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CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

ONSIA

Jaecheol Koh

ONSIA Inc.

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

A Step by Step Guide

ISBN-13: 978-1508691501 ISBN-10: 1508691509

Author: Jaecheol Koh Publisher: ONSIA Inc. (www.e-onsia.com) E-Mail: jckoh@e-onsia.com

Coypright © 2015 by Jaecheol Koh, ONSIA Inc. All rights reserved.

No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical,including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher.

The files associated with this book or produced according to the steps in this book remain the intellectual property of the author. The files are permitted for use by the original legal purchaser of this textbook and may not be transferred to any other party for presentation, education or any other purposes.

Download Files for Exercises

Visit our homepage www.e-onsia.com. You can download the files for exercises without any limit. This textbook is written in CATIA V5-6R2014 and the files are available in CATIA V5R20. Users of earlier releases can use this textbook with minor modifications.

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

Download Files for Exercises

Visit our homepage www.e-onsia.com. You can download the files for exercises without any limit. This textbook is written in CATIA V5-6R2014 and the files are available in CATIA V5R20. Users of earlier releases can use this textbook with minor modifications.

Preface

This textbook explains how to create models with freeform surfaces using CATIA V5. CATIA is a three dimensional CAD/CAM/CAE software developed by Dassault Sys- tèms, France. This textbook is based on CATIA V5-6R2014. Users of earlier releases can use this book with minor modifications. We provide files for exercises via our website. All files are in CATIA V5R20 so readers can open the files using later releases of CATIA V5.

It is assumed that readers of this textbook are accustomed to the modeling tools and pro- cesses in how to construct solid models in CATIA V5. For basic modeling, assembly and drafting techniques, refer to the textbook written by the author. This textbook is suitable for anyone who are interested in learning how to create and use the freeform surface in constructing 3D models using CATIA V5.

Topics covered in this textbook

- Chapter 1: Introduction to Surface Design

- Chapter 2: Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body

- Chapter 3 and 4: Creating Reference Elements and Curves

- Chapter 5 through 9: Creating Freeform Surfaces with various Commands

- Chapter 10: Analyzing Suface Quality

- Chapter 11 through 16: Modeling Projects (Cup Holder, Router Stand, PET Bottle, Lamp Shade, Classical Handset, Bumper Surface of Audi Q5)

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction to CATIA V5 Surface Design

1

1.1

What is the Surface Design

2

1.2

Workbenches and Toolbars

3

 

1.2.1

Workbenches for Surface Modeling

3

1.2.2

Screen of Workbench

4

1.2.3

Adding Workbenches in the Start Menu

5

1.2.4

Toolbars for Generative Shape Design

6

1.3

Understanding Geometries

8

1.4

Settings for Surface Modeling

9

 

1.4.1

Edge Display

9

1.4.2

Update Option

10

1.4.3

Defining a Shortcut Key

11

Chapter 2 Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body

13

2.1 Guidelines for Successful Surface Modeling

14

2.2 Geometrical Sets

15

2.2.1

Creating a Geometrical Set

15

Exercise 01

16

2.2.2 Characteristics of Geometrical Set

20

2.2.3 Options for Geometrical Set

20

2.3 Ordered Geometrical Set (OGS)

22

2.4 Body

22

2.5 Hybrid Modeling

22

 

Exercise 02

24

2.6 Constructing a Free Form Surface in a Solid Body

24

2.6.1 Close Surface

24

 

2.6.2 Split

27

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

Exercise

03

27

Exercise

04

28

2.6.3

Sew Surface

28

Exercise 05

30

2.6.4

Thick Surface

30

Chapter 3 Reference Elements

31

3.1 What is a Wireframe 32 3.2 Points. . . . . . . .
3.1
What is a Wireframe
32
3.2
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3.2.1 Coordinate
33
3.2.2 On Curve
33
3.2.3 Tangent on Curve
34
3.2.4 Type Lock Button
35
Exercise 01
36
3.3
Extremum
36
3.4
Multiple Result Management (MRM)
Exercise 02
37
39
3.5
Lines
Exercise 03
41
42
3.6
Plane
44
3.6.1 Offset from plane
44
3.6.2 Parallel through point
44
3.6.3 Angle/Normal to plane
45
3.6.4 Through point and line
45
Exercise 04
46
3.6.5
Through planar curve
46
3.7
Repeated Creation of Elements
49
3.7.1 Object
Repetition
49
3.7.2 Planes
Between
49
3.7.3 Duplicate Geometrical Features Set
50

