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The Future of

Materials Science and Engineering:


An Industry Perspective
May 14-15, 2013

2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

Technological advances of the future require innovations aimed at envisioning, predicting, designing,
developing and manufacturing materials with multiple functions, prescribed forms, and properties
customized for desired performance requirements and applications. Materials science and engineering
(MSE) programs at universities across the world face an unprecedented opportunity and a challenge of
focusing on research in materials and education of students in a wide spectrum of areas from
fundamentals to applications of traditional and advanced materials.
The symposium on the Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective was held
at the Georgia Institute of Technology, on May 14-15, to provide directions for defining the future of our
discipline. It followed the symposium held on Feb 23-24, 2011, on the Future of MSE in the 21st
Century (http://www.mse.gatech.edu/msesymposium/videos), in which participants from academia,
national laboratories, and funding agencies discussed frontiers of research in materials and presented
salient projections for the future of their particular areas. The present symposium focused on industry
because advances in technology needed to address the societal challenges of tomorrow require
materials producing and enabling industries to not only team with one another, but also to partner with
universities and national laboratories, in a manner that ensures deployment of discoveries in materials
in a cost effective and time-efficient manner. Speakers representing various industry sectors delivered
20-minute long presentations (http://www.mse.gatech.edu/2013symposium) highlighting what they
perceived are the materials challenges facing their respective sector, from the perspective of the state
of technology, sustainability and environmental issues, availability of critical materials, and education
and training. Forum discussions following the presentations on each theme were held, led by panelists
representing heads of materials programs at national laboratories and universities. The symposium was
capped by the banquet presentation by former astronaut and Georgia Tech alumna Sandra Magnus on
Perspectives from Space, which highlighted and reminded us about the different perspectives which
we often ignore, as we take everyday things for granted. Understanding the perspectives can make us
more accommodating, in space, on earth, and in life.
The proceedings of this symposium, includes the agenda and highlights of presentations and summaries
of panel discussions. We trust that it will provide the impetus for continued industry-university dialogue
to identify: (a) common grounds for collaborations and modes of partnerships for seeking innovations in
materials technologies and (b) strategies and avenues for education and training of next generation
materials scientists and engineers, as well as for continuing/life-long learning, for adoption in MSE
programs in the U.S. and across the globe.

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013
Symposium Agenda

TUESDAY AFTERNOON and EVENING, MAY 14th


11:00
12:25
12:30
12:45

Registration and Lunch


Naresh Thadhani, Professor and Chair, MSE, Georgia Tech, Welcome and Symposium
Introduction
Steve Cross, Executive Vice President for Research, Innovation Georgia Tech
Gary May, Dean, College of Engineering, Georgia Techs Engineering Enterprise

Theme I:
1:00
1:20
1:40
2:05

Energy Sector (Session Chair Meilin Liu, Professor, MSE, Georgia Tech)
Lee Silverman, Research Manager, Nanomaterials Technologies, DuPont
Supratik Guha, Director, Physical Sciences, T. J. Watson Research Center, IBM
Eric Amis, Director, Physical Sciences Dept., United Technologies Research Center
Forum Discussion Panelists: Gary Messing (Chair, MSE at Penn State), Viola Acoff (Head,
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa), Robert Briber
(Chair, MSE University of Maryland)

2:45

Break

Theme II:
3:00
3:20
3:40

Materials Producers (Session Chair Ken Sandhage, Professor, MSE, Georgia Tech)
Peter Bocko, Chief Technology Officer, Corning Glass Technologies
Nikhil Verghese, Research Fellow, SABIC Technology Center
Jack Clark, Vice President & Chief Technical Officer, Novelis Global Research and Technology
Center
George Corbin, Head of Research, Development & Technology, Solvay Specialty
Polymers
Forum Discussion Panelists: Helen Chan (Chair, MSE at Lehigh University), Steve Kampe
(Chair, MSE at Michigan Tech), Keith Bowman (Chair, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace
Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology)

4:00
4:25

5:30

Graduate Student Poster Session and Reception, Academy of Medicine

7:00

Banquet at Academy of Medicine, MC: Kurt Jacobus, Medshape Inc., MSE EAB Chair

7:45

Perspectives from Space by Sandra Magnus, Executive Director, AIAA, Former Astronaut and
Alumna

8:30

Adjourn

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

WEDNESDAY MORNING, MAY 15th


Theme III: Transportation Sector (Session Chair Dave McDowell, Director IMAT, and Professor ME/MSE,
Georgia Tech)
8:00
Al Romig, VP/GM, Skunkworks Advanced Development Programs, Lockheed Martin
Aeronautics Company
8:20
Gerould Young, Director, Materials & Fabrication Technology, Boeing Research and Technology
Office
8:40
Anil Sachdev, Manager, Chemical/Materials Systems Lab, General Motors Global R&D
9:00
Timo Faath, Team Manager, Application Technology, ThyssenKrupp Steel
9:25
Forum Discussion Panelists: G.T. Rusty Gray (Materials Science, Los Alamos National
Laboratory), David Bahr (Head, Materials Engineering, Purdue University), Lawrence Drzal
(Distinguished Professor, Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Michigan State University)
10:05

Break

Theme IV: Medical and Consumer Products Sector (Session Chair Satish Kumar, Professor MSE,
Georgia Tech)
10:20
Robert Kriegel, Senior Scientist, Global Packaging, The Coca-Cola Company
10:40
Bryan D. Haynes, Director, Research and Planning, Global Nonwovens,
Kimberly-Clark Corporation
11:00
Michael Tompkins, VP Technology Development, Hanger Inc.
11:20
Jeff Martin, President & CEO, Yulex Corporation
11:45
Forum Discussion Panelists: Morley Stone (Chief Scientist, AFRL), Justin Schwartz
(Head, Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University), David
Hoagland (Head, Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts)
12:30

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Closing Remarks and Adjournment

2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013
Highlights of Presentations and Summary of Discussions

Naresh Thadhani, Chair, School of Materials Science and Engineering at Georgia Tech, welcomed the
participants and introduced the scope, objectives and logistics of the symposium. He invited industry
speakers to talk about the materials challenges facing their sector, and suggest possible strategies that
universities can use to best prepare students for their industries to meet the challenges of the future. He
also asked the panelists to present what they foresee are their challenges in working with industry and
training students who are prepared to meet the needs of industry for today and tomorrow.
Steve Cross, Executive Vice-President for Research, Georgia Tech, extended his welcome to the
participants and started by saying that materials research at Georgia Tech permeates the entire Institute
which has a $736M research portfolio. Georgia Tech is advocating increased partnerships with industry
and moving to create a more intimate relationship with companies with matching research interests.
We want to make Georgia Tech synonymous with innovation. We were created as a source for how to
use educational enterprise to help build industry. To continue this mission, we must to infuse
entrepreneurial elements and innovation into all areas of education. Our faculty should be thought
leaders for collaboration and partnering in research with industry and government organizations.
Our goal is to accelerate innovation of materials to actual manufacturing from 20 years to 5 years.
Insight into research areas should come from industry since they are the people who will actually be
using the research. We want to encourage developing disruptive ideas in partnership with industry,
because universities should be a place where risky ideas are explored for companies. In the end,
students are the greatest source for GT innovation.
Gary May, Dean of the College of Engineering, Georgia Tech, also welcomed the participants and
provided general information about the College stating that every single degree program is in the top 10
ranking by USN&WR. He said that it is our job at universities to empower students to be independent
learners who are major contributors in their fields and fearlessly face complex problems. Currently 14%
of research in the College of Engineering is industry funded of the total $300M research budget. Our
strategic plan is for Georgia Tech to be unmatched in research innovation by providing the best possible
environment for faculty and students to develop new ideas.
We want Georgia Tech to be the standard for engineering excellence People should ask What would
GT do? To get to this we must leverage collaboration between departments, schools, industry, and
government and provide industry with access to facilities, ideas, and most importantly people. We must
develop vertically integrated research with goals set by industry needs and work to provide wellestablished connection points for collaboration. Expanded use of project-based classes with thinking
requirements will better prepare students for real-world industry jobs. We must do a better job
industrializing graduate student research ideas and provide more opportunities for successful spin-off
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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

companies (currently about 10 per year). Georgia Tech has about $215B economic impact on the state
of Georgia, the highest of any institution in the University System of Georgia, and is the 3rd largest
producer of patents in the state.
THEME I: Energy Sector
Session Chair Meilin Liu, Regents Professor and Associate Chair, MSE, Georgia Tech introduced the
Energy theme stating that materials play a vital role in the creation of new energy technologies,
especially those for storage, conversion, and capture of energy from renewable sources. Breakthroughs
in new materials/novel structures are required for a clean and secure energy future. And industryuniversity collaborations will be essential for advances in materials needed for storing and harvesting
energy. He asked the industry speakers to highlight the materials challenges they face from the
perspective of their respective energy sector.
Lee Silverman, Research Manager of Nanomaterials Technologies at Dupont started by saying that we
must learn from the past to determine what the materials scientist of the future should be. Materials
science began in paleolithic-age, followed by the bronze-age, then the iron-age with better
understanding of materials processing and availability. Iron started off only as an ok product but was
successful because of the raw materials constraints. The process of selecting raw materials, formulating
properties, and designing nanostructures can also be done in reverse to optimize the materials for
performance. We must consider properties entitlement and cost entitlement. With properties
entitlement every component can be optimized for properties. With cost entitlement we must consider
property constraints while optimizing costs. Laboratory discovery is only the beginning; industry must
make money and this requires both process and product simplification.
DuPont focuses on determining the properties required for a specific application. After initial
requirements and production, we can then determine the actual microstructure and actual
performance metrics; this is the current standard for new material design in industry.
The future of materials science and engineering is to consider affordable complexity. A materials
scientist/engineer has to be a designer who can take diverse materials and diverse properties and bring
those together into a single functional piece, as well as be able to work on a hierarchy of lengths and
scales, be interdisciplinary so that they can integrate all the factors and scales together and understand
what is going on in the entire system in order to properly design materials. The next phase of materials
science will require the proper integration of all classes of materials together in order to achieve the
desired properties.
DuPont is a very market driven organization. If there is not a customer, they will not make the
material. They focus on ideas that have both function and application, and not necessarily the cause.
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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

