments
5.5 Rule for prepositional logic: rule of implication
and Rule of equivalence
5.6 Natural deduction

Chapter Six
Induction:
6.1 Analogy and legal and moral reasoning
6.2 Causality and Mill's Methods
Hypothetical Reasoning

Pre-requisites
Semester

Course policy

TBA

TBA

Week 16

None
Year 1, Semester I

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the Senate
Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest including
cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage during your
studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally
important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and does
not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no means.
The mode of the delivery of the course combines the following methodologies:
Lecture

Teaching &
Learning
Methods

Class room discussion

Case studies
Group Discussions
Intensive Role play
Debates
Home Works

Assessment/Eval
uation & Grading
System

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests.10%
Quizzes.....10%
Project Work.10%
Assignments..10%
Presentations.5%
Attendance....5%
Final Exam (50%)
1. Hurley, P.J. (2005). A Concise Introduction to Logic, 6th Edition.
2. Belmarnt: Wadsworth Publishing Company.
3. Stephen, C. (2000). The Power of Logic. London and Toronoto: Mayfield Publishing

Literature

49

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Company.
Copi, Irving M. and Carl Cohen " Introduction to Logic" , New York: Macmillan
Publishing company 2001
Fogilin, Robert J. " Understanding arguments: An Introduction to Informal Logic", New
York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Publishing company 2001
Guttenplan , Samuel" The Language of Logic" : Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2000
Stephen C. " The Power of Logic" Londoan and Toronto: Mayfield Publishing
Company, 2000
Walelign Emiru "Freshmen Logic" ,Addis Ababa:"Commercial Printing Enterprise,
2005
Simico N. D. and G.G. James " Elementary Logic" , Belmont Ca: 2nd ed. Wadswoth
Publishing Company, 1999.

9.

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

50

MODULE 04
BASIC ENGINEERING MECHANICS MODULE [10 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

Basic Engineering Mechanics

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

General
[04]
GEng-M1043

Total Study Hours in the


Module

Lecture

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

701000100270
The study of static and dynamic systems subjected to forces/loading/friction
and the associated studies in Statics and Dynamics is a fundamental area to
be understood and practiced by the mechanical Engineering students.
The main objectives of the module are to:
Understand physical interaction of bodies with their surrounding
and attain a state of rest & apply the principles of force systems for
analyzing of static structures;
Develop appropriate mathematical models that represent physical
systems using appropriate coordinate systems; and
Derive equations of motion that relate forces acting on systems and
the resulting motion.
After completion of this module the students shall be able to;
i.apply basic principles of forces and equations of motions under static
and dynamic loading conditions
ii.develop appropriate mathematical models that represent physical
systems
Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture, Tutorials

Rationale of the module

Module Objectives

Module Competencies

Group Discussion, Home Works

Module Mode of Delivery


Module Learning and
Teaching Method

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.

Module Assessment
Techniques
Total ECTS of the module

10 Credit Point

Module Description
Course Number
CEng 1041
MEng 1042

Course Name
Engineering Mechanics I (Statics)
Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics)
Total ECTS

.
Engineering Mechanics I (Statics)
51

ECTS
5
5
10

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program

CEng1041
Engineering Mechanics I (Statics)
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Lecturer

TBA
5 CP

Course Weight

Lecture

Tutorial

35

50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

Course Objective and Learning Outcomes:

Course Objectives

Up on successful completion of the course, students will be able


to:
Distinguish between concurrent, coplanar and space force systems
Compute the resultant of coplanar and space force systems
Draw free body diagrams, Analyze reactions and pin forces induced in coplanar and
space systems using equilibrium equations and free body diagrams
Determine the centroid and center of mass of plane areas & volumes
Represent distributed force with equivalent resultant force which has the same effect
as the distributed forces
Draw shear force & bending moment diagrams
Determine friction forces and their influence up on equilibrium of systems
Apply sound analytical techniques and logical procedure in the solution of
Engineering problems
Ability to define and apply the concepts of equilibrium;
Demonstrate familiarity with structural analysis of trusses, frames and beams and
application of mechanics to Engineering problems.

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

52

This course presents the fundamental physical concepts, laws and Statics of particles:
Resultants of coplanar and none-coplanar force systems, Equitation of equilibrium for
coplanar and none-coplanar force systems. Statics of rigid bodies: Equilibrium of simple
Course Description
structures: trusses beams, frames and machines. Analysis of structures (truss, Frames and
machines). Centroid & center of gravity, moment of inertial. Force in beams: shear force
& bending moment diagrams. Static friction.
Course outline
ContentReferenceAssessmentWeek
Chapter 1: Scalars and Vectors
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Scalars and Vectors
TBATBAWeek 1
1.3 Operation with Vectors
Vector Addition or Composition
Vector Multiplication: Dot & Cross
Chapter 2: Force Systems
2.1 Introduction
I. Two Dimensional Force Systems
2.2 Rectangular Resolution of Forces
2.3 Moment and Couple
TBATBAWeek
2.4 Resultants of general coplanar force systems
II. Three Dimensional Force Systems
2.5 Rectangular Components
2.6 Moment and Couple
2.7 Resultants
Chapter 3: Equilibrium
3.1 Introduction
I. Equilibrium in Two Dimensions
3.2 System Isolation
TBATBAWeek
3.3 Equilibrium Conditions
II. Equilibrium in Three Dimensions
3.4 System Isolation
3.5 Equilibrium Conditions
Chapter 4: Analysis of simple Structures
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Plane Trusses
TBATBAWeek
4.2.1 Method of Joints
4.2.2 Method of Sections
4.3 Frames and Simple Machines

53

Chapter 5: Internal Actions in beams


5.1 Introduction
5.2 Diagrammatic conventions and classification of
beams
5.3 Diagrammatic representations of internal actions
in beams
5.4 Types of loads and reactions
5.5 Shear force and bending moment in beams
5.6 Relation between the static functions and their
applications
5.7 Relations among load, shear, and bending
moments
Chapter 6: Centroids
6.1 Introduction,
6.2 Center of gravity
6.3 Centroids of lines, Areas, and Volumes
6.4 Centroids of composite bodies
6.5 Determination of centroid by integrations
6.6 Distributed loads in beams

Chapter 7: Area Moments of Inertia


7.1 Introduction to area moments of inertia
7.2 Moment of inertia of plane areas and curves
7.3 Moments of inertia of Composite areas
7.4 Products of Inertia and Rotation of Axes

Chapter 8: Friction
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Types of Friction
8.3 Characteristics of dry friction
8.4 Application of Friction in Machines

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of delivery

Mode of assessment

None
Year 1, Semester I
Compulsory
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests...10%
Quizzes...10%
Assignments....20%
Active Participation................. 5%
Class Attendance..5%

54

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week 16

Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. Meriam, J.L. and Kraige, L.G., Engineering mechanics, 7 th ed
2. Meriam, J.L. and Kraige, L.G., Engineering mechanics, 6 th ed
3. Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics by Anthony M. Bedford, Wallace
Fowler, Prentice Hall; 5 edition (July 2007)
4. Engineering Mechanics: Statics by Russell C. Hibbeler, Prentice Hall; 12 edition
(January 7, 2009)
5. Schaum's Outline of Engineering Mechanics by E. W. Nelson, Charles L. Best,
William G. McLean, McGraw-Hill; 5 edition (May 1997)
6. Engineering Mechanics - Statics and Dynamics by Anthony M Bedford, Wallace
Fowler, Prentice Hall; 4 edition (August 2004)

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

55

Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics)

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

MEng1042
Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics)
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Basic Engineering Mechanics

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

5 CP
Lecture

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Course Outcomes

Tutorial

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

355050135
Course Objectives
To provide students with a clear and thorough presentation of the theory and
applications of Engineering mechanics.
Select appropriate coordinate systems for physical systems and analyze motion
variables such as position, velocity, and acceleration.
Conduct kinematic analysis for the velocity & acceleration of moving bodies.
Draw free-body-diagram for rigid body in motion
Apply principle of conservation of energy
Apply Newton's Law of Motion to rigid body motion
Apply principles of impulse and momentum of a rigid body

Student Learning Outcome


Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
Develop the fundamental equations that characterize the kinematics and
Newtonian dynamics of a particle, systems of particles, and rigid bodies.
Develop the ability to model and analyze the dynamic behavior of a particles,
systems of particles, and rigid bodies
Provide experience in the application of dynamic analysis to elementary problems
in Engineering practice
Understand and apply basic principles that govern the motion of objects.
Develop appropriate mathematical models that represent physical systems.
Derive equations of motion that relate forces acting on systems and the resulting
motion.

56

Competences to be
Acquired/Course level
competences

Course Description

This course prepares students to handle assignments related to fluid dynamics during
their Hydraulics II as in flow through pipes and pumps and Hydropower course as in
surge tank design and surge analysis.
Basic equations of motion; Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; Kinetics of
particles and rigid bodies
Course Outline
Content

Reference
[1]:pp 1-19

Chapter 1: Introduction to Dynamics


1.1 Basic concepts
1.2 Equations of motion
1.3 Gravitation
Chapter 2: Kinematics of particles
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Rectangular motion
2.3 Plane curvilinear motion
2.4 Coordinate systems
2.5 Relative motion
2.6 Constrained motion

Time Plan
Week 1

Quize-1 ,5%

[1]:pp. 21-80,
91-117

Week 2-5
Quize-1 ,5%

[2]:pp. 3 -106
Group
Assignment 1, 10%

Chapter 3: Kinetics of Particles


3.1 Introduction
3.2 Newtons second law
3.3 Work Energy equation
3.4 Impulse and Momentum
3.5 Conservation of Energy and Momentum
3.6 Special applications/Impact/

[1]:pp. 119 270


[2]:pp. 108-309

Chapter 4: Kinematics of rigid bodies


4.1 Introduction
4.2 Fixed axis rotation
4.3 Absolute motion
4.4 Relative motion

[1]: pp. 331 417

Week 6-9

Individual
Assignment 1, 10%

10-13
Test-1, 10%

[2]: pp. 311 394

Chapter 5: Kinetics of rigid bodies


5.1 Introduction
5.2 General equations of motion
5.3 Work Energy method
5.4 Impulse and Momentum
Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Teaching & Learning

Assessment

[1]: pp. 419 524


[2]: pp. 455548

CEng1041
Year 1, Semester II
Compulsory
Lecture

57

Quize-2 ,5%

14-16

Methods

Assessment/Evaluatio
n & Grading System

Course policy

Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests...10%
Quizzes(Two)...15%
Assignments....20%
Active Participation................. 5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
Textbook:

[1]Meriam, J.L. andKraige,L. G., Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics, 6thEd.,


2003.
Literature

Reference:
[2]Hibbeler, R.C., Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics,12thEd., 2012.
[3]Beer, Johnston, Clausen, Eisenberg, Cornwell, Vector Mechanics for Engineers:
Dynamics, 9th ed., 2004.

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

58

MODULE 05
BASIC ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS [12 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

Basic Engineering Mathematics

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

General Science and Engineering


[05]
Math-M1053

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

1001000124324
Justification of the module:
Students require a strong background in mathematics for successful
accomplishment of their Civil Engineering Studies.
Short narrative on the aims and characteristics of the module: The student shall
acquire the fundamentals of linear algebra. Including
Vector spaces, vector equations
Systems of linear equations, matrices
Analytical geometry
Complex numbers
The students will be exposed to methods of solving ordinary differential equations
as well..
After completion of this module the students shall be able to;
Model and analyze Engineering problems by applying concepts of
calculus, vector algebra, and probability and statistics

Module
Competencies
Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning
and Teaching
Method
Module Assessment
Techniques
Module Description

Course Number
Math1051
Math1052

Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach


The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment


should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course Name
Applied Mathematics I
Applied Mathematics II
Total ECTS

59

ECTS
6
6
12

Applied Mathematics I
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

Math1051
Applied Mathematics I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Applied Engineering Mathematics

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
6CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Lecture

Tutorial

50

50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

62

162

Students shall learn and understand the principles of vector and scalars, definition and
operation of matrices & determinants, basics of limit and continuity, basic rules of
derivatives & their applications, integrals, integration techniques and their application
in volume, arc length, and surface area determinations.

CompetencesStudents
to be will be able to apply linear algebra to various applications in Engineering.
Acquired/course
They
level
will be able to solve systems of linear equation using direct methods and
competencesiterative methods. They will be able to determine the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of
a given matrix.
This course covers Vectors and vector spaces, Matrices and determinants, Limit and
continuity, Derivatives and application of derivatives, Integration and Application ofCourse Description
Integrals
Course Outline
ContentReferenceAssessmentWeek
1. Vectors and vector spaces
Plane vector
Addition and scalar multiplicationTBATBAWeek
Space vectors
Scalar product and vector product

60

2.

3.

4.
5.

Lines in plane
Lines in space, planes in space
Applications
Matrices and determinants
Matrix
Addition, scalar multiplication, product of
matrices
Transpose
Determinant
Inverse
Applications
Limit and continuity
Definition of limit and examples
Basic limit theorems
One-sided limits
Infinite limits and limit at infinity
LHopitals rule
Continuity of a function.
Derivative & application of derivatives
Inverse functions and their derivativesand
application
Inverse functions
Inverse trigonometric functions
Hyperbolic functions and their inverses
Derivatives of inverse functions
Derivatives of trigonometric functions and
their inverses
Derivatives of hyperbolic functions and their
inverses
Implicitdifferentiation,higherorder
derivatives
Application of derivatives

6. Techniques of integration and their application


Integration by parts
Integration by substitution
Trigonometric integral
Trigonometric substitution
Integration by partial fractions
Improper integrals
Application of Integrals

Pre-requisites

None
61

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week 16

Semester
Status of Course

Mode of delivery

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

Year 1, Semester I
Compulsory
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests...10%
Quizzes...10%
Assignments....20%
Active Participation................. 5%
Class Attendance..5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1.Robert Ellis and Denny Gulick: Calculus with Analytic geometry
2.Sherman K. Stein and Anthony Barcellos: Calculus and Analytic geometry
3.A.C. Bajpai: Engineering Mathematics
4.Richard E. Johnson: Calculus with Analytic geometry
5.Frank Ayres: Calculus Schaums outline series
6.Larson, R., Hostetler, R. P., and Edwards, B.H. (2005), Calculus with Analytic
Geometry, 8th edition, Houghton Mifflin Company.
7. S.Lang (2004), Linear Algebra, 3rdedition, Springer.
8. Stewart, J. (2002), Calculus, 5th edition, Brooks Cole.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signature.date

.
62

Applied Mathematics II

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

Math1052
Applied Mathematics II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Applied Engineering Mathematics

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
6CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Lecture

Practice
Tutorial
orHome studyTotal Hour
Laboratory

5050062162
Students will learn about representations of transdental functions in Taylor series and
Maclaurain series. Moreover, student will be introduced the calculus of functions of
several variables

Competences to
Students
be
will learn the application of Taylor Series, Macluarian Series,
Acquired/course
Fouries
level Series in solving Engineering problems. Moreover, they will be able to
competences differentiate and integrate functions of several variables duringapplications to
various Engineering problems.
This course covers sequences, series, power series, and Fourier series; differential and
Course Descriptionintegrals calculus of functions of several variables and their applications, and multiple
integral.
Course Outline
ReferenceAssessmentWeekCourse Contents
Chapter 1: Sequence and series (30hrs.)

1.1. Definition and types of sequence


1.2. Convergence properties of sequences
1.3. Subsequence and limit points
1.4. Definition of infinite series
1.5. Convergence and divergence, properties
convergent series

[1],[5]- PPTBA
of

63

Assignment-1 (10%)
Quize-1, 5%

Week 1-5

1.6. Nonnegative term series


1.7.Tests of convergence (integral, comparison,

ratio and root tests)


1.8.Alternating series and alternating series test
1.9.Absolute and conditional convergence
1.10. Generalized convergence tests
Chapter 2. Power series (14hrs.)

2.1.Definition of power series at any and


2.2.Convergence and divergence, radius and
interval of convergence
2.3.Algebraic operations on convergent power
series
2.4.Differentiation and integration of power series
Taylor series; Taylor polynomial and application
Chapter 3: Differential calculus of function of
several variables (30hrs.)
3.1 Notations, examples, level curves and graphs
3.2 Limit and continuity
3.3 Partial derivatives; tangent lines, higher order
partial derivatives.
3.4 Directional derivatives and gradients
3.5 Total differential and tangent planes
3.6 Applications: tangent plane approximation of
values of a function
3.7 The chain rule, implicit differentiation
3.8 Relative extrema of functions of two variables
3.9 Largest and smallest values of a function on a
given set
Extreme values under
constraint conditions:
Lagranges multiplier

64

[1],[5]- PPTBA

[1],[5]- PPTBA

Test-1, (5%)

Assignment-2 (10%)
Quize-2, 5%

Week 6-7

Week 8-12

Chapter 4: Multiple integrals (26hrs.)


4.1 Double integrals and their evaluation by iterated
integrals
4.2 Double integrals in polar coordinates
4.3 Application: Area, center of mass of plane region,
surface
4.4 Triple integrals in cylindrical and spherical
coordinates
Application: Volume, center of mass of solid
region.

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of delivery

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

Quize-3, 5%
[1],[5]- PPTBA

Test-2,5%

Week 1316

Math1051
Year 1, Semester II
Compulsory
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests(two) ...10%
Quizzes(three)...15%
Assignments....20%
Active Participation................. 5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. [1]Ellis, R. and Gulick, D. (1998), Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 5 th edition,
Harcourt.
2. Ron Larson, Robert P. Hostetler, and Bruce H. Edwards, Calculus with analytic
Geometry, 8th ed, 2005.

65

3. C. Henry Edwards and David E. Penney, Calculus with analytic Geometry: 6th
Edition, 2002.
4. Dennis G. Zill , A 1st course in Differential Equations, 5th ed. 2000.
5. [5]Erwin Kreyszig (2005), Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 9th edition,
Wiley.6th

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

66

MODULE 06
BASIC ENGINEERING SKILLS MODULE [13 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Name
Module Category
Module Number
Module Code
Total EtCTS of the Module
Total Study Hour
Objectives

Competencies

Module Mode of Delivery

Module Learning and


Teaching Method

Module Assessment
Techniques

Basic Engineering Skills


General
06
GEng-M1063
13
351
The objectives of this module is:
To offer an introduction to the Engineering professionalism and
basic Engineering skills particularly in the field of Civil
Engineering.
To introduce students to broader views of various Engineering
disciplines
To give students a hands-on practices in workshops
To enable students to interpret and prepare drawings and
visualize 3D objects

i.Prepare Engineering drawing manually.


ii.Able to make basic computer programming.
iii.Able to make informed decision in choice of Engineering discipline.
iv.Develop ability to use and apply the techniques, skills and
Engineering tools necessary for Engineering practice and
general workshop safety and practice skill.
Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Laboratory Practice
Workshop Practice
Group Discussion
Home Works

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes

67

Lab reports
Assignments
Active Participation
Class Attendance

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course Number
MEng1061
GEng1062
CEng1063
CEng2064
Total

Courses of the Module


Course Name
Engineering Drawing
Introduction to Engineering Profession
Workshop Practice
Computer Programming

68

EtCTS
5
2
2
4
13

Engineering Drawing
Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

MEng1061
Engineering Drawing
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Basic Engineering Skills
Name:
.

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
EtCTS Credits5
Study Hour Lecture 25 hrs
Laboratory ...... 40 hrs
Assessment..20 hrs
Home Study .... 50 hrs
Total....135 hrs
ObjectivesThe objectives of this course is:
To provide students with the concepts of technical drawing.
To provide students with the basic contents of technical drawing like
projection, views, multi view and pictorial drawings, intersection and
development.
CompetenciesAt the end of the course, students would understand:
The different types of projection techniques
How to sketch multi view drawings of any given pictorial drawings
How to sketch pictorial drawings of given multi view drawings
Sketching auxiliary and sectional views as a supplement of multi
view drawings.
How to find intersection lines of different geometries and development
of surfaces.
Course Description/ Course Contents
ContentReferenceAssessmentWeek
1. Introduction: History of technical drawing and
Lecturer

TBATBAWeek

objective of the course


2. Theory of Projections: Types and
TBATBAWeek

classifications of projections

69

3. Multi View Drawings: Systems of


projection; Choice of views, Laying out of
views; Projection of lines, planar and nonplanar lines; Tangent surfaces; Fillets;
Rounds; Run-outs.
4. Pictorial Drawings: Comparison between
multi-view and pictorial drawings;
Axonometric; Oblique and central projections;
Isometric and oblique drawings.
5. Auxiliary Views: Primary and secondary
auxiliary views; Complete and partial
auxiliary views
6. Sectional Views: Making sectional drawings;
Types of sections; Conventional
representations; Sectional auxiliary views;
Sections in pictorial drawings
7. Intersections and Development of Simple
Transition Pieces
Pre-requisiteNone
SemesterI
Status of theCompulsory
Course

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

TBA

TBA

Week

Lecture
Module Learning
and Teaching
Method

Module
Assessment
Techniques

Tutorials
Group Discussion
Laboratory Practice
Workshop Practice
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests...10%
Quizzes..10%
Assignments..10%
Class Attendance5%

Mini projects....15%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
70

Literature

Approval Section

penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. French, T. E. and Helsel, J. D. (2003), Mechanical Drawing: Board and
CAD Techniques, Student Edition, 13th edition, Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
2. Giesecke, F.E., Mitchell, A., Spencer, H.C. and et al. (2002), Technical
Drawing, 12th edition, Prentice Hall.
Name of course Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

71

Introduction to Engineering Profession


Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

GEng1062
Introduction to Engineering Profession
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Basic Engineering Skills
Name:
.

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
2

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Lecture

Tutorial

16

16

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

22

54

Lecture . 16 hrs
Assessment .. 16 hrs
Home Study ............. 22 hrs
Total 54 hrs
The objectives of this course is:
Acquaint students with different areas of Engineering discipline.
To introduce students to the concepts and field of Engineering as a
whole.
Explain the different types of Engineering profession.
Students will be familiar with different areas of specialization of Engineering
and be exposed to various career opportunities.
An introduction to the Engineering profession
Overview of different fields of Engineering.
Engineering Ethics.

Course
Description/
Course Contents

Course Content
Chapter 1: Introduction to Engineering Skill
1.1. What is Engineering?
1.2. Engineering Thinking
1.3. Problem solving strategies
1.4. Application of Engineering
Experience

72

Reference

Assessment

Time plan

TBA

Quize-1, 5%

Week 1-3

1.5. Failure Design, Construction,


Operation or Maintenance?
1.6. Attributes of the Engineer
Chapter 2: Engineering Career
2.1. What does an Engineer do?
2.2. What types of Engineers are there?
2.3. How Does An Engineer Do Things?
Chapter 3: Engineering Design Methods
3.1. Elements of Engineering Design and the
Process
3.2. Design Considerations
3.3. Design Methodology
Chapter 4: Engineering Ethics
4.1. What is Engineering ethics?
4.2. Fundamental principles of Engineering
Ethics
4.3. General rules (Fundamental Canon)
Chapter 5: Engineering Disciplines
5.1 Engineering Disciplines
5.2 Seminar presentation.

Pre-requisite
Semester
Module Learning
and Teaching
Method

Module
Assessment
Techniques

TBA

Test-1, 5%

Week 4-6

TBA

Mini Project -1, 20%

Week 7-9

TBA

Presentation- 10%
Test-2, 5%

Week 10-12

TBA

Seminar Report-10%
Seminar Participation10%
Quize-2, 5%

Week 13-16

None
I
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests(two)...10%
Quizzes(two)..10%
Seminar Report..10%
Seminar Participation...10%

Mini project....20%
Presentation.10%
Final Exam (30%)

Assessment
Techniques

Course policy

Continuous assessment (quizzes, tests, assignments, class works) and final exam
All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and

73

submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be


penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
Literature

Landis, R. B. (2001), Studying Engineering, 2nd Edition, Discovery Press, Burbank, CA.

References:
Engineering in History, Richard Shelton Kirby, et al, Dover, 1990.
Beyond Engineering: How Society Shapes Technology, Robert Pool, Oxford
University Press,
1997.
Engineering: An Introduction to a Creative Profession: Fifth Edition, Beakley,
Evans, Keats,
Macmillan Publishing Company, 1986. .

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

74

Workshop Practice
Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

CEng1063
Workshop Practice
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Basic Engineering Skills
Name:
.

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
2
Lecture ...................... 6 hrs
Workshop ...... 30 hrs
Assessment..18 hrs
Totals...54 hrs
This course is mainly designed to impart students to a hand-on exercises and
practices on plumbing, masonry works, concrete mixing, wood work and the
like.
After the successful completion of the course students will be able to
effectively supervise and comment on plumbing, woodwork, masonry,
electrical installation and similar works.
Course Description/ Course Contents
ReferenceAssessmentTime Plan
Workshop practice manualsMini Project-1, 5%Week 1-2
Workshop practice manualsMini Project-2, 5%Week 3-4
Mini Project-3, 5%
Workshop practice manualsWeek 5-7

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Content
Plumbing

Woodwork
Concrete work
Plastering

Workshop practice manuals

Mini Project-4, 5%

Week 8-9

Masonry work

Workshop practice manuals

Mini Project-5, 10%

Week 10-12

Basicelectrical
installation
Construction sites
whichhave
finished or un

Workshop practice manuals

Mini Project-6, 5%

Site Visit Report- 10%


Presentation- 5%

75

Week 13-14

Week 15-16

finished tasks are


visited.
Pre-requisiteNone
SemesterII
Status of the CourseCompulsory
LectureLearning Teaching
Workshop PracticeMethods
Laboratory Practice
Group Discussion
Home Works

Assessment
Techniques

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Site Visit Report ...10%

Mini projects....35%
Presentation...5%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
1. Jim Forrest & Peter Jennings (1998), Workshop Construction (Workshop
Practice), Special Interest Model Books.
2. Alex Weiss (1998), Workshop Electrics (Workshop Practice), Special
Interest Model Books.
3. Workshop practice manuals
Name of course Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

76

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

CEng2064
Computer Programming
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
General Science and Engineering
Name:
.