Chapter 4

3D Curves

 

51

4.1

3D Curves

52

4.2

Creating Curves from Points

52

 

4.2.1 Polyline

52

 

4.2.2 Circle

53

4.2.3 Spline

53

Exercise 01

54

4.3

Creating New Curves Using Existing Curves

57

 

4.3.1 Corner

57

4.3.2 Connect Curve

59

 

Exercise 02

59

 

4.3.3

Continuity

61

 

Exercise 03

62

 

4.3.4 Combine

62

4.3.5 Parallel Curve

64

4.3.6 3D Curve Offset

65

Exercise

04

66

4.3.7

Transformation Commands

66

4.4

Creating New Curves from Existing Surfaces

68

 

4.4.1

Projection

68

 

Exercise 05

69

 

4.4.2

Intersection

72

4.5

Creating New Curves from Existing Edges

72

 

4.5.1

Boundary

72

4.5.2

Extract

73

4.6

Modifying Curves

74

 

4.6.1

Split

74

Exercise

06

75

Exercise

07

76

 

4.6.2 Trim

76

4.6.3 Join

77

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

4.6.4

Curve Smooth

78

Exercise 08

79

Chapter 5 Rigid Surface, Explicit Sweep and Law

83

5.1 Rigid Surface

 

84

 

5.1.1

Extrude

84

5.1.2

Revolve

84

5.1.3

Sphere

85

 

Exercise 01

86

 

5.1.4

Cylinder

86

5.2 Sweep

89

5.3 Explicit Sweep

90

 

5.3.1

With Reference Surface

90

Exercise

02

91

Exercise

03

92

Exercise

04

96

Exercise

05

99

5.3.2

Spine and Relimiter

104

5.3.3

With Two Guide Curves

105

 

Exercise 06

106

 

5.3.4

With Pulling Direction

109

5.4

Law

110

5.4.1 Defining in the Law Definition Dialog Box

110

5.4.2 Using the Law Definition Command

111

 

Exercise 07

112

 

5.4.3

Using Function for Law

116

Chapter 6 Surface Operations

119

6.1 Surface Operations

 

120

6.2 Cutting.

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6.2.1

Split

120

 

6.2.2

Trim

122

Exercise

01

124

Exercise

02

127

6.3

Join

130

6.3.1 Check Options

130

6.3.2 Propagations

131

Exercise

03

132

Exercise

04

136

6.3.3

Federation

137

Exercise 05

138

6.4

Healing

143

6.5

Extract

144

6.6

Extrapolate

145

6.7

Offset

147

Exercise

06

150

Exercise

07

154

Chapter 7 Adaptive Sweep

159

7.1 Adaptive Sweep

 