Food, energy, and protection are their future focus. They are working on marrying agriculture and
biological research with traditional materials. In the energy sector DuPont is moving towards the
materials paradox, for creating, storing, and saving energy. They are looking at materials with multiple
functionalities that do not currently exist, but those that can combine different properties, for example:
(i) transparent, flexible, and impermeable properties, (ii) electrically conducting and thermally insulating
(for thermoelectric) as well as thermal conducting and electrically insulating properties, (iii) ionic
conductivity without water transportation, (iv) flexible and creep resistance, (v) smudge resistance and
crack resistance, (vi) oxidation resistance, high-electrical conductivity, and inexpensive. The materials
scientist of the future will as the integrator. They will combine materials to get new and different
functions and properties, but in a way that is inexpensive for the customer. The time scale of market
driven research is critical and should be improved.
Supratik Guha, Director of Physical Sciences at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center focused his talk on
the future in the context of the semiconductor chip industry. He started by saying that the semiconductor industry has seen huge improvements over the past several decades. The driving forces is
economics. The progress in the computer industry has not come from design, but from improvements
in materials processing technologies: smaller size/features better performance and cost/function
more applications larger market. Currently, the demand for performance is equal between consumer
products and high-end applications which was not the case in the past. Density of nodes on the chip
and performance correlate quite well, but we are essentially at the end of silicon processor technology.
Major new advances in microprocessor technology have come directly from good materials science
research. We have reached the end of performance scaling, silicon will only continue for 3-4 more
generations (~12 years). Scaling beyond 10nm requires significant innovation in patterning, materials,
devices, and processes. There is a lot of activity looking at different materials and options to replace
silicon. Also, many candidates for high dielectric materials are silicon composites. It is unclear right now
what the replacement will be, since all the current options have problems. Perhaps we need to make
innovations to other things (architecture, software, resistors, etc.) in order to continue to move forward.
Challenges for 2020 and beyond will require the discovery and development of the next switch. We
will also need to explore new materials (possibly carbon based - carbon nanotubes, graphene) and
devise physics to break the memory bottleneck. Silicon nanophotonics will replace communications
technologies and future computers will be more human-like possibly quantum computing. Low
voltage systems should be developed. For DRAM volatile memory (needs to be refreshed) the refresh
rates will soon start choking the bandwidths. There are also concerns that it will un-scalable. We are
looking into magnetic switching as a way to refresh, but it is early technology. RRAM write in various
states, so has different resistance depending on voltage. We will require extending optical
communications across scales in the IT infrastructure. Exploring the fundamental physics of new
information processing architectures will also be needed

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

Student skills and knowledge needed in the industry (such as at IBM) include: chemistry, molecular selfassembly, surface functionalization; biochemistry; photonics and optics; broad knowledge of large suite
of materials classes: crystalline oxides, chalcogenides, magnetic heterostructures, 2D materials; more
rigorous grasp of fundamental materials science; and interdisciplinary education with strong basics.
Eric Amis, Director of Physical Sciences, United Technologies Research Center, talked about Advanced
Manufacturing, through materials. He noted that materials enable the possibility for advances and can
limit the pace of innovation. There is increasing pressure on manufacturing, requiring shorter time to
market materials, use in extreme conditions, reduced weight, increased product life, lower cost, higher
yield in processing and less waste, improved energy efficiency, and improved environmental
friendliness. There are also additional challenges such as complexity of geometries and systems in which
materials are being used (e.g., Boeing 787 airplane), and expanded materials options are a challenge for
manufacturing.
The key to manufacturing is that the materials paradigm evolves linking materials, performance, and
production with materials design in the middle of the tetrahedron paradigm. The design of materials
needs a more integrated approach from the beginning. Advances in manufacturing should allow for
constant real-time monitoring, quality control testing, and feedback from processes. An important
element in process monitoring is evaluating how to change the process when feedback is received.
Wasted materials and design have a huge impact on manufacturing cost. Reduced waste can lead to the
use of new materials that were previously cost prohibitive. We must consider quality, speed, and cost of
manufacturing, for example using physics-based to understand and predict microstructure evolution and
selection of materials properties; understanding and improving the process to improve the final material
performance, such as during the formation of a chip during machining operations; and selecting targets
to change material property through modeling.
We need to enable agility by additive manufacturing (complexity, agility, efficiency). This includes
implementing concurrent, hybrid processes, considering the design space with topology organization,
production constraints, and optimization of variables and materials. Innovation is better through
additive manufacturing, such as using Additive Topology Optimized Manufacturing (ATOM) which
helped place brackets on the Black Hawk helicopter, and drastically reduces wasted material.
The future for materials science and engineering will rely upon invention and innovation. The two
are complementary and a huge challenge for our field.
Follow-up discussions led by panelists Gary Messing, Chair, MSE at Penn State; Viola Acoff, Head,
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; and Robert Briber,
Chair, MSE at University of Maryland.

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

Each program chair gave a brief introduction of their program, with Gary Messing saying that historically
MSE was split across different departments (metals, polymers, ceramics) which later merged at different
times, but the coursework structure has not changed. Penn State got rid of options and limited the
required courses to only 3. They now have disciplines and students can decide sectors rather than
options energy sector, electronics sector, etc. Adding flexibility enhanced the rigor of the department.
They added a computational class for undergraduates it teaches languages used in computational
work, but does not try to make them an expert. Viola Acoff stated that theirs was one of only 8
metallurgical programs. Their curriculum and how the curriculum is structured needs to change. She
commented that overall our field has an identity crisis there is some confusion among students on
what materials science is and what its application is. Robert Briber said that the University of Maryland
has added an innovation academy; every student has some experience in innovation/entrepreneurship.
Entrepreneurship has been added in to the metrics for faculty. An obligation to the local government
and populace of Maryland is the creation of knowledge and move it into creation of jobs, wealth, and
economic leverage, and not just leave it to academic papers. Need to have more of a tangible impact.
The discussions that followed focused on several questions outlined below.
Where is the field of materials science and engineering going and how do we meet the needs of
industry? It is necessary to know all sectors of materials in order to be a useful materials engineer. There
is some need for specialization in new application areas rather than traditional areas. Universities
should require a computational materials class or at least teach the basics. Schools should do something
similar to the University of Maryland in requiring courses in innovation and entrepreneurial activities.
They also should make an investment to develop skills appropriate for industry.
Schools need to enhance the brand recognition of materials science and engineering programs by
emphasizing all of the different opportunities and applications because we are losing students.
Why has US industry been reluctant to fund research in energy, e.g., new battery technology? IBM
does not intend to be a manufacture of batteries and therefore is not too interested in battery
technology. Solar energy will soon become more cost competitive and that batteries are the key
hindrance to this technology. Many new non-silicon innovations are currently coming from Korea and
rest of Asia. There has been little growth in solar technology in the US because there hasnt been a
growth of power lines; it needs a new business model, maybe a rooftop model. Energy space is a tough
place to work have to compete with the oil and gas industry. United Technologies just had to sell of its
fuel cell company. Federal funding is a key restriction to energy development. We are losing innovation
by publishing in high impact journals but this research is not carried through to industry. The belief is
currently to invent a new technology then let someone else manufacture it. We demonstrate things on
a bench top level and move on, rather than trying to carry things through to industry, which is why we
are losing innovation. What can we do to make it more useful to industry? Industry is reluctant to invest
in something that will not provide return. Example: OLEDs were developed in the 80s and are only just
now producing the smallest of returns. Industry does not have the capital or the time to invest 30 years
in these technologies. We need to find ways to bring more developed technologies forward.

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

How can academics help industry? There is no general generic format just need to develop individual
relationships. There are many restrictions regarding IP transfer, which stop collaborations. Exotic devices
and research takes away from developing actual standard manufacturing techniques that are usable.
Federal research money should change direction in order to make research more applicable for industry,
and industry should pick up funding in more traditional areas of research.
Theme 2: Materials Producers Sector
Session Chair Ken Sandhage, B. Miffin Hood Professor, MSE, Georgia Tech introduced the Materials Producers
theme, stating that the four upcoming speakers from diverse industry sectors associated with production of
traditional and advanced materials (including glass, polymers, composites, and metals), can provide important
perspectives of our field. The speakers were asked to highlight the critical materials challenges they face as
materials producers.

Peter Bocko, Chief Technology Officer, Corning Glass Technologies started by saying that, while silicabased glass is one of the oldest commercial materials, modern glass technology can be considered to be
the fulcrum upon which the information technology industry age rests. The market for glass is growing
and there are fantastic innovations continuing to emerge in optical fibers, display glass, and very strong
cover glass, which have a large impact on modern devices. The future holds numerous opportunities to
create new value with glass, but such opportunities come with significant challenges. Further knowledge
as to how to control the properties of glass is needed in order to provide new value to glass products
(e.g., anti-reflective, anti-microbial, 3D shapes, or flexible glass). The industry is moving beyond
traditional roles to provide new multifunctional glass, such as advanced glass for enhanced mechanical
rigidity as well as protection of device components. For example, Gorilla Glass was developed and
directly marketed for the first time as a product from Corning, directly based on the demand of
consumers for manufacturers to include this material in their products.
Among the challenges for the future are the need to make glass formulations for specific applications,
and to employ processing methods that are more environmentally friendly. New advances are needed to
create an unbroken glass path from the source to the user (e.g., as for the fiber optics industry). The
functional range of glass will expand beyond the traditional role as an encapsulant for thermal and
optical functionality towards increasingly customized applications. A new thrust is to develop flexible
glass.
Academic research in the area of glass is not in a good state. There has been a severe decline in glassrelated research proposals submitted to NSF and other funding agencies as well as a lack of young
professors interested in glass in recent years. The thought leaders of the 60s & 70s have retired or
passed on, and glass science programs have been diluted by the implementation of more general
materials science programs. Corning needs to hire people who are already experienced in glass as the
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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