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
4
Lecture . 15 hrs
Laboratory. 40 hrs
Assessment ... 15 hrs
Home Study ..................................... 38 hrs
Total . 108 hrs
To introduce students to computer based problem solving.
To enable students to design, develop, compile and debug programs in a
high level programming language.
To enable students to develop programs to solve numerical Engineering
problems.

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Students shall be familiar with computer and programming language and shall be
able to plan, analyze and write computer programs for basic Engineering
problems.

Course
Description/
Course Contents

Introduction to computers: hardware, software.


Number representation in computers: fixed and floatingpoint numbers.
Fundamental programming concepts: program organization, modularity in
programming, algorithms, flow charts.
Data types: intrinsic and user-defined data types, variables, initialization,
assignment statements, control statements, loops.
Input and output statements; files for input and output.
Intrinsic and user-defined subprograms.
Possible language: FORTRAN (latest version) or C++ or Visual Basic.
None

Pre-requisite
77

Semester
Status of the
Course
Learning Teaching
Methods

Assessment
Techniques

III
Compulsory
Lecture
Laboratory Practice
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests...10%

Mini projects....15%
Presentation.5%
Assignments..10%
Class Attendance...10%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. Glassborow, F. (2004), A Beginners Introduction to Computer
Programming, Wiley.
2. Chapman, S.J. (2003), Fortran 90/95 for Scientists and Engineers, 2nd
edition, McGraw-Hill Science /Engineering /Math.
3. Brain, D.H. (1996). Fortran 90 for Scientists and Engineers
4. Smith, I.M. (1995). Programming in Fortran 90
5. Dida Midekso. (1994). Introduction to Computer Science. Addis Ababa
printing press.
6. C++: An Introduction to Computing, 2nd edition (Adams, Leestma, and
Nyhoff; Prentice-Hall, 1998)
7. Halterman, Richard. Fundamentals of Programming and Software Design
in Java. 2001.
8. Thinking in C++, 4th Edition (Sunil K. Pandey GTBP1, New Delhi)
9. C++ How to program, Fifth Edition (By H. M. Deitel - Deitel &

78

Approval Section

Associates, Inc., P. J. Deitel - Deitel & Associates,)


10. Java How to program, sixth Edition (By H. M. Deitel - Deitel &
Associates, Inc., P. J. Deitel - Deitel & Associates,)
Name of course Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

79

MODULE 07
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS [15 ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

Advanced Engineering mathematics and Numerical methods

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

General Science and Engineering


[07]
GEng-M2073

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

11411433144405
Justification of the module:
Students require advanced mathematics and statistical analysis in
their Civil Engineering higher courses.
The students will need to understand stochastic problems for which
probability analysis is fundamental.
Civil Engineers need ability to formulate and solve Engineering problems
numerically.
Short narrative on the aims and characteristics of the module:
The student shall acquire knowledge on higher mathematical topics
and statistical and probabilistic theories
Complex number integrals
Series
Partial differential equations
Probability theories
Statistical analysis
And basic numerical methods and Engineering applications.
Apply appropriate advanced mathematical and numerical method to analyze
problems related to Civil Engineering and be able to plan analyze and write
computer programs for numerical methods and basic Engineering applications

Module
Competencies
Module Mode of
Delivery

Module Learning
and Teaching
Method

Module Assessment
Techniques

Total Hour

Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach


The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture
Laboratory Practice
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests
Laboratory Practice
Quizzes

80

Assignments
Active Participation
Class Attendance
Final Exam (50%)
Total ECTS of the
module
Module Description

Course Number
Stat2071
Math2072
CEng2073

14 Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course Name
Probability and Statistics
Applied Mathematics III
Numerical Methods
Total ECTS

81

ECTS
4
6
5
15

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

Stat2071
Probability and Statistics
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Advanced Engineering mathematics and Numerical methods

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
4CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Lecture

Tutorial

30

30

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

48

108

After successful completion of this course the students shall have a general
understanding of the:
Methods of collecting statistical data (specifically sampling techniques)
Summarizing data ( construction of frequency distributions)
Basic concepts and computations of probability,
Different probability distributions (continuous and discrete),
Making inferences (estimation of population parameters and tests of
hypotheses)

Students will be able to:


Understand the concepts of probability and statistics.
Acquire basic knowledge of fundamental probability distribution functions,
discrete and continuous, univariate and multi-variate.
Estimate and interpret correlation coefficient.
Carry out point and interval estimations involving normal populations.
Understand hypothesis testing and the meaning of the null hypothesis.
Have an appreciation for Monte Carlo simulation techniques.
Participate in Engineering projects that embody probabilistic and statistical
components.

82

Course Description

This course introduces


Probability theory.
Random variables and random distribution.
Discrete and continuous density functions.
Bivariate distribution.
Introduction to statistics.
Frequency distributions.
Measures of central distribution and dispersion.
Regression and correlation coefficients
Course Outline

Course Content

Reference

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION


Meaning of the Term Statistics; Some Basic Terminologies
(Population, Sample, Parameter, Statistic, Qualitative
variable, Quantitative variable-Discrete& Continuous);
Descriptive & Inferential Statistics
CHAPTER TWO: FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS
Absolute Frequency Distributions (Discrete data,
Continuous data); Relative Frequency Distributions;
Cumulative Frequency Distributions
CHAPTER THREE: NUMERICAL SUMMARIES OF
DATA
PART A: The Arithmetic Mean (Simple, Weighted, and
Combined); the Median; the mode; Quartiles.
PART B: The Range & Coefficient of the Range; The
Interquartile Range & Coefficient of the Interquartile
Range; The Standard deviation &
Coefficient of Variation
CHAPTER FOUR: BASIC PROBABILITY
CONCEPTS
*Elements of Set Theory; Combinatorial Problems
(Multiplication principle, Permutations, and Combinations);
Some Probabilistic Terms ( Random experiment, Outcome,
Sample space, Event, Mutually exclusive, Exhaustive,
Equally likely); Definition of Probability (Classical
definition, Relative frequency definition, and Axiomatic
definition); Additive Theorem of Probability; Conditional
Probability; Multiplicative Theorem of Probability; Bayes'
Formula; Independent Events
CHAPTER FIVE: RANDOM VARIABLES
General Notion of a Random Variable; Discrete Random
Variables & Probability Mass Functions (Pdf); Continuous
Random Variables & Probability Density Functions(Pdf);

83

Assessment

Course
plan

Cumulative Distribution Function(Cdf); The Expected


Value of an R.V.; The Variance of an R.V.; Tchebichev's
Inequality
CHAPTER SIX: SPECIAL DISTRIBUTIONS

The Binomial Distribution; The Poisson Distribution;


The Poisson Approximation to the Binomial
Distribution; The Uniform (or Rectangular)
Distribution; The Normal (or Gaussian) Distribution
Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of delivery

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

None
Year 2, Semester I
Compulsory
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests...10%
Quizzes...10%
Assignments....20%
Active Participation................. 5%
Class Attendance..5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
REFERENCES .
1) Bluman, A.G. Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step approach (3rd ed.).
2) DeGrot, M.H. (1989). Probability and Statistics (2nd ed.), Addfson-Wesley
Publishin'g Co.
3) Johnson, R. (2005). Miller and Freund's Probability and Statistics for Engineers
(7th ed.),

84

4) Meyer P.L. (1989). Introductory Probability and Statistical Application (2nd


ed.), Addison-Wesley.
5) Soong, T.T. (2004). Fundamentals of Probability and Statistics for Engineers,
John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
6) Spiegel, M.R. & Stephens, L.J. (2008). Schaum's Outlines: Theory and Problems
of Statistics (4th ed.) McGraw-Hili Inc
7) Tijms, H. (2007). Understanding Probability (2nd ed.), Cambridge University
Press.

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

85

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

Math2072
Applied Mathematics III
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Advanced Engineering mathematics and Numerical methods

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
6CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Lecture

Tutorial

50

50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

62

162

Objective:
The objective of the course is to offer an introductory treatment of ordinary partial
differential equations, vector analysis and complex analysis that arise in Engineering.
Students shall understand the fundamental theories and applications of ordinary partial
differential equations, vector and complex analyses in Civil Engineering.

At the end of this course, students will be able to


solve ODEs and PDEs. Moreover, they will be able to use Complex Functions in
Engineering Applications.

This course covers First order differential equations, second order differential
equations, Vector differential calculus, Line and surface integral, Complex
Course Description
analytical functions and complex integrals, Taylor and Laurent Series, Integration
by the method of residue
Course Outline
Course contentReferenceAssessmentTime Plan
1. Ordinary Differential Equations, ODEs
1.1 Ordinary Differential Equations of the
first order
1.1.1 Basic Concepts, modelingTBATBATBA
1.1.2 Separable Equations
1.1.3 HomogeneousDifferential
equation

86

1.1.4 Exact Differential Equations


1.2 Linear first Order Differential Equations
Ordinary Linear Differential equations of
the second order
1.2.1 Homogeneous Linear Differential
equations of the second order
1.2.2 Methodforsolvingnon
homogeneous linear differential
equations
1.3 Laplace Transforms
1.3.1 LaplaceTransform.Inverse
Transform. Linearity. s-Shifting
1.3.2 Transforms of Derivatives and
Integrals. ODEs
1.3.3 Differentiation and Integration of
Transforms.
1.3.4 Systems of ODEs
2. Fourier series
2.1 Fourier series and integrals
2.2 The complex Fourier series and integrals
2.3 Forced Oscillations
2.4 Fourier and Laplace transformations
2.5 Fourier cosine and sine transformation
2.6 Differentiation and integration of Laplace
transformations.
3. Vector calculus
3.1 Gradient of a scalar field
3.2 Divergence of a vector field
3.3 Curl of a vector field
3.4 Line integrals
3.5 Surface integrals
3.6 Gauss divergence theorem and its
application
4. Complex analysis
4.1 Complex Analytic Functions.
4.2 Complex Integrals.
Integration by method of residue
Math1052
Pre-requisites

Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

Year 2, Semester I
Compulsory
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion

87

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Home Works

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests...10%
Quizzes...10%
Assignments....20%
Active Participation................. 5%
Class Attendance..5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
REFERENCES .
1. Erwin Kreyszig (2005). Advanced Engineering Mathematics. 9th edition, Wiley.
2. Ellis, R. and Gulick, D. (1998). Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 5th edition.
Harcourt.
3. Stewart, J. (2002), Calculus, 5th edition, Brooks Cole.
4. Churchil, R.V. (2003). Complex Variables and Application. 7/e. McGraw Hill
Education.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

88

Numerical Methods

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng2073
Numerical Methods
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Advanced Engineering mathematics and Numerical methods

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5CP

Course Weight

Lecture

Tutorial

34

34

Practice or
Laboratory
33

Home study

Total Hour

34

135

Objective
Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Course Description

Enabling students to apply knowledge of linear algebra and differential equations in


the context of Engineering problem-solving. Introduce classical and contemporary
Engineering problems to students at the lower division level.
At the end of this course, students will be able to:
To perform a range of matrix and vector operations.
Solve mathematical models of Engineering systems and/or components.
Find roots of nonlinear equations.
Solve systems of linear and non-linear equations.
Perform least-squares fitting of a curve to data.
Numerically integrate ordinary differential equations.
This course covers
Mathematical Modeling
Roots of Equations
Linear Algebraic Equations
Curve Fitting
Numerical Differentiation and Integration
Numerical Solution ff ODE
Course Outline

89

Content

Reference
TBA

1. Mathematical Modeling, Number System and


Errors

TBA

2. Roots of Equations
3.

Solution of Non-linear Equation:


3.1 Bisection method
3.2 Secant method;
3.3 Newton's method

TBA

4. Curve Fitting:
4.1 Least square Regression;
4.2 Interpolations
4.3 Fourier Approximations

TBA

5. Solutions of Systems of Linear Algebraic


Equations:
5.1 Matrix-Inversion
5.2 Gauss-Siedle Iteration
5.3 Gaussian-Elimination
5.4 LU-Decomposition
6. Numerical Differentiation & Integration:
6.1 Trapezoidal-Rule
6.2 Simpson's Rule;
6.3 Gauss-Quadrature;
6.4 Romberg's Integration

TBA

TBA

TBA

8. Numerical Solution of ODEs:


7.1. Euler's method;
7.2. Runge-Kutta method

TBA

Week 1

Assignment-1 , 5%

Week 2-4

Assignment-2 , 5%
Quize-1 , 5%

Week 5-7

Test-1 , 5%

Week 8-9

Assignment-3 , 5%

Test-2 , 5%

Mini Project-1 , 10%

Week 12-13

Week 12-13
Week 14-15

Quize-2 , 5%
Week 16

9. Working with MAT LAB and Excel

TBA

Application in Numerical Method

Mode of delivery

---

Time Plan

Week 10-11

7. Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Assessment

Comp2064
Year 2, Semester II
Compulsory
Lecture
Laboratory Practice
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests(two)...10%
Quizzes(two)...10%
Assignments(three)....15%
Mode of assessment

90

Presentation 5%

Mini Project............................. 10%


presentation5%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
REFERENCES .
1. Chapra C.S. and Canale P.R. (2005), Numerical Methods for Engineers with
Programming and Software Application, 5th edition, McGraw-Hill
Education.
2. Rao, S.S. (2002), Applied Numerical Methods for Engineers and Scientists,
Prentice Hall.
3. Recktenwald, G.W. (2001), Introduction to Numerical Methods and
MATLAB: Implementations and Applications, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

91

MODULE 08
SURVEYING [12 ECTS]

Module Title
Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

Department of Civil Engineering


Surveying module
TBA
[08]
CEng-M1081

Lecture
Tut/Sem
Pra/Lab
Home Study
Total Study Hours in
the Module
70154100324
Measurement lies at the heart of every Engineering design. Before realizing any
project on the ground, one has to take accurate measurement such as
Rationale of the module topographic, bathymetric and so on to accurately locate the point of
implementation with reference to given sound datum. Hence, this module
exposes the student with the know-how of geodetic measurement.

Module Objectives

The main objectives of the module are to:


Learn theory and field work in construction and land surveying.
Familiar with the use of surveying equipment and the preparation of
field book records.
Understand basic introduction to GIS and remote sensing. Moreover,
interpretation of aerial imagery is also dealt with.

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


Module Competencies

Module Mode of
Delivery

Module Learning and


Teaching Method

Module Assessment
Techniques

understand surveying work principles,


Use of surveying equipment and apply the knowledge through field
practice.
Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture
Laboratory Practice
Field Practice
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests
Laboratory Report
Field Report

92

Total Hour

Quizzes
Assignments
Active Participation
Class Attendance
Final Exam (50%)
Total ECTS of the
module
Module Description

Course Number
CEng1081
CEng2082
CEng2083

13 Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course Name
Surveying I
Surveying II
Surveying Field Practice
Total ECTS

93

ECTS
5
5
2
12

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng1081
Surveying I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Surveying

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5 CP
Lecture

Course Weight
35

Tutorial
0

Practice or
Laboratory
50

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

Course Objective and Learning Outcomes:

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Course Description

Up on successful completion of the course, students will be able


to:
Know basic principles of geodetic surveying and land information system.
Accurately measure distances and angles using high precision and up-to-date
surveying equipment at the end of this course.

Student understand surveying work principles, use of surveying equipment and apply
the knowledge through field practice

Introduction and Basic definitions


units of measurement, theory of errors and their adjustments
types of surveys
measurement of angles, distance & heights
bearing & azimuth of a line
leveling;

94

area computations, traverse computation & adjustment


optical and electronic distance measurements

Course Content

Course outline
Reference

Chapter One
INTRODUCTION
1.1 Definition
1.2 Need for Surveying
1.3 Types and Principles of Surveying
1.4 Sources of Error Precision and Correction
Chapter Two
MEASUREMENT OF HORIZONTAL DISTANCES
2.1. Introduction
2.2. Methods of Measurement
2.3. Chain Surveying/ Taping
2.3.1. Principle of Chain Surveying
2.3.2. Miscellaneous Taping and Ranging Operation
2.4. Sources of Errors Precaution and Corrections
2.4.1. Sources of Errors
2.4.2. Correction for Errors in tape Measurement
Chapter Three
MEASUREMENT OF VERTICAL DISTANCES
3.1. Introduction
3.2. Methods of leveling
3.3. Types of Spirit Level
3.3.1. Differential Leveling
3.3.2. Reciprocal Leveling
3.3.3. Profile Leveling
3.3.4. Cross-section Leveling
3.3.5. Trigonometric Leveling
3.4. Errors and Mistakes in Leveling
Chapter Four
MEASUREMENT OF ANGLES AND DIRECTIONS
4.1. Introduction
4.2. Methods of Describing Directions
4.3. Methods of Describing angles
4.3.1. Interior Angles
4.3.2. Deflection Angles
4.3.3. Angles to the Right
4.3.4. Magnetic Compass
4.3.4.1. Magnetic Declination

Assessment

Course plan

Test-1, 5%

Week 1-2

Laboratory-1, 5%

Week 3-5

TBA

Laboratory-2, 5%
Assignment-1, 5%

Week 6-10

TBA

Laboratory-3, 5%
Quize-1, 5%

Week 11-13

TBA

TBA

95

4.3.4.2. Local Attraction


4.3.5. Use and Adjustment of Theodolites
4.3.5.1. Measurement of Horizontal Angles
4.3.5.2. Measurement of Vertical Angles
4.3.7. Tacheometry
4.3.7.1. Stadia Method
Chapter Five
TRAVERSING PRINCIPLE
5.1. Introduction
5.2. Traversing by Compass and Theodolite
5.2.1. Types of Traverse
5.2.2. Compass Traverse
5.2.3. Interior Angle Traverse
5.2.4. Deflection Angle TraverseLaboratory-4, 5%
TBA
5.2.5. Angle to the right traverseProject-1, 5%
5.2.6. Azimuth Traverse
5.2.7. Stadia Traverse
5.2.8. Plane table and Alidade
5.3. Traverse Computations
5.4. Sources of Errors and Precision Traversing
5.5. Checking adjusting traverse
5.6. Computation of Area
Pre-requisitesNone
SemesterYear 1, Semester II
Status of CourseCompulsory
Lecture
Field Practice
Mode of deliveryTutorials

Week 14-16

Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Test........5%
Laboratory Reports(four) .20%
Mode of assessmentProject ..10%
Quizze...5%
Assignments.10%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be

96

penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.

1. Wolf, P. R. and Ghilani, C. D. (2006), Elementary Surveying: An Introduction


to Geomatics, 11th edition, Prentice Hall
2. Uren, J. and Price, W.F. (2005), Surveying for Engineers, 4th edition, Palgrave
Macmillan.

Literature

Approval Section

3.Chambers, Analysis of survey data


4.Ghilani,CharlesD., Elementary surveying
5.McCormack, Jack C., Surveying.
6.Boniface, Peter R., Civil surveying sample exams for the California
special Civil engineer examination/
7. Dr. A. M. Chandra, Surveying [2005], New Age International (P) Ltd.,
Publishers
Name of course Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

97

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng2082
Surveying II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Surveying

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

5 CP
Lecture

Course Weight

35

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/Course level
competences

Tutorial
0

Practice or
Laboratory
50

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

Course Objectives
Students will learn theory and field work in construction and land surveying
Student Learning Outcome
Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
Understand surveying project fundamentals
Obtain a full understanding of the nature of surveying data
Understand their environment and terrain through topographic maps
Understanding of role of photogrammetric surveying.
Student understand surveying work principles, use of surveying equipment and apply
the knowledge through field practice.
Triangulation ,
Contour lines and Digital Terrain Model,
Engineering Surveys and Setting out, GPS Surveying,
Topographic Surveys and Mapping,
Principles of Photogrammetric surveying,
GIS and remote sensing.

Course Description
Course Content

Reference

98

Assessment

Time Plan

1. Topographical Surveying
1.1 Introduction
1.2. Contouring
1.2.1 Contour and contour interval
1.2.2 Characteristics of contours
1.2.3 Methods of contouring
1.2.4 Uses of contours
2. Curves
2.1. General
2.2. Types of curves and their uses
2.3. Circular curves
2.4. Compound curves
2.5. Reverse cures
3.1. Transition curves
3.2. Vertical curves
3.3. Methods of setting out
3. Triangulation and Trilateration
3.1. General
3.2. Principle and uses
3.3. Classification
3.4. Triangulation figures and arrangements
3.5. Well-condition triangle
3.6. Strength of figure
3.7. Reconnaissance and selection of stations
3.8. Inter-visibility of triangulation stations
3.9. Signals and phase of signals
3.10.Base line and its extension
3.11.Triangulation computations
3.12. Adjustments of Survey Observations

3.13. Definitions
3.14. Weights
3.15. Least squares theory Adjustment problems
4. Photogrammetric
4.1. General
4.2. Aerial, terrestrial and close-range
photogrammetric
4.3. Different types of photographs
4.4. Photo coordinate system
4.5. Vertical photographs and definitions
4.6. Scale of photograph and relief displacement
4.7. Sterophotogrammetry
4.8. Uses of photogrammetric
5. Introduction to GIS Application Software

99

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Teaching & Learning


Methods

Assessment/Evaluation &
Grading System

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

CEng1081-surveying-I
Year 2, Semester I
Compulsory
Lecture
Field Practice
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests....10%
Laboratory Reports .15%
Interview .5%
Quizzes.5%
Assignments.10%
Class Attendance..5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
1. Wolf, P. R. and Ghilani, C. D. (2006), Elementary Surveying: An Introduction to
Geomatics, 11th edition, Prentice Hall.
1. Uren, J. and Price, W.F. (2005), Surveying for Engineers, 4th edition, Palgrave
Macmillan.Engineers: Dynamics, 9th ed., 2004.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

100

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng2083
Surveying field practice
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Surveying

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/Course level
competences

Course Description

2 CP
Lecture

Tutorial

Practice or
Laboratory
54

Home study

Total Hour

54

Students who successfully complete this course will be:


Exposed to field exercise in surveying
Analyze and interpret data independently and come up with contour maps for a
given plot.
Know how surveying data is clearly and ethically reported
Work with others, respect the contributions of others, resolve difficulties, and

understand responsibility.

control survey
topographic survey
highway alignment
Canal alignment
leveling work
triangulation

Course Outline
Course Content
1. Topographic data Collection
1.1Introduction
1.2 Field data collection Using Total Station

101

Reference

Assessment

Time Plan

TBA

100 % Project Data


Collection, analysis
and Plotting of

Week 13-14

2. Data Analysis
2.1 Computer based Data Analysis
2.2 Developing Contour map
Pre-requisitesCEng2082-surveying-II
SemesterYear 2, Semester I
Status of CourseCompulsory
Teaching & LearningField works
Methods
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Field Reports .35%
Assessment/Evaluation
Presentation ...10%
& Grading System
Class Attendance.5%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

Contour map of
identified area.

Week 15-16

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students must attend 100% during Field practice. Punctuality is equally
important.
2. Uren, J. and Price, W.F. (2005), Surveying for Engineers, 4th edition, Palgrave
Macmillan

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

102

MODULE 09
BASIC BUILDING ENGINEERING [15 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

Building Engineering

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

Architecture and building technology


[09]
CEng-M2091

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Total Hour

10850126121405
Since one of the basic necessities of the society is shelter, this module emphasizes
on the Engineering skills required to design a building for residence. Moreover, the
principles are equally applicable to the design of building for other purposes. The
appropriate materials to be used for the construction of the buildings and the
application of CAD software are also covered in this module
Short narrative on the aims and characteristics of the module
The students learn:
Operational sequencing and important subsoil characteristics,
How to complete excavations and how projects are structured and sealed
against water,
The elements of masonry and how to apply simple calculations to masonry
walls,
to recognize structural and physical problems arising from the construction
of walls, ceilings and roofs, the elementary frame structure used in sloped
and flat roofs,
to read Civil Engineering plans and draw typical construction works
according to accepted norms
And to learn Application Software for Civil Engineering.
The student shall learn how to dimension buildings taking the following
requirements:
Heat Insulation,
Moisture Protection,
Noise Insulation.
Moreover , the production and mechanical properties of the main construction
materials ,namely, cement and steel are treated in detail in this module.
Students get basic knowledge on construction materials for Civil Engineering
infrastructures; elements of building; and architectural drawings. Abel to prepare
Drawings with computer aid focusing on Civil Engineering infrastructures;

Module
Competencies
Module Mode of
Delivery

Home Study

Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach

103

Module Learning
and Teaching
Method

Module Assessment
Techniques

The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:


Lecture
Laboratory Practice
Workshop Practice
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests
Laboratory Report
Mini Project
Quizzes
Assignments
Active Participation
Class Attendance
Final Exam (50%)

Total ECTS of the


module
Module Description

Course Number
CEng2091
CEng2092
CEng3093
CEng3094

16Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course Name
Computer Aided Drafting(CAD)
Construction Material
Building Construction
Fundamental of Architecture
Total ECTS

104

ECTS
2
5
5
3
15

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module
Module Coordinator
Lecturer

CEng2091
Computer Aided Drafting(CAD)
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Building Engineering

TBA
2CP
Course Weight

Course Objectives
Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences
Course Description

Lecture

Tutorial

Home study

1800
Objective
Students will learn Application Software for Civil Engineering

Total Hour
54

At end of this course students will be able to


Prepare Civil Engineering drawings using Auto CAD software.

This course covers


Auto cad

Course Outline
Course ContentReference
1. Introduction to Latest AutoCAD software
The users interface: Tool bars
The menu bars, shortcut menus, command
windows, design center, tool palates, customize
the drawing environment, start, organize, and save
drawings.
2. Control the drawing views:
change views. Choose a work process: create
single-view drawing, create multiple-view
layouts.
3. Create & modify objects: control the
properties of objects: include layer, line type,
color, line weight, and plot style. Use
precision tools, draw geometric objects, plot
and publish drawing.