160

Exercise 01

161

7.2 Sketches for Adaptive Sweep

165

Exercise 02

166

7.3 G1 Continuity with the Adjacent Surface

166

7.4 Availability of Adaptive Sweep

171

7.5 Adding Section

173

7.6 Relimitation

174

Exercise

03

175

Exercise

04

179

Exercise

05

184

Exercise

06

190

Exercise

07

195

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

Chapter 8 Implicit Sweep

201

8.1 Implicit Sweep

202

8.2 Line Type

203

8.2.1

Two Limits

203

Exercise 01

203

8.2.2

Limit and Middle

205

8.2.3

With Reference Surface

205

Exercise 02

205

8.2.4

With Reference Curve

208

Exercise 03

209

8.2.5 With Tangency Surface

211

8.2.6 With Draft Direction

212

8.2.7 With Two Tangency Surfaces

213

8.3 Circle Type

214

8.3.1 Three Guides

214

8.3.2 Two Guides and Radius

215

8.3.3 Center and Two Angles

216

8.3.4 Center and Radius

218

8.3.5 Two Guides and Tangency Surface

219

8.3.6 One Guide and Tangency Surface

220

8.3.7 Limit Curve and Tangency Surface

221

8.4 Conic Type

222

8.4.1 Two Guide Curves

222

8.4.2 Three Guide Curves

223

8.4.3 Four Guide Curves

224

8.4.4 Five Guide Curves

224

 

Exercise 04

225

Chapter 9 Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

9.1 Multi-Sections

Surface

229

230

9.1.1

Surface with Sections

231

9.1.2 Surface with Sections and Guides

232

9.1.3 Conditions of Sections and Guides

233

 

Exercise 01

234

9.1.4

Continuity

236

Exercise

02

238

Exercise

03

240

9.1.5 Closing Point

246

9.1.6 Coupling

248

 

9.1.7 Spine

250

9.1.8 Using Closed Curves

254

 

Exercise 04

256

9.2 Blend

260

 

Exercise 05

261

9.3 Fill

264

 

Exercise 06

265

Chapter 10 Surface Analysis

269

10.1 Connect Checker

270

10.1.1 Curve-Curve Connection

270

10.1.2 Surface-Surface Connection

271

10.1.3 Surface-Curve Connection

273

10.2 Light Distance Analysis

274

10.3 Feature Draft Analysis

275

10.4 Surfacic Curvature Analysis

276

10.5 Porcupine Curvature Analysis

277

10.6 Apply Dress-Up

279

10.7 Geometric Information

279

Chapter 11

Cup Holder

281

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

11.1 Cup Holder

282

11.2 Modeling Process

284

11.3 Detailed Process

285

11.3.1 Creating

Ring

285

11.3.2 Creating Attachment Part

286

11.3.3 Creating Connection Surface

287

Chapter 12

Router Stand

289

12.1 Router Stand

290

12.2 Modeling Process

292

12.3 Detailed Process

293

12.3.1 Base

293

12.3.2 Side Surface

293

12.3.3 Creating a Solid Body for Side

295

12.3.4 Creating the Cutter Body

296

12.3.5 Completing the Model

301

Chapter 13

PET Bottle

303

13.1 PET Bottle

304

13.2 Modeling Process

305

13.3 Detailed Process

306

13.3.1

Basic Surface

306

13.3.2

Narrow Waved Surface

306

13.3.3

Wide Waved Surface

310

13.3.4

Twisted Surface

312

13.3.5

Neck

314

13.3.6

Bottom

318

13.3.7

Completing the Bottle

322

Chapter 14

Lamp Shade

325

14.1 Lamp Shade

326

14.2 Modeling Process

327

14.3 Detailed Process

328

14.3.1 Basic Surface

328

14.3.2 Sine Curve

328

14.3.3 Creating Other Curves

332

14.3.4 Creating Frill Surface

335

14.3.5 Surface Analysis

337

14.3.6 Modifying Surface

340

14.3.7 Boss

342

14.3.8 Completing

342

Chapter 15 Classical Handset

345

15.1 Classical Handset

346

15.2 Modeling Process

347

15.3 Detailed Process

348

15.3.1 Base Points and Planes

348

15.3.2 Back and Ring Surface of Transmitter

349

15.3.3 Front Surface of Transmitter

351

15.3.4 Receiver

354

15.3.5 Handle

358

Chapter 16 Bumper Surface of Audi Q5

363

16.1 Bumper Surface

364

16.2 Modeling Process

365

16.3 Detailed Process

366

16.3.1

License

366

CATIA V5-6R2014 Surface Design

16.3.2 Preparing for File and Image

366

16.3.3 Creating Sketch for Each View

370

16.3.4 Completing Curves

373

16.3.5 Creating Surfaces

377

Chapter

2

Creating a Freeform

Surface in a Solid Body

Chapter 2 Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body After completing this chapter you will
Chapter 2 Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body After completing this chapter you will

After completing this chapter you will understand

- the characteristics of surface modeling with CA-

TIA V5

- the method to manage various types of geometries.