speed at which industries now compete does not allow for lengthy on-the-job training and development.
Such training and expertise needs to be achieved at the University level.
Industry needs to sustain internship programs in good times and bad, to engage academia and identify
grand challenges in glass science, to promote partnerships with affiliated resources (such as the
Corning Museum of Glass), and to encourage and reward young scientists for conducting and presenting
their work on fundamental glass science.
There is a target-rich environment for glass research which should be of interest in academia, in areas of
glass structures, novel chemistries, property characterization, and new functions. Cornings Research
Division is working to be more integrated with academic research, as well as engaging academia and
funding agencies.
Nikhil Verghese, Research Fellow, SABIC Technology Center, talked about sustainability and lightweight, high-performance polymers. SABIC is the 2nd largest diversified chemical company on the planet.
SABIC encourages disruptive technology developments with a key focus on sustainability issues and
reduction of waste. With polymers leading the pack, plastic consumption is outrunning population
growth. Such skyrocketing plastic consumption results in serious disposal issues that must be solved.
Sustainability, as well as the reduction of waste, must be considered as a goal from the beginning and
throughout the product life cycle in order to meet social, economic, and environmental requirements.
Innovation should be integrated into all components of a products life time. For example, recycled PET
bottles could become a new sustainable product.
There exist huge problems that need to be solved both in terms of processing, and product
performance. The processing area is not getting enough attention right now, and materials science can
really make an impact, particularly in technologies for making new feed-stocks or catalysts/reactants,
reducing carbon fuel dependence, and enabling significant improvements in plant operations (burners,
separation, etc.). Products developed need to satisfy consumer needs in regards to reliability,
continuous supply, and low price, while still being profitable for SABIC and reducing the carbon
footprint. We must reduce production costs by incorporating the production of actual components with
raw material processing. New technological problems require hybrid, complex, multifunctional material
development. The problems are very complex and no single material is going to solve them. This will
require an integrated approach not just chemistry or new materials. There is still plenty of room for
altering existing materials to perform better by aligning academic research with industry needs. There is
also a need for application of physics to provide greater understanding of materials properties. Finally,
processes in polymer manufacturing require a great deal of research in order to achieve new regimes of
materials properties for advanced technologies.

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Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

Jack Clark, VP and CTO, Novelis Global Research and Technology Center, stated that Novelis is the
largest producer of rolled aluminum in the world. Flat rolled aluminum is used in many different
markets, the largest being beverage cans, but the automotive industry and specialty products also rank
highly. While growth in the North American industry is flat, Asia and North Africa are growing rapidly.
The need for people is prevalent in the aluminum industry. Novelis recognizes that it is the
technologists, the scientists, and the engineers in R&D that are going to drive this company forward.
Novelis will need over 1,000 engineers and technologists between now and 2020. They will need people
who are schooled in aluminum, or are well grounded in basic materials science but are innovative and
have soft skills (such as superior leadership and communication skills), and can put through training in
aluminum.
Among the technology challenges in aluminum is the need for stronger, lighter, and more formable
aluminum alloys that also incorporate new processing techniques. Sustainability is a key consideration in
the aluminum industry. We currently recycle approximately 43% of aluminum, and our goal is to raise
that level to 80% by 2020. Additionally, for beverage cans (currently at 70% recycled alloys), our goal is
reach 100% recycled level.
Key developments that we are addressing include incorporating scrap into different alloys, processing
scrap, and sorting scrap more efficiently to keep natural resources here. The future of aluminum
includes aluminum-intensive vehicles that are lightweight with better fuel economy, with the continuing
challenge of meeting safety and environmental regulations. Car companies require much stronger and
more easily formable aluminum components.
George Corbin, Head of R&D, Solvay Specialty Polymers started with the quote saying deep insight can
impair foresight. He added that industry usually has a problem with forecasting future developments in
materials. Often a product is developed for a specific market, but that product finds a different market
later or the market may not actually have existed. Industry is science for the pursuit of money. Academia
is science for the pursuit of knowledge. The polymer industry has started to slow, but it is not clear
whether this is a sustained decline or just a discontinuity in the production curve. The recipe for success
starts with patience for development and industrialization and a lot of capital. Serendipity also plays a
part in success and often the technical solutions look for the wrong market problem. Not knowing all
of the obstacles can sometimes help.
There are many value innovation levers available today to commercialize old polymers that never made
it to the market. Advanced modeling techniques can be used for materials design to reduce cycle time,
predict performance, regulatory profiles, etc. Surgical chemistry for specifically tailoring products for
application, and low-cost custom manufacturing of novel monomer/polymer processing technologies
based on process intensification (microreactors), are some examples. Clever end-use design and
fabrication processes such as for hybrid structures and additive manufacturing are also needed.
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Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