4. Project
Pre-requisites

Practice or
Laboratory
36

MEng1061

105

Assessment

Time plan

Assignment-1, 10%
Class work-1, 5%

Week 1-4

Assignment-2, 10%
Class work-2, 5%

Week 5-8

Assignment-3, 7.5%
Class work-3, 5%

Week 9-12

Mini Project- 20%


Seminar/ jury
Presentation- 10%

Week 13-16

Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Year 2, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, Lab, class works, assignments
Mini Project...20%
Class works(three).....15%
Assignments(three)...25%
presentation ......................10%
Total..................................70%
Final Exam........................30%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.

Literature

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor ________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

106

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng2092
Construction Material
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Building Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5 CP
Lecture

Course Weight

Tutorial

35

Practice or
Laboratory
50

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

Objective of the course

Course Objectives

To provide basic knowledge about the materials needed in the fields of construction

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

On successful completion of this subject students should be able to:


(i)describe Engineering properties of concrete, steel and other materials
related to their use in construction;
(ii)assess the significance of environmental factors on the behavior and
durability of concrete and steel;
(iii)formulate Engineering solutions to problems associated with the use of
concrete, steel and other materials;
(iv)Prepare reports on practical exercises relevant to the manufacture and
properties of concrete.
This course introduces the production, nature and characteristics of
different construction materials and identifying them with respect to
their suitability to different Engineering structures.

Course Description
Course outline
Reference

Course Contents

107

Assessment

Time Plan

1. Chapter One: Nature& Properties of construction


Materials
1.1. Classification & Natures of Materials
1.2. Properties of Materials
1.3. Behavior of materials under load

TBA

2. Cementing Materials
2.1. Lime
2.2. Gypsum
2.3. Cement
2.4. Mortar
3. Concrete
3.1. Materials for concrete
3.2. Fresh concrete
3.3. Hardened concrete
3.4. Mix design
3.5. Quality control

Quize-1, 5%

Lab1; , 2.5%
TBA

Test 1-1, 5%

Lab 2, 2.5%
TBA

Mini Project-1, 10%

Lab 3 , 2.5%

4. Building stone
4.1. Classifications of stones
4.2. Tests on building stones

TBA

5. Clay & clay products


5.1. Bricks
5.2. Tiles
5.3. Other Types of Blocks
5.3.1. Stabilized soil blocks
5.3.2. Hollow Concrete Blocks
6. Metals & Timber
6.1. Ferrous metals
6.2. Non ferrous metals
6.3 Timber

Week 1 & 2

Week 3 & 4

Week 5- 7

Week 8 & 9

Lab4- 2.5%
TBA

Assignement-1, 5%

Week 10 & 11

Lab 5; 2.5%
Week 12 & 13

TBA
Assignement-2, 5%

Lab 6; 2.5%
Week 14

TBA

7. BITUMINOUS MATERIALS.

8. EDUCATIONAL TOUR

Industries in local which manufacture different


Construction Materials, Tests on Different
construction materials before use.
Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

TBA

None
Year 2, Semester II
Compulsory
Lecture
Workshop Practice

108

Presentation 5%

Week 15-16

Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Quize......5%
Test........5%
Laboratory Reports....15%
Mini Project .............................................10%
Assignments(two).....10%
Presentation...5%
Final Exam (50%)

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
7. AbebeDinku, Construction Materials
8. Marotta, Theodore, W. Basic Construction Materials. (2005). Pearson Prentice
Hall.
9. William P. Spencer. (2006). Construction Materials, Methods and Techniques.
Thomson Delmar Learning, 2nd Edition
10. Illston J. M. Construction Materials: Their Nature and Behavior, Taylor & Francis;
3rd Edition, 2001
11. Parbinsingh, Civil Engineering Materials
12. Don a. Watson, Construction Materials and Processes
13. A.M. Neville and J.J.Brooks, Concrete Technology

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

.
109

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng2093
Building Construction
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Building Engineering

Name:

Course
Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5 CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course
Description

Lecture

Tutorial

35

50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

Objective:
To understand the fundamentals of construction planning and design procedures,
and site selection.
To develop skills and knowledge in the preparation of working drawings.
To understand the concepts of various components of a low-rise building and their
construction methods.
To acquire a thorough understanding of the basics of framed structures, shell and
dome structures and prefabricated building systems.
Students will be able:
Select building site,
Prepare working drawing for buildings,
Understand the basics of framed and dome structures

The course introduces students with the different types of buildings, their components and
methods of construction. The overall building processes beginning from site works will be
covered

Course Content
1. Types of Buildings
2. Building Drawings
3. Site Works

Course outline
Reference
TBA
TBA
TBA

110

Assessment
TBA
TBA
TBA

Time Plan
WeekWeekWeek-

Site Features
Site Preparation
Setting out
4- Foundations
Shallow FoundationsTBA
Deep Foundations
5-Walls
Masonry
Load Bearing WallsTBA
Cavity Walls
Partition Walls
6-Floors
Floor below ground level
Floor above ground level
Suspended Floor

TBA

Week-

TBA

Week-

TBA

Week-

TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA

WeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeek-

TBA
TBA7-Stairs
TBA8-Doors and Windows
TBA9-Roofs and Roof Coverings
TBA10-Framed Structures
TBA11-Prefabricated Building Systems
TBA12-Powerhouse Construction
TBA13-Shell and Dome Structures

Pre-requisitesCEng2092
SemesterYear 3, Semester I
Status of CourseCompulsory
Lecture
Workshop Practice
Mode of delivery
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests....10%
Laboratory Reports .15%
Mode of
Mini Project 10%
assessment
Assignments10%
Class Attendance..5%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the Senate
Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest including
cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage during your
studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
111

soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally
important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

Literature

Approval Section

1. Edward Allen and Joseph, (2003 ),Fundamentals of Building


Construction: Materials and Methods, Wiley publishers; 4th edition.
2. AbebeDinku , (2007), A text book of building construction, AAU Press.
3. Francis D. K. Ching and Cassandra Adams, (2000), Building
Construction Illustrated, 3rd Edition, Wiley.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

112

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng3094
Fundamental of Architecture
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Building Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Course Weight

3 CP
Lecture
20

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Tutorial
0

Practice or
Laboratory
40

Home study

Total Hour

21

81

Objective:
To understand the fundamentals of construction planning and design
procedures, and site selection.
To develop skills and knowledge in the preparation of working drawings.
To understand the concepts of various components of a low-rise building and
their construction methods.
To acquire a thorough understanding of the basics offramed structures, shell
and dome structures andprefabricated building systems.

Students will be able to:


Read architectural drawings, structural drawings, sanitary drawings

The course includes introduction to architecture with regards to climatic condition,


landscape architecture and aesthetic design. It also includes space, structure and its
function, construction of structure related to architecture. It also deals with the
Course Description
drawing of architectural, structural, plumbing, electrical and connection detail aspects.
Reviewing of plans and drawing of other Engineering structure are also included in
the course.
Course outline
Course ContentReferenceAssessmentTime Plan
1. Introduction to Architecture:

113


Definition of terms

Principles of architecture

Codesandminimum

2.

3.

4.

5.

requirements
Basic elements of Architecture
Modifyingelementsof
architecture
Aesthetic Design
Climatic and Site Condition
Landscape Architecture
Space, Structure and Function:
Space and Structure, Space and
Function,Relationship
between the specified terms
Construction and Structure
Related to Architecture: Types
of structures related to
architecture,Architectural
breakthrough and famous
structures, Role of architects
and Civil Engineers
Architectural Drawing:
Vicinity map, Site development plan,
Floor plans, Elevations, Sectioning(
long and short direction),Perspective,
Different types of templates for
architectural designs
Structural Drawing:
Beam details, Column-Footing
details, Foundation plans, Slab,
staircase, and balusters, Roof
framing detail
Electrical Drawing and Power
Layout:
Power Layout, Lighting layout,
Riser diagram, Symbols and
legends used in electrical
drawings, Load schedule and
computation
Sanitary Drawing:
Plumbing layout, CWL and
DWL, Isometric view of
plumbing details, Plan and

6.

114

elevation of septic tanks,


Symbols and legends used in
sanitary drawings
7. Planning and Drawing of Building
Accessories:
Details of connections, Details
of Toilet and bath, Roofing
details
8. Review of Drawing for some Civil
Engineering projects:
Road construction drawings,
Bridge construction drawings,
Other CE structure
Pre-requisitesCEng2091,Co-requisite
SemesterYear 3, Semester I
Status of CourseCompulsory
Lecture
Laboratory Practice
Mode of delivery
Group Discussion
Home Works
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests....10%
Mini Projects 20%
Mode of assessmentPresentation ..5%
Assignments10%
Class Attendance..5%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

CEng3083

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1. Lorraine

Farrelly,

115

(2007),

TheFundamentals

of

Architecture,

AVA

Publishing.
2. MostafaAbd-El-Barr, Hesham El-Rewini ,(2004), Fundamentals of
ComputerOrganization and Architecture, Wiley-Interscience.
3. Edward Allen, Joseph Iano, (2003),Fundamentals of Building Construction
:Materials and Methods, Wiley publishers;4th edition.
4. Forrest Wilson, Ron Keenberg, and WilliamLoerke, (1990), Architecture:
FundamentalIssues Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

116

MODULE 10
FUNDAMENTALS OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING THEORIES MODULE [16 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering

Fundamentals of Structural Engineering Theories

Module Title

Module Category
Core
Module Number[10]
Module Code CEng-M1101
Total Study Hours in the Lecture Tut/Sem
Module
120150

Pra/Lab

Home Study

162432
To make the students able to identify material strength, stress analysis
due to shear, bending, compression, and torsion. Analyze determinate
structure and indeterminate structure and finally produce moment, shear,
axial, and torsion diagram and calculate deflection.
The main objectives of the module are to:
Identify the properties of structural materials
Stress analysis in compression, tension, bending ,torsion
members
Analyze and calculate deflection of determinate structures
Analyze Indeterminate structures using displacement methods
and produce bending, shear, axial, and torsion diagram
After completion of this module the students shall be able to;
Identify material structural properties
Able to calculate stress in structural members
Analyze determinate and indeterminate structures

Rationale of the module

Module Objectives

Module Competencies

Module
Delivery

Mode

Total Hour

of

Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach

The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as


follows:
Module Learning andLecture
Teaching MethodTutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests
Quizzes
ModuleAssessment
Assignments
Techniques
Discussions and Presentations
Active Participation
Class Attendance

117

Final Exam (50%)


Total ECTS
module

of

the

16 Credit Point

The study of advanced structural Engineering involves the analysis and


Module Description
design of special structures using concrete and steel.
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course
Course NameECTS
Number
CEng1101Strength of Materials6
CEng2102Theory of Structures I5
CEng2103Theory of Structures II5
Total ECTS16

118

CEng1101 Strength of Materials


Civil Engineering
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng1101
Strength of Materials
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
MCEng1091, Fundamentals of Structural Engineering Theories

Course Coordinator

Name:

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Credit Hour, CP
ECTS Credits,
Contact Hours (per
week)
Course Weight

4
6
6

Course Objectives &


Competences to be
Acquired

Lecture

Tutorial

50

50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home
study
62

Objective:
Develop and apply various analytical methods for determining the mechanical
behavior of solid bodies (for example: stress, strain, strength, stiffness, deflection, and
stability) subjected to various types of loading which include: axial loading, bending,
shear, torsion, or a combination.
Outcome:
Students will be able to:
Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and Engineering dealing with
mechanics of materials under axial loading, torsion, bending, and combined
loading.
Draw axial force, torque, shear and moment diagrams of simple members subject
to combined loading.
Compute stresses and strains in simple members subject to axial loading, torsion,
bending, and combined loading.
Compute deflection of beams.
Compute buckling load of compressive members.
Design components to meet desired needs in terms of strength and deflection.
Develop and apply various analytical methods for determining the mechanical
behavior of solid bodies (for example: stress, strain, strength, stiffness, deflection
and stability) subjected to various types of loading which include: axial loading,

119

Total
Hour
162

Course Description

bending, shear, torsion, or a combination


This course introduces the properties and strength of materials i.e. Flexure, Shear,
Torsion, Compound Stress analysis as well as Buckling of Compression Members.

Course Content
Chapter 1. Mechanical Properties of
Material.
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Normal stress-strain.
1.3 Stress-Strain relation.
1.4 Shear stress and strain
1.5 Allowable stresses and factor of

safety
1.6 Axially loaded members

Course Outline
Reference

Assessment

Course plan

[1],[2],[3]- PPTBA

Quize-1, 5%
Assignment-1 5%

Week 1-4

[1],[2],[3]- PPTBA

Assignment-2, 5%
Test 1, 5%

Week 5-7

[1],[2],[3]- PPTBA

Test 2, 5%

Week 8-9

1.7 Changes in Lengths of Axially


Loaded Members
1.8 Changes in Lengths under Nonuniform Conditions
1.9 Statically Indeterminate

Members
1.10 Thermal effect
Chapter 2. Flexural and Shearing
stresses.
2.1 Introduction

Types of Beams, Loads and


Reactions.
2.2 Relationship Between Loads Shear
Forces and Bending Moments
Shear Force and Bending Moment
Diagram.
2.3 Flexural Stresses in Beams
2.4 Derivation of Bending stress
equation for composite materials.
2.5 Shearing Stresses in Beams
Chapter 3. Torsion of Circular Shafts &
Power Transmission.
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Torsion of circular shafts
3.2 Non- Uniform Torsion
3.3 Transformation of power by

circular shafts.
120

Chapter 4. Compound Stresses.


4.1 Combined Stresses,
4.2 Plane Stress.
4.3 Principle Stresses Mohrs circle.

[1],[2],[3]- PPTBA

Chapter 5. Deflection in Beams


[1],[2],[3]- PP5.1 IntroductionAssignment-4, 5%
TBA
5.2 Direct integration Method.
Chapter 6. Buckling of Compression
Members
6.1 Introduction[1],[2],[3]- PP-Quize-2, 5%
6.2 Buckling and StabilityTBA
6.3 Euler formulas for various
boundary conditions.
Pre-requisitesCEng1041 Engineering Mechanics I and Math1051
Semester2nd
Status of CourseCompulsory
Lecture
Teaching & LearningTutorials
MethodsGroup Discussion

Assignment-3, 5%

Week 10-12

Week 13-14

Week 15-16

Home Works

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests(two)...10%
Quizzes(Two).10%
Assessment/Evaluation
Assignments(four)...20%
& Grading System
Discussions and Presentations....5%
Active Participation5%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.

121

Literature

Approval Section

- Basic texts (e.g. textbooks)


1. [1]Beer and Johnson. Mechanics of Materials, 3rd
Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2001.
2. [2]Mechanics of Materials by Timoshenko
3. [3]Popov, E.P. (1998) Engineering Mechanics of Solids 2 nd Edition, Prentice
Hall.
4. Morrov, H.I. & Kokernak, R.P. (2006), Statics and Strength of Materials, 6 th
Edition, Prentice Hall.
5. Pytel, A. & Kiusalaas, J. (2002), Mechanics of Materials, 1 st Edition,
Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.
6. Meriam, J.L. and Kraig, L.J. Engineering Mechanics
(Statics), 6th Edition, Wiley & Sons, 2006.
7. Other Related Sources not older than 5 years (older only in very exceptional
cases)

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

122

CEng 2102 Theory of Structures I


Civil Engineering Department
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program

CEng 2102
Theory of Structures I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Credit Hour
ECTS Credits
Contact Hours (per
week)

3
5
5

Lecture

Tutorial

Course Weight
Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Field Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home
study
50

Total Hour

3550135
Objective
This course provides an introduction to the analysis of determinate and indeterminate
structural systems common in Civil Engineering with software applications.

Outcome
Students will be able to:
Apply the methods of joints and sections to analyze statically determinate trusses.
Develop shear and moment diagrams of statically determinate beams, beam
assemblages, and frames.
Develop influence lines.
Apply the elastic beam theory and the double
integration, moment/area,
Conjugate beam, and energy methods to analyze the deformation of beams6, trusses,
and frames.

Course Description/
Course Contents

The courses introduces the calculation of determinate stuctures


Chapter 1
Structural Loads
Static determinacy and Stability of Structures
Chapter 2

123

Deflection of Structures by
- Direct Integration,
- Moment-Area,
- Conjugate Beam ,
- Virtual Work Method,
- Castiglianos and Maxwell
Betti Theorem
Chapter 3
Analysis of Indeterminate Structures by Method of
Consistent Deformations,
Energy Method, and
Three Moment Equations
Chapter 4
Influence Lines for Determinate Structures

Prerequisite CEng 1101, Strength of Materials


Semester
3rd
Status ofCompulsory
Course
Teaching & Learning
Lecture
Methods
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Assessment/Evaluation Continuous Assessment (50%)


& Grading SystemTests..10%
Quizzes..10%
Assignments..15%
Discussions and Presentations...5%
Active Participation5%
Class Attendance5%
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and

124

does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
Literature
1. Hibbler, R. C. Structural Analysis, 6th Edition, PrenticeHall,
2005.
2. Leet, M., et al. Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, 2nd
Edition, McGraw Hill, 2004.
3. M.S. Williams, Structures: Theory and Analysis, Palgrave
Macmillan., 1999
3. Theory of Structures by Aslam Kassimali
4. Full bibliographic citation; sources not older than 5 years (older only in very
exceptional cases)
5. Nigussie Tebedge, Methods of Structural Analysis, 1983, AAU
6. Basic texts (e.g. Handout)

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

125

CEng2103 Theory of Structures-II


Civil Engineering Department
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng2103
Theory of Structures II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
CEng-M1101, Structural Engineering Theories

Course Coordinator

Name:

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Credit Point
ECTS Credits
Contact Hours (per
week)
Course Weight

3
5
5

Lecture

Course Objectives &


Competences to be
Acquired

Tutorial

Field Practice or
Laboratory

Home
study
50

Total Hour

3550135
Objective:
This course provides an introduction to the analysis of
indeterminate structural systems common in Civil
Engineering.
Outcome:
Students will be able to:
Identify, formulate, and solve support reactions of trusses, beams, and frames.
Apply the displacement method to analyze statically indeterminate beams and
frames.
Use approximate methods to evaluate the statically indeterminate structural
responses.
Employ the stiffness method to solve complex trusses, beams, and frames.
Analyze indeterminate structures using structural analysis soft-wares

Course Description
Course Contents
Course ContentReference
Chapter I Analysis of indeterminate structures
[1],[2],[3] &[6],
1.1Displacement Method
PP-TBA
a. Kinematic indeterminacy

Assessment
Mini Project
(Manual)-1, 10%

126

Time Plan
Week 1-8

b. Slope deflection MethodPresentation 5%


c. Moment Distribution Method
d. Kanis MethodAssignment-1, 5%
i. Frames without Side Sway
ii. Frames with Side Sway
1.2 Approximate Methods of indeterminate
structures
Chapter 2 Influence lines for Indeterminate
Structures.
[1],[2],[3] &[6],
Week 9-102.1 Beams and FramesTest-1, 10%

PP-TBA
2.2 Truss
2.2 Arches
Chapter 3 Introduction to Matrix Methods
[1],[2],[3] &[6],
Week 11-123 .1 Stiffness MethodAssignment-2, 5%

PP-TBA
3.2 flexibility Method

Chapter 4 Introduction to Computer Oriented


Mini Project
Structural Analysis[1],[2],[3] &[6],
Week 13-16(Computer

4.1 The Flexibility MethodPP-TBA


Oriented)-2, 10%
4.2 The Stiffness Method
Pre-requisitesCEng 2102, Theory of Structures I
Semester4th
Status of CourseCompulsory
Teaching & LearningLecture
TutorialsMethods
Group Discussion
Home Works

Assessment/Evaluation Continuous Assessment (50%)


& Grading SystemTest..10%
Mini Project.20%
Assignments..10%
Presentations...5%
Active Participation5%
Final Exam (50%)
AttendanceMinimum 80%
Requirements
Literature
[1.] Hibbler, R. C. Structural Analysis, 6 th & 8th Edition, PrenticeHall, 2005.
[2.] Theory of Structures by Aslam Kassimali
[3.] Nigussie Tebedge, Methods of Structural Analysis, 1983, AAU
4. Leet, M., et al. Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, 2 nd Edition, McGraw Hill,
2004.
5. M.S. Williams, Structures: Theory and Analysis, Palgrave Macmillan., 1999
[6.] Building Codes, EBCS 1& 8, 1995

127

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

128

MODULE 11
CONCRETE STRUCTURES [10 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

Concrete Structures

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code
Total Study Hours in
the Module

Core
[11]
CEng-M3111
Lecture Tutorial/Seminar

70

Module Description
Module Objectives

Module
Competencies

100

Practice/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

100

270

Structural concrete are mainly used to construct load bearing structures such as
buildings and bridges. Hence, students should be made familiar with sections
composed of concrete and steel as applied to frames and foundations.
The main objective of the module is to:
- Provide an introduction to the use of structural concrete as used in
structures and foundations.
After completion of this module the students shall be able to;
- comprehends structural mechanics of reinforced structure and apply the
knowledge in the design of basic RC structural elements
- design reinforced concrete components such as beams, slabs and columns

Module Mode of
Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach
Delivery
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Module Learning Lecture, Tutorials
and Teaching
Construction Site Visit
Method
Group Discussion, Home Works
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments
Module Assessment
Class Attendance
Techniques
Field Report
Mini projects
Presentations
Final Exam (50%)
Total ECTS of the module10 Credit Point
Course Number
CEng3111
CEng3112

Course Name
Reinforced Concrete Structures I

ECTS
5
5

Reinforced Concrete Structures II


Total ECTS

10

129

CENG 3111 - Reinforced Concrete Structures I


Department of Civil Engineering
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng 3111
Reinforced Concrete Structures I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
MCEng3101, Concrete Structures

Course Coordinator

Name:

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

5
Lecture

Tutorial

Contact Hours
Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Description
Course Contents

Practice or
Laboratory

Home
study
50

3550
Objective
This course provides an introduction to the use of structural concrete as used in
structures and foundations.
Outcome
Students will be able to:
Analyze and design singly and doubly reinforced concrete beams under flexure,
including regular (rectangular shaped) and T-beams.
Analyze and design structural concrete beams subjected to shear loading.
Conduct a service load analysis to control deflection and cracking of beams.
Analyze and design reinforced concrete columns and develop moment axial load
interaction curves.
Determine bond length, lap splice and detailing requirements for reinforced concrete
members.

Chapter 1 Introduction to Reinforced Concrete Design


Mechanical Properties of concrete and reinforcing steel.
Concrete Mix Design.
Chapter 2 Basic Concepts of Design
Design Philosophy
Limit State Design (LSD) method.
Chapter 3 Design of beams
Singly and doubly reinforced for Rectangular and T-sections.
Design Aids.

130

Total
Hour
135

Detailing of flexural reinforcement.