- how to use a freeform surface to form a face of a solid body.

Ch 2: Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body

2.1 Guidelines for Successful Surface Modeling

There are two major differences between solid modeling and surface modeling. Under- standing the differences and characteristics of surface modeling will help with your con- fidence to learn how to create complex surface models.

► There are many types of objects that you have to manage.

Types of elements include solid bodies, sheet bodies, wireframes, reference elements, faces, edges, curves, etc. as shown in Fig 1-13. Many faces are required to construct a solid body, and many wireframes are required to construct a face. You have to use points, lines and planes to precisely define a wireframe. Therefore, you have to manage each element properly to complete a final model with ease and accuracy.

► There are many commands and options for each command to create a surface.

Therefore, you have to be patient to achieve a satisfactory result. The process of trial and

Sample Chapter

error may be tedious especially for beginners. If you understand these characteristics of

surface modeling, it will be helpful for you not to give up and skip to the next step to accomplish your task.

In addition, keep in mind the following guidelines for successful surface modeling.

1. Choose as simple a process as possible.

2. Manage elements by using the geometrical sets.

3. If two elements have to meet, there should be no gap between the objects.

4. Create a solid body as early as possible. Keep in mind that the final result is almost always a solid body.

5. The surface has to be as smooth as possible.

2.2 Geometrical Sets

You can group geometries into a type of folder which is called a Geometrical Set and Body. There are two kinds of geometrical sets: geometrical sets(GS) and ordered geo- metrical sets(OGS). We should understand the characteristics and usages of geometrical sets and bodies to manage CATIA geometries properly and to understand and efficiently modify modeling history.

2.2.1 Creating a Geometrical Set

You can create geometrical sets according to the following process.

1. Select features in the Spec Tree and choose Insert > Geometrical Set in the menu bar.

2. Enter the name of the geometrical set and choose either GS, Part Body or OGS(Ordered

Geometrical Set) in the Spec Tree.

3. Click OK in the Insert Geometrical Set dialog box.

Sample Chapter

The selected geometries are grouped in the geometry set “a” as shown in Fig 2-1.

selected geometries are grouped in the geometry set “a” as shown in Fig 2-1. Fig 2-1
selected geometries are grouped in the geometry set “a” as shown in Fig 2-1. Fig 2-1
selected geometries are grouped in the geometry set “a” as shown in Fig 2-1. Fig 2-1

Fig 2-1 Creating a Geometrical Set

Ch 2: Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body

You can remove the geometrical set by right clicking on the geometrical set and choosing

“a” object > Remove Geometrical Set as shown in Fig 2-2.

object > Remove Geometrical Set as shown in Fig 2-2. Fig 2-2 Removing a Geometrical Set

Fig 2-2 Removing a Geometrical Set

Exercise 01

Creating Wireframe and Surface into a Geometrical Set

In this exercise, we will learn how to create geometries into a geometrical set according to the following procedure.

Sample Chapter

1. Start a new file and create geometrical sets.

2. Create sketches and planes into a geometrical set.

3. Create a surface into a geometrical set.

4. Move geometry into another geometrical set.

Creating a New Part

1. Close all parts by choosing File > Close in the menu bar.

2. Choose File > New and select Part in the New dialog box as shown in Fig 2-3.

3. Enter part name in the New Part dialog box and uncheck the Enable hybrid design

option as shown in Fig 2-4.