For the future of the polymer industry, academia should be a source inspiration for new industrial
materials. We need to find new ways that allow industry to make a profit from the exciting new
materials developments occurring in academia. There is an extremely large design space for custom and
specific molecules. Nanoscience provides the possibility of multifunctional polymer properties. The key
challenge is to achieve nano-level dispersion for useful composites. Biopolymers are extremely
important for future polymer materials. These are polymers that come from natural feed stocks and
have biodegradation properties. However, such natural products have the problem of huge variations in
pricing and availability.
Follow-up discussions led by panelists Helen Chan, Chair MSE, Lehigh University; Steve Kampe, Chair,
MSE Michigan Tech; and Keith Bowman, Chair, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology.
Each program chair gave a brief introduction of their respective programs. Steve Kampe talked about the
enterprise track (partnership with industry) at Michigan Tech, which involves joint interdisciplinary
teams that work on projects for industry members. The projects last for many years with students
starting as sophomores and staying on the projects during their junior and senior years. Helen Chan
identified several trends that can have major impact on MSE programs. For example, the Introductory
MSE course taught online at MIT was taken by 38,000 people. It has tremendous benefit for people in
developing countries and in industry. It also has the potential to help people in traditional departments,
as we always say that there isnt enough time to teach everything in 4 years. Can we make some of the
courses be available online for students to take to supplement their own experience during summer
months or during later years? Another issue that impacts MSE programs is the type and source of
funding. For a long time, it was defense money and related funding that provided strategic advantage
for research in academia. Now, global and societal initiatives/challenges are central, such as clean water
availability and access to basic health care which require a return on investment. Computational
Materials Science and Engineering and Advanced Characterization Techniques are very important and
are going to transform our field.
There was a question raised about PhDs currently being produced and whether they have the correct
skill set for industry. Certain types of materials PhDs are hard to find and industry generally does not
hire Masters students. Corning hires mostly PhDs domestically and sends Masters students to
international locations. Industry is beginning to see some loss of quality in the basic knowledge of
recently graduated PhD candidates. The gap in focus between industry and PhDs is partly reinforced by
what is emphasized in academic journals. There exists dis-connect between an emphasis on publications
and a different emphasis in industry. The response from industry was that they were quite happy with
graduates with Bachelors degrees, especially with those from places like Georgia Tech, and if they have
soft skills and a collaborative nature. A few graduates with Masters degrees are hired in some places,
and they are sometimes used as laboratory technicians. For some industries, it is very difficult to find
PhD graduates who meet expectations. It is possible that PhD graduates are becoming too specialized. It
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is hard to find PhD graduates who have a good broad foundation in the traditional areas such as in
metals and metallurgical research. PhD graduates are doing a better job of being collaborators and
working in teams. Industries want them to be competent, curious, and collaborative. Are internships/coop opportunities necessary? For graduates with Bachelors degrees, such experiences are great; for Ph.D.
graduates, such experiences would be nice but are not necessary.
This led to another question: Will there be an industrial application for nanotechnology? There are
clear applications of nanotechnology, but from an industrial perspective there is some confusion
regarding nanotechnology in general. This confusion comes from conflicting opinions in scientific
journals. We need more clarity in this field to give the industry the confidence to invest further.
Keith Bowman talked about the demographic and research support changes that have occurred over
the past 10 years. The variety and diversity of MSE, is both our greatest strength and one of our greatest
weaknesses. We are producing twice as many PhDs now than in 1980. As MSE degree production has
gone up at all levels (BS by 47.8%, MS by 48.1%, and Ph.D. by 81.7%), funding from state and federal
agencies has also increased over the past 10 years from ~180M to ~$320M per year, and at much higher
rates than industrial funding which increased from ~37M to ~$52M per year. Hence, it is easy for us to
not focus as much on industry given that the funding from other sectors has increased more, although it
is becoming clear that we should now be focusing more strongly on industry.
Theme 3: Transportation Sector
Session Chair Dave McDowell, Executive Director of IMat and Regents Professor, ME/MSE, Georgia
Tech introduced the transportation theme stating that the transportation sector already has a history
of industry-university partnership at Georgia Tech, and recent programs such as the Materials Genome
Initiative make it all the more important to build on those past partnerships. This sector has among the
greatest need for advances in lightweight materials of different forms and their integration. He asked
the industry speakers to highlight the materials challenges from the perspective of their respective
sector.
Al Romig, VP/GM, Skunkworks Advanced Development Programs, Lockheed Martin focused on the
Skunkworks, a unit of Lockheed-Martin, whose mission is rapid production of airplanes (in less than 1
year). He said that hypersonics represented the biggest materials challenge for the future of the
aerospace industry. He defined hypersonic conditions where the shockwave lies close to the surface of
the vehicle boundary layer, which is what differentiates it from supersonic. The rise to high pressure is
similar to a detonation. Temperatures and stresses can get very high during flight. Applications of
hypersonics include future vehicles flying into space at low cost and Rapid Access/Rapid Strike fighter
planes that allow rapid global strike capabilities. Examples such as the X-51 Scramjet (Mach-5) proved
that hypersonic flight is possible. This was the first demonstration of air-breathing hypersonic flight.
The Falcon HTV-2 (Mach-20) is an example of a hypersonic glide vehicle; however, the test flight ended
as a result of a material failure at extreme temperature (greater than 5000oF).
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Specific materials challenges include extreme heating (and extreme temperature gradients across
vehicle). Considerations include (i) radiation cooled structures made from nickel and cobalt based
superalloys (up to 1900 deg F), refractory metals and ceramic matrix composites (1900-3100 deg F),
Carbon-Carbon Structures (current state-of-the-art); (ii) insulated structures (also known as Thermal
Protection Systems) made of high-temperature silica tiles (but these are very fragile) and ablatives to
absorb gases and remove heat (not very useful for these vehicles because they have to be continually
replaced between flights), or mixtures of the two such as in the X-51A; and (iii) internally cooled
structures with liquid oxygen as the cold fuel, the current state-of-the-art turbine-based combined cycle
engine with Pratt and Whitney (uses Inconel Ni-based superalloy).
There are many other challenges, but extreme heating is shown here as a representative example
relevant to materials.
Gerould Young, Director of Materials and Fabrication, Boeing Research, discussed aviation materials.
He said that throughout history there has been a significant increase in the number of alloys available
for tailoring performance and cost. Tailoring and optimization is driving the number of materials used in
aircraft. Materials development over the past many years included aluminum alloys and titanium alloys.
Composite materials are relatively new and include fibers and matrix resins which are currently being
used in both commercial and military vehicles. Composite materials effectively provide a new and very
larger design space for new materials and properties, based on fiber, matrix, and fabrication options.
Fuel economy of commercial airlines has typically improved by 1% a year over time and can be directly
related to the materials used for higher performance vehicles. This is predominantly related to the
airframe material (e.g., for the Boeing 787 airplane).
The demand for materials is paramount to the improvement and performance of aerospace vehicles,
but the biggest issue is that the cost for development is increasing and the time to implement new
materials is decreasing; material development takes longer than airplane development (currently 8-10
years, ideally 2-3 years). Therefore, there is need to significantly decrease the materials development
time. Manufacturing process development is even lagging behind materials development. We need to
improve screening and manufacturing processes. A possibility is to integrate computational materials
into development to understand new materials properties and improve manufacturing processes. We
also need to upscale to move from just discovery to real applications and to actually understand
production principles. It is important to correlate predicted materials properties to the final integrated
product quality and properties. Process simulations could be good learning tools for understanding
performance.
Composites used in service are dramatically increasing and expected to continue to increase. The
production of Boeing 787 production will allow for 1M pounds of composites production per month. The
feedstock of materials for composite manufacturing could become a choke point for future
manufacturing.
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The amount of information that needs to be characterized in order to certify a material has led to a
process/qualifying pyramid to narrow down materials for qualification. The Certification Pyramid
involves going from Computational Materials Material Configurations Element Design
Component Design Virtual Testing Full Scale Testing. Converting Fundamental Material Properties
to those that can be used in full scale production is still a challenge. Need to expand or upscale the
current work to elevate from just discovery to application. The Manufacturing Pyramid involves
going from Constituent Design Material System and Forms Process Development Scale Up
Assembly and Tolerance Vehicle. We typically understand the basics, but we always encounter new
challenges during the manufacturing process. This provides us with learning tools, but they are not
available early enough on the material development side. We must work to understand how the
material is going to perform during manufacturing at a much earlier stage.
Anil Sachdev, Manager of Chemicals/Materials Lab, General Motors R&D stressed the need of lightweight materials for the automotive industry. He said that the challenges facing the auto industry
include emission, congestion, affordability, and safety. A 10% mass reduction will provide a 6% increase
in fuel economy. Improving materials properties often leads to more expensive materials so we need to
use less material. Reducing cost and improving design need to be done simultaneously with materials
development. There is a need for more rapid innovation and decrease cycle time to implement new
materials.
Currently GM uses more than 2B pounds of aluminum casting products. These products are made in
many different countries and processes must be optimized to ensure quality everywhere. Defects in
castings can be reduced by decreasing the turbulence of the metal flow into very large cast parts.
Retention of porosity and oxides in cast products has the largest effect on part failure. A future
challenge for GM is wear-resistant aluminum alloys to replace iron parts. Wear is a big problem. Efforts
have been focused on trying to control wear and deformation by optimizing the composition and
microstructure of the alloy. Developments in castings and materials have allowed for lighter single parts
with high flow metals such as magnesium. One goal for the safety of the passenger is to consider the
plasticity of the material so that It deforms in a controlled manner folding or bending rather than
fracture, and that the engine slides under the vehicle rather than through the firewall.
Grain rotation and texture randomization favors plasticity. Hence, there is significant interest in
understanding of how texture and composition affects the local strain response. With high resolution
EBSD, one can now measure strain along grain boundaries (to identify where damage nucleates), twins,
and sub-twins. Extreme plasticity is also essential for hemming (aesthetic lines and seams in the outer
panels). In-situ TEM and nanoindentation measurements are used for tension and compression testing.
We can now get the properties of a single crystal and can put that in to a model, homogenize, and get
the properties of the component. We have used this to develop aluminum alloys with specific
properties. What is needed is to combine theory with physical and computational experiments to get
material design through an understanding of mechanism based models. It is most important to
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understand the fundamental mechanisms in materials so that they can be leveraged in design. It is all
about engineering the microstructure and GM is very open to collaborations with university.
Timo Faath, Team Manager, ThyssenKrupp Steel stated that the automotive industry is the main sector
for steel research and Thyssen is working to meet the current high strength needs of the automotive
industry (strength in excess of 2 GPa). To meet the overall requirements they must be able to build
vehicles that customers will buy, maintain government and industry safety standards, meet CAF and
other global CO2 regulations, and employ lightweight designs.
New designs should incorporate aluminum components integrated with high strength steels while
meeting the crash safety requirements. New developments in materials will likely come from countries
other than the US because of more aggressive international fuel economy standards.
Another key factor to consider regarding automotive vehicle is the complete life cycle. There is too much
emphasis with regard to the carbon footprint in terms of MPG and not enough on the lifecycle cost of
the vehicle, including recycling. Production and recycling cost and emissions are higher for newer,
lightweight materials. There are two ways to calculate emissions: use phase and vehicle production. Use
phase (while drive) currently gets the most emphasis. Vehicle production is also important but is not
currently calculated or examined. Steel production has greatly decreased carbon dioxide emissions even
though the overall industry and production level has increased. This is probably a result of collaboration
among different steel companies within the industry.
What are some of the pros and cons of steel? About 97% of steel by-products can be reused (current
recycle rate is 92%). The 2nd generation steel has great elongation-strength properties, but hydrogen
embrittlement and joining are a problem. There is an opportunity for a 3rd generation steels with
properties between those of 1st and 2nd generation steels. Key gaps in implementing advanced high
strength steels have been defined by NIST and should be addressed. ICME can (and should) be used to
work on both key gaps and on developing the third generation steels. Unfortunately, steel is considered
uncool and settled or solved but there is still a lot of work to be done in the field.
Follow-up Discussions were led by panelists George T. (Rusty) Gray, Los Alamos National Laboratory;
David Bahr, Head, Materials Engineering, Purdue University; and Lawrence Drzal, Distinguished
Professor, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University.
Rusty Gray pointed out challenges for universities, saying that Congress does not support fundamental
research and there is a lack of an established US materials science and engineering strategy. Other
countries have been successful by moving their focus from science to engineering and are driving
innovation without the support of federal funding. If the only thing that matters is publication rate, then
we are losing a lot of brilliant people that have really been pushing engineering and innovation. We need
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to emphasize the importance of life-long learning and drive innovation throughout education (especially
in undergraduate engineering programs). The curriculum needs to focus more on ethics, safety, and
quality assurance. Many people have addressed the lack of safety being taught in universities.
Lawrence Drzal commented that we need to prepare undergraduates for their careers differently than
graduate students. Undergraduates need to be competent, communicative, and collaborative. At the
graduate level the training should emphasize problem solving. They need the broad tools to be
successful. Graduate students need to be able to communicate, collaborate, and solve in-depth
problems that they may not have seen before. The future of materials is hybridization, both at the micro
level and the macro level. We cannot be driven by experimental work alone, there needs to be (and
there is) a growing and greater emphasis on computational tools and materials.
David Bahr argued that MSE is seeing growth in the undergrad program, so we need to teach materials
classes differently. We are no longer a small boutique kind of department with an apprenticeship
approach. Outreach continues to be crucial for MSE schools. We need to get out and spread the word
on what opportunities are available with an MSE degree. Computational activities need to be pushed
down to the undergrad level and needs to become pervasive. Similar to how mechanical engineering
looked at FEM (do we train people to be able to write an FEM code or to use an FEM code). Students
need to be introduced to computations earlier and at all the levels. At the graduate level we teach
people to be experts in a single emphasis, but we need to create T shaped people, they need depth,
but also good breadth and fundamentals. We emphasize and reward an exemplary result at the
graduate level. We design on things like manufacturing ability, quality assurance, and safety factors. We
do a better job of this at the undergraduate level.
Theme 4: Medical and Consumer Products Sector
Session Chair Satish Kumar, Professor MSE, Georgia Tech, introduced the speakers of the consumer and
medical products sector where the need for consumer interests and desires is of paramount of
importance in dictating the selection and use of materials. He asked the speakers to identify the
challenges they face from the perspective of their products.
Robert Kriegel, Senior Scientist, The Coca-Cola Company started by saying that Coke is currently serving
1.8B beverages per day; the goal is to reach 3B. Coke uses both academic and industry partners to
determine new processes and materials. Some of the challenges in terms of packaging materials that
Coke is facing today include making containers in the form of new and different shapes, using less raw
materials and relying on 100% recycled products, longer shelf life, and easier manufacturing. Coke is also
trying to leverage materials development in the delivery of their products and has the largest fleet of
large hybrid vehicles.