Shear in beams - truss model. Bond, anchorage and development length.
Detailing of shear reinforcement.
Chapter 4 Design of Slabs
One-way solid and ribbed slabs on ULS method.
Two-way solid slabs.
Serviceability- elastic analysis of beam sections, cracking, moment curvature
relationship, deflection.
Chapter 5 Comparison of hand calculations with SAP/Etabs/Excel
Pre-requisitesCEng 2103, Theory of Structure II
Semester6th
Status of CourseCompulsory
Teaching & LearningLecture
TutorialsMethods
Construction Site Visit
Group Discussion
Home Works

Assessment/Evaluation Continuous Assessment (50%)


& Grading SystemTests..10%
Mini Project15%
Field Report.5%
Assignments..10%
Presentations...5%
Class Attendance5%s
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1. Arthur H Nelson, Design of concrete structures, McGraw-Hill, 14th Edition,
2010
2. James Macgregor, Reinforced Concrete Mechanics and Design, 5 th Edition.
3. W.H. Mosley, R. Hulse, J.H Bungey, Reinforced Concrete Design, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2007

131

3. Jack C. McCormac, Design of Reinforced Concrete, McGraw-Hill, 2005


4. Ethiopian Building Code Standard 2 (EBCS 2), 1995
5. Any Related Book

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

132

CEng3112 Reinforced Concrete Structures II


Department of Civil Engineering
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng3112
Reinforced Concrete Structures II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
MCEng3101, Concrete Structures

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Credit points
ECTS Credits
Contact Hours

3
5
Lecture

Course Objectives &


Competences to be
Acquired

Tutorial

Home
study
50

Total Hour

3550135
Objective
This course is designed to introduce students to the design of reinforced concrete
components such as slabs and columns.
Outcome
Students will be able to design reinforced concrete of
Columns
Flat slabs,
Continuous beams,
Two way slab using yield line method
Torsion

Course Description

Course Outline

Practice or
Laboratory

Chapter 1. Columns
- Short columns
- Combined axial force and bending
- Interaction diagrams, biaxial bending.
- Design aids.
- Slender columns.
Chapter 2 Design of Flat slabs
- - Introduction
- - Load transfer in flat slabs
- - Distribution of moments in flat slabs
- - Practical analysis of flat slabs

133

- - Design of flat slabs as per EBCS 2


Chapter 3 Inelastic Moment Redistribution
- Introduction
- Non-linear analysis of indeterminate structures
- Plastic hinge and collapse mechanisms
- Moment redistribution as per EBCS 2 Continuous beams.
Chapter 4 Yield Line Theory for Slabs
- Introduction
- Upper and lower bound theorems
- Methods of yield line analysis
- Moments along skewed line
- Effects of restrained corners
Chapter 5 Torsion in Reinforced Concrete members
Chapter 6 Introduction to Pre-stressed Concrete Structures
- Introduction
- Basic concepts of pre-stressed concrete
- Analysis and design of pre-stressed members as per EBCS 2
Chapter 7 Special Structural Elements
- Introduction
- Behavior of deep beams
- Strut and tie models for the design of deep beams
- Design of deep beams as per EBSC 2
- Behavior of corbels
- Strut and tie models for the design of corbels
- Design of corbels as per EBSC 2
Pre-requisitesCEng3111 Reinforced Concrete I
Semester8th
Status of CourseCompulsory
Teaching & LearningLecture
TutorialsMethods
Construction Site Visit
Group Discussion
Home Works
Assessment/Evaluation Continuous Assessment (50%)
& Grading SystemTests..10%
Mini Project15%
Field Report.5%
Assignments..10%
Presentations...5%
Class Attendance5%s
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
134

at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
Literature

Approval Section

1. Arthur H Nelson, Design of concrete structures, McGraw-Hill, 14th Edition, 2010


2. James Macgregor Reinforced Concrete Mechanics and Design, 5th Edition.
3. W.H. Mosley, R. Hulse, J.H Bungey, Reinforced Concrete Design, Palgrave
Macmillan, 2007
4. Jack C. McCormac, Design of Reinforced Concrete, McGraw-Hill, 2005
5. Ethiopian Building Code Standard 2 (EBCS 2), 1995
6. Any Related Book

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

135

Module 12
DESIGN OF STRUCTURES MODULE [9 ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

Design of structures

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

01,Core
[12]
CEng-M5121
Pra/LabHome StudyTotal HourTotal Study Hours in Lecture Tut/Sem

the Module
105135138378
Rationale of the Design of steel and timber structures and introduction to fundamentals of bridge
design. Finally produce detail drawingsmodule
The main objectives of the module are to:
Design steel and Timber structural members for tension, compression,
bending, shear or torsion or the combined action of compression and
Module Objectives
bending, bending ,shear and torsion
Design of connection and detail drawing
Introduction to fundamentals of bridge design
Module
Competencies
Module Mode
Delivery

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


Design steel structural members such as beams, columns and trusses
Prepare detail drawings
Classify ,select and design bridges
of Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach

The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:


Lecture
Module Learning
Tutorials
and Teaching
Construction Site Visit
Method
Group Discussion
Home Works
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments
Module Assessment
Class Attendance
Techniques
Field Report
Mini projects
Presentations
Final Exam (50%)
Total ECTS of the
9 Credit Point
module
The design of steel and timber structures and introduction to fundamentals ofModule Description
136

bridge design.
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course NumberCourse Name
CEng5121Fundamental of Bridge Design
CEng4122Steel & Timber Structures
CEng5123Structural Design
Total ECTS

ECTS
4
5
5
14

137

CEng5121 Fundamentals of Bridge Design

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng5121
Fundamentals of Bridge Design
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
MCENG 5111, Design of Structures

Course Coordinator

Name:

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits
Course Weight

4
Lecture

Tutorial
35

35

Field Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

38

Course Objectives &


Competences to be
Acquired
Course Description
Course Contents
Chapter 1Investigation for Bridge
General Introduction
Elements of Bridge Project
Design Objectives
Design Philosophy and Specification
Site Selection and Data Collection
Site Investigation
Span Determination
Chapter 2 Bridge Type and Selection
Bridge Classification [Reinforced concrete (slab, girder, and frame), arch, cable
stayed and suspension.]
Geometry of bridges (length, cross-section).
Materials
Structural Arrangements
Chapter 3 Bridge Loading and Design Methods
Gravity Loads
Lateral Loads
Forces due to Deformation

138

108

Collision Loads
Water Loads
Chapter 4 Super Structure Design of Bridge
Concrete Deck Design
T-Girder
Box Girder Design
Overhang Design
Walkway and Handrail
Chapter 5 Sub Structure Design Bridge
Elements of Sub Structure Design (Abutment, Pier)
Chapter 6 Bearing and Railing
Bearing Design
Railing Design
Chapter 7 Low Level Water Crossing and Culverts
Design of Low Level Water Crossing
Design of Culverts

Chapter 8 Bridge Construction Methods and Maintenance (Optional)


Pre-requisitesCEng3112, Reinforced Concrete Structure II and CEng3154
Semester9th or 10th
Status of CourseCompulsory
Teaching & LearningLecture
TutorialsMethods
Construction Site Visit
Group Discussion
Home Works
Assessment/Evaluation Continuous Assessment (50%)
& Grading SystemTests..10%
Mini Project15%
Field Report.5%
Assignments..10%
Presentations...5%
Class Attendance5%s
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.

139

Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
Literature

Approval Section

1. T.R. Jagadeesh and M.A. Jyaram, Design of Bridge Structures, Prentice-Hall of


India Pvt. Ltd 2004
2. Richard M. Barker and Jay A. Puckett, Design of
Highway Bridges: An LRFD Approach, Wiley
Publisher 2006
3. AASHTO Design Specifications: SI Units 2nd
Edition, 1998
4. Ethiopian Roads Authority Manuals, 2004.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

140

CEng4122 Steel and Timber Structure


Department of Civil Engineering
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng4122
Steel & Timber Structure
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
CEng-M 5121, Design of Structures

Course Coordinator

Name:

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits
Contact Hours (per
week)

5
3
Lecture

Tutorial

35

50

Field Practice or
Laboratory
0

Course Weight
Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Description

Course Contents

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

Objective
To introduce students to timber and steel structures as applied to various
constructions such as bridges , trusses , buildings, etc
Outcome
Students will have the ability to design timber and steel structures, connections, and
apply the EBCS for the design purpose.

This course induces the structural design of steel and timber structural members
subjected to tension, compression, bending and shearing stress, bending ,torsion and
shearing, bending and axial compression uniaxial or biaxial stress using EBCS 3,
1995 and EBCS 5, 1995 codes and preparing detail drawings
Mechanical properties of structural steel.
Structural shapes.
Structural bolts.
Ethiopian Building Code Standard 3
Standards for design of steel structures.
Tension and compression members.
Bending Members.
Plate girders.
Beam column members
Structural connections.

141

Pre-requisites
Semester

Design
of built up steel members.

Physical
and mechanical properties of timber.
Ethiopian Building Code Standards for design of timber.
CEng2103, Theory of Structure II
th

9
Status of CourseCompulsory
Teaching & LearningLecture
TutorialsMethods
Construction Site Visit
Group Discussion
Home Works
Assessment/Evaluation Continuous Assessment (50%)
& Grading SystemTests..10%
Mini Project15%
Field Report.5%
Assignments..10%
Presentations...5%
Class Attendance5%s
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1. W.M.C. McKenzie, Design of structural Steel Work, Palgrave Macmillan.., 1998
2. W.M.C. McKenzie, Design of structural Timber, Palgrave Macmillan..,2000
3. R. L Brocken brough &F. S. Merritt, Structural Steel Designer's Handbook,
McGraw-Hill, 1999
4. EBCS-3 Ethiopian Building Code Standard-Design of Steel Structures, 1995
5. EBCS-5: Ethiopian Building Code Standard utilization of timber,1995

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
142

Signature
Name of department head
Signature

143

date
date

CEng5123 Structural Design


Department of Civil Engineering
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng5123
Structural Design
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
MCEng5212, Advanced Structural Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

5
Lecture

Tutorial

Course Weight
Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Description
Course Contents

Semester
Pre-requisites
Status of Course

Field Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home
study
50

3550
Objective
The course is design to provide students with background on various types of loading
on structures.
Outcome
At the end of this course, students will be able to:
Design lateral-load resisting systems
Carry out plastic analysis of frames structures
Design detailing and connections

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Wind loads, earthquake loads, Ethiopian


Building Code Standards for wind and earthquake loads.
Lateral load-resisting systems in buildings.
Stable arrangement of structural systems and distribution of lateral loads.
Plastic analysis for framed structures (plastic hinge and plastic zone theory).
Simple strip method for slabs.
Composite steel concrete structures.
Introduction to elastic stability theory.
Detailing and connections.

9th or 10th
CEng3112, Reinforced Concrete Structure II
Compulsory

144

Total
Hour
135

Teaching & Learninglectures, tutorials, project work


Methods
Assessment/Evaluation - Written (Final) Examination 50%
& Grading System- Continuous Assessment 50% It comprises of
- Quiz & Assignments 20%
- Project Work & Presentation 30%

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1. Jack C. McCormac. (2007). Structural Steel Design,
McGraw-Hill.
2. Arthur H Nilson. (2003). Design of concrete structures, McGraw-Hill.
3. EBCS 1, EBCS 2, and EBCS 8, The Ethiopian
Building Code of standards, 1995.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

145

MODULE 13
FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING [13 ECTS]
Module Name
Module Category
Module Number
Module Code
Total EtCTS of the
Module
Total Study Hour
Objectives

Competency

Mode of delivery
Module learning
teaching methods

Module assessment
techniques

Department of Civil Engineering


Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering
Core
13
CEng-M2131
13

351
Civil Engineers need solid knowledge of soils and rocks to design infrastructure
on/in soils and rocks. The objective of this module is to offer an introduction to the
field of geotechnical Engineering, and to provide an understanding of the basic soil
and rock behavior through experience with common soil laboratory testing
procedures. This module is a prerequisite for the Foundation Engineering module.
The competency of this module is students will be able to solve several classical
problems in Civil Engineering problems such as settlement, shear failure, load
bearing capacity, earth pressure and stability problems related to the behaviors of
soils and rocks.
Basically on Semester Basis or Parallel approach
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Construction Site Visit
Group Discussion
Home Works
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests, Quizzes
Assignments
Class Attendance
Field Report
Mini projects
Presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Courses of the Module


Course Number
CEng2132
CEng2131
CEng3133

Course Name
Engineering Geology
Soil Mechanics I
Soil Mechanics II
Total

EtCTS
3
5
5
13

146

Course Code
Course Name
Degree Program
Module
Module Coordinator
Lecturer
EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Course Description/ Course


Contents

Department of Civil Engineering


Engineering Geology
CEng2132
Engineering Geology
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering
TBA
TBA
3
Lecture . 45 hrs
Assessment .. 07 hrs
Home Study ............. 29 hrs
Total 81 hrs
To provide an introduction to the geotechnical significance of earth
materials, rock defects, structural geology, geomorphology,
hydrogeology, active tectonics, earthquakes, volcanism, erosion and
mass movement in the Civil Engineering practice
At the end of the course, students will be introduced to the relevant
terminology, classifications and concepts with the aim of ensuring
effective communication between engineers and Engineering
geologists in the geotechnical team.
Introduction: The earth & its interior, Geology & its applied
branch, Importance of geology in Civil Engineering.
Minerals & rocks: Classification & types of minerals, rock
forming minerals, types of rocks.
Geologic structures and their effect on structures: Folds, faults
and joints.
Weathering and its implication: physical, chemical, biological
weathering.
Earthquake and seismic design: Causes & classification of
earthquakes, Effects of earthquakes, precautionary measures.
Geological investigation: Phases and methods of investigation,
geological considerations in structures (dams, reservoirs,
tunnels, road &bridges, buildings)
None
IV
Compulsory

Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the Course
Learning teaching methods
Lecture
Tutorials
Construction Site Visit
147

Assessment techniques

Attendance Requirements
Literature

Group Discussion
Home Works
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests..10%
Quizzes ..10%
Field Report10%
Assignments...10%
Presentations...5%
Class Attendance.5%s
Final Exam (50%)

Minimum of 80 % attendance during lectures and 100 % attendance


during practical work sessions, except some unprecedented mishaps.
1. Bell, F.G. (2007), Engineering geology, 2nd edition, ButterworthHeinemann.
2. Kehew, A. E. (2006), Geology for Engineers and Environmental
Scientists, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall.
3. Press, F. Siever, R. Grotzinger, J., & Jordan, T. (2003),
Understanding Earth, 4th edition, W. H. Freeman.

148

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Name

CEng2131
Soil Mechanics I

Degree Program
Module

B.Sc. in Civil Engineering


Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering
Name:

Course
Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5
Lecture . 30 hrs
Laboratory ... 45 hrs
Assessment| Tutorial ... 10 hrs
Home Study ............. 50 hrs
Total 135 hrs
This course is designed to introduce Civil Engineering students to the
properties and behavior of soil as an Engineering material and their application
in the solution of certain Civil Engineering problems such as compressibility
of soil, seepage, retaining walls and stability of slopes.
The student will be able to:
Evaluate and classify soils.
Evaluate the state of stress in a soil mass.
Calculate seepage volume through a soil mass.
Estimate settlement magnitude of compressible soils.
Evaluate lateral earth pressures on retaining walls.
Perform slope stability analysis.
Introductions: definitions, soil formations, common soil types.
Simple soil properties and soil classifications: weight - volume
relationships, grain size distribution, soil consistency.
Engineering soil classifications.
Soil water and seepage: soil water, permeability, flow nets, seepage,
pressures and forces in soil water.
Compressibility and consolidation of soils: general measurement of
compressibility, consolidation of soils.

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Course
Description/

149

Stress distribution in soils and settlement analysis: stress distribution


under own weight of soils and different loading conditions, elastic and
consolidation settlement.
(Laboratory tests: specific gravity determination, grain - size analysis,
consistency tests, permeability tests, consolidation tests.)
Course outline
Course contentReferenceAssessmentTime Plan

Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1. Definition of Soil Mechanics
1.2. Soil, Geotechnical Engineering and Soil
Mechanics
1.3. Soil Mechanics and Foundation
Engineering
1.4. Formation of soils
1.5. General types of soils

[1],[2],[3] pp
TBA

Chapter 2 Physical Characteristics of


Soils
2.1. The phase diagram
2.2. Soil Phase Relationship
2.3. Particle Size Analysis
2.4. Consistency of Clay Soils
2.5. Index Properties of Soils
2.6. Classification of Soils

[1],[2],[3] pp
TBA

Laboratory-1, 5%

[1],[2],[3] pp
TBA

Laboratory-2, 5%
Test-1, 5%

[1],[2],[3] pp
TBA

Laboratory-3, 5%

Chapter 3 Effective Stress and Pore


Water Pressure
3.1. Effective Stress Principles
3.2. Effect of Water Table Fluctuations on
Effective Stress
3.3. Effective Stress in a Soil Mass under
Hydrostatic Conditions
3.4. Effective Stresses in Soils Saturated By
Capillary Action
3.5. Effective Stress and Surcharge
3.6. Effective Stress and Seepage Pressure
3.7. Effective Stress in Partially Saturated
Soils
Chapter 4 Soil Permeability and Seepage
4.1. Soil Permeability
4.2. Hydraulic Head
4.3. Darcys Law
4.4. Determination of Coefficient of
Permeability
4.5. Permeability of Stratified Soil Deposits

Quize-1, 5%

Week 3-5

Week 6-8

Week 9-11
Quize-2, 5%

150

Week 1-2

4.6. Seepage through Soils


4.7. Laplaces Equation
4.8. Stream and Potential Functions
4.9. Characteristics and Construction of
Flow Net
4.10. Seepage through Earth Dams

Chapter 5 Compressibility and


Consolidation of Soils
5.1. Initial, Primary and Secondary
Consolidation
5.2. Basic Terms Related to Consolidation
5.3. Consolidation Test
5.4. Determination of Void Ratio in
Consolidation Testes
5.5. Terzaghis Theory of Consolidation
5.6. Determination of Coefficient of
Consolidation
5.7. Pre-Consolidation

[1],[2],[3] pp
TBA

Laboratory-4, 5%

Week 12-14

6.Compaction
[1],[2],[3] pp
6.1 Field compaction testsLaboratory-5, 5%
TBA
6.2 Field control of compaction
Continuous Assessment (50%)Assessment
Test..5%techniques
Quizzes(two) .10%
Laboratory Report.25%
Assignments..........5%
Participation......5%
Final Exam (50%)

Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the
Course
Learning
teaching methods

Course policy

Week 15-16

CEng2151 & CEng1101


IV
Compulsory

Lecture, laboratory and field tests, field visits


All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
151

Literature

Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
References:
1. [1]Das, Braja, Principles of Geotechnical Engineering,
ed.,Brooks/Cole, 2002.
2. [2] Arora, D. K. (n.d.). Soil mechanics and Foundaion Engineering.
Atkinson, J. (n.d.)

3. [3] Teferra, A. & Mesfin, L., Soil Mechanics, AAU.


4. Budhu M. (2000), Soil Mechanics and Foundations, Wiley and Sons.
5. Lambe, T. W., Whitman, R. V. (1999), Soil Mechanics, John Wiley &
Sons Inc.
6. The Mechanics of Soils and Foundations (
7. 2nd ed.).Helwany, S. (n.d.). Applied Soil Mechanics.Murthy, V. (n.d.).
Geotechnical Engineering, Principles and Practices of Soil Mechanics and
Foundation Engineering. Scott, C. (n.d.). Soil Mechanics and Foundaions ( 3rd
ed.) . ( M. S. B.A M.I.C.E., Ed.)

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

152

5th

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Name

CEng3133
Soil
Mechanics II

Degree
Program
Module

B.Sc. in Civil Engineering


Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering
Name:

Course
Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5

EtCTS
Credits
Study Hour Lecture . 30 hrs

Laboratory ... 45 hrs


Assessment .. 10 hrs
Home Study ............. 50 hrs
Total 135 hrs
ObjectivesStudents will incorporate and utilize technology in Geotechnical analysis.
Competencies Students will demonstrate an understanding of fundamental soil behaviour
with applications in areas of earth pressures, changing stress, soil strength
parameters, prediction of settlements, and prediction of bearing capacities.
Students will understand common laboratory techniques.
Shear strength of soils: shear resistance of soils, stress at a point andCourse
Mohr stress circle, shear characteristics of soils, Mohr-Coulomb failure
Description/
criteria, shear tests.
Course
Contact pressure distribution: theoretical and approximate contact
Contents
pressure distribution.
Bearing capacity of soils: general determination of bearing capacity of
soils using different methods.
Lateral earth pressure: lateral earth pressure problems, earth pressure
153theories.
Slope stability problems: slope movements, slope stability analysis.
(Laboratory tests: direct shear test, triaxial compression test,
unconfined compression test.)

Pre-requisite CEng2131
SemesterV
Status of theCompulsory
Course
Learning teaching methodsLecture, laboratory and field tests, field visits
AssessmentContinuous assessment (quizzes, tests, class works, assignments, laboratory
techniquesand field works and presentations) and final exam
Course Policy All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Minimum of 80 % attendance
during lectures and 100 % attendance during practical work sessions, except
some unprecedented mishaps. A student who misses more than 20% of the
semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally
important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
Literature1. Das, Braja, Principles of Geotechnical Engineering, 5th ed.,Brooks/Cole,
2002.
2. Budhu M. (2000), Soil Mechanics and Foundations, Wiley and Sons.
3. Lambe, T. W., Whitman, R. V. (1999), Soil Mechanics, John Wiley &
Sons Inc.
4. Teferra, A. & Mesfin, L., Soil Mechanics, AAU
5. Craig, R.F. (2004), Craig's Soil Mechanics, 7th edition, Taylor & Francis.
Name of course Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate______________
ApprovalName of course team leader _______________________________
SectionSignaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

154

MODULE 14
GEOTECHNICAL DESIGN [10 ECTS]

Module Name
Module Category
Module Number
Module Code
Total EtCTS of the
Module
Total Study Hour
Objectives

Competencies

Department of Civil Engineering


Geotechnical Design
Core
14
CEng-M3141
10

270
In practice Civil Engineers are required to design and propose foundations for
a variety of infrastructure. The purpose of this module is to provide the
students with a solid knowledge and understanding of the principles
governing the design and analysis of foundation systems for structures
and to provide them with an opportunity to apply the design procedures
learned in class to a "real life" foundation design project.
Students will be able to understand and formulate a foundation design
problem, able to compute the design bearing capacity of shallow and deep
foundations, able to compute the settlement of shallow and deep
foundations, able to analyze the forces on and stability of retaining walls,
and able to develop the pressure and force diagrams needed to produce
shear and moment diagrams for foundation design.
Parallel
Lectures, tutorials, assignments, class works, mini projects and field visits

Mode of Delivery
Learning Teaching
Method

Module Assessment
Techniques

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.
Continuous assessment (quizzes, tests, assignments, mini projects, class
works, reports and presentations) and final exam
Courses of the Module

Course Number
CEng3141
CEng4142

Course Name
Foundation Engineering I
Foundation Engineering II
Total ECTS

EtCTS
5
5
10

155

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

CEng3141
Foundation Engineering I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Geotechnical Design

Name:
Course
Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Course
Description/
Course Contents

Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the
Course
Mode of Delivery
Mode of

Lecture . 35 hrs
Tutorial .... 50 hrs
Home Study ............. 50 hrs
Total 135 hrs
To equip students with a sound knowledge about site exploration methods, selection
of foundation type, analysis and design of shallow foundations and retaining
structures.
The student shall be able to:
Plan a geotechnical site investigation program.
Design different types of shallow foundations.
Design earth retaining walls.
Site exploration: purpose, plan and methods of soil explorations, evaluation of
field tests data.
Types of foundations and their selection.
Introduction to Ethiopia standards and other standards in foundations area.
Design of shallow foundations: isolated or spread footings, combined
footings, strap or cantilevered footings, mat foundations, eccentrically and
inclined loaded foundations.
Analysis and design of retaining structures: conventional retaining walls,
introduction to soil reinforcement techniques, sheet pile walls.
Comparison of hand calculations with SAFE/PLAXIS/GEOSLOPE
CEng3133 and CEng3111
VI
Compulsory

Lectures, tutorials, assignments, class works, mini projects and field visits
Continuous assessment (quizzes, tests, assignments, mini projects, class works,156

Assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

reports and presentations) and final exam

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1. Bowles, J. E., Foundation Analysis and Design, McGraw-Hill.
2. Das, B. M., Principles of Foundation Engineering, PWS pub. Co.
3. Tefera, A., Principles of Foundation Engineering, AAU.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

157

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

CEng4142
Foundation Engineering II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Geotechnical Design

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Course Description/
Course Contents

Lecture . 35 hrs
Tutorial .... 50 hrs
Home Study ............. 50 hrs
Total 135 hrs
To equip students with a sound knowledge about pile foundations, cofferdams and
caissons, foundations of expansive soils and environmental issues in soil mechanics
and foundation areas.

The student shall be able to:


Design deep foundations such as piles and pile raft foundations.
Understand & interpret the behavior of expansive soils and be able to
design foundations on expansive soils and take remedial measures.
Understand the environmental issues in geotechnical Engineering.
Pile foundations: classification, properties, pile capacity, negative skin friction,
pile group, pile caps, batter piles, and laterally loaded piles.
Introduction to piled raft foundations.
Cofferdams and caissons (short exposure).
Introduction to foundations of expansive soils: characteristics of expansive
soils, Physical properties of expansive soils, mechanisms of swelling, methods
of preventing heave damage, investigation of cracked buildings in expansive
soil areas and the remedial measures.
Environmental issues in soil mechanics and foundation areas: interference of
retaining structures on the environments, effects of burrow and fill sites on the
environment, effects of sanitary fill sites on the environment.
CEng3141
VII
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials, assignments, class works, mini projects and field visits

Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the Course
Mode of Delivery

158

Mode of Assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

Continuous assessment (quizzes, tests, assignments, mini projects, class works,


reports and presentations) and final exam

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1.Bowles, J. E., Foundation Analysis and Design, McGraw-Hill.
2.Das, B. M., Principles of Foundation Engineering, PWS pub. Co.
3.Tefera, A., Principles of Foundation Engineering, AAU.
4.Tomlinson, M.J. and Boorman, R. (2001), Foundation Design and Construction,
7th edition, Longman Group United Kingdom.
5. Coduto, D.P. (2001), Foundation Design: Principles and Practices, 2nd edition,
Prentice Hall.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

159

Module 15
Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics Module
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

01
[015]
CEng-M2151

Total Study Hours


in the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Module
Competencies

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

14065135200540
A Civil engineer needs to understand the water cycle near the surface of the
earth since many of the infrastructures built are one way or another are
affected by the same cycle. In order to design irrigation, water supply and
hydropower infrastructure, a need arises as to what amount of water is
available for direct use.

Water is delivered to the point of use either in closed conduits or open


channels. The sizing of these conveyance structures requires sound
understanding of continuity equation, conservation of momentum, and
conservation of energy and their application.
This module is required in order to analyses such problems.

The main objectives of the module are to:


Understand how elements of the hydrologic cycle impact in Civil and
environmental Engineering systems.
Understand how to use hydrology to design hydraulic systems.
Understand the importance of a probabilistic approach of analysis.
Understand how observations of the hydrologic cycle are made and
how they can be appropriately used.
Understand how to predict risks and reliabilities of flood control
systems
Be familiar with the field of hydraulics
for given flows and conditions, be able to dimension pipes and
channels;
learn the fundamentals of sediment transport;
learn the principles of flow modeling in hydraulic Engineering;
gain understanding of the methods and applications of hydraulic
research

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


Analysis of Hydrological methods, water supply and elementary

160

hydraulic structures
Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning
and Teaching
Method
Module Assessment
Techniques
Total ECTS of the
module
Module Description

Parallel

Lectures, tutorials, laboratory, exercises, Project

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment


should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
20 Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course
Number
CEng2151
CEng2152
CEng3153
CEng3154

Course Name
Hydraulics I
Hydraulics II
Open Channel Hydraulics
Engineering Hydrology
Total ECTS

ECTS
5
5
5
5
20

161

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng2151
Hydraulics I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5 CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Lecture

Tutorial

30

10

Practice or
Laboratory
45

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

To introduce junior Civil Engineers to fluid mechanics at a more fundamental


level and with a more mathematical approach

Students will be able to:


Understand the mechanical properties of fluids (density, viscosity, stress/strain
relationship) and their relation to molecular properties.
Discern between laminar and turbulent flow.
Compute forces on structures (e.g. dams) resulting from fluid pressure.
Understand fluid pressure distributions in moving fluids.
Perform control volume analyses of mass, momentum, and energy conservation
in accordance with Reynolds Transport Theorem.
Understand and compute drag and lift forces.
Properties of fluids.
Hydrostatics: Eulers basic equation, relative equilibrium.
Manometry.
Hydrostatic forces on plane and curved surfaces. Tensile stress in pipes.
Buoyancy and stability of floating bodies. Kinematics of fluid flow.
Flow net analysis.