4. Click OK.

Switching to GSD Workbench

1. Choose Start > Shape > Generative Shape Design.

Fig 2-3 Selecting File Type Creating Geometrical Sets Fig 2-4 Part Name 1. Create two

Fig 2-3 Selecting File Type

Creating Geometrical Sets

Fig 2-3 Selecting File Type Creating Geometrical Sets Fig 2-4 Part Name 1. Create two geometrical

Fig 2-4 Part Name

1. Create two geometrical sets named “wireframe” and “surface” as shown in Fig 2-5.

named “wireframe” and “surface” as shown in Fig 2-5. Fig 2-5 Creating Geometrical Sets Sample Chapter
named “wireframe” and “surface” as shown in Fig 2-5. Fig 2-5 Creating Geometrical Sets Sample Chapter

Fig 2-5 Creating Geometrical Sets

Sample Chapter

Creating Sketches in the “wireframe” GS

1. Define the “wireframe” GS in a work object. (Right click on the “ wireframe” GS and

press “f”.)

2.

Create a sketch on the zx plane as shown in Fig 2-6 A .

Create a sketch on the zx plane as shown in Fig 2-6 A .

3.

Create a plane by offsetting the zx plane 70mm.

4.

Create another sketch on the offset plane as shown in Fig 2-6 B .

Create another sketch on the offset plane as shown in Fig 2-6 B .

70mm. 4. Create another sketch on the offset plane as shown in Fig 2-6 B .
A B
A
B

Fig 2-6 Creating Sketches

Ch 2: Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body

Creating a Surface

1.

Define the “surface” GS in a work object.

2.

Click the Blend icon in the Surfaces toolbar.

3.

Select the first sketch as the First curve and the second sketch as the Second curve. If

the direction of the arrow is not consistent, select the curve again.

4. Click OK in the Blend Definition dialog box.

The surface and the Spec Tree are as shown in Fig 2-8.

box. The surface and the Spec Tree are as shown in Fig 2-8. Sample Chapter Fig
box. The surface and the Spec Tree are as shown in Fig 2-8. Sample Chapter Fig

Sample Chapter

Fig 2-7 Creating Sketches

surface and the Spec Tree are as shown in Fig 2-8. Sample Chapter Fig 2-7 Creating
surface and the Spec Tree are as shown in Fig 2-8. Sample Chapter Fig 2-7 Creating

Fig 2-8 Surface Created

Creating a New GS under the “wireframe” GS

1. Choose Insert > Geometrical Set in the menu bar.

2. Select “wireframe” in the Father dropdown list and enter “ref” in the Name input box

in the Insert Geometrical Set dialog box.

3. Select Plane.1 in the Spec Tree.

4. Click OK in the dialog box.

Spec Tree is as shown in Fig 2-9.

OK in the dialog box. Spec Tree is as shown in Fig 2-9. Sample Chapter Fig
OK in the dialog box. Spec Tree is as shown in Fig 2-9. Sample Chapter Fig

Sample Chapter

Fig 2-9 Changing Geometrical Set

END of Exercise

END of Exercise

Ch 2: Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body

2.2.2 Characteristics of Geometrical Set

1.

You can use geometrical sets regardless of the feature creation order.

2.

You can define a geometrical set in the lower or upper level of the existing geometrical

set.

3.

You cannot define a specific feature in a geometrical set in a work object.

4.

The order of feature creation is not important. Therefore, you cannot use the Edit >

Scan or define in work object command in the menu bar. This does not mean that you can neglect parent/children relationship between features.

2.2.3 Options for Geometrical Set

Right click on the geometrical set in the Spec Tree and select the geometrical set object. Several options are available for the geometrical set.

Several options are available for the geometrical set. Sample Chapter Fig 2-10 Options for Geometrical Set

Sample Chapter

Fig 2-10 Options for Geometrical Set

Change Geometrical Set

You can move the selected geometrical set into an existing geometrical set.

You can move the selected geometrical set into an existing geometrical set. Fig 2-11 Change Geometrical

Fig 2-11 Change Geometrical Set Dialog Box

Auto Sort

When you move a geometry into a geometrical set after creating it, the order of the geom- etries in the geometrical set is sorted automatically. The modeling result is not affected by the sorting.