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Coke is looking for low cost, high performance materials. They are working on high strength glass.
Currently their small product to packaging ratio needs improvement. They are also exploring high barrier
polymeric materials to extend shelf life. The new polymer product, has a better shelf-life but they still
require the development of new polymer processes to make this material applicable to industry.
As in other industries, sustainability is crucial. They are exploring renewable and recyclable materials.
Coke is considering both short and long term innovation. They are big fans of collaborating and looking
to places like Georgia Tech for new technologies. They are seeking strategic partners who will
proactively share front end innovation and research that will enable mutually beneficial collaborative
models. Coke has a win-win mindset and enters strategic partnerships with a multi-year view.
Bryan D. Haynes, Director of Research, Global Nonwovens, Kimberly-Clark talked about current
challenges in nonwoven materials. He identified three major challenges facing the industry. One is
market differentiation and the best way to overcome this is to have a new kind of product or a new
kind of material. Raw materials are costly and they have to consider sustainability by extending
resources and recycling. There is a movement toward nanofibers to make polymers go further. The
scalability of the process (prototype to product) is also a challenge. Most R&D programs never make it
to market. Many emerging technologies can benefit from industry participation to help identify scale up
issues earlier in development.
KC is a vertically integrated company, producing everything from the raw materials to the final product.
An example of this is the development of Spunbond from polypropylene. A key development from KC is
the integration of elastic properties in nonwoven materials. Kimberly-Clark is one of the largest
producers and patent-holders for nonwoven materials around the world.
A major concern of the industry is the cost of raw materials. This is the driving factor for low cost,
disposable products. The key is to make a little polymer go a long way if new materials are going to be
used. Their concern is not just new material, but being the first to market is also important (timelines for
materials development).
Michael Tompkins, VP Technology Development, Hanger Inc. talked about materials for orthotics
applications and said that they have nearly 700 clinical locations for prosthetics and they manufacture
and custom fit all of their devices. This is an extremely high tech process including laser scanned
modeling or fitting procedures. Hanger is trying to adapt materials and technologies from other fields,
but they are not designed for this field and are often unstable. They would like to develop technology
for this field, but there is little capital available.
Opportunities for the future include materials with reduced weight, perspiration control, reduced odor
and bacteria growth, textiles with controllable hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties and high vacuum
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liner with increased wear characteristics. Additive manufacturing areas they are addressing, include
processing speed, material strength, and verification tools.
In order to decrease manufacturing time and reduce process steps they are evaluating many
opportunities such as a patient digitizer to definitive limb creation, 3D scanning directly to definitive
limbs, a roll-on sensor sock with a multitude of sensors providing static and dynamic feedback
Materials evolution being addressed include the Lamborghini Carbonskin and osseointegration and
interface components FDA just allowed the first human study.
Jeff Martin, President and CEO, Yulex Corporation talked from the perspective of a small company
dealing with the domestic natural rubber industry. He said that the only globally commercialized plant
for natural rubber is the Brazilian Rubber Tree even though many other plants produce natural rubber
latex. 99% of rubber production comes from SE Asia and is an extremely labor intensive business. The
natural rubber industry is not sustainable. Yulex product relies on the plant Guayule. This plant can
produce as much or more rubber per acre compared to natural rubber trees. Integrating plant-based
science and materials-based science is difficult.
One of the challenges they face for the future is a transition from petro-economy to bio-economy. They
are seeking biomaterials and advanced biofuel from renewable resources. Bio-based technologies are
popular, but funding is not available for agricultural research. It is difficult to make green technologies
that are the same cost as standard production techniques. Their current task is to make the market for
production viable in the US (these plants can grow in the desert).
Follow-up Discussions were led by Morley Stone, Chief Scientist, AFRL; Justin Schwartz, Head, MSE,
North Carolina State University, and David Hoagland, Head, Polymer Science and Engineering, University
of Massachussetts, Amherst.
Georgia Tech is one of the largest MSE schools in the country but also most of its students are also
domestic. This is important for many industries. There is talk at the federal level of accelerating the
green card process for those completing PhDs. Why cant we start the process in graduate school?
ABET supports innovative teaching but not necessarily teaching innovation. If we want to teach
innovation, it needs to be done with the ABET format. Graduate programs have more flexibility.
Morley Stone talked about the huge advantage of the BIONIC Center at Georgia Tech for student
exchange and research advances. There is a need for the design of wearable biological and
environmental sensors that materials science can create.

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There was some discussion of the need for more engineers and less attorneys for the promotion of
academic and industrial collaboration.
At Georgia Tech, it is difficult to determine in which research areas each professor works in order to
start collaboration; that is there exists no research organization chart. Some companies, like Coke, have
dedicated individuals to identify new research and ideas at different Universities.
To better prepare students, it was suggested that engineers should be educated in economics (e.g., what
it takes to scale-up production, regulatory agencies for different industries, and business models). It
would be beneficial if students also had an understanding of FDA regulations for the certification of new
materials.

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Viola L. Acoff, Ph.D.


Professor, ChBE/MTE
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Dr. Acoff received her B.S. (1989), M.S. (1991) and Ph.D. (1994) degrees in
Materials Engineering from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). She
joined The University of Alabama (UA) as Assistant Professor in the Department
of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MTE) in 1994 and was promoted to
the rank of Full Professor in 2004. In 2008, Dr. Acoff was appointed Interim Head
of the Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering (ChBE). In 2009, she was
appointed to serve as Head of two different departments in the College of
Engineering: ChBE and MTE, a dual role she served for one year. Since 2010, she has served solely as
Head of MTE. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in welding metallurgy, physical
metallurgy and scanning electron microscopy and has an active research group with research projects
involving joining and characterization of advanced materials, especially titanium-based intermetallics.
Dr. Acoff has received numerous national and international awards and recognitions including the
prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Dr. Acoff has published more than 80 refereed
papers and has received over $7 million in research grants. She also serves as UAs Site Coordinator for
the Alabama Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program. In this capacity, she spearheads
activities to increase the number of science and engineering degrees awarded to students from
underrepresented minority groups.
Eric Amis
Director, Physical Science Dept.
United Technologies Research Center
Eric J. Amis is the Director of Physical Sciences at United Technologies Research
Center (UTRC), a position he has held since August of 2009. Prior to UTRC, he
spent 15 years in leadership roles at the National Institute of Standards and
Technology (NIST) in the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory,
including 10 years in the Polymers Division. Before NIST, he was on the faculty
in Chemistry at the University of Southern California for 11 years. His Ph.D. in
Chemistry is from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. At UTRC, he is
responsible for research and development in materials science, chemistry, chemical engineering,
structural integrity, applied physics, and measurement science. He is a Fellow of the American Chemical
Society, the Materials Research Society, the American Physical Society (APS), and the Polymeric
Materials: Science and Engineering Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS). His research
specialties are combinatorial and high-throughput methods for advanced materials, nanomaterial
characterization, and soft matter physics. He has 150 peer-reviewed publications.
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David Bahr
Head and Professor
Materials Engineering, Purdue Univ.
Prof. David Bahr received his BS and MS in Materials Science and Engineering
from Purdue University in 1992 and 1993, and a PhD in Materials Science from
the University of Minnesota in 1997. He worked for a short time at Sandia
National Laboratories during his PhD before starting as a faculty member in the
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University
in 1997.
Prior to joining Purdue in August 2012 as Head of the School of Materials Engineering, Dr. Bahr was most
recently the Director of the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at WSU, and before that
served as WSUs campus-wide Director of Undergraduate Research.
He has supervised 2 Post-docs, 18 PhD students, 27 MS students, and over 50 undergraduate
researchers in the general area of small scale mechanical behavior. His research spans a range of
materials reliability issues, from hydrogen embrittlement to high strain MEMS to dislocation nucleation
in metals. In addition to work in metallic systems, he has investigated deformation mechanisms and
mechanical properties in piezoelectric thin films, polysilicon, molecular organic crystals, and natural and
cellulosic composites.
In 2000 he won the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for his work with Sandia
on DOE stockpile stewardship, in 2003 he received the Bradley Stoughton Award from ASM
International, and in 2007 received the Robert Lansing Hardy award from TMS (where he currently
serves as a member of the board of directors for membership and student development). He has
published over 130 papers in the archival literature, given over 40 invited talks and seminars worldwide,
has 5 US patents, edited, co-edited and written eight proceedings and book chapters and secured over
$19M in extramural funding.
Peter L. Bocko
Chief Technology Officer
Corning Glass Technologies
The holder of eleven U.S. patents, Dr. Peter L. Bocko serves as Chief Technology
Officer for Corning Glass Technologies, Corning Incorporateds largest Business
Group. Dr. Bocko is considered among the foremost experts in glass for display
and electronics applications.
In his current position since October 2010, Dr. Bocko joined Corning in 1979 as
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senior scientist with research interests in the areas of glass composition, surface chemistry and novel
optical fiber materials. He has held numerous leadership positions in Science & Technology and
business units at Corning, best known for his contributions to the flat panel display revolution over the
last 25 years including the award winning EAGLE XG substrate. In 2009, Bocko received a Special
Recognition Award from the Society for Information Display (SID), a major industry honor recognizing his
central role in delivering innovative, high-performance glass substrates for the display industry. He
recently served as technical advisor for Cornings acclaimed A Day Made of Glass video series.
Bocko received a bachelors degree in chemistry from the State University College at Oswego and
masters and doctorate degrees in physical chemistry from Cornell University.
Keith J. Bowman
Professor and Chair
Dept. of Mechanical, Materials & Aerospace Eng.
Illinois Institute of Technology
Keith Bowman became Professor and Chair of the Department of Mechanical,
Materials and Aerospace Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) in
August, 2011, immediately following nearly five years of experience leading the
Purdue School of Materials Engineering as Interim Head and Head. His first
faculty appointment was as an Assistant Professor at Purdue University in 1988
after receiving degrees from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), (B.S.
1981, M.S. 1983) and the University of Michigan (Ph.D. 1987). He was promoted to Associate Professor
in 1992, and then promoted to Professor in 1996. He was named a Fellow of the American Ceramic
Society in 2000, has held several division and society positions, including becoming a member of the
Board of Directors in 2012. In ASME, known as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, he is a
member of the executive committee of the mechanical engineering department heads and chairs
(MEDHC). Awards at Purdue University include receiving the MSE Best Teaching Award in 1992 and
1995 and Purdues highest teaching award, the Charles Murphy Undergraduate Teaching Award in
1995. In 2003 Professor Bowmans name was added to the Purdue Book of Great Teachers. In 2007 he
received the Purdue College of Engineering Mentoring Award and he became a Professor of Engineering
Education (by courtesy). In 2012 he was invested as the first Duchossois Leadership Professor in the IIT
Armour College of Engineering. Professor Bowman has served as advisor or co-advisor to twenty-two
Purdue masters students and twenty-two Purdue doctoral students. His research group has lead efforts
to quantify and model preferred orientation and property anisotropy in ceramics and ceramic
composites with expansion recently into describing properties and performance of lead free
piezoelectric materials. Professor Bowman has over 150 publications including the textbook An
Introduction to Mechanical Behavior of Materials (Wiley, 2004).