Course Description

162

Continuity and Bernoullis equations.


Impulse and momentum principle and itsapplications.
Boundary layer theory: concepts, growth, energy and momentum thickness,
laminar sub-layer

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

2.0
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4

Course outline

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

CHAPTER 2: FLUID PROPERTIES


General description
Properties of fluids
Physical Properties
Pressure, compressibility & Elasticity
Surface tension & capillarity

CHAPTER -3 HYDROSTATICS OF FLUIDS


3.0 Introduction
3.1Hydrostatic pressure at a point
3.2Basic Equation of Hydrostatics
3.3 Measurement of pressure
3.4Hydrostatic pressure on plane & curved Surfaces
3.4.1 Hydrostatic forces on plane Surfaces:
3.4.2 Hydrostatic forces on curved surfaces
3.5Buoyancy & Stability of Floating & Submerged bodies:
3.6Relative Equilibrium of liquids
CHAPTE- 4 KINEMATICS OF FLUID FLOW
4.0 Introduction
4.1 Dimensions of Flow
4.2 Describing the pattern of flow
4.3 Types of flow
4.4 Continuity equation
4.5 Stream function & Velocity potential
4.6 Flow Nets
CHAPTER-5 DYNAMICS OF FLUID FLOW
5.0Introduction
5.1 Forces influencing fluid motion
5.2Equation of Motion
5.3Hydraulics grade line & Energy grade line
5.4Impulse momentum equation

Math1051 and CEng1041 Applied Mathematics I; Engineering Mechanics I


Year II, Semester I
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials, Lab., exercises

163

Mode of
assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

continuous assessment 50%


Lab. Report 10%
final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Minimum of 80 % attendance
during lectures and 100 % attendance during practical work sessions, except
some unprecedented mishaps. A student who misses more than 20% of the
semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally
important.
1. Crowe, Roberson and Elger. Engineering Fluid Mechanics, 8th Edition, John Wiley
& Sons, 2005.
2. Streeter V., Fluid Mechanics, 1997

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

164

.Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng2152
Hydraulics II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/Course
level competences

5 CP
Lecture

Tutorial

30

10

Practice or
Laboratory
45

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

The aim of this course is to familirze the students with pipe flows, flows in pipe
networks, free-surface flows, applications of physical modelling, and fundamentals of
water hammer analysis.
Ability to analyze and design piping systems, including water distribution
systems,Ability to analyze and design open channel flow facilities, including
conveyance, systems, hydraulic jumps and backwater curves,Be familiar with
hydraulics and design of pump stations, Familiarity with the design and analysis of
culverts.
Laboratory
Ability to identify various pieces of hydraulic equipment such as pumps, valves, pipe,
sizes and material of construction, Ability to operate hydraulic equipment such as
pumps, valves and meters, Ability to conduct hydraulic experiments; and to collect,
analyze and interpret collected,data, Ability to use computer to solve complex
hydraulic problems.
Open channel flow: definition, elements of flow, computation.
Energy and momentum principles in open channel flow: specific e nergy and specific
force, critical flow, Channel transitions, hydraulic jump.
Hydraulic models: dimensional analysis and hydraulic similitude,methods of

Course Description

165

Course Outline

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Teaching &
Learning Methods
Assessment/Evaluat
ion & Grading
System

Course policy

investigation on scale models, model building.


Closed-conduit flow: head loss equation, energy and pressure grade lines, laminar
flow in pipes.
Network design and analysis. Hydraulic machines: pumps and turbines
types, velocity triangles, work done, efficiency, specific speed, and performance
characteristics.
Pump pipe systems.
Introduction to water hammer analysis.
Chapter One: Open Channel Flow
1.0 Types of Flow in Open Channel
1.1 Uniform Flow in Open Channel
1.2 Channel of Efficient Cross-section
1.3 Energy & Momentum Principles in Open Channel Flow
1.4 The Hydraulic Jump
Chapter Two: Dimensional Analysis and Similitude
2.1 Dimensional Analysis
2.2 Dimensional Homogeneity
2.3 Methods of Dimensional Analysis
2.4 Model Analysis & Similitude
Chapter Three: Closed Conduit Flow
3.1 Pipe Friction Formula, Laminar & Turbulent Flow
3.2 Pipes in Series, Parallel and Branching pipes
3.3 Network of Pipes
3.4 Introduction to Water Hammer Analysis
Chapter Four: Hydraulic Machines
4.1 Pump Types
4.2 Turbine Types
4.3 Head on pumps and turbines
4.4 Specific Speed of pumps and turbines
4.5 Performance of pumps and turbines
4.6 Cavitation
Hydraulics I CEng2151
Year II, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials,Lab.

continuous assessment 50%


lab. Report 10%
final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
166

submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be


penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Minimum of 85 % attendance
during lectures and 100 % attendance during practical work sessions, except some
unprecedented mishaps. A student who misses more than 15% of the semester
class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally important.

Literature

Approval Section

Crowe, Roberson and Elger. Engineering Fluid Mechanics, 8th Edition, John Wiley
& Sons, 2005.
3. Streeter W., Fluid Mechanics, 1997

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate
Name of department head
Signaturedate

167

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number

CEng3153

Course Title

Open Channel Hydraulics

Degree Program

B.Sc. in Civil Engineering

Module

Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics

Name:
Course
Coordinator

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.
Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5 CP

Course Weight

Lecture

Tutorial

30
Course
Objectives

Competences to
be
Acquired/course
level
competences

45

Home study

50

Total Hour

135

to develop a mechanistic understanding of steady and unsteady fluid flow in


channels including streams, rivers, and tidal wetlands

Course
Description

10

Practice or
Laboratory

Apply energy and momentum concepts to analyze open channel flow.


Apply the Manning Equation and Chezy Equation to describe uniform flow.
Classify gradually varied flow profiles.
Recognize the unsteady flow equations and understand the concept of
characteristics.
Develop simple software that solves open channel flow equations, and apply the
software for analysis and design purposes..
Flow computations: critical flow, uniform flow.
Gradually varied flow: differential equations of gradually varied flow; gradually
varied flow profiles, computations of gradually varied flow
Rapidly varied flow: flow characteristics, flow over spillways, flow under gates,
hydraulic jump and its use as energy dissipater.
Sediment transport and design of stable channels:sediment transport in open
channels, hydraulic properties of sediments, mode of sediment transport, design

168

of stable channels

Course outline

Chapter One: Open Channel Flow


1.1 Open Channel Flow and Its Classification
1.2 Basic Hydraulics Principles
1.3 Specific Energy and Critical Depth
1.4 Critical State of Flow
1.5 Flow Computation Formulas
Chapter Two: Gradually Varied Flow (GVF)
2.1 General Equation for GVF
2.2 Classification of Flow Profile
2.3 GVF Computations
Chapter Three: Rapidly Varied Flow (RVF)
1.1 RVF VS GVF
1.2 Flow Over Spillways
1.3 Hydraulic Jump and Its Use as Energy Dissipater
1.4 Flow Under gates
Chapter Four: Sediment Transport in Open Channels
1.1 Characteristics of Sediment
1.2 Hydraulic properties of Sediment
1.3 Mode of Sediment Transport
1.4 Design of Stable Channel
Chapter: Creating Water Profiles using Excel or related softwares
CEng2152, Hydraulics II

Pre-requisites
Semester

Year III, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Mode of
delivery

Lectures, tutorials, lab., exercises

continuous assessment 50%


Mode of
assessment

lab. Report 10%


final examination 40%

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
169

soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Minimum of 85 % attendance
during lectures and 100 % attendance during practical work sessions, except
some unprecedented mishaps. A student who misses more than 15% of the
semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally
important.
Literature

Approval
Section

Henderson, F. M. Open Channel Flow, Macmillan,


Subhash C. Jain. (2000). Open Channel Hydraulics, John & Wiley.
Hubert Chanson (2004), Hydraulics of Open Channel Flow.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

170

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng3154
Engineering Hydrology
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Course Weight

5 CP
Lecture
50

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Tutorial
35

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

50

Understand how observations of the hydrologic cycle are made and how
they can be appropriately used.
Understand
how to predict risks and reliabilities of flood control systems.

Students will be able to:


Complete a water balance on a watershed.
Understand how to obtain process and use hydrologic data from various
sources.
Understand measurements techniques of the components of the hydrologic
cycle and the associated errors, advantages, and limitations.
Understand the significance of global and local precipitation patterns.
Use unit hydrographs for Engineering applications.
Apply standard river and reservoir routing techniques
Basic hydrological concepts: the hydrologic cycle.
Precipitation, Evaporation and sediment stream flow: factors affecting,
measurement.
Areal rainfall estimation, Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves, and runoff:
stage-discharge relations, rating curves.

Course Description

171

135

Course outline

Hydrographs,
Unit hydrographs, S-hydrographs, Synthetic UH, flow-duration
curves.
Processing of hydrological data, frequency analysis of floods.
Flood routing through reservoirs and river channels.
Spillway design flood estimation.
Estimation of reservoir capacity.
Groundwater: occurrence and movement,
Darcys law, determination of ground water flow parameters, hydraulics of
wells.
CHAPTER ONE
1.1General
1.2Meteorological data
1.2.1Principle of data analysis
1.3Hydrological data
1.3.1 Missing data and comparison with the precipitation data
CHAPTER TWO
RAINFALL-RUNOFF RELATIONSHIPS (APPLICATION OF DIFFERENT
RAINFALL RUNOFF MODELS)
2.1HYDROLOGICAL MODELS
2.2DETERMINISTIC HYDROLOGICAL MODELS
2.2.1 Empirical (Black Box) Models
2.2.2 Lumped Conceptual Models
2.2.3 Distributed Process Description Based Models
2.3STOCHASTIC TIME SERIES MODELS
2.4RATIONAL METHOD
2.4.1 Runoff Coefficient
2.4.2 Rainfall intensity
2.4.3 Time of Concentration
2.5SCS CURVE NUMBER METHOD
2.6TIME-AREA METHOD
2.7STREAM FLOW HYDROGRAPH
2.7.1 Hydrograph Analysis
2.7.2 Factors affecting flood hydrograph
2.7.3 Effective Rainfall
2.7.4 Separation of Base Flow and Runoff
2.8THE UNIT HYDROGRAPH (UH)
2.8.1 Derivation of the Unit Hydrograph from single storms
2.8.2 Changing of the Duration of the UH
2.9APPLICATIONS OF UNIT HYDROGRAPH
2.10 SYNTHETIC UNIT HYDROGRAPHS
2.10.1 Snyders method
2.11 UH FROM A COMPLEX STORM
2.12 INSTANTANEOUS UNIT HYDROGRAPH (IUH)
2.13 DIMENSIONLESS UNIT HYDROGRAPH

172

2.14 HYDROLOGY OF UNGAUGED CATCHMENTS


CHAPTER THREE
FLOOD ROUTING
3.1GENERAL
3.2SIMPLE NON-STORAGE ROUTING
3.3STORAGE ROUTING
3.4RESERVOIR OR LEVEL POOL ROUTING
3.5CHANNEL ROUTING
3.5.1 MUSKINGUM METHOD OF ROUTING
3.5.2 APPLICATION OF THE MUSKINGUM METHOD
3.6 HYDRAULIC ROUTING
CHAPTER FOUR
FREQUENCY ANALYSIS (PROBABILITY IN HYDROLOGY)
4.1GENERAL
4.2FLOW FREQUENCY
4.3FLOOD PROBABILITY
4.3.1 Selection of Data
4.3.2 Plotting Positions
4.3.3 Theoretical Distributions of Floods
4.3.4 Extreme-Value Type I Distribution (Gumbels Method)
4.3.5 Gumballs Equation for Practical Use
4.3.6 Confidence Limits for the fitted data
4.3.7 Log-Pearson Type III Distribution
4.4REGIONAL FREQUENCY ANALYSIS
4.5LOW FLOW ANALYSIS
4.5.1 Definitions and Basic Concepts
4.5.2 Low flow frequency analysis
4.5.3 Drought analysis

4.6 PRECIPITATION PROBABILITY


4.7 RISK, RELIABILITY AND SAFETY FACTOR
CHAPTER FIVE
STOCHASTIC HYDROLOGY
5.1INTRODUCTION.
5.2TIME SERIES
5.3PROPERTIES OF TIME SERIES
5.4ANALYSIS OF HYDROLOGIC TIME SERIES
5.4.1 Trend component
5.4.2 Periodic component
5.4.3 Stochastic component
5.5TIME SERIES SYNTHESIS
5.6SOME STOCHASTIC MODELS

173

5.6.1
Purely random stochastic models
Autoregressive models
5.6.2
First order Markov process with periodicity: Thomas - Fiering model
5.6.3
Moving average models
5.6.4
ARMA
models
5.6.5
THE USES OF STOCHASTIC MODELS
5.7
CHAPTER SEVEN
RESERVOIR CAPACITY DETERMINATION
7.1MASS CURVE (RIPPLE'S) METHOD:
7.2RESERVOIRS AND SEDIMENTS
7.3SEDIMENT LOAD PREDICTION
CHAPTER EIGHT
URBAN HYDROLOGY
8.1CATCHMENT RESPONSE MODIFICATIONS
8.2URBAN DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
8.3DRAINAGE DESIGN

Pre-requisites

CEng2151, Hydraulics II

Semester

Year III, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Mode of delivery

Lectures, tutorials,exercises
continuous assessment 60%

Mode of assessment

Course policy

final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.

174

Literature

Approval Section

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Hydrology principles, analysis and design, by H.M Raghunath, 1995


Elzabeth M.Shaw (1994), Hydrology in practice, 3rd edition
Ray K.Linseley, JR etal, (1982), Hydrology for Engineers, 3rd edition
Stochastic Hydrology, Dr. P. Jayarami reddy 1997, New Delhi
Flood frequency analysis, A.Ramachandrarao Kahled H. Hamed
Engineering hydrology, Second edition, K Subramanaya
Ven Te Chow and Maidment (1988). Engineering Hydrology. McGraw-Hill.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

175

MODULE 16
DESIGN OF HYDRAULIC STRUCTURES & IRRIGATION MODULE [14 ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

Design of Hydraulic Structures & Irrigation

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

[01]
16
CEng-M3161

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

1108525138378
In order to insure food security and alleviate poverty, water resources
should be developed economically. Water storage and conveyance
structures are employed to this end. Hence, this module elucidates
techniques employed to design such structures safely and economically.
In order to ensure food self-efficiency in the face of increasing
population, it is essential to harvest crops at least twice or more times
annually.In order to ensure so, irrigation assisted farming is mandatory
in times of deficiency of rainfall. Hence, this module is justified since it
exposes the students with various methods of irrigation systems and the
infrastructure required for the same purpose.
This module is required in order to analyses such problems.

The module has the objective of introducing the students to:


To expose students to water storage structures such as dams,
construction materials for dams, dam appurtenant structures and
related ones. These include
Intake structures,
Outlet structures,
Energy dissipating structures,
Water diversion structures, and so on.
To exposed to river training measures, river morphology, soil
conservation structures, and design of weirs on alluvial foundations.
Methods of estimating crop water requirement,
Methods of application of irrigation water such as sprinkler and
drip irrigation systems
Diversion structures such as weirs and barrages

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


Module Competencies

Student can make analysis and design of hydraulic structures such


as dams, spillways, and flood control structures. Student can design
176

water works infrastructures like irrigation


Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning and
Teaching Method
Module Assessment
Techniques

Parallel
Lectures, tutorials, exercises, Project

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.

Total ECTS of the


module
Module Description

14 Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course
Number
CEng3161
CEng4162
CEng5163

Course Name
Hydraulic Structures I
Hydraulic Structures II
Irrigation Engineering
Total ECTS

ECTS
5
5
4
14

177

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng3161
Hydraulic Structures I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Design of Hydraulic Structures & Irrigation

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Course Weight

5 CP
Lecture
35

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Description

Tutorial
50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

The course provides students with basic principles of design of dams and its
appurtenant structures.

Students will be able to:


Select appropriate type of dams for a given site
Design different types of dams
Check and appreciate safety of dams
Classification of hydraulic structures.
Location and selection of appropriate type of dam and spillway.
Data collection.
Foundations of dams and their treatment.
Design and stability analysis of dams: gravity dams, earth dams, and rock-fill
dams.
Principles of design of arch and buttress dams
Design and hydraulic calculation of spillways: ogee spillway, siphon spillway,
shaft spillway and side channel spillway.
Spillway crest gates.
Terminal structures.

178

Outlet and intake structures.


Methods of stream diversion during construction.
Hydraulic structures In Hydropower Stations

Course outline

1. Elements of Dam Engineering


1.1. Introduction
1.2. Dam Structures and Reservoirs
1.3. Storage Components
1.4. Reservoirs
1.5. Classification of Dams
1.6. General Characteristics of Embankment Dams
1.7. Characteristics of Concrete Dams
1.8. Site investigation, Selection of Sites and Type of Dams
2. Design Principles of Dams
2.1. Concrete Dams
2.1.1. Force Acting On Concrete Dams
2.1.2. Design and Analysis Of Gravity Dams
2.2. Embankment Dams
2.2.1. Classification of Embankment Dams
2.2.2. Causes of Failure of Earth Dams
2.2.3. Design Principles
2.3. River Diversion During Construction
3. Dam Outlet Works
3.1. Spillways and Its Design Principles
3.2. Energy Dissipaters
3.3. Dam Outlets or Sluices ways
4. Hydraulic structures In Hydropower Stations
4.1. Introduction
4.2. Classification of Hydropower plant
4.3. Prinicipal Components of Hydroelectric Scheme
4.4. Hydraulic Turbines
5. Comparison of hand calculations with GEOSLOPE Application Software
CEng3154, CEng3133 Soil Mechanics II and Engineering Hydrology
Year III, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials, exercises
continuous assessment 60%
final examination 40%

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery
Mode of
assessment

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
179

submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be


penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

Literature

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________

Signaturedate______________

Name of course team leader _______________________________

Signaturedate _____________

Name of department head_______________________________


Signaturedate_______________
.

180

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng4162
Hydraulic Structures II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Design of Hydraulic Structures & Irrigation

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

Course Weight

5 CP
Lecture

Tutorial
Practice orHome studyTotal Hour
Laboratory

35352540135
Provide students with principles of river Engineering, design of flood protectionstr
uctures, and design of river bank protection structures.
Design of diversion structures are taught in the course.

Course Objectives
Competences to be
Acquired/Course level
competences

Course Description

Students will be able to design:


Dykes,Groynes,Checkdams,Wiers,Stone Ripraps.
River Morphology: cross-sectional index, meandering index, development
process of alluvial streams, self adjustment of cross sections, alluvial cones and
fans, stream delta, stream confluence, meandering and braided stream.
Design of riverbanks and bed erosion protection works: drops, bottom sills,
groins, or spurs, ripraps, revetments, gabions, and natural protection (planting of
vegetation).
Flood protection methods: dykes, flood diversion structures, storage ponds, etc.
Diversion structures: types of diversion structures, design of diversion weirs and
barrages.
Seepage: critical exit gradient, Lane's theory of weighted creep length, Khosla's
theory of seepage, flow nets, causes of failure by piping and uplift, safety against
uplift and piping.
Silt exclusion devices: silt excluder, silt ejector..

181

Course Outline

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Teaching & Learning
Methods
Assessment/Evaluatio
n & Grading System

Course policy

1. INTRODUCTION TO RIVER HYDRAULICS


1.1 Development process of alluvial stream
1.2 River Morphology
1.3 Meandering and braided stream
2. RIVER TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Objective and purpose of river training
2.3 Different types river training work
2.3.1 Marginal Embankment (levee)
2.3.2 Groynes or spurs
2.3.3 Pitched Island
2.3.4 Bank erosion protection
2.3.5 Guide bank
2.3.6 Artificial cutoff
2.4 River navigation
3. DIVERSION HEAD WORK
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Head Work for Diversion River
3.3 Weir types and component
3.4 Cause of Failures of Weir and their remedies
3.5 Components of barrage
3.6 Design of weirs and Barrages: Theory of Seepage
3.6.1 Khoslas theory of seepage
3.6.2 Exit and critical Gradient
3.6.3 Silt Excluder device
CEng3161, Hydraulics Structure I
Year IV, Semester I
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials, project.

continuous assessment 60%


final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality

182

is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.

Literature

Approval Section

1.Arora, Hydraulic Structures.


2.Guarg, Irrigation Engineering & Hydraulic structures.
3.U.S.B.R, Design of small Dams.
4.Thomas, The Engineering of large dams.
5.Vicher & Hager (1998), Dam Hydraulics.
6.Jansen (1988), Advanced dam Engg for design construction
&Rehabilitation.
7. Davis & Sorenson, Handbook of hydraulics.
8. Daryl B.Simon and Fuat Sentirk, Sediment transport and technology
9. S.N Ghosh, Flood control and Drainage Engineering.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

183

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng5163
Irrigation Engineering
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Design of Hydraulic Structures & Irrigation

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Course Description

4 CP
Lecture

Tutorial
Practice orHome studyTotal Hour
Laboratory

400068108
Provide students with the basic principles of irrigation design, selection of irrigation
systems, determination of the quality of water for irrigation and finally assessment of
the feasibility of irrigation schemes

Students will be able


To choose the appropriate irrigation scheme
Determine crop-water requirement
Design various types of irrigation schemes
Feasibility studies of irrigation projects.
Soil-Plant-Water relationship: soil water potential, moisture stress of plants,
soil moisture and plant growth, crop-water requirement.
Land grading and field layout: land grading, survey and design, constructionproce
dures and equipment, contour bench leveling.
Water application techniques: border, furrow, sprinkler, drip and check-basin
irrigation methods, irrigation efficiency.
Salt problems in irrigated agriculture: saline and alkaline soils, quality of
irrigation water, water logging and land reclamation process.
Water conveyance and control: irrigation distribution systems, methods of
water measurement and related hydraulic structures.
Design and construction of subsurface drainage: drain materials and layout,
filter design.
Operation of irrigation systems: irrigation frequency

184

1)

2)

3)

4)
Course outline

5)

INTRODUCTION
1.1 Definition and Scope of Irrigation
1.2 Benefits and Ill-Effects of Irrigation
1.3 Irrigation Development in Ethiopia
1.4 Standards of Irrigation Water
1.5 Procedures for Feasibility Studies of Irrigation Projects
SOIL-PLANT-WATER RELATIONSHIP
2.1 Soil-Water Potential
2.2 Moisture Stress of Plants
2.3 Soil Moisture and Plant Growth
CROP-WATER REQUIREMENT
3.1 Reference Evapotranspiration
3.2 Crop Water Requirements/Consumptive Use
3.3 Irrigation Efficiency and Irrigation Frequency
WATER APPLICATION TECHNIQUES
4.1 Land Grading, Survey and Design
4.2 Border
4.3 Furrow
4.4 Check-Basin
4.5 Drip
4.6 Sprinkler
WATER CONVEYANCE AND CONTROL
5.1 Irrigation Distribution Systems
5.2 Methods of Water Measurement
5.3 Related Hydraulic Structures
SURFACE DRAINAGE AND SUB-SURFACE DRAINAGE
6.1 Salt Problems in Irrigation Agriculture
6.2 Saline and Alkaline Soils, Quality of Irrigation Water
6.3 Water Logging and Land Reclamation Process
6.4 Surface and Sub Surface Drainage Design and Construction

6)

Pre-requisites

CEng4161, Hydraulics Structure I

Semester

Year V, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Mode of delivery

Lectures, exercises
continuous assessment 60%

Mode of assessment

Course policy

final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
185

dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated


at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.

Literature

Approval Section

1. Laycock A. (2007). Irrigation System: Design, Planning and Construction.


Oxford University Press.
2. Michael, A.M. (1999). Irrigation, Theory and Practice.1/e. South Asia Book
s.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

186

MODULE 17
SANITARY & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING MODULE [13 ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

Sanitary & Environmental Engineering

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

17
[01]
CEng-M3171

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

868628151351
Every citizen in a given country vie1s to get potable water. Hence, the raw
water from surface or ground water should be treated to an
acceptable standard. Moreover, in urban areas excess storm water
should be catered for safely in order to minimize the damaging effects
of flood.
Hence, this module is included to give the students familiarity on
these issues from a Civil Engineering point of view.
To give students an introduction to water supply and quality issues,
water
treatment systems and urban drainage:.
conduct analysis and design of hydraulics infrastructure
including pipelines, storm sewers and channels, and detention
basins.
Introduce basic chemical and biological water quality concepts;
Introduce the fundamentals of unit processes in WQ management;

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


Module Competencies

Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning and
Teaching Method
Module Assessment
Techniques

Analyze and Design water supply, water treatment and sewerage


treatment systems.
Apply environmental concept in Design

Parallel
Lectures, tutorials, laboratory, exercises, Project

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.

Total ECTS of the


module

16 Credit Point

187

Module Description
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course
Number
CEng3171
CEng4172
CEng4173

Course Name
Water Supply and Urban Drainage
Water Treatment
Sewage Treatment
Total ECTS

ECTS
5
4
4
13

188

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng3171
Water Supply and Urban Drainage
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Sanitary & Environmental Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5 CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Lecture

Tutorial

30

30

Home study

Total Hour

60

135

to familiarize the students with the design of water supply systems, demand
projection, design of storm water drainage, and identification of water supply
sources.
Students will be able to:
Learn how to identify the sources of potable water, how to design pipes and pipe
networks and how to develop wells. Moreover, the student learns how to design
storm and combined sewers

Course Description

Practice or
Laboratory
15

Demand for Water: Quantity of Water for different uses.