Reorder Children

You can modify the order of the features in the geometrical set according to your require- ments. The modeling result is not affected by the order of the features.

result is not affected by the order of the features. Fig 2-12 Reorder Children Dialog Box

Fig 2-12 Reorder Children Dialog Box

Group

Features in a geometrical set are grouped in a single container. If you right click on the

Sample Chapter

group name, the options for the group are available as shown in Fig 2-14. You can ex-

pand the group to see the contents of the group or ungroup it by choosing

option.

the Edit Group

of the group or ungroup it by choosing option. the Edit Group Fig 2-13 Group Dialog

Fig 2-13 Group Dialog Box

of the group or ungroup it by choosing option. the Edit Group Fig 2-13 Group Dialog

Fig 2-14 Options for Group

Ch 2: Creating a Freeform Surface in a Solid Body

2.3 Ordered Geometrical Set (OGS)

You can create an ordered geometrical set in the same manner as the geometrical set. The differences with the OGS compared to the GS are as follows.

1. You can define an OGS in another OGS.

2. The creation order is significant. You can change the order of the features in the OGS

and the order may change the modeling result. A feature that is dependent on another fea- ture cannot be reordered before the parent feature. You can create a feature in the desired location order by right clicking and choosing the Define in Work Object option. In this case, you cannot use the geometries that appear after the work object in the Spec Tree. 3. You can modify an OGS to a GS, but the reverse is not allowed.

2.4 Body

Solid bodies have to be created in a Body in the Spec Tree. You can define a GS in a Body,

but you cannot create an OGS in a Body. In case you create a solid body during the surface

Sample Chapter

modeling process, a Body is set in a work object automatically.

2.5 Hybrid Modeling

In the New Part dialog box, you can choose whether to enable hybrid design or not while you are creating a model.

enable hybrid design or not while you are creating a model. Fig 2-15 New Part Dialog

Fig 2-15 New Part Dialog Box

Hybrid, as a word, means that two different types of objects are allowed for a single purpose. For example, a hybrid engine can use both electrical power and fossil fuel. The classical meaning of hybrid modeling is that you can use solid bodies and surfaces in combination to complete a target solid body.

Chapter

6

Chapter 6 Surface Operations After completing this chapter you will understand - how to use various

Surface Operations

Chapter 6 Surface Operations After completing this chapter you will understand - how to use various

After completing this chapter you will understand

- how to use various commands to modify surfaces.

Ch 6: Surface Operations

Ch 6: Surface Operations Replacing Surface A with Surface C 1. Show surface C if you
Ch 6: Surface Operations Replacing Surface A with Surface C 1. Show surface C if you

Replacing Surface A with Surface C

6: Surface Operations Replacing Surface A with Surface C 1. Show surface C if you have

1. Show surface C if you have hidden it.

2. Double click the Join.1 feature in the Geometrical Set.1.

2. Double click the Join.1 feature in the Geometrical Set.1. 3. Select the surface A in

3. Select the surface A in the element to join list box and clear selection. You can remove

element to join list box and clear selection. You can remove the surface A by pressing
element to join list box and clear selection. You can remove the surface A by pressing

the surface A by pressing the Remove Mode button and selecting the surface A again. Or you can clear the selection by right clicking on the surface A in the list.

selection by right clicking on the surface A in the list. 4. Select the surface C

4. Select the surface C as the element to join.

5. Press OK in the Join Definition dialog box.

to join. 5. Press OK in the Join Definition dialog box. Note that the fillet is

Note that the fillet is updated to the newly constructed edge without any problem.

updated to the newly constructed edge without any problem. Sample Chapter Fig 6-44 Replacing Surfaces Joining
updated to the newly constructed edge without any problem. Sample Chapter Fig 6-44 Replacing Surfaces Joining

Sample Chapter

Fig 6-44 Replacing Surfaces

Joining without Federation

1.

Do not save the file and open the file again.

2.

Join the surfaces B and C without the Federation option.
Join the surfaces B and C without the Federation option.

Join the surfaces B and C without the Federation option.