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Robert M. Briber
Professor and Chair
Materials Science and Engineering
University of Massachusetts
Professor Robert M. Briber has been Chair of the Department of the Materials
Science and Engineering since 2003. He has a B.S. degree in Materials Science and
Engineering from Cornell University and a Ph.D. degree in Polymer Science and
Engineering from the University of Massachusetts. He is an
internationally recognized researcher in the field of materials science and
polymer physics. He is a past President of the Neutron Scattering Society of
America, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a recipient of the Department of Commerce Bronze
Medal and a former editor of the Journal of Polymer Science. He teaches the class Materials of
Civilization as a University of Maryland I-Series and a Marquee Science and Technology course.
Helen M. Chan
Chair and New Jersey Professor
Dept. of Materials Science & Eng.
Lehigh University
Dr. Chan received her B.Sc. (First Class Hons.) and Ph.D. degrees from the
Dept. of Materials Science & Technology at Imperial College (University of
London). She joined the Lehigh faculty in 1986, and subsequently took an
18-month leave of absence at the National Institute of Standards and
Technology, where she worked in the Mechanical Properties Group of the
Ceramics Division. Dr. Chan returned to Lehigh January 1988, and was
promoted to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure in 1991 and to the rank of Full Professor in
1995. Dr. Chan is currently Chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.
Dr. Chans research interests include the application of reactive processing to fabricate unique
ceramic/metal structures, including cellular and nano-patterned materials. She is also actively involved
in research on grain boundary complexions, and the role of dopants and interfacial chemistry on
diffusion limited processes in ceramics. She is the author of over 170 publications, and included in
Thomson ISIs list of highly cited researchers in materials.
Dr. Chan has received the American Ceramic Society Roland B. Snow award on four separate occasions
(1986, 1990, 1992, and 1999). In 1990, Dr. Chan was awarded the Alfred Noble Robinson Award for
"outstanding performance and unusual promise of professional achievement", and she has received
Lehigh University's "Service Teaching Excellence Award" on 3 separate occasions (1991, 1992 and 2007).
Dr. Chan was named the 1992 recipient of ASM International's Bradley Stoughton Award for outstanding
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young faculty in the field of Materials Science & Engineering. In 1993, Dr. Chan was awarded the "Class
of 1961" Professorship by Lehigh University for "distinction in teaching, research and service, and in
1999, she was named the New Jersey Zinc Professor at Lehigh. Dr. Chan was inducted as a Fellow of the
American Ceramic Society (2005), and received Lehigh Universitys 2005 Eleanor and Joseph F. Libsch
Award for excellence in research. Dr. Chan chaired the 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Solid State
Ceramics.
Dr. Chan serves as an Editor of the Journal of Materials Science, and has been an Associate Editor for the
Journal of the American Ceramic Society since 1999. Dr. Chan currently serves on the Advisory Council of
several MSE departments. She is a former Chair of the University Materials Council (2011-2012) and
chaired the executive committee of the Basic Science Division of the American Ceramic Society (20102011).
Jack Clark
Chief Technolical Officer
Novelis Inc.
Jack Clark is Chief Technical Officer for Novelis Inc. In this role, which he
assumed in 2012, Mr. Clark leads a team that is responsible for delivering worldclass performance in operations, engineering, research and development, and
environment, health and safety. His mission is to drive the Novelis strategy of
innovation, technology and engineering excellence in products and processes.
Mr. Clark has over 30 years of industry experience. He was previously Vice
President, Operational Excellence, Novelis Inc. and began his career at Novelis as Director of Global
Engineering. Prior to joining Novelis in 2010, Mr. Clark held roles of increasing responsibility at Alcoa Inc.
in North America, Europe and Asia concluding with his role as Vice President of Operations for Alcoa
China Rolled Products.
Mr. Clark holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from Purdue University.

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George Corbin
Solvay Specialty Polymers
Head of Research, Development, & Technology
George Corbin is a Chemical Engineering graduate of Columbia University (BS)
and MIT (ScD). His entire career has been in the polymers industry at Amoco, BP
and Solvay striving to bend molecules and extract profits. He holds a range of
leadership positions in general management, licensing, and research and
development. Currently he is leading a global R&D team of more than 500
colleagues located in 18 sites around the world. He is on the External Advisory
Board for the GT MSE department and at MIT Materials Processing Center and
at Georgia Southern College of Science & Mathematics. His is also known as one of Deltas favorite
customers
Steve Cross
Executive Vice President for Research
Georgia Tech
Dr. Stephen (Steve) E. Cross is the Executive Vice President for Research of
the Georgia Institute of Technology. As such, he has the responsibility for
Georgia Techs research strategy with direct oversight of 10 interdisciplinary
research centers, applied research, technology transition, economic
development, and research administration. He also holds faculty
appointments as a Professor in the College of Engineering, School Industrial
and Systems Engineering; and as an Adjunct Professor in the School of
Interactive Computing, College of Computing; and the College of Management. Before joining Georgia
Tech in 2003, he was the Director and CEO of the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute in
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). He is retired military office with his last posting as a Program Manager at
the Defense Research Projects Agency. Through current service on the Defense Science Board and
previous service on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Dr. Cross has led studies on the topics of
disruptive innovative and adaptive organizations. He received his PhD from the University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign, his MSEE from the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), and his BSEE from the
University of Cincinnati. Dr. Cross is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
(IEEE). He received his Professional Engineer certification from the State of Ohio in 1978. He has
published over 60 technical papers and book chapters on application of artificial intelligence and
technology transition. A past Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Intelligent Systems, he is currently the Associate
Editor of the Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Systems Management.

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Lawrence T. Drzal
University Distinguished Professor
Chemical Eng. & Materials Science
Michigan State University
Lawrence T. Drzal is a University Distinguished Professor of Chemical
Engineering and Materials Science and Director, Composite Materials and
Structures Center at Michigan State University. He received his PhD (Case
Western Reserve University) and joined MSU in 1985 after serving 11 years as a
military and civilian researcher at the AF Materials Laboratory at WrightPatterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio where he was responsible for interfacial research
in advanced composite materials and adhesively bonded systems. Since joining
MSU his research has been directed at understanding the fundamental physical and chemical
interactions that take place between polymers and the surfaces of adherends, fibers, fillers, and
nanoparticles in composite materials and adhesively bonded structures. His current research is
concentrated on investigating graphene nanoplatelets and how they impart multifunctionality into
polymers, composites, and energy generation and storage devices.
During his career Professor Drzal has published over 300 peer reviewed research papers, and has been
awarded 31 patents. He serves on the editorial board of five journals, numerous government
committees, and has been elected a Fellow in five professional societies. In 2007, he co-founded XG
Sciences, Inc., a graphene nanoplatelet company, and serves as the Chief Scientist.
Timo Faath
Team Manager, Application Technology
ThyssenKrupp Steel
Timo Faath is responsible for the areas vehicle technology, customer
project engineering and product strategy. He currently focuses on
expanding the Application Technology Team to support customers in using
advanced steel products.
He has been working in research and development positions at
ThyssenKrupp Steel for more than 12 years, including product manager for new surface coatings and
engineering manager for automotive customers.
Prior to ThyssenKrupp Steel he worked for BMW in Munich and Porsche Engineering Services in Troy,
MI, where he was involved in the ULSAB-AVC project.

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Timo Faath holds an Automotive Engineering degree from the University of Applied Science in Esslingen,
Germany. He obtained his Master of Business Administration for Technology Management at the
University in St. Gallen, Switzerland.
George T. (Rusty) Gray III
Laboratory Fellow, Materials Science Division
Los Alamos National Laboratory
George T. (Rusty) Gray III is a Laboratory Fellow and staff member in the
dynamic properties and constitutive modeling team within the Materials Science
Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory. He came to LANL following a threeyear visiting scholar position at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg in
Hamburg, Germany having received his PhD in Materials Science in 1981 from
Carnegie-Mellon University. As a staff member (1985-1987) and later team
leader (1987-2003) in the Dynamic Materials Properties and Constitutive
Modeling Section within the Structure / Property Relations Group (MST-8) at LANL, he has directed a
research team working on investigations of the dynamic constitutive and damage response of materials.
He conducts fundamental, applied, and focused programmatic research on materials and structures, in
particular in response to high-strain-rate and shock deformation. His research is focused on
experimental and modeling studies of substructure evolution and mechanical response of materials. He
is a Life Member of Clare Hall, Cambridge University where he was on sabbatical in the summer of 1998.
He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), Fellow of ASM International (ASM), and Fellow of
the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS). He is a member of APS, ASM, TMS, and serves on the
International Scientific Advisory Board of the European DYMAT Association. In 2010 he served as the
President of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS). He has authored or co-authored over
380 technical publications.
Supratik Guha
Director Physical Sciences
T.J. Watson Research Ctr.
IBM
Supratik Guha is the Director of the Physical Sciences Department at IBM
Research and in this capacity is responsible for managing IBMs worldwide
research in the physical sciences. His technical work, over the past dozen
years, has been in the area of new materials for silicon microelectronics
where he was responsible for some of the key materials and methods used
in IBM's high k metal gate transistor technology, representing the most significant changes over the last
30 years in silicon CMOS. More recently, his own research work has been on new materials for energy
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conversion. As a manager, he has established many successful research programs at IBM including ones
in silicon nanophotonics, sensor based analytics, and photovoltaics. He received his Ph.D. in materials
science from the University of Southern California in 1991, and a B. Tech in Metallurgical Engineering
from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, in 1985. Supratik is also an adjunct professor of
materials science at Columbia University and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society.
Dr. Brian D. Haynes
Director of Research & Eng.
Global Nonwovens
Kimberly-Clark
Dr. Haynes received his B.S. (1985) and M.S. (1987) in Aerospace Engineering
and Ph.D. (1991) in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Tennessee
at Knoxville. During his graduate studies Dr. Haynes specialized in the
aerodynamics and polymer processing of the meltblowing process which was
funded by Exxon Chemical Company. He taught full time in the Department of
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering prior to joining Kimberly-Clark
Corporation as a Research Scientist in 1992. While working at Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Dr. Haynes
has held various positions in research and engineering including an assignment at the Lexington Mill in
North Carolina serving as the Technical Team Manager. Dr. Haynes has published several papers and has
obtained 40 U.S. Patents and 13 Trade Secrets during his Kimberly-Clark career. He currently holds the
position of Director of Research and Engineering in Global Nonwovens at Kimberly-Clark. His team is
responsible for advanced research and development for nonwoven technologies used in the companys
personal care, health care, and professional products. Dr. Haynes has received several awards including
the Kimberly-Clark Technical Excellence Award and most recently the 2012 Rodney D. Chipp Memorial
Award from the Society of Women Engineers. He is also an Adjunct Professor at The University of
Tennessee in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering. He also serves on
the Board of Directors for Georgia FIRST which is a non-profit organization that supports STEM programs
in Georgia, including FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics, Lego
League, etc. Dr. Haynes is married with two daughters.