Sources of water.
Surface water abstraction.
Design of wells
Collection and distribution of water: types of water intakes, distribution systems,
service reservoirs.
Pipelines and appurtenances, pumping.
Plumbing Water supply and drainage of buildings.
Quantity of Sanitary sewage.

189

Course outline

Quantity of storm water and urban drainage .


Hydraulics of sewers.
Design of sewer systems.
Sewage pipes and appurtenances.
Loads on buried pipes.
Organization and Administration of water
supply and sewer projects..
1. DEMAND FOR WATER
1.1 Variation and Factors Affecting demand
1.2 Quantity of Water for Domestic and Industrial Uses
1.3 Fire Demand
2. METHODS OF FORECASTING POPULATION

3. SOURCES OF WATER
3.1 Types
3.2 Source Selection Criteria
4. COLLECTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF WATER
4.1. Intakes
4.2. Methods of Distribution
4.3. Service Reservoirs
4.4. Pipes Used in Water Distribution Systems
4.4.1. Pipe Materials
4.4.2. Determination of Pipe Sizes
4.4.3. Energy Losses in Pipes
4.4.4. Pipe Appurtenances
4.5. Pipes System
4.5.1. Methods of Laying Distribution Pipes
4.5.2. Analysis of Water distribution Systems
5. INTRODUCTION TO WATER TREATMENT
5.1. Preliminary Treatment methods
5.2. Coagulation-Sedimentation
5.3. Filtration
5.4. Disinfection
5.5. Miscellaneous Methods of Water Treatment
6. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF WATER
7. WATER, SANITATION AND HEALTH RELATIONSHIP
8. INTRODUCTION TO WATER CARRIAGE SANITATION SYSTEMS
8.1. Septic Tanks
8.2. Sewerage Systems
9. INTRODUCTION TO NON-WATER CARRIAGE SANITATION SYSTEMS
9.1. Dry Pit Latrine
9.2. Solid Waste Management
10. WATER SUPPLY PROJECT PREPARATION

190

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

11. Comparison of hand calculations with WATER CAD/EPNATE Application


Software
CEng3154, Engineering Hydrology
Year III, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials, Project, exercises
continuous assessment 60%
final examination 40%

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Water Supply and Sanitation. Steel & Terence


Environmental Engineering. Peavy, Rowe & Techobanoglous
Water & Waste Water Engineering.Vol1&2, Fair, Geyer & Okun
Water, Waste & Health in Hot Climates. Feacham, Mc Garry & Mara
Environmental Health Engineering in the Tropics.Caircross & Feacham
Small Community Water Supplies. Hofkes.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

191

.Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng4172
Water Treatment
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics

Course Coordinator

Name:

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
4CP
Lecture

Tutorial

26

26

Total Hour

43

108

Students will be able to:


Analyze and Design water treatment systems.

Water quality: impurities of water.


Physical, chemical and biological examination of water.
Drinking waters standards.
Water quality and health.
Conventional methods of water treatment:sedimentation:
coagulation/flocculation,filtration, disinfection
Industrial water quality requirements: watersoftening, Iron and
Manganese removal, water conditioning.
Advances in water treatment: roughing, multistage filtration.

Course outline
Pre-requisites
Semester

Home study

The course provides the student with the basic unit processes employed for
watertreatment.

Course Description

Practice or
Laboratory
13

Water Supply and Urban Drainage


Year IV, Semester I

192

Status of Course
Mode of delivery
Mode of assessment

Course policy

Pre-requisite
Literature

Approval Section

Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials, Project, exercises
continuous assessment 60%
final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
CEng3171
1. Kawamura, Susumu, Integrated Design of Water Treatment Facilities, John
Wiley & Sons, 2000.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

193

Department of Civil Engineering


Civil Engineering Department
Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng4173
Sewage Treatment
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
4CP
Lecture

Tutorial

Course Weight
30

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Course Description

Course outline

30

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

48

Total Hour

108

Students will learn the basic methods for industrial and municipal wastewater
treatment facilities and about the processes involved; they will learn the basic
design of wastewater treatment facilities.
Students will be able to:
understand the design procedure for wastewater treatment facilities; sludge
treatment and disposal methods; and onsite sanitation systems
Wastewater characteristics: Examination of Wastewater. Wastewater treatment
objectives and methods.
Design of facilities for Physical, Chemical and Biological treatment processes.
Effluent disposal and water pollution control.
Sludge treatment and disposal methods.
On- site sanitation systems: design, construction and performance of pit latrines,
septic tanks..
Introduction to Wastewater Treatment(sewage treatment).
General about Wastewater Treatment
Goals of Wastewater Treatment
1Wastewater treatment standards
1.1
Flow Sheets for wastewater treatment systems
1.2
1.3
1.4

194

2-Characteristics of Wastewater
2.1Physical, Chemical and Bacteriological Characteristic of Wastewater
2.2Measurement of concentration of contaminants in wastewater
2.3Mathematical Model for the BOD Curve
3-Preliminary and primary Wastewater Treatment Methods
3.1Preliminary treatment
3.2Primary Wastewater treatment
4-Secondary/Biological and tertiary Wastewater treatment
4.1Microorganisms and Their Role in Wastewater Treatment
4.2Bacterial Growth Kinetics (Monod Equation)
4.4Types of Biological Process for Wastewater Treatment
4.5Tertiary treatment processes
5-Sewage Effluent Disposal Techniques
5.1Land disposal and treatment
5.2Disposal by dilution and oxygen sag curve
6-Sludge Treatment and Disposal
6.1Sludge Treatment Methods
6.1.1 Sludge Treatment Flow sheets
6.1.2 Sludge Thickening, Conditioning, Stabilization and Dewatering
6.2Disposal and Reuse options
CEng3171, Water Supply and Urban Drainage

Pre-requisites
Semester

Year IV, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Mode of delivery

Lectures, tutorials, Project, exercises


continuous assessment 60%

Mode of assessment

Course policy

final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and

195

does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.

Literature

Approval Section

1. Introduction to Environmental Engineering, Third edition, Davis M. and Cornwell


D., McGraw-Hill.
2. Small and decentralized wastewater Management systems, Crites R. and
Tchobanoglous G., McGraw-Hill.
3. Unit Operations and Processes in Environmental Engineering, Second Edition,
Reynolds T. and Richards P., PWS publishing comp.
4. Wastewater Engineering, Treatment and Reuse Metcalf and Eddy, (2003), 4th
Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

196

MODULE 18
ROAD AND TRANSPORT ENGINEERING MODULE [15 ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title
Module Category
Module Number
Module Code
Total Study Hours in
the Module

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Road and Transport Engineering Module


01
18
CEng-M3181
Lecture

Tut/Sem

Home Study

10511535150405
Students need to learn the basics of transport Engineering in order to
design highways on the basis of sound data.
To introduce students to the fundamental issues in transportation
systems theory, analysis, and design.
This module is highly justified for the very fact that it emphasizes on
the underlying principles of geometric design of highways and the
pavement necessary to carry the traffic load.
The main objectives of the module are to:
Familiarize students with the fundamentals of planning, analyzing,
and designing of basic elements of an integrated surface
transportation system. Basic elements of a surface transportation
system.
Equip students with the concepts and applications of geometric
design for rural and urban highways.
Make students acquainted with the principles of pavement analysis
and design and help them acquire basic knowledge and practical
prospective of highway materials, and construction practice.
.
Students will be able to identify components of the different
transportation modes and will be able to utilize design characteristics
of the driver, pedestrian, vehicle, and roadway to design
Students will be able to understand and apply the different geometric
design control criteria, and be able to evaluate and modify the
condition of an existing highway system.
Students will also demonstrate knowledge of properties of highway
materials, construction practice, and quality control.

Module Competencies

Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning and
Teaching Method

Total
Pra/Lab
Hour

Parallel
lectures, tutorials, lab and projects

197

Module Assessment
Techniques

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.
Tests, quiz, assignments, lab reports, presentations and exams

Total ECTS of the


module

15 Credit Point
Module Description
Clustered Courses in the Module

Course
Number
CEng3181
CEng 3182
CEng 4183

Course Name
Transport Engineering
Highway Engineering I
Highway Engineering II
Total ECTS

ECTS
5
5
5
15

198

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program

CEng3181
Transport Engineering
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Road and Transport Engineering Module

Module

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5 CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Description

Lecture

Tutorial

35

50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

To introduce students to the fundamental issues in transportation systems theory,


analysis, and design.
Students shall
Learn and understand transportation systems & their planning; and demonstrate
ability to plan, analyze, and design the basic elements of an integrated surface
transportation system.
Design and analyze traffic volume studies.
Design and analyze travel time and delay studies.
Design and analyze traffic accident studies.
Design and analyze parking studies
Introduction to transport systems: Highways, railways, airways, and waterways.
Transport planning: elements of transport planning, urban transport planning,
and evaluating transport alternatives.
Driver, pedestrian, vehicle, and road characteristics.
Traffic Engineering studies: spot speed studies, volume studies, travel time and
delay studies parking studies and road traffic safety.
Fundamental principles of traffic flow: traffic flow elements, and flow-density
relationships.
Traffic-control devices and systems: traffic signs, pavement markings and
islands, and traffic signals.

199

Highway capacity: level of service, capacity of highways, and intersections.

Course outline

Chapter one
1.1 FUNDAMENTALS OF TRAFFIC FLOW.
1.1.1 Speed, volume, density measurements
1.1.2 Speed, density, flow relationships
1.1.3 Vehicle/driver/roadway interactions
1.1.4 Equations of motion for a single vehicle
1.2 TRAFFIC FLOW CHARACTERISTICS
2.1.1Flow characteristics
2.1.2 Speed characteristics
2.1.3 Density characteristics
1.3 STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TRAFFIC FLOW PARAMETERS
1.31.Counting and interval distributions
1.3.1 Headway distributions
1.3.2 Speed distribution models
1.3.3 Gap acceptance distributions
1.4 TRAFFIC STREAM MODELS
1.4.1 Speed-density models
1.4.2 Speed-flow models
1.4.3 Density-flow models
Chapter Two
CAR FOLLOWING MODELS
2.1 Linear car following models
2.2 Traffic stability
2.3 Non-linear car following models
2.4 From car following to traffic stream models
2.5 Acceleration noise.
Chapter Three
CONTINUUM FLOW MODELS
3.1 Simple continuum models
3.2 High order continuum models
Chapter Four
TRAFFIC OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES
4.1 shock wave analysis
4.2 Definition of shock waves
4.3 Types of shockwaves
4.4 Calculation of shockwave speed
4.5 Shock wave at intersections
4.6 Shock wave along a highway
4.7 Applications of shockwave analysis
Chapter Five
QUEUING ANALYSIS
5.1 Queuing systems
5.2 Deterministic queuing

200

5.3 Stochastic queuing


5.4 Queuing models for roadways
5.5 Queuing models for intersections
5.6 Applications of queuing analysis
Chapter Six
TRAFFIC SIMULATION (PROBABILISTIC MODELING)
6.1 Principles of Simulation
6.2 Traffic flow simulation
6.3 Steps in developing simulation models
6.4 Commercially available models, simulation
6.5 languages, applications
Chapter Seven

NETWORK FLOW SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL


7.1 Arterial traffic flow control
7.2 Network traffic flow control
Chapter Eight
TRAFFIC FLOW MODELS FOR INTERSECTIONS
8.1 Signalized Intersections The HCM procedure
8.2 Signalized intersections saturation flow, capacity and LOS
8.3 Signalized intersections signal optimization
8.4 Un signalized intersections The HCM procedure
8.5 Un signalized intersections Gap acceptance
Chapter Nine
HIGHWAY FACILITIES AND PRINCIPLES FOR THEIR ANALYSIS
9.1 Freeways The HCM methods
9.2 Freeway merging Gap acceptance for merging
9.3 Freeway weaving Modeling and simulation
9.4 Two-lane highways The HCM procedure Modeling and simulation

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

None
Year 3, Semester I
Compulsory
parallel
Tests, quiz, assignments, lab reports, presentations and exams

Mode of assessment

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
201

Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

Literature

Approval Section

Roess, R. P. and Prassas, E. (2004), Traffic


Engineering, 3rd edition, Prentice-Hall.
2. Roess, R. P. and Falcocchio, J. C. (2004),
Highway Transportation Engineering,
14. Pearson US Imports & PHIPEs.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

202

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng3182
Highway Engineering I
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Road and Transport Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

5 CP
Lecture

Course Weight

Practice
Tutorial
orHome studyTotal Hour
Laboratory

3550050135
Students will develop and apply concepts of geometric design for rural and urban
highways.

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/Course
level competences

Course Description

Students will demonstrate ability to design and evaluate various types of rural and
urban highways
Knowledge of geometric design of highways and streets.
Knowledge of criteria for determining final highway alignment.
Knowledge of interchange design.
Functional classification systems of highways
Highway route selection: factors to be considered in highway route selection,
steps in highway route surveys.
Geometric design of highways: Design controls and criteria;
Highway cross-section elements lane and shoulders, sidewalks, medians, and
pedestrian crossings;
Elements of geometric design sight distance, horizontal alignment: design of
circular and transition curves; vertical alignment: grade selection and design of
vertical curves; combinations of horizontal and vertical alignment; Intersections
and interchanges.
Drainage and drainage structures: surface and subsurface drainage facilities.
Earthwork quantities and mass-haul diagram.

203

Course Outline

1.1.1 Chapter I: Introduction to Transportation Planning


Introduction,
1.2 Basic elements of transportation planning,
1.3 Planning data collection
1.4 Transportation Systems Modeling
1.4.1 Trip Generation
1.4.2 Trip Distribution
1.4.3Modal Split
1.4.4 Trip Assignment
1.1.2 Chapter II: Introduction to Traffic Engineering
2.7 Introduction to traffic Engineering,
2.8 study areas of traffic Engineering,
2.9 3-Es of traffic Engineering,
2.10 traffic flow analysis,
2.11 Highway capacity [L-O-S analysis].
1.1.3 Chapter III: Highway Alignment and Surveys
Introduction
3.1 Requirements of alignment,
3.2 Factors Controlling Alignment,
3.3 Engineering Surveys for Highway Location,
3.4 Map Study, Reconnaissance,
3.5 Preliminary Survey, Final location and detailed survey
3.6 Highway Drawings and Report Profile,
3.7 Steps in a new highway projects
1.1.4 Chapter IV: Highway Geometric Design
4.1 Principles of alignment
4.1.1 Tangents
4.1.2 Circular curves
4.1.3 Transition curves
4.1.4 Super elevation
4.1.5 Roads widening
4.1.6 Friction factors
4.2 Vertical alignment:
4.2.1 Principles of alignment
4.2.2 Grades
4.3 Vertical curves
4.3.1 Crest curves
4.3.2 Sag curves
Chapter V: Comparison of hand calculations with EIL ROAD/EAGLE POINT
Application Software
Surveying field practices (CEng2083) & Transport Engineering (CEng3181)
Year 3, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials and project.

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Teaching &

204

Learning Methods
Assessment/Evaluat
ion & Grading
System

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

Tests, quiz, assignments, presentations and exams

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
Wright, P. H. and Karen, D. (2003), Highway
Engineering, 7th edition, Wiley.
2. Rogers, M. (2003), Highway Engineering,
Blackwell Science Ltd.
1. Mannering, F. L., Kilareski, W. P., & Washburn, S.
S. (2004), Principles of Highway Engineering and
4. Traffic Analysis, 3rd edition, Wiley

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

205

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng4183
Highway Engineering II
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Road and Transport Engineering Module

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Course Weight

5 CP
Lecture
35

Tutorial
15

Practice or
Laboratory
35

Home study

Total Hour

50

135

At the end of the course, students would understand:

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Course Description

Identify the classification of soil with respect to Engineering properties


by laboratory works
Differentiate materials used in base and sub-base construction that are
available in the location of construction
Select form every alternatives with what types of road to be constructed.
Design structurally and efficiently flexible and rigid pavements
Design drainage structure intelligently with the efficient and economical
sections

Students will demonstrate ability to analyze and design both asphalt and
concrete pavements.
Knowledge of factors affecting the highway foundation structure
Knowledge of flexible and rigid pavement design
Knowledge of cost and economic life of roads
Knowledge of overall highway design process.
Overview of pavement structures & types:
Stresses in pavement structures.
Traffic volume and loading
Sub grade soils, special soil tests for pavement design, soil classification for
highway purposes.

206

Course outline

Unbound pavement materials.


Stabilized pavement materials.
Bituminous materials: sources and properties of binders; types of asphalt
mixtures.
Marshall Method of mix design, and surface treatments.
Structural design of flexible pavements: AASHTO method of flexible
pavement design;
Design of flexible pavement structures using ERA and AACRA design
procedures,
Design of gravel surfaced road
CHAPTER-I INTRODUCTION TO HIGHWAY PAVEMENT
General [Functions, Characteristics, Types, Components, Design Process,
Maintenance and Rehabilitation] Of Pavements
CHAPTER-II HIGHWAY MATERIALS
General,
2.1 Highway materials:
2.1.1 Soils
2.1.2Aggregates
2.1.3 Bituminous
2.1.4 Portland cement
CHAPTER-III HIGH-TYPE BITUMINOUS PAVEMENTS
General,
3.1 Design of Paving Mixtures:
3.1.1 Fundamental Properties of Bituminous Mixes
3.1.2Concept and Objectives of Asphalt Mix Design
3.1.3Classification of Hot-Mix Paving
3.1.4Steps in Paving Mix Design
3.1.5Preparation of Mixture
CHAPTER-IV FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT DESIGN
General,
4.1 Pavement Design Process,
4.2 Parameters of Pavement Thickness Design:
4.2.1 Traffic
4.2.2 Sub grade
4.2.3 Climate or Environment
4.2.4 Use of design Catalog
CHAPTER-V INTRODUCTION TO ROAD MAINTENANCE
General,
5.1 the pavement management context,
5.2 pavement maintenance and rehabilitation, VIZIR 5.3 method
of quality evaluation for paved roads.
CHAPTER-VI HIGHWAY DRAINAGE DESIGN
General,
6.1 basic elements for highway drainage

207

6.2 procedures for highway drainage design of ditches and culverts,


Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

Highway Engineering I (CEng3172)


Year 4, Semester I
Compulsory
Lectures, lab and projects
Tests, quiz, assignments, lab reports, presentations and exams

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Minimum of 80 % attendance
during lectures and 100 % attendance during practical work sessions, except
some unprecedented mishaps. A student who misses more than 20% of the
semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally
important.
1. Huang, Y.H. (2003), Pavement Analysis &
Design, 2nd edition, Prentice-Hall.
2. Ritter L. J., Paquette, R.J. and Wright, P. H.
(2003), Highway Engineering, 7th edition,
John Wiley & Sons Inc.
3. Garber, N.J. & Hoel, L.A. (2001), Traffic
& Highway Engineering, 3rd edition,
15. Thomson-Engineering

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate______________
Name of course team leader _______________________________
Signaturedate _____________
Name of department head_______________________________
Signaturedate_______________

208

MODULE 19
INTEGRATED CIVIL ENGINEERING DESIGN MODULE [109 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module NameIntegrated Civil Engineering Design
Module Category01
Module Number19
Module CodeCEng-M3191
Total EtCTS of the Module09
Total Study Hour378
ObjectivesIn this module students will perform a comprehensive design project using
their knowledge acquired from pervious modules with a team approach requiring
interaction with practitioners, development of a team project report and a formal
presentation.
CompetenciesStudents will be able to take a design project that includes various fields of Civil
Engineering and develop a project design, be able to demonstrate ability to
determine required information, collect required data, analyze data and evaluate
what needs to be done, and be able to develop a project design as a team and
report on the design.
Mode of DeliveryParallel
Learning TeachingProjects, lectures, class works, assignments, group discussions, presentations
Methods

Module
Assessment
Techniques

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment


should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.

Course Number
CEng3192

Course Name
Technical Report Writing and Research Methodology
for Engineers
Integrated Civil Engineering Design
Total ECTS

CEng5191

Continuous assessment, final exam and seminar presentation


Courses of the Module

209

EtCTS
4
5
09

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

CEng3192
Technical Report Writing and Research Methodology for Engineers
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Integrated Civil Engineering Design

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies
Course Description/
Course Contents

Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the Course
Learning Teaching
Methods
Assessment
Techniques
Course policy

Lecture . 15 hrs.
Class discussion, group work and presentation .... 40 hrs.
Assessment .. 15 hrs.
Home Study ............. 38 hrs.
Total 108 hrs.
The objective of the course is to equip students with effective report writing skills and
research methodologies. Students shall develop solid technical report and paper/thesis
writing skills, analysis and data interpretation techniques, and research
methodologies.
Students shall develop good technical report and paper/thesis writing skills, analysis
and data interpretation techniques, and research methodologies.
Report overview: features, functions, and classification of reports.
Communication: definition, processes, barriers, and communication channels.
Distinguishing features of a technical report.
A technical report: rational of a research report.
Guidelines on identification of semester project.
The research process: data sources, data collection, text organization, the writeup.
Preparation of bibliography.
EnLa1012
VI
Compulsory
Lectures, class works, assignments, group discussions, presentations

Continuous assessment and final exam

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
210

Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic


dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Minimum of 80 % attendance
during lectures and 100 % attendance during presentation, except some
unprecedented mishaps. A student who misses more than 20% of the semester
class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is equally important.
Literature

Approval Section

1. Alley, M. (1999), The Craft of Editing: A Guide for Managers, Scientists, and
Engineers, 1st edition, Springer
2. Ranjit Kumar , ( 1999), Research Methodology: A Step-by-Step Guide for
Beginners , Sage Publications Ltd

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

211

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Name
Degree Program
Module

CEng5191
Integrated Civil Engineering Design
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Integrated Civil Engineering Design

Name:__________________________________________________________
Course
Coordinator

Office location: _________________________________________________


Mobile:__________________; e-mail:_____________________________
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________________
Name:__________________________________________________________

Lecturer

Office location: _________________________________________________


Mobile:__________________; e-mail:_____________________________
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________________

EtCTS Credits
Study Hour

Objectives

Competencies

Course
Description/
Course Contents
Pre-requisite
Semester
Status of the
Course
Learning Teaching
Methods
Assessment
Techniques
Course policy

Project ..100 hrs


Advising..35 hrs
Total....135 hrs
In this course students will perform a comprehensive design project using their
knowledge acquired from pervious modules with a team approach requiring
interaction with practitioners, development of a team project report and a formal
presentation.

Students will be able to take a design project that includes various fields of Civil
Engineering and develop a project design, be able to demonstrate ability to
determine required information, collect required data, analyze data and evaluate
what needs to be done, and be able to develop a project design as a team and
report on the design.
Project

None
VIII
Compulsory

Project
Continuous assessment and seminar presentation

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
212

action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. 100 % attendance during
Consultation, progress report & Presentations, except some unprecedented
mishaps.. Punctuality is equally important.
Literature

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

213

MODULE 20
CONTRACT MANAGEMENT [17 ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

Contract Management

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

Construction Technology & Management


[20]
CEng-M5201

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

127157-175459
Justification of the module
A Civil Engineering project involves the deployment of huge material resources
and human resources. The Construction could be either labour intensive or
machine-intensive. One way or the other there is a need to develop know-how how
to manage these resources scientifically in order to economize on both time and
resources. This module elucidates techniques and methodologies on how to
effectively make use of the usually scanty resources available for construction.

Short narrative on the aims and characteristics of the module

Module Objectives

The student will get familiarity with various construction methods for
building excavations, bridges, streets, etc. and organize project works into
tasks in order to schedule construction equipment and arrange the sequence
of construction operations at the planning stage.

Moreover, the gets acquainted with official contracting terms for the award
of construction performance contracts. Calculation of performance
indicators and establishing critical path network. The student will be able to
describe the framework of typical company forms and cooperative ventures.

After completion of this module the students shall be able to;


Module
Competencies

Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning
and Teaching
Method
Module Assessment

Comprehend basic gridlines, contract, formulation, administration, and


planning management techniques.

Parallel
lectures, tutorials, and projects, class works, assignments, group discussions,
presentations.

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment


214

Techniques
Total ECTS of the
module
Module Description

Course Number
CEng5201
CEng5202
CEng5203
CEng5204

should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.


18 Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course Name
Engineering Economics
Contract, specification & Quantity Survey
Construction Equipment
Construction Management
Total ECTS

215

ECTS
4
5
3
5
17

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng5201
Engineering Economics
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Contract Management

Name:

Course
Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
4CP

Course Weight

Lecture

Tutorial

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

303048
The Course objectives are to:
Understand the basic concepts of Engineering economics.
Course
Objectives

Understand the time value of money.


Understand the concepts behind benefit-cost analyses.
Understand the concept of depreciation.
The competencies to be acquired by the student in this course are:
Describe the most common modes of transport and their socioeconomic
implications.

Competences to
be
Acquired/course
level
competences

Calculate present and future worth and rates of return on investment.


Choose among investment alternatives.
Develop benefit-cost analyses.
Calculate depreciation of different machinery and infrastructure assets

Course
Description

Course Outline

Prepare a simple economic feasibility study


Investment; time value of money: Interest; present worth; rate of return; future worth.
Costing: Cost centers; labor cost; investment cost; running cost; equipment cost,
Depreciation accounting, Economic analysis: Benefitcost analysis; Sensitivity analysis;
inflation effects; case study: economic analysis of hydropower development: economic
analysis of multi-purpose projects, Project appraisal.
Course Contents
216

108

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of
delivery
Mode of
assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval
Section

1. 1 Introduction to Economics.
2. Basic concepts
3. Annual, discrete and periodic compounding
4. Present and future worth
5. Rate of return and payback periods
6. Benefit-cost ratio
7. Depreciation and equipment replacement
None
Year 5, Semester I
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials

Continuous Assessment 60%


-Final Examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. A Collin and William B, 1982, Engineering Cost Analysis, Courtland
Ledbetter, Harper and Row Publishers.
2. Bill G. Eppes & Daniel E. Whitema, 1977Cost Accounting for the
Construction Firm.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

217

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng5202
Contract, specification & Quantity Survey
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Contract Management

Course Coordinator

Name:

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
5CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Description

Lecture

Tutorial

35

50

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

50

105

Students will gain knowledge in the legal aspects of contracts and bidding; types of
construction documents including bonds; interpretation of technical building
specifications and their application to selection and installation of materials,
equipment and systems.
The student will be able to
Prepare tender documents
Prepare take-off sheets
Settle claims

At the completion of this course you should be able to:


Explain the design and construction process and the roles of the different
participants.
Identify the different types of specification formats used in the construction
industry.
Outline the relationship between the documents which makeup the
Construction Documents.
Describe the different types of contracts, the number of contracts, the method
of contractor selection and the basis for contractor payment.
Explain the bidding process, including the documents included in the bidding
requirements
Describe the Conditions of the Contract, their purpose, content, and

218

relationship to other parts of the Project Manual.