3.

Split the solid body and apply 2mm fillet on the edges as shown in Fig 6-43.

4.

Replace surface A with surface C and click OK in the Join Definition dialog box.
Replace surface A with surface C and click OK in the Join Definition dialog box.

Replace surface A with surface C and click OK in the Join Definition dialog box. You

will encounter the error message shown in Fig 6-45.

140

Fig 6-45 Error Message 5. Click OK . 6. The Update Diagnosis dialog box is

Fig 6-45 Error Message

5. Click OK.

6. The Update Diagnosis dialog box is invoked as shown in Fig 6-46 with the model.

Note that the side of the split is not correct. If this is the case, you have to reverse the side of the split.

this is the case, you have to reverse the side of the split. Sample Chapter Fig
this is the case, you have to reverse the side of the split. Sample Chapter Fig

Sample Chapter

Fig 6-46 Model and Update Diagnosis

Modifying the Errors

1. Close the Update Diagnosis dialog box.

2. Double click the split feature in the Spec Tree and reverse the direction if required. You

will be encountered with the Update Diagnosis dialog box again.

3. Click the Edit button in the dialog box and click OK in the Feature Definition Error

dialog box.

and click OK in the Feature Definition Error dialog box. Fig 6-47 Feature Definition Error 4.

Fig 6-47 Feature Definition Error

4. Select the newly created edge in the model as designated by the arrow in Fig 6-48 and

press OK in the Edge Fillet Definition dialog box.

141

Ch 6: Surface Operations

Ch 6: Surface Operations Fig 6-48 Selecting the New Edge The error for the first edge
Ch 6: Surface Operations Fig 6-48 Selecting the New Edge The error for the first edge

Fig 6-48 Selecting the New Edge

The error for the first edge fillet has been resolved and the Update Diagnosis dialog box for the next error is encountered as shown in Fig 6-49.

5. Click the Edit button and press OK in the Feature Definition Error message box.

6. Select the newly created surface as designated by the arrow in Fig 6-50.

7. Click OK in the dialog box. The model is updated and all the errors have been resolved.

The model is updated and all the errors have been resolved. Sample Chapter Fig 6-49 Update

Sample Chapter

Fig 6-49 Update Diagnosis

errors have been resolved. Sample Chapter Fig 6-49 Update Diagnosis Fig 6-50 Selecting the New Faces

Fig 6-50 Selecting the New Faces

END of Exercise

END of Exercise

142

6.4 Healing

Using the Healing command, you can join surfaces while the point or tangent continuity is satisfied.

When you are performing point healing, the surfaces within the merging distance are joined within the distance objective. If you want to satisfy tangent continuity between the surfaces, you have to choose Tangent in the Continuity dropdown list.

You can specify surfaces that do not have to be changed as a result of surface healing. Note that some surfaces have to be changed from their initial shape to satisfy the point or tangent continuity. If you do not specify the frozen element, all the elements to heal are deformed to satisfy the continuity.

Note that the edges have to be joined so that you can apply tangent healing. Therefore,

you have to set the merging distance appropriately when the surfaces have not been joined

in advance. You can apply tangent healing up to 10 degrees of tangency angle to satisfy

Sample Chapter

the tangency objective.

Free Edge Joined Edge
Free Edge
Joined Edge

Fig 6-51 Join with Healing

143

Ch 6: Surface Operations

6.5 Extract

Using the Extract command in the Operations toolbar, you can extract faces from the existing solid body or sheet body as the new sheet bodies.

If you select faces in the existing body with tangent continuity, the faces are created as

a single joined surface feature. You can select additional faces by pressing the multiple

selection button. The faces that are selected in the multiple selection tool will be created as respective extract features that are not joined. If you want to extract multiple faces as a single feature, you have to use the Multiple Extract icon.

If you select all the outer surface of a solid body and they are closed within the default

distance tolerance, the output surfaces constitute a solid body.

Note that the Federation option is available, and you can create the multiple extract fea- ture as a federation and then you can use them to minimize the impact on the downstream

modeling process when you are modifying features.