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Professor David A. Hoagland


Head
Dept. of Polymer Science & Eng.
Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst
Professor David A. Hoagland is the Head of the Polymer Science and
Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, one of
the most distinguished academic centers of polymer research in the world.
Hoagland received a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Stanford
University in 1980, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in the same field from Princeton
University in 1981 and 1986, respectively. He has spent his entire subsequent
career at the University of Massachusetts, rising to Full Professor in 2003; since 2010, he has also been a
Distinguished Guest Professor at the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry of the Chinese Academy
of Sciences. Hoaglands research interests encompass the structure and dynamics of soft matter
polymer systems such as solutions and gels. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and was
named a Sigma Xi Distinguished National Lecture for 2004-7.
Kurt Jocobus, Ph.D.
Chief Executive Officer and President
MedShape, Inc.
Dr. Jacobus received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of
Illinois. He spent five years as a management consultant with McKinsey &
Company, focusing on the development of growth businesses for start-up to
Fortune 500 clients. He has over 10 years of early stage company experience,
leading or supporting the start of over a dozen new businesses. Based on his
graduate work at the University of Illinois, he brings a strong background in
shape memory materials. Dr. Jacobus sits on the Advisory Board for the Georgia
Tech School of Materials Science and Engineering, the Advisory Board for Georgia Techs Center for
Advanced Bioengineering for Soldier Survivability and the Metropolitan Atlanta Chamber of Commerces
Bioscience Industry Leadership Council. Dr. Jacobus has served as MedShapes Chairman, President and
CEO since 2006.

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Stephen L. Kampe
Franklin St. John Professor and Chair
Materials Science and Engineering
Michigan Tech
Dr. Stephen L. Kampe is the Franklin St. John Professor and Chair of Materials
Science and Engineering at Michigan Tech. He is a physical metallurgist, with
research and teaching activities in the area of processing/structure/property
development. Current or recent research activities include multifunctional
metal matrix composites, aluminum alloy development, mechanical behavior
characterization, reaction synthesis processing, modeling of aluminum-based
matrix composites, characterization and modeling of laser additive
manufacturing processes, and deformation processing of metals and composites. His teaching
responsibilities have included courses on mechanical behavior, mechanical testing, composite materials,
and material selection and design. Dr. Kampe has over 120 technical publications and presentations
dealing with his research and materials development activities, and he holds nine patents in various
aspects of innovative materials processing and composite synthesis. Prior to Michigan Tech, Dr. Kampe
served on the faculty of Virginia Tech for 16 years and as a Senior Research Scientist in Martin Mariettas
corporate laboratories for six years. He is a member of TMS, ASM, and ASEE. Dr. Kampe received three
degrees (B.S., M.S., and PhD) in Metallurgical Engineering from Michigan Tech.
Robert M. Kriegel
Senior Scientist
Global Packaging, The Coca-Cola Company
He received his BS degree in Chemistry from Augusta College in Augusta, Georgia
in 1994. He also received his MS in Organic Chemistry from Georgia Tech in 1996
and followed that with a Ph.D. in Polymer Chemistry from Georgia Tech in 2001,
both under the guidance of Profs. David Collard (now the associate dean of the
College of Sciences) and Charles Liotta (then Vice Provost of Graduate Research,
now Chair of the School of Chemistry). This was followed by a Post-Doctoral
Fellowship sponsored by Halliburton Energy Services under Profs. Marcus Weck,
Will Rees. He joined Halliburton Energy Services for 2 years prior to joining The Coca-Cola Company in
Global Packaging. While at TCCC he has been involved in developing the technology base for PlantBottle
as well as numerous barrier and small sized PET packaging technologies that has brought him in contact
with numerous academic and research organizations world-wide. Several years ago, he worked with
Brock Kolls and Ed Getty and his connections with GT to help initiate the process to develop the existing

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(and first) Master Institute Research Agreement with Georgia Tech. He currently splits his time at CocaCola between External Technology Acquisition and Global Packaging.
Dr. Sandra H. Magnus
Executive Director
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Dr. Sandra H. Sandy Magnus is the Executive Director of the American
Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the worlds largest technical
society dedicated to the global aerospace profession, with more than 35,000
individual members in 79 countries.
Born and raised in Belleville, Ill., Dr. Magnus attended the Missouri University of
Science and Technology, graduating in 1986 with a degree in physics and in
1990 with a masters degree in electrical engineering. She also holds a Ph.D. from the School of
Materials Science and Engineering at Georgia Tech (1996).
Selected to the NASA Astronaut Corps in April, 1996, Dr. Magnus flew in space on the STS-112 shuttle
mission in 2002, and on the final shuttle flight, STS-135, in 2011. In addition, she flew to the
International Space Station on STS-126 in November 2008, served as flight engineer and science officer
on Expedition 18, and returned home on STS-119 after four and a half months on board. Following her
assignment on Station, she served at NASA Headquarters in the Exploration Systems Mission
Directorate. Her last duty at NASA, after STS-135, was as the deputy chief of the Astronaut Office.
While at NASA, Dr. Magnus worked extensively with the international community, including the
European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), as well as
with Brazil on facility-type payloads. She also spent time in Russia developing and integrating
operational products and procedures for the International Space Station.
Before joining NASA, Dr. Magnus worked for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Company from 1986 to 1991,
as a stealth engineer. While at McDonnell Douglas, she worked on internal research and development
and on the Navys A-12 Attack Aircraft program, studying the effectiveness of radar signature reduction
techniques.
Dr. Magnus has received numerous awards, including the NASA Space Flight Medal, the NASA
Distinguished Service Medal, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and the 40 at 40 Award (given to
former collegiate women athletes to recognize the impact of Title IX).

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Jeff Martin
Co-Founder, President and Chief Executive Officer
Yulex Corporation
Jeff Martin co-founded Yulex Corporation in 1999 to produce agricultural-based
biomaterials made from guayule, a new industrial crop. The companys
biomaterials provide an alternative to tropical rubber or petroleum-based rubber
for consumer, industrial and medical applications. Yulex uses 100% of the guayule
plant for a truly sustainable bioprocess. Since Yulexs incorporation, Jeff raised
over $100 million in funding which enabled Yulex to become the first commercial
enterprise to produce biobased natural rubber latex in North America. The
company recently announced a venture with the European chemical giant ENI Versalis to build guayule
rubber capacity in Italy.
Prior to Yulex, Jeff was Vice President of Sales & Marketing for Safeskin Corporation who became a
market leader in latex medical devices. He was an integral part of the team which led its successful IPO
in 1994 and positioned Safeskin as The Best Small Company in America (Forbes Magazine, 1996). He
launched the sales operations of London Rubber Companys (Regent Medical) U.S. startup in 1990,
which subsequently became a global leader in the surgical glove market. Jeff began his career in R&D
and held positions as both a scientist and a sales executive with the Professional Healthcare Group of
the Kimberly-Clark Corporation, and the Ethicon Division of Johnson & Johnson, Inc. in the Polymer
Development Department.
He received his degree in engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he was recently
inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni.
Gary May, PhD
Dean - College of Engineering
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Dean May received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Georgia Tech in
1985 and his M.S./PhD in electrical and computer engineering from
University of California at Berkeley in 1987 and 1992 respectively. Dean May
joined the ECE faculty at Georgia Tech in 1991 as a member of the schools
microelectronics group. He started his tenure as Dean of the College of
Engineering on July 1, 2011.
Dean May's research focuses on computer aided manufacturing of integrated circuits. He was a
National Science Foundation "National Young Investigator" (1993-98) and was Editor-in-Chief of IEEE
Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing (1997-2001). He has authored over 200 articles and
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technical presentations in the area of IC computer-aided manufacturing. In 2001, he was named


Motorola Foundation Professor, and was appointed associate chair for Faculty Development
Dean May is the founder of Georgia Tech's Summer Undergraduate Research in Engineering/Science
(SURE) program, a summer research program designed to attract talented minority students into
graduate school. He also is the founder and director of Facilitating Academic Careers in Engineering and
Science program, a program designed to encourage minority engagement in engineering and science
careers. Dean May was a National Science Foundation and an AT&T Bell Laboratories graduate fellow,
and worked as a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ. He is a
member of the National Advisory Board of the National Society of Black Engineers.
My vision is to create an environment where anyone with the aptitude and inclination to study
engineering will want to come to Georgia Tech, said May. In partnership with colleagues in the other
colleges, he added, we will build a community of scholars to address the issues and challenges of the
world through technology.
Gary L. Messing
Distinguished Professor
Ceramic Science and Engineering
Head, Dept. of MSE
Pennsylvania State University
Dr. Gary L. Messing is Distinguished Professor of Ceramic Science and
Engineering and Head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering
at the Pennsylvania State University. Before his current position, he served as
Director of the Materials Research Laboratory at Penn State, and was Founding
Director of the NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center on
Particulate Materials at Penn State.
Dr. Messing received a B.S. degree in Ceramic Engineering at the New York State College of Ceramics at
Alfred University in 1973 and a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida in
1977.
He has published over 275 papers and co-edited 13 books. He is interested in improving ceramic
materials for optical, piezoelectric and structural applications by regulating microstructure evolution
using innovative approaches including seeding of phase transformations, sintering stress analysis, and
templated grain growth. In 2009 he was appointed Editor in Chief of the Journal of Materials Research.
Professor Messing received the Wilson Research and Outstanding Service Awards of the College of Earth
and Mineral Sciences at Penn State. Messing was elected Fellow the American Ceramic Society, the
Materials Research Society and as an Academician of the World Academy of Ceramics.
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Alton Al D. Romig, Jr.