Explain the distinct roles of Drawings and Specifications.
Describe the various methods of specifying.
Explain the intent of a warranty, the various types, and the relationships
between the parties involved in warranting specific parts of a project.
Describe the types and purpose of construction bonds and insurance.
Explain the concept of multiple prime contracts in a construction project.
Explain the Negotiated Contract delivery method with special emphasis on
the use of fast-tracked construction.
Explain the concept of "Design-Build" as a construction delivery system and
the preparation of the contract documents to facilitate this process.
Course Contents
1. The law of contract as applied to Civil Engineering constructions
2. Types of Civil Engineering construction contracts
3. Contract documents
4. Conditions of contract
5. Administration of contract, settlement of claims
6. Bidding theory, Preparation of tender, Tender appraisal
7. Types of specifications, Specification writing,
8. Quantity surveying: material take off preparation and writing of bill of quantities;
9. Project cost estimation
10. Site supervision
11. Measurement and value of work.

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

CEng3093
Year 5, Semester I
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials
Continuous Assessment 60%
-Final Examination 40%

Mode of assessment

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent

219

and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.

Literature

Approval Section

1. John Adriaanse, (2004), Construction Contract Law, Palgrave Macmillan.


2. Ivor H. Seeley, George P. Murray, 2001)Civil Engineering
Quantities, Palgrave Macmillan.
3. R.W. Thomas, (2001), Construction Contract Claims, Palgrave Macmillan.
4. Duncan Cartlidge, (2006), New Aspects of Quantity Surveying
Practice, Butterworth- Heinemann; 2 edition.
5. FIDIC, (1991), Conditions of Contract for works of Civil
Engineering Constructions.
6. BATCODA, (1991), Conditions of Contract.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

220

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng5203
Construction Equipment
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Contract Management

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
3CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Description

Lecture

Tutorial

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

27272781
Course Objective
To know the most common types of construction equipments.
To have a knowledge for selection of an appropriate construction equipment
To understand the concepts of depreciation and production rates for
construction equipments safety.

At the end of this course, students will be able to


properly select foundation equipment, concreting equipment, compactors, paving
equipment. Moreover, students will understand the management of construction
equipment.
Course Description:
This course includes the types of construction equipment; Compressors and pumps;
Equipment for earth work:
Trenching, dredging and tunneling equipment, Power excavators and cranes;
Foundation equipment; Concreting equipment; Compactors and paving equipment;
Aggregate production equipment; Choosing construction equipment; Construction
equipment schedule, Management of construction equipment: Finance, maintenance,
safety.
Course Outline
Types of construction equipment
Compressors and pumps
Equipment for earth work: Trenching, dredging and tunneling equipment,

Course Outline

221

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery
Mode of
assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

Power excavators and cranes;


Foundation equipment
Concreting equipment
Compactors and paving equipment
Aggregate production equipment
Choosing construction equipment
Construction equipment schedule
Management of construction equipment
Finance, maintenance, safety
CEng2092
Year 5, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials
Continuous Assessment 60%
-Final Examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
1. Robert L Peurifoy, Clifford J. Schexnayder, and Aviad Shapira,
(2005), Construction Planning, Equipment, and Methods,
Mcgraw-Hill Series in Civil Engineering.
2.Schaufelberger, J.E., (1999), Construction Equipment
Management, Prentice-Hall.
3.Nunally, S.W., (2000), Managing Construction Equipment,
Prentice-Hall.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

222

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng5204
Construction Management
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Contract Management

Name:__________________________________________________________
Course Coordinator

Office location: _________________________________________________


Mobile:__________________; e-mail:_____________________________
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________________
Name:__________________________________________________________

Lecturer

Office location: _________________________________________________


Mobile:__________________; e-mail:_____________________________
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________________
5CP

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Lecture

Practice
TutorialorHome studyTotal Hour
Laboratory

3550050105
By the End of this course Students should:
Be aware of the size/scope of the construction industry, and the role of the
organizations which are involved in Construction Projects
Know about different phases of construction projects, contract administration and
procedures for public projects
Know the steps that lead to successful construction projects
Be familiar with aspects of construction project management such as: Project
planning; progress; monitoring; construction and risk management ;cost control;
claims and disputes
Understand the role/complexity of construction project management, by
completing cost estimation, project planning & sequencing exercises for
example project(s)
Students will learn how to prepare TOR for project implementation; techniques of
project management and planning ; site organization and basics of insurance in the
construction industry.

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Course Description

Course Description:
This course includes the types of construction equipment; Compressors and pumps;
Equipment for earth work:
Trenching, dredging and tunneling equipment, Power excavators and cranes;
Foundation equipment; Concreting equipment; Compactors and paving equipment;
Aggregate production equipment; Choosing construction equipment; Construction
equipment schedule, Management of construction equipment: Finance, maintenance,

223

safety.
Course Contents
1. Construction in the national economy
2. Parties in construction industry
3. Construction and consulting organizations
4. Design and construction procedure of public projects
5. Preparation of TOR
Course Outline

6. Project management and planning techniques


7. Financial project appraisal and cash-flow analysis
8. Personnel management
9. Site organizations
10. Insurance in construction industry
11. Individual/Group term paper preparation and presentation.

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

CEng5202
Year 5, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials
Continuous Assessment 60%
Final Examination 40%

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1. Donald S. Barrie, Boyd C Paulson, and Boyd Paulson Professional
Construction Management, McGraw-Hill 3 edition, 1991
224

2. Abebe Dinku, Construction Management and Finance, AAU Press,


2003

3. Daniel W. Halpin, Construction Management, Wiley; 3 edition, 2005


4. Richard H. Clough, Glenn A. Sears, and S. Keoki Sears, Construction Project
Management , Wiley; 4/e , 2000

5. Alan Griffith, Paul Watson, Construction Management, Palgrave Macmillan,


2003

Approval Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

225

MODULE 21
INDUSTRY PRACTICE AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP [34 ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

Industry Practice and Entrepreneurship

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

[21]
GEng-M4211

Total Study Hours in


the Module

918

Rationale of the
module

In the Bachelors study program, the student has to leave for a one semester
internship (industry placement) after the successful completion of the holistic
examination to be conducted at the end of the 6th Semester.
Civil Engineers need efficient entrepreneurial skills and the ability to manage and
liaise with a wide variety of people.

Module Objectives

Module
Competencies

Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning
and Teaching
Method

The objectives of the internship are expansion of knowledge and acquaintance with
industry in the field of Civil Engineering, consolidation and deepening of existing
knowledge in Civil Engineering design and construction, involvement in planning,
steering and management of design & construction processes and acquiring handson training in practical skills typical for Civil Engineering
The objective of the module is to equip students with the necessary business,
social, and interpersonal skills to operate effectively in organizational environments
in their future career.

The outcome is students will:


Apply existing knowledge in Civil Engineering design and construction,
involve in planning, steering and
manage design & construction processes
acquire hands-on training in practical skills typical for Civil Engineering
demonstrate understanding of market identification and assessment
techniques, new business idea development, fundamentals of finance &
marketing, intellectual property protection, soliciting funding, and
successful business partnership

Parallel

Lecture, class works, assignments &hands on practice at the industry

226

Module Assessment
Techniques

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment


should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
written report , oral presentation & defense, Tests , assignments& exams

Total ECTS of the


module
Module Description

Course Number
CEng 5211
CEng 4212

34 Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course Name
Entrepreneurship for Engineers
Internship
Total ECTS

227

ECTS
4
30
34

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng 52011

Entrepreneurship for Engineers


B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Industry Practice and Entrepreneurship

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Course Weight

4 CP
Lecture
30

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/course level
competences

Course Description

Course outline
Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Mode of delivery

Tutorial
30

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home study

Total Hour

48

108

The objective of the course is to equip students with efficient entrepreneurial skills in
Engineering.
Students shall demonstrate understanding of market identification and assessment
techniques, new business idea development, fundamentals of finance & marketing,
intellectual property protection, soliciting funding, and successful business
partnership.

What it takes to be an entrepreneur


How to assess markets to identify new opportunities
How to value a new business idea
Fundamentals of Finance
Fundamentals of Marketing
How to protect intellectual property
How to put together a successful business plan
How to solicit funding
How to hire and grow a start-up business
How to partner for success.
To be completed

None
Year 5, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials and projects

228

Mode of assessment

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

written report , oral presentation, Tests , assignments& exams

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated
at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more
than 15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality
is equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent
and does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted
by no means.
1 .Weichert, D., et al. (2001), Educating the
Engineer for the 21st Century, 1st edition,
Springer.
2. Schoonhoven, C. & Romanelli, E. (2001)
The Entrepreneurship Dynamic: Origins of
Entrepreneurship and the Evolution of
Industries, 1st edition, Stanford Business
Books.
3. Payne, A.C. et al. (1996), Management for
Engineers, John Wiley & Sons.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

229

Department of Civil Engineering

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng 4212
Internship
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Industry Practice and Entrepreneurship

Name:

Module Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Advisor/ Mentor

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/Course
level competences

Course Description

30 CP
Mentoring /
Advising
600
Overall Course Objectives:

Industry Practice
& Presentation
750

Total Hour
810

To integrate classroom learning with field experience


To gain work experience in the students career field
Provide exposure to advanced skills and knowledge
To develop foundation for workplace competencies
Provide exposure to job opportunities and potentials
To clarify and confirm career goals
To increase understanding of workplace culture

Internship experiences require a three-way working relationship among an employer,


the School and the student. Effective communication between all parties is essential to
the development of successful Internship experiences

Internship Performance
Employer Evaluations
a. Mid-Term Evaluation
b. Final Evaluation
Final Internship Presentation
Program Objectives
Resume and Cover Letter Assignment
Employability Skills Workshops
Work Ethic Assignment
The student Thank Letter to Employer

230

Job Search Assignment


The student should submit a computer-written, 1-2 page description about the
searched job answering these questions:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.

The job or career field the student has chosen.


Average salaries and typical benefits in the students career field.
Education required.
Experience required.
Description of job or career field provided by the web site.
Description of term of employment
Overall Professionalism of Internship report
Internship Assessment Document

Course Outline
Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Teaching & Learning
Methods

Year 1, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials

Assignment
1. Internship Performance

Points Available
(30)

*Employer Evaluations
*Students final presentation
2. Program Objectives

Assessment/Evaluatio
n & Grading System

3. Resume and Cover Letter


Assignment

(5)

4. Work Ethic Assignment

(5)

5. Students thank letter to the Employer

(5)

6. Job Search Assignment

(5)

7. Overall Professionalism of Report

(5)

8. Performance Assessment

(5)

TOTAL

Course policy

(35)

100

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Students must also
respect the code of conduct of intuitions while practicing internship. Academic
231

dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated


at any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work
and submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall
be penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or project reports, contact
your mentor as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend Internship program regularly. 100 %
attendance during internship practice & Mentor visit, except some
unprecedented mishaps.
Literature

Approval Section

Manuals if any industrial guide lines may be used.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

232

MODULE 22
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

01
[22]
CEng-M5221

Total Study Hours in


the Module

135

Rationale of the
module
Discuss environmental disturbances and their causes
Discuss the importance of environmental considerations in all Engineering
Module Objectives

Module
Competencies
Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning
and Teaching
Method

Module Assessment
Techniques

endeavors.
Describe the key technologies used to reduce the impact of human activities on
the water, air, and land environments
Appreciate environmental impact assessment as a tool for sustainabledevelopment.
The student is able to
Scope out main environmental problems
Carry out EIA
Design landfills for solid waste

Parallel

Lecture, class works, assignments & projects.

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment


should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
written report , oral presentation & defense, Tests , assignments& exams

Total ECTS of the


module
Module Description

Course Number
CEng3221

34 Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course Name
Environmental Engineering
Total ECTS

233

ECTS
5
5

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

CEng3221
Environmental Engineering
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Environmental Engineering

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:. ; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

ECTS Credits

3CP
Lecture

Course Weight

Course Objectives

Competences to be
Acquired/Course level
competences

Course Description

Practice
Tutorial
orHome studyTotal Hour
Laboratory

50003181
Discuss environmental disturbances and their causes
Discuss the importance of environmental considerations in all Engineering
endeavors.
Describe the key technologies used to reduce the impact of human activities on
the water, air, and land environments
Appreciate environmental impact assessment as a tool for sustainabledevelopment
The student is able to
Scope out main environmental problems
Carry out EIA
Design landfills for solid waste

Major environmental problems and their relation to human activity and


development.
Aspects of environmental policies and legislation.
Sources and causes of water, land, food, and air pollution and their control.
Urbanization and its impact on the environment.
Issues and strategies of environmental protection.
Quantities and composition of solid wastes.
Methods of solid waste treatment (land filling, incineration, composting, etc.).
Handling of hazardous waste.
Aspects of solid waste management.
Environmental impact assessment.

234

Course Outline

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course
Teaching & Learning
Methods
Assessment/Evaluatio
n & Grading System

Course policy

Literature

Approval Section

None
Year III, Semester II
Compulsory
Lectures, tutorials, Project.

continuous assessment 60%


final examination 40%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
15% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by
no means.
2. Mackenzie L. Davis, Susan J. Masten. (2003). Principles of Environmental
Engineering and Science. 1/e .

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

235

MODULE 23
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING (ELECTIVE) [15ECTS]

Department of Civil Engineering


Module Title

Advanced Structural Engineering

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

02,Elective
[23]
CEng-M5212
Pra/LabHome StudyTotal HourTotal Study Hours in Lecture Tut/Sem

the Module
7050050270
Rationale of the The study of advanced structural Engineering involves the analysis and design of
special structures using concrete and steel structures .module
The main objectives of the module are to:
Analysis of special structures such as curved beam, oblique support, non
prismatic members, irregular frames shell structures
Estimation of lateral load using Ethiopian Building Codes and using
advanced analysis methods for lateral load distribution in high rise
Module Objectives
buildings and plan and design lateral load resisting systems
Use advanced analysis methods such as strip f method of slab design for
irregular shaped slabs and using plastic analysis for framed structures.
Apply the principle of reinforced concrete design to shell structures, shear
walls, water tankers, Bunkers and silos.
After completion of this module the students shall be able to;
structures such as curved beam , non prismatic members,
Analyze special
Module
high
rise
buildings,
oblique supports
Competencies
Determine lateral loads on high rise buildings and device lateral load resisting
system and distribute lateral load
Design and detail special reinforced concrete structures such as shell, bunkers,
Silos, and Water tankers
Semester based or ParallelModule Mode of Delivery
Lectures, tutorials, Project work and PresentationModule Learning and Teaching Method

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment Module Assessment
Techniquesshould comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
Total ECTS of the
15 Credit Point
module
The study of advanced structural Engineering involves the analysis and design of
Module Description
special structures using concrete and steel structures .
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course NumberCourse NameECTS
Theory of structures III5CEng5231
Reinforced concrete structures III5CEng5232
Total ECTS15

236

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5231
Theory of structures III
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Advanced Structural Engineering
Theories
Name:

Module No

23
.

Course
Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Total ECTS5 CP
LectureTutorialPractice orHom AssessmeTotal
LaboratoryentHour
study
304505010135
Student gets basic knowledge to
Classify structures w.r.t static and kinematic methods
Perform indeterminate structural analysis using the matrix flexibility methods
Perform indeterminate structural analysis using the matrix stiffness methods
Use the Direct Stiffness Method to perform structural analysis
Employ the techniques to overcome special problem types

Students Workload

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Fundamental principles of matrix methods of structural analysis. Energy


concepts. Flexibility method: Basic concepts, flexibility of prismatic members,
Course Objectives system flexibility, solution procedure. Stiffness method: Basic concepts,
stiffness of prismatic members, axis transformation and system stiffness, direct
stiffness method. Non prismatic members. Curved members. Elastic supports.
Oblique supports. Discontinuities in members. Offset connection.
Stability & Determinacy of Structures, Loads on Structures, Influence Lines
Course Description (IL)for Determinate Structures, Deflection of Determinate Structures and
Consistent Deformation Method
Course outline
ContentReferenceAssessmentDate

237

1. Fundamental Principles of Structural


Analysis
1.1. Introduction
1.2. Deformations in framed structures
1.3. Action and Displacements
1.4. Equilibrium and Compatibility
TBA
TBAWeek 1
1.5. Principle of Superposition
1.6. Structural Analysis Methods
1.7. Action and Displacement Equations
1.8. Flexibility and Stiffness Matrices
1.9. Equivalent Joint Load
1.10. Energy Methods
2. The Flexibility Method
2.1. Basic Concepts
2.2. Flexibility of Prismatic MembersWeekTBA
TBA
2.3. Action Transformation and System Flexibility
Equation
2.4. Formalized Solution Procedures
3. The Stiffness Method
3.1. Basic Concepts
3.2. Basic concepts
3.3. Stiffness of Prismatic MembersWeekTBA
TBA
3.4. Axis Transformation and Master Stiffness
Equation
3.5. Formalized Solution Procedures
3.6. Direct Stiffness Method & Solution Procedure
4. Additional Topics for the Stiffness Method
4.1. Curved Members,
4.2. Non Prismatic Members,WeekTBA
TBA
4.3. Oblique Supports Elastic Supports,
4.4. Discontinuities in Members,
4.5. Offset Connection (rigid offsets)
Pre-requisites CEng2103
SemesterYear 5, Semester I
Status ofElective
Course
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active
learning and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Mode of
Tutorials
delivery
Group Discussion
Home Works
Mode of delivery is Parallel
Continuous Assessment (50%)Mode of
assessmentTests
238

Course policy

Literature
Approval
Section

Quizzes
Assignments
Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)
All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. Matrix Analysis of Framed Structures by Weaver & Gere
2. Matrix Structural Analysis by McGuire & Gallagher
Name of course Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

239

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5232
Reinforced Concrete Structures III
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering

Advanced Concrete Structures


Name:

Module No

23

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Objectives

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial
Practice orHomeTotal

5 CP
Assessment

LaboratorystudyHour
304505010135
Students will have developed the following skills:
1. An ability to carry out the structural design of curved beams, haunched beams,
deep beams, and corbels in the ultimate limit state and verify the satisfaction of
serviceability limit state requirements,
2. An ability to carry out structural design of structural walls for shear and flexure in
the ultimate limit state and verify the satisfaction of serviceability limit state
requirements,
3. Understand the basics in the analysis and design of pre-stressed concrete beams and
4. Understand the basics in the analysis and design of water retaining structures,
bunkers and Silos.

At the end of the course, the student will:


Be able to carry out structural design of curved beams, haunched beams, deep
beams, and corbels in the ultimate limit state and verify the satisfaction of
serviceability limit state requirements,
Be able to carry out the structural design of structural walls for flexure and shear in
the ultimate limit state and verify the satisfaction of serviceability limit state
requirements,
Be able to understand the basic concept in pre-stressed concrete design which
includes method of pre-stressing, materials and permissible stresses, loss of pre-stress
and bending stress analysis of simple and composite sections,
Be able to carry out the structural design of water retaining structures and verify the
satisfaction of serviceability limit state requirements
Be introduced to structural design of bunkers and silos.

240

Course Description

1. Design of curved beam, haunched beam, deep beam and corbels,


2. Shear wall design and detailing,
3. Introduction to pre-stressed concrete design and
4. Design of water retaining structures, bunkers and silos.

Content

Course outline
Reference

Assessment

1. Deep Beams and Corbels


1.1. Strut and Tie model
1.2. Behavior of deep beams and corbels
1.3. Design of deep beams
1.4. Design of corbels

TBA

2. Curved Beams and Hunched Beams


2.1. Introduction
2.2. Design of curved beams
2.3. Design of haunched beams

TBA

TBA

TBA

3. Design of Concrete walls


3.1. Introduction
WeekTBA
3.2. Design of plain concrete wallsTBA
3.3. Design of reinforced concrete walls
3.4. Detailing of reinforced concrete wall
4. Introduction to Pre-stressed concrete design
4.1. Introduction
WeekTBA
4.2. Methods of pre-stressingTBA
4.3. Materials and Permissible Stresses
4.4. Analysis and design of pre-stressed concrete
5. Water retaining Structures
5.1. IntroductionWeekTBA
TBA
5.2. Joints in water tanks
5.3. Circular and Rectangular tanks
6. Bunkers and Silos
6.1. IntroductionWeekTBA
TBA
6.2. Bunkers
6.3. Silos
Pre-requisitesCEng3112
SemesterYear 5, Semester II
Status of Course Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Mode of
Tutorials

delivery
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


241

Date

Week 1

Week

Mode of
assessment

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests
Quizzes
Assignments

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

Approval
Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. Reinforced Concrete: Mechanics and Design, by James G MacGregor and James K
Wight.
2. Design of Concrete Structures, by Arthur H. Nilson, David Darwin and Charles W.
Dolan.
3. Yield Line Analysis of Slabs, L.L. Jones and R.H. Wood
4. The Mechanics of Pre-stressed Concrete, S.K. Mallick and K.S. Ranges
5. Ethiopian Building Code Standards 2, Structural Use of Concrete
Name of course Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date..

242

MODULE 24
ADVANCED TRANSPORT ENGINEERING MODULE (ELECTIVE) [10 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering

Module Title

Advanced transport Engineering module

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

Elective
[24]
CEng-M5242

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the
module

Module Objectives

Module Competencies

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

Total Hour

701000100270
The specification of roadway construction, its maintenance and
rehabilitation, road management system and the economic aspect of road
construction and method of road construction with respect to labor-based
method. The module general overview railway Engineering and its
significance in transportation.
The main objectives of the module are to:
Know the different method of roads maintenance and rehabilitation
Know the basic method of road construction in labor based construction.
To gain the understanding of railways as a transportation.

Apply the method of construction of bituminous and concrete pavement


Manage the road usage in its maximum capacity
Economically apply the method of road construction applicable in every
locality
Analyze and design of railway structures.
To identify the track components, construction and maintenance

Module Mode of DeliveryParallel


Module Learning and
Lectures, Tutorial and projects
Teaching Method
Module Assessment
Techniques

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.