Sample Chapter

process when you are modifying features. Sample Chapter <Tangent Continuity>y> <Multiple
process when you are modifying features. Sample Chapter <Tangent Continuity>y> <Multiple
process when you are modifying features. Sample Chapter <Tangent Continuity>y> <Multiple
<Tangent Continuity>y> <Multiple Selection>
<Tangent Continuity>y>
<Multiple Selection>

<PartBody Hidden>

Fig 6-52 Join with Healing

144

6.6 Extrapolate

Using the Extrapolate icon in the Operations toolbar, you can extend the free edges of a sheet body.

You can define the amount of extrapolation in the Limit option. You can define it by en- tering length or by selecting an element with the Up to Element option.

The continuity of the extended surface can be defined in the Continuity option. If you choose Tangent (G1) in the Continuity dropdown list, the surface is extended with the same tangency angle as the extrapolated surface at the shared boundary. If you choose Curvature (G2) in the Continuity dropdown list, the surface is extended with the same curvature as the extrapolated surface at the shared boundary. Note that, if you extend the edge with curvature continuity, you cannot identify the shared edge in the model.

you cannot identify the shared edge in the model. Sample Chapter <Tangent Continuity> <Curvature
you cannot identify the shared edge in the model. Sample Chapter <Tangent Continuity> <Curvature

Sample Chapter

cannot identify the shared edge in the model. Sample Chapter <Tangent Continuity> <Curvature Continuity>

<Tangent Continuity>

in the model. Sample Chapter <Tangent Continuity> <Curvature Continuity> Fig 6-53 Continuity of

<Curvature Continuity> Fig 6-53 Continuity of Extrapolation

145

Ch 6: Surface Operations

In the Extremities option, you can determine how to extend the end points of the edge to extend. If you choose Normal in the Extremities dropdown list, the extended edge is created normal to the edge to extend while the continuity option is still satisfied. If you choose Tangent, the extended edge is created tangent to the extrapolated surface while the continuity option is satisfied.

Normal
Normal

<Normal Extremities>

Tangent
Tangent

<Tangent Extremities>

Fig 6-54 Extremities Option

If you choose the Assemble result option, the extended surface is joined with the ex-

Sample Chapter

trapolated surface. You can use the

Propagation mode option to select free boundary

edges of a surface that are point continuous or tangent continuous with the selected edge.

point continuous or tangent continuous with the selected edge. Fig 6-55 Selecting Edges with Point Continuity

Fig 6-55 Selecting Edges with Point Continuity Option

146

6.7 Offset

Using the Offset command in the Surfaces toolbar, you can create a new surface feature by offsetting the existing surfaces. You can reverse the side of offset by clicking the Re-

verse Direction button.

You can create offset surfaces on both sides by choosing the Both sides option. In this case, two offset surfaces are created on both sides as respective offset features. If you choose the Repeat object after OK option, you can create several offset features in the geometrical set.

can create several offset features in the geometrical set. Sample Chapter Fig 6-56 Offsetting Surface When
can create several offset features in the geometrical set. Sample Chapter Fig 6-56 Offsetting Surface When
can create several offset features in the geometrical set. Sample Chapter Fig 6-56 Offsetting Surface When

Sample Chapter

Fig 6-56 Offsetting Surface

When the offset distance is too much to construct one or more offset surfaces, a warning message will be issued as shown in Fig 6-57. If you click YES, the MRM dialog box is invoked with the preview of the partial result as shown in Fig 6-58. You can choose your desired option in the MRM dialog box and click OK.

in Fig 6-58. You can choose your desired option in the MRM dialog box and click
in Fig 6-58. You can choose your desired option in the MRM dialog box and click

Fig 6-57 Warning Message

147

Ch 6: Surface Operations

Ch 6: Surface Operations Fig 6-58 Partial Offset If you click NO in the warning message

Fig 6-58 Partial Offset

If you click NO in the warning message box shown in