Vice President and General Manager of Advanced Development Programs
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
Dr. Alton D. Romig, Jr., PhD is Vice President and General Manager of
Advanced Development Programs (ADP) for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
Company. In this capacity, he sets the strategic direction for the capture of
new business and leads the management of the world-renowned Skunk
Works, the pre-eminent leader in aerospace innovation for nearly 70 years.
As the head of ADP, Dr. Romig has the responsibility for the strategic and
operational success of the product and technology front end of the Aeronautics Company business line.
He leads the organization in the development of advanced systems concepts, product improvements
and derivatives, advanced projects and programs (both classified and unclassified), providing ultimate
oversight for multiple contracts and new business initiatives, while supporting major program campaigns
and capture opportunities across Aeronautics and the Lockheed Martin Corporation.
Prior to joining Advanced Development Programs in January 2011, Dr. Romig spent more than 30 years
with Sandia National Laboratories, which is operated by Lockheed Martin Corporation. His
responsibilities there included the leadership of activities providing science, technology and systems
expertise in support of U.S. programs in military technology; nuclear deterrence and proliferation
prevention; technology assessments; intelligence and counterintelligence; homeland security; and
energy programs. While at Sandia, he held a variety of management assignments including Chief
Technology Officer and Vice President for Science, Technology, and Partnerships; Chief Scientific Officer
for the Nuclear Weapons Program, and ultimately Executive Vice President, Deputy Laboratories
Director, and Chief Operating Officer responsible for all aspects of Laboratory business
Known for his pioneering work in materials science, engineering and characterization, he has won
numerous international prizes, including the American Society for Materials (ASM) Silver Medal for
Outstanding Materials Research.
Dr. Romig is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Council on Foreign Relations. He
serves on numerous advisory councils and boards, including: the Intelligence Science Board; the Air
Force Studies Board; the Standing Advisory Committee to the Special Operations Command; and the
Standing Committee on Technology Insight. Dr. Romig has served on several industrial boards, including
the Technology Ventures Corporation, a Lockheed Martin subsidiary dedicated to technology
commercialization; and the Atomic Weapons Establishment Board of Directors in the United Kingdom.
He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, ASM International, and the
Minerals, Metals and Materials Society. Dr. Romig is a Senior Member of Institute for Electrical and
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Electronics Engineers (IEEE.) In 2013 he was named as Associate Fellow of the American Institute of
Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA.) Al also served as Chairman of the United Way of Central New
Mexico.
Dr. Romig received his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and Doctorate degrees in Materials
Science and Engineering from Lehigh University. He and his wife, Julie, have one married son and a
granddaughter.
Anil K. Sachdev
Research Fellow and Lab Group Manager
Chemical and Materials Systems Lab
GMR&D Center
Anil Sachdev started his GM career in 1977 with the GM Research Labs after
receiving his doctorate in Materials Science and Engineering from the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his MSc in Metallurgical Engineering
from Purdue University, and BSc in Metallurgical Engineering from Banaras
Hindu University in India. He research interests include structure-property
relationships and microstructure design in aluminum and magnesium alloys
for structural applications, metal matrix-composites, and high strength steels.
He is currently Research Fellow and Lab Group Manager in the Chemical and Materials Systems Lab at
the GMR&D Center, and leads advanced materials-related projects for next-generation lightweight body
and powertrains. The various projects he is leading are focused on improving the performance of
lightweight materials to reduce component mass for improved fuel economy. He has 100+ external
publications and 33 patents, and has received Best Paper Awards from the AFS and TMS Societies.
He was most recently instrumental in setting up GM Collaborative Research Labs at Brown University
and Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

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Justin Schwartz
Department Head and Kobe Steel Distinguished Professor
Materials Science and Engineering
North Carolina State University
Justin Schwartz joined NCSU Department of Materials Science and Engineering as
Department Head and Kobe Steel Distinguished Professor in 2009. Prior to joining
NCSU, he was the Jack E. Crow Professor of Engineering at the Florida State
University. His groups primary research interests are in the underlying science
that drives performance of advanced oxide materials, including mechanical and
functional failure, manufacturing, processing, packaging and system integration.
His research group is cross-disciplinary, integrating physics and chemistry of novel materials with
mechanical, electrical, magnetic, thermal, and systems issues, bridging the underlying nanoscopic
phenomena to macroscopic behaviors.
Lee Silverman
Research Manager
Nanocomposite Technologies
DuPont
Lee received his B.S. from MIT in Materials Science and Engineering in 1981.
He then worked for a two years doing process development for optical
waveguide materials for telecommunication at Corning. Lee then went back to
MIT, and graduated with a Ph.D. in Ceramic Science and Engineering in 1987.
Following graduate school, Lee went to DuPont, where he has been for the last
25 years. While in DuPonts Central Research and Development Laboratory in
Wilmington, Delaware, he has worked on a wide range of materials intended for uses in structural,
electronic, optical and sensing applications, and more. Lee is currently Research Manager for Materials
Science and Engineering, and Nanocomposite Technologies in CR&D.

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Morley O. Stone, Ph.D.


Chief Scientist
Air Force Research Laboratory
Dr. Stone, a member of the U.S. Air Forces scientific and technical cadre of
senior executives, is Chief Scientist, 711th Human Performance Wing at Air
Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and also serves as the Department of Defense
lead for autonomy research. Prior to assuming his current duties, Dr. Stone was
the Senior Scientist for Molecular Systems Biotechnology at AFRLs Human
Effectiveness Directorate and Chair of the Bio-X Strategic Technology Thrust for
AFRL. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Stone was the Chief of the Hardened
Materials Branch for AFRLs Materials and Manufacturing Directorate. From 2003-2006, he was detailed
as a Program Manager with the Defense Sciences Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency. Dr. Stone received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from Carnegie Mellon University in 1997 and has
worked in the biotechnology and materials science areas for more than 20 years. In 2005, he was
elected Fellow of AFRL and received Carnegie Mellons Alumni Merit Award. He is a recipient of the
Office of the Secretary of Defense medal for Exceptional Civilian Service and in 2007 elected Fellow of
the International Society of Optical Engineering.
Michael E. Tompkins
Vice President of Technology Development
Hanger Orthopedic Group
Michael E. Tompkins joined Hanger Orthopedic Group in 2007 as the Vice
President of Technology Development. In this role to advance Hangers
innovation and growth objectives, Tompkins is responsible for developing new
concepts and products, promoting technological innovation across corporate
divisions, and identifying product acquisition or commercialization
opportunities by analyzing emerging technology and intellectual property.
Prior to joining Hanger, Mr. Tompkins founded Animated Prosthetics, Inc., and served as its president for
15 years. This company developed and manufactured innovative electronic control systems, primarily
for upper-extremity prosthetics.
Before entering the Orthotics and Prosthetics industry in 1990, Mr. Tompkins held executive and
technical management positions in organizations that provided research, development and
manufacturing for products in the industrial, consumer and medical fields. He currently holds nine
patents and has other patent applications in process.
Some of the many highlights associated with Mr. Tompkins 20 year dedication to the O&P profession
include: reception of the prestigious Thranhardt Award, member of the National Academies Keck
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Futures Initiative on Smart Prosthetics, participation in the Department of Defense Orthotics and
Prosthetics Workshop, and scientific paper presentations at major conferences such as AAOP, AOPA,
Pacific Rim and ISPO.
Dr. Nikhil Eapen Verghese
Research Fellow
SABIC Technology and Innovation
Nikhil is a Research Fellow aligned with Sabics Innovative Plastics
business unit and is working in a few areas ranging from new platform
development to initiating programs with strategic academic institutions
and providing technical insights into potential industrial partnerships and
joint ventures. Prior to joining SABIC in 2012, Nikhil worked at the The
Dow Chemical Company for 12 years in various roles in Research and
Development. He joined Dows Materials Science Group in Core R&D in
2000 after completing his Ph.D. in Material Science and Engineering and a one year post-doctoral
fellowship at Virginia Tech, all under the guidance of Prof. J. J. Lesko in the Engineering Science and
Mechanics Department. In 2004, he moved to Thermosets business as Technical Group Leader of the
Material Science group overseeing both Epoxy and Polyurethane based products. During this time he
was responsible in launching FORTEGRATM, a new family of rubber toughening technologies including a
novel ampiphilic block copolymer based approach for epoxy and epoxy vinylester based thermoset
resins. In 2006 he moved to Michigan and while at Dow Automotives New Business Development-R&D
in Auburn Hills, he partnered closely with the commercial function to identify opportunities in various
areas pertaining to transportation including the use of composites. Finally
in 2009 he returned to Texas as Global Technology Leader to start a new platform in Thermoset
Composites that resulted in the launch in 2011 of VORAFORCETM a family of Epoxy and Polyurethane
formulations designed to address the fabrication needs in technologies such as Ultra Fast RTM, Filament
Winding, Pultruion, LFI and SRIM
Nikhils publications include a chapter in Reinforced Plastics Durability, edited by Geoffrey Pritchard and
over 50 peer reviewed journal papers and conference proceedings. He has also authored over 15
external patent filings and holds 5 issued patents. Nikhil served as chairman of the Failure Analysis and
Prevention Special Interest Group at SPE-ANTEC in 2002 and co-chairs the Bonding, Joining and Finishing
of Composites division of SPE-ACCE in 2008. In 2009 he elected as a board member for SPEs
Composites Division and is the Technical Program Chair for the division at ANTEC 2012 and 2013.

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

Jerry Young
Director Materials & Fabrication Technology
Boeing Research & Technology
Jerry leads the Materials and Fabrication Technology Organization for Boeing
Research & Technology. This team of 650 engineers and scientists is developing
next generation materials and manufacturing processes for existing and future
Boeing products.
Prior to his current role, Jerry was the Director of Materials and Structures
Technology, where he led Boeings long-term R&D for materials, structural
concepts and analysis tools. Jerry led three Boeing Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) technology programs for
affordable titanium product forms casting, welding and forming and led Boeings enterprise-wide
development programs for Structural Analysis and Loads processes. In technical roles, he specialized in
advanced computational methods for design and manufacturing process development. He has worked
on defense and commercial programs including B2, 777, F22 and JSF.
He holds a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Utah and is a graduate of the
Advanced Management Program at University of Pennsylvanias Wharton Business School. He also holds
four patents and has authored a number of technical papers.

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The College of Engineering

Institute for Materials (IMAT)

School of Materials Science and Engineering

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2013

Proceedings of the Symposium on


The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, May 14 15, 2013

Dr. Naresh Thadhani,


Dr. Meilin Liu, Associate Chair, Academic
Dr. David Bucknall, Associate Chair for Graduate Studies
Dr. Fred Cook, Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies

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