Tests, quiz, assignments, presentations and exams


Total ECTS of the module10 Credit Point
Module Description
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course NumberCourse Name
CEng5241Highway Engineering III
CEng5242Rail way Engineering
Total ECTS

243

ECTS
5
5
10

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5241
Highway Engineering III
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Advanced Highway Engineering

Module No

01

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial

30

Practice or
Laboratory
0

45

Home
study
50

5 CP
Assessment
10

Total
Hour
135

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Objectives

Course Description

The course includes the detailed specification of roadway construction, its


maintenance and rehabilitation. Introduction to road management system and the
economic aspect of road construction are also a part of the course. It also deals with
the method of road construction with respect to labor-based method

Content

Course outline
Reference

Assessment

Chapter one
Road Construction
1.1 Earthwork operation and equipment,
1.2 construction of sub-bases, bases,
1.3 bituminous pavement,

TBA

Chapter two
Road Maintenance and Rehabilitation
2.1 Surface condition survey,
2.2 roughness and frictional structural condition,

TBA

244

TBA

TBA

Date

Week 1

Week

2.3 drainage check,


2.4 traffic control and safety devices
2.5 design of overlays
Chapter three
Introduction to Road Management System
3.1 Economic Aspect of Road Construction
3.2 Choosing between alternatives influencing material
cost and labor
WeekTBA
3.3 Labor Based Method of Road ConstructionTBA
3.4 Basic concept of technology application,
3.5 feasibility study of road construction and
development,
3.6 economic study of the labor-based method of
construction
Pre-requisitesCEng4183
SemesterYear 5, Semester I
Status of Course Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Mode of
Tutorials

delivery
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Mode of
Assignments
assessment

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

245

Literature
Approval
Section

O'Flaherty, C. A. (2001), Highways: The Location, Design, Construction and


Maintenance of Road Pavements, 4th edition, Butterworth-Heinemann

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

246

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5242
Railway Engineering
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Railway Engineering

Module No

01

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Objectives

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial
Practice orHomeTotal

5 CP
Assessment

LaboratorystudyHour
304505010135
understand the basics of railway system Engineering
Acquire basic knowledge of railway subgrade characteristics and design
requirements
Understand railway communication, signaling and control systems
Have knowledge of design of railway subgarde, railway line , rails, sleeper, ballast
and sub ballast, stations
Acquire principles of design and construction of railway tunnel and bridge
Familiarize themselves with the different parts and components of in railway system
Engineering
Participate in railway projects and develop interest in the field
Basic knowledge about rail way systems and train operation.
Railway signaling, communication and control
concepts of geometric design for rail ways,
understand basic features of roadbed section,
incorporate and utilize railway track technology
design principles of rail, sleeper, fasteners, ballast, sub ballast and subgrade
basic knowledge on freight & passenger transportation including train formation
and organization of car flow
The course includes the detailed specification of roadway construction, its
maintenance and rehabilitation. Introduction to road management system and the
economic aspect of road construction are also a part of the course. It also deals with
the method of road construction with respect to labor-based method

Course Description

Content

Course outline
Reference
247

Assessment

Date

1. Basics Of railway Engineering


1.1 Railway transportation system
1.2 Historic development of railway
1.3 Components of railway
1.4 General principle for railway construction and
development
1.5 Railway classification and main technical standards
1.6 Railway signal, communication and control
2. Railway Line and subgrade

TBA

I. Railroad line
2.1 Economic survey of railway line
2.2 Selection of main technical standards
2.3 Plane section
2.4 Longitudinal section

TBA

II. Railroad subgrade


2.5 Standard subgrade sections
2.6 Design of subgrade surface
2.7 Drainage of road bed
2.8 Safeguards and strengthening of roadbed
3. Railway Track Structures
3.1 Component and function of track structure
3.2 Rails
3.3 Sleepers
3.4 Ballast and sub ballast
3.5 Rail fastening system/ Union piece
3.6 Ballasted and slab track
4. Railway Station
4.1 Definition, Basic tasks and Classification of railway
station
4.2 Distribution and location of station
4.3 Rules for station distribution and Location
4.4 Passing and overtaking stations
4.5 Intermediate station Layout
4.6 Main equipments and facilities

TBA

5. Switches & Turnouts


5.1 The Switches and their function
5.2 Main Types of switches and turnouts
5.3 Components of a single switch
5.4 Turnouts
5.5 Switch calculations and design
5.6 Railway Clearance
6. Introduction to tunnels & bridges
I. Tunnels
6.1. Definition and Function of Tunnel
6.2. Cross section and Notations in tunneling
6.3. Installations in tunnels
6.4. Uncertainties in tunneling

248

TBA

TBA

TBA

Week 1

Week

Week

6.5. Tunnel Design methods


6.6. Tunneling techniques
II. Railway Bridges
6.7. Layout and components Railway Bridge
6.8. Bridge components: use and functionality
6.9. Deck Configuration
6.10. Types of bridges
6.11. Design Loadings for Railway Bridges
7. Organization of train operation
7.1. Train Formation
7.2. Organization of Car Flow and Freight- formation
plan
7.3. Train Diagram & Carrying capacity
7.4. Organization of Station Operation
Pre-requisitesCEng3182, CEng2103,
SemesterYear 5, Semester II
Status of Course Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Mode of
Tutorials

delivery
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Mode of
Assignments
assessment

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.
1. Modern railway Track (C. Esveld)
249

2. Railroad Engineering (William W.Hay)


3. Railway Management and Engineering
4. AREMA standard
5. Chinese standard
6. Any Railway Engineering books
Approval
Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

250

MODULE 25
WATER RESOURCE ENGINEERING MODULE (ELECTIVE) [9 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

Water Resource Engineering

Module Category
Module Number
Module Code

25
[02]
CEng-M5252

Total Study Hours in


the Module

Lecture

Rationale of the module

Module Objectives

Tut/Sem

Pra/Lab

Home Study

7085098243
Water resources could be harnessed to produce clean energy. As
the country is endowed with such a potential, this module is highly
relevant. The module enlightens the students with the principles of
development of hydropower.
Water resources development practice is multi-faceted and has many
aspects including but not limited to Engineering, socio-economic, legal and
environmental ones.
Hence, this module is included to give the students familiarity on
these issues from a Civil Engineering point of view.
To select appropriate site for hydropower development,
To design components of hydropower plant,
To assess the socio-economic and environmental impacts of
hydropower
Apply science, mathematics, and modern Engineering tools to identify,
prevent, analyze and solve environmental and water resources problems.
Effectively communicate both orally and in writing, the nature of, and
solution to environmental and water resources problems.
Work as a productive member of a multi-disciplinary team.
Recognize and appreciate social, political, economic and
environmental impacts of environmental and water resources
Engineering projects on scales
After completion of this module the students shall be able to;
Analysis and Design of Waterworks Infrastructures, Irrigation and
Hydropower plants. Optimize water resource system

Module Competencies
Module Mode of
Delivery
Module Learning and
Teaching Method
Module Assessment
Techniques

Total Hour

Parallel
Lectures, tutorials, exercises, Project

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.

251

Total ECTS of the


module
Module Description

Course Number
CEng5251
CEng5252

10Credit Point

Clustered Courses in the Module


Course Name
Water Resource Development
Hydro Power Development
Total ECTS

252

ECTS
4
5
9

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5252
Hydropower Development
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Water Resource Engineering

Module No

25

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Objectives

Course Description

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial

Practice or
Laboratory
0

3045
The student is able to
Select appropriate site for hydropower development
Assess the hydropower potential of a given river
Design basic layout and elements of a hydropower plant

Home
study
50

5 CP
Assessment
10

The objective of the course is to introduce the fundamentals of design, construction,


operation and maintenance of hydropower systems and infrastructure. Students will
demonstrate understanding of hydraulic power as a source of energy, and be able to
select appropriate site for hydropower development, understand different types of
hydropower development arrangements, assess hydropower potential, perform
hydrologic analysis of water storage alternatives for power production and design
basic layout and elements of a hydropower plant.
Water as a source of energy.
Estimation of waterpower potential: flow duration curves.
Electrical loads on turbines: load curve, load factor, firm and secondary power.
Classification of hydroelectric power plants: run-of-river, storage and pumped
storage plants
Design of Power intakes, canals, tunnels, foreBay, surge tanks, penstocks.
Layout of powerhouse and accessories: cavitation requirements, draft tube,
electromechanical equipment.
Planning and design of small hydropower plants.
Course outline
ContentReferenceAssessmentDate

253

Total
Hour
135

1. Introduction
1.1. Sources of Energy
1.2. Merits and Demerits of Hydropower

TBA

2. Development of Hydropower
2.1. Hydropower Status in the World
2.2. Hydropower potential & Status in Ethiopia

TBA

3. Estimation of Water Power Potential


3.1. Water Power Potential
3.2. Firm and Secondary Power
3.3. Load Prediction and Demand Assessment
4. Classification and Types of Hydropower
Development
4.1. Classification and Basis
4.2. Site selection ,Layouts and Capacity Computation
4.3. Storage and Pondage
5. Water Conveyance Structures
5.1. Intakes, Canals and Tunnels
5.2. Water Hammer Analysis
5.3. Surge Tanks
5.4. Forebays
5.5. Penstocks
5.6. Anchors
6. Power house and Hydropower Machines
6.1. Layout of powerhouse and accessories
6.2. Impulse, Momentum and Power of a Turbine
6.3. Design Consideration for Hydraulic Machines
6.4. Types of Turbines
6.5. Draft Tubes, draft Heads
6.6. Dimensioning of Turbines
6.7. Generator and Governors

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

7. Planning and design of small hydropower plants


Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of
delivery

Mode of
assessment

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

CEng4162
Year 5, Semester II
Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments

254

Week 1

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week

Week

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature
Approval
Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

1. Harvey, A. and Brown, A. (2004). Micro- Hydro Design Manual. Practical Action.
2. P. Novak (2007). Hydraulic Structures. 1/e .Taylor & Francis.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

255

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5251
Water Resource Development
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Water Resource Engineering

Module No

25

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Objectives

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial

Practice or
Laboratory
0

Home
study
50

5 CP
Assessment

304510
Students will be able to:
Analyze cost-benefit analysis
Come up with optimal water allocation
Understand basics of Master Plan for Water Resources
Understand legal, socio-economic, environmental aspects of WRD
Provide students with the principles of water resources planning and management,
principles of integrated water resources development

Total
Hour
135

Course Description
Content
Assessment of surface and sub-surface
water resources and their development.

Course outline
Reference

Assessment
TBA

Planning of water resources projects

TBA

Sustainability of water resources


development

TBA

Planning and operation tools.

TBA

256

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Date

Week 1

Week

Week

Week

Project formulation: reconnaissance,


prefeasibility,
and feasibility studies, final
design.

TBA

Trans-boundary water issues.


Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of
delivery

TBA

TBA

TBA

Week

Week

CEng2152, CEng3154
Year 5, Semester I
Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments
Mode of
assessment

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

1. Larry W. Mays. (2005). Water Resources Engineering. Wiley.


2. David A. Chin. (2006). Water Resources Engineering. Prentice Hall.
3. Loucks, Daniel P. and Eelco van Beek. (2005). Water Resources Systems
4. Planning and Management: An Introduction to Methods, Models and Applications.
UNESCO.

257

Approval
Section

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

258

MODULE 26
ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
Department of Civil Engineering
Advanced Environmental Engineering Module Name

Module CategoryElective
Module Number26
Module CodeCEng-M5261
Total EtCTS of the Module10
Total Study Hour270
The module discusses the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment Objectives

and introduces the basic equations and models used in environmental


Engineering. The module examines the use of geographic information systems
(GIS) for environment modelling and exposes students to a range of spatial
analytic and modelling tools and applications of GIS.

Competencies

Module Mode of Delivery


Module Learning and
Teaching Method

Module Assessment
Techniques

Course Number
CEng5261
CEng5262
Total

The module demonstrates the key principles of the EIA process, the role of EIA
in relation to Civil & Environmental Engineering works. It introduces the
methodological issues related to the performance of EIA and legislative and
quality requirements concerning the EIA process. It also discusses design and
construction considerations useful in minimizing and mitigating such impacts
Students will be able to model simple environmental processes using computer,
use GIS software, apply GIS in environmental modelling.

The student will understand EIA process and it application in relation to Civil
and Environmental Engineering works. At the end of this module, the students
are expected to be able to conduct EIA.
Parallel
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture, Tutorials
Group Discussion, Home Works

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous assessment


should comprise at least five (5) different assessment techniques.
Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests,Quizzes
Assignments, Mini projects, Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Courses of the Module


Course Name
GIS and Environmental Modeling
Environmental Impact Assessment

259

EtCTS
05
05
10

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5261
GIS and Environmental Modeling
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
GIS and Environmental Modeling

Module No

01

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Objectives

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial orHomeTotal
Practice

5 CP
Assessment

LaboratorystudyHour
304505010135
Be able to model simple environmental processes using computer, use GIS software,
apply GIS in environmental modeling

To discuss the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment


to introduce the basic equations and models used in environmental Engineering
To examine the use of geographic information systems (GIS) for the environmental
modeling.
Students will be exposed to a range of spatial analytic and modeling tools and
applications of GIS in Environmental Engineering
Environmental Processes, environmental modeling, fundamentals of GIS, application
of GIS in environmental modeling

Course Description

Content
1. Introduction to Environmental Modeling

Course outline
Reference

Assessment
TBA

260

TBA

Date
Week 1

2. Transport phenomena

TBA

3. Chemical reaction kinetics

TBA

4. Flow modeling

TBA

5. Pollutant modeling in surface water

TBA

6. Groundwater contaminant transport

TBA

7. Fundamentals of GIS

TBA

8. Modeling with GIS

TBA

9. Modeling physical systems

TBA

10. Modeling processes

TBA

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of
delivery

TBA

TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA

Week

Week
Week
Week
Week
Week
Week
Week
Week

CEng3221, CEng2082
Year 5, Semester I
Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments
Mode of
assessment

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than

261

20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

Literature

Approval
Section

Clarke, K. et. al.: Geographic Information Systems and Environmental


Modeling. Prentice Hall, 2001
E. Holzbecher. Environmental Modeling using MATLAB. Springer,2007
N. Nirmala Khandan. Modeling tools for environmental engineers and
scientists. CRC Press, 2002
Jo Smith. Environmental modeling: An introduction. Oxford University
Press, 2007
Jerald L. Schnoor. Environmental Modeling: Fate and transport of
pollutants in water, air and soil, John Wiley & Sons, 1996

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

262

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5262
Environmental Impact Assessment
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Environmental Impact Assessment

Module No

01

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

Course Objectives

Course Description

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial
Practice orHomeTotal

5 CP
Assessment

LaboratorystudyHour
304505010135
Understand EIA process and it application in relation to Civil and
Environmental Engineering works. At the end of this course, the students are
expected to able to conduct EIA.

To demonstrate the key principles of the EIA process,


To demonstrate the role of EIA in relation to Civil & Environmental
Engineering works,
To introduce the methodological issues related to the performance of EIA,
To introduce legislative and quality requirements concerning the EIA
process
to discuss design and construction considerations useful in minimizing and
mitigating such impacts

Environment and development, EIA processes, prediction and assessment


of impacts, regulations & quality standards for EIA process and
international standards, Impact mitigation and monitoring, GIS & RS for
EIA

Content

Course outline
Reference

Assessment
TBA

1. The EIA processes

263

TBA

Date
Week 1

2. EIA application in Civil Engineering

TBA

3. Prediction and assessment of impacts

TBA

4. Mitigation and Monitoring

TBA

5. Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA)

TBA

6. EIA process in Ethiopia and International standards

TBA

7. Application of GIS and Remote Sensing in EIA

TBA

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of
delivery

TBA

TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA

Week

Week
Week
Week
Week
Week

CEng3222
Year 5, Semester II
Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments
Mode of
assessment

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

264

Literature

Approval
Section

Environmental Impact Assessment Methodologies. Y. Anjaneyulu. BS Publications


(2007)
Methods of Environmental Impact Assessment. Peter Morris and Riki. Taylor &
Francis (2009)
Environmental Impact Assessment Practical Solutions to Recurrent Problems. David P.
Lawrence. John Wiley & Sons (2003)
Life Cycle Assessment in the Built Environment. Robert H, Crowford. Spon
Press(2011)

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

265

MODULE 27
ADVANCED GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Name
Module Category
Module Number
Module Code
Total EtCTS of the Module
Total Study Hour
Objectives
Competencies

Advanced Geotechnical Engineering

Module Mode of Delivery

Parallel
The mode of the delivery of the module can be summarized as follows:
Lecture

Module Learning and


Teaching Method

Elective
27
CEng-M5271
10
270

Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Accounts 50% and final exam (summative) 50%, continuous


assessment should comprise at least five (5) different assessment
techniques.
Module Assessment
Techniques

Continuous Assessment (50%)


Tests
Quizzes
Assignments

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course Number
CEng5271
CEng5272
Total

Courses of the Module


Course Name
Introduction to Seismology & Earthquake
Engineering
Engineering Properties of Tropical Soils

EtCTS
05

05

266

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5271
Introduction to Seismology and Earthquake Engineering
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Geotechnical EngineeringModule No
27

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Students Workload

Lecture

Total ECTS
Tutorial

30

Practice or
Laboratory
0

45

Home
study
50

5 CP
Assessment
10

Total
Hour
135

Competences to be
Acquired/course
level competences

The course on Introduction to Earthquake Engineering provides the fundamental

Course Objectives

concepts, principles and application of earthquake Engineering in seismic analysis


and design of structures.
The course begins with the Seismology explaining the causes of occurrence of
earthquake and its characterization. The seismic analysis of the structures under
earthquake excitation is developed. The structural system modeled as discrete and
continuous system.
The concept of response spectrum analysis procedure to determine structure response

Course Description

and design earthquake forces is explained. The codal provisions for earthquake
resistant design of structures as per Ethiopian Standards will be explained.
Finally, the course also covers the soil structure interaction and inelastic response
spectra. The advanced course material on Earthquake Engineering will be very useful
to undergraduate students, post-graduate students, teachers and practitioners.
A number of chosen problems will be solved to illustrate the design and analysis
concepts clearly.

Content

Course outline
Reference

267

Assessment

Date

1. Seismology:

Earth's Interior and Plate Tectonics;

Causes of Earthquakes and Seismic Waves;


Measurement of Earthquakes and
Measurement parameters;

TBA

Modification of Earthquake due to the Nature

TBA

Week01-02

of Soil;

Seismic Hazard Analysis I;

Seismic Hazard Analysis II; Discussion on


Tutorial Problems.

2. Earthquake Inputs:

Time History Records and Frequency Contents


of Ground Motion;

Power Spectral Density Function of Ground


Motion; Concept of Response Spectrums of
Earthquake;

TBA

Combined DVA Spectrum and Construction

TBA

Week03-04

of Design Spectrum; Site Specific, Probabilistic


and Uniform Hazard Spectrums;

Predictive Relationships for earthquake


parameters;

Discussion on Tutorial Problems

3. Dynamics for Earthquake Analysis:

Equations of Motion for SDOF and MDOF


Systems; Undamped Free Vibration of SDOF
and MDOF Systems;

Mode Shapes and Frequencies of MDOF


System; Rayleigh Damping Matrix;

TBA

Direct Time Domain Analysis of MDOF

TBA

Week05-06

System;

Direct Frequency Domain Analysis of MDOF


System;

Modal Analysis in Time and Frequency


Domain;

Discussion on Tutorial Problems.

4. Response Analysis for Specific Ground Motion:


Equations of Motion for Single and
MultiSupport Excitations and Solutions;

Equations of Motion in State Space and

TBA

Solutions;

Computational Steps for the Solutions using


MATLAB I;

Computational Steps for the Solutions using

268

TBA

Week07-08

MATLAB II;

Time History Analysis of 3D Tall Buildings;

Discussion on Tutorial Problems.

5. Response Spectrum Method of Analysis:

Concept of Equivalent Lateral Force for


Earthquake;

Modal Combination Rules;

Response Spectrum Method of Analysis of

TBA

Structures and Codal Provisions;

TBA

Week 09-10

Response Spectrum Method of Analysis for


Torsionally Coupled Systems;

Response Spectrum Method of Analysis for


NonClassically Damped Systems;

Discussion on Tutorial Problems.

6. Seismic Soil - Structure Interaction:


Fundamentals of Seismic SoilStructure
Interaction;

Direct Method of Analysis of SoilStructure


Interaction using FEM and Use of ABAQUS
Software I;

Direct Method of Analysis of SoilStructure

TBA

Interaction using FEM and Use of ABAQUS

TBA

Week 11-12

Software II;

Substructuring Method of Analysis of


SoilStructure Interaction Problem I;

Substructuring Method of Analysis of


SoilStructure Interaction Problem II;

Discussion on Tutorial Problems.

7. Inelastic Response of Structures for Earthquake


Forces:

Fundamental Concepts of Inelastic Response


Analysis for Earthquake Forces;

Solutions of Incremental Equations of Motions

We4k 13-14

for SDOF Systems;

Solutions of Incremental Equations of Motions


for MDOF Systems;

Push over Analysis;

Concepts of Ductility and Inelastic Spectrum;

Discussion on Tutorial Problems.

8. Base isolation for earthquake resistant design of


structures:
Base isolation concept, isolation systems and

Week 15-16

their modeling;

269

linear theory of base isolation;

stability of elastomeric bearings;

codal provisions for seismic isolation, practical


applications

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Mode of
delivery

CEng2132
Year 5, Semester I
Elective
The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments
Mode of
assessment

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

270

REFERENCES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Literature
6.

Clough R.W. and Penzien J., 'Dynamics of Structures', McGraw-Hill, 2nd edition,
1992.
Newmark N.M. and Rosenblueth E., 'Fundamentals of Earthquake Engg.,'
Prentice Hall, 1971.
David Key, 'Earthquake Design Practice for Buildings', Thomas Telford, London,
1988.
Ellis L. Krinitzsky, J.M. Gould and Peter H. Edinger, 'Fundamentals of
Earthquake Resistant Construction', John Wiley, 1993.
Blume J.A., Newmark N.M., Corning L.H., 'Design of Multi-storied Buildings for
Earthquake ground motions', Portland Cement Association, Chicago, 1961.
Pankaj Agarwal and Manish Shrikhande, 'Earthquake Resistant Design of
Structures', PHI, 2008.
Proc. of World Conferences on Earthquake Engg., 1956-2008.
I.S. Codes No. 1893, 4326, 13920 etc.

7.
8.

ADDITIONAL READINGS
1.

2.

Approval
Section

Journals Related to Earthquake Engineering and Bureau of Indian Standard codes.


EBCS 8.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

271

Department of Civil Engineering


Course Code
Course Title
Degree Program
Module Name

CEng5272
Engineering Properties of tropical soils
B.Sc. in Civil Engineering
Advanced Geotechnical Engineering

Module No

27

Name:

Course Coordinator

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________
Name:.

Lecturer

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation Hours: ___________________________________

Lecture

Students Workload

Total ECTS
Tutorial

30
Competences to be Acquired/course level
competences
Course Objectives
Course Description

Content
1. Clay mineralogy

Practice or
Laboratory
0

45

Course outline
Reference
TBA

5 CP
Assessment
10

Assessment
TBA

2. Geotechnical properties & behavior of lateritic and


black cotton Soils
3. Properties of desiccated clays

TBA

4. Relation between Load & swelling

TBA

5. Effect of climate on behaviour of Clay.

TBA

6. Effect of swelling on buildings.

TBA

7. Failure of foundations due to expansive soils.

TBA

8. methods of preventing Damage from swelling clays.

TBA

Pre-requisites
Semester
Status of Course

Home
study
50

TBA

CEng3133
Year 5, Semester I
Elective

272

TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA

TBA
TBA
TBA

Total
Hour
135

Date
Week 1
Week
Week
Week
Week

Week
Week
Week

Mode of
delivery

The mode of the delivery of the course will basically be student centered active learning
and is summarized as follows:
Lecture
Tutorials
Group Discussion
Home Works

Mode of delivery is Parallel


Continuous Assessment (50%)
Tests
Quizzes
Assignments
Mode of
assessment

Mini projects
Reports and presentations
Final Exam (50%)

Course policy

Literature

Approval
Section

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic dishonest
including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at any stage
during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be
penalized.
If you are having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor as
soon as possible.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. A student who misses more than
20% of the semester class is not eligible to sit for final exam. Punctuality is
equally important.
If you must bring a cell phone to class, make sure that it is absolutely silent and
does not disturb any one. The teaching-learning process shall be disrupted by no
means.

1. Larry W. Mays. (2005). Water Resources Engineering. Wiley.


2. David A. Chin. (2006). Water Resources Engineering. Prentice Hall.
3. Loucks, Daniel P. and Eelco van Beek. (2005). Water Resources Systems
4. Planning and Management: An Introduction to Methods, Models and Applications.
UNESCO.

Name of course Instructor _________________________________


Signaturedate.
Name of course team leader.
Signaturedate.
Name of department head.
Signature.date.

273

MODULE 28
B.SC THESIS /PROJECT MODULE [12 ECTS]
Department of Civil Engineering
Module Title

B.SC Thesis /Project

Module Category
01,Core
Module Number
[28]
Module Code CEng-M5281
Progress advising &Project workTotal Hour
Total Study Hours in
Presentation
the Module
124200324
Rationaleofthe To enable students identify problems and give solution in scientific sprocedure by
producing technical report.module
The main objectives of the module are to:
The Final Year Project (Bachelors Thesis) is the culmination of the program and
Module Objectives
should develop and demonstrate independent, methodological abilities as well as
provide the students with their first research experience
After completion of this module the students shall be able to;
Identify problems regarding Civil Engineering in the society
Propose and select in the order of priority
Module Competencies
Analyze and Design
Write Technical Report
Present and initiate its implementation
ModuleModeof
Semester based or Parallel
Delivery
Module Learning and
Lectures, tutorials, Project work and Presentation
Teaching Method
- Progressive Evaluation (At least two times) 40%
Module Assessment
- Professional Written Report 30%
Techniques
- Oral Presentation (Last Presentation) 30%
Total ECTS of the
12 Credit Point
module
The subjects for the Bachelors Thesis can be set in consultation between the
Professor and the student. Some works in cooperation with the industry are alsoModule Description
possible.
Clustered Courses in the Module
Course NumberCourse NameECTS
CEng5281BSC thesis12
Total ECTS12

274

Course Number
Course Title
Degree Program
Module

Module Coordinator
Literature

Advisor

ECTS Credits
Contact Hours
Approval
Section

Course Objectives &


Competences to be
Acquired
Course Description

Course Contents

Semester

Status of Course
Teaching & Learning
Methods
Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System

Course policy

submitting others work is considered as serious act of cheating and shall be


Civil Engineering Department
penalized.
If you are
CENG
5281having problems with the assignments or tests, contact the instructor
as soon
as possible.
BSc
Thesis
B.Sc.
in Civil
Students
are Engineering
expected to report their progress regularly. 100 % attendance
CEng
-M
5281,
Final Year
Projectreport, presentation and , except some
during Consultation,
progress
unprecedented mishaps. Punctuality is equally important.
Name:
.
Office location.
Full
bibliographic
Mobile:.;
e-mail:.citation; sources not older than 5 years (older only in very
exceptional
cases)
Consultation
Hours: ___________________________________
-Name:.
Basic texts (e.g. textbooks)
- Recommended supplementary literature
- Journals & Articles
- Previous Related Project works.

Office location.
Mobile:.; e-mail:.
Consultation
___________________________________
NameHours:
of course
Instructor _________________________________
Signaturedate.
12
Name of course team leader.
ProgressSignaturedate.
advising &Project workTotal Hour
Presentation
Name of department head.
124200324
The FinalSignature.date.
Year Project (Bachelors Thesis) is the culmination of the program and
should develop and demonstrate independent, methodological abilities as well as
provide the students with their first research experience.
The subjects for the Bachelors Thesis can be set in consultation between the Professor
and the student. Some works in cooperation with the industry are also possible.
The content of the Bachelors Thesis should be a further development of the work done
in the basis course and the focused study of the Bachelors curriculum. The supervisor
is responsible for fixing the conditions of the bachelors thesis. The selection of the
subject and/or supervisors is the choice of the students, i.e., there is no obligation to
connect the bachelors thesis with the focused study.
The bachelors thesis is undertaken during the tenth semester, and the students are
required to submit a written report and hold an oral presentation of their work.
Successful completion of bachelors thesis is worth 6 credit hours.
Compulsory
Project Work and Consultation,

- Progressive Evaluation (At least two times) 40%


- Professional Written Report 30%
- Oral Presentation (Last Presentation) 30%

All students are expected to abide by the code of conduct of students and the
Senate Legislation of the University throughout this course. Academic
dishonest including cheating, fabrication, and plagiarism will not be tolerated at
any stage during your studies and will be reported to concerned bodies for
action.
While team work is highly encouraged, dependence and copying ones work and
275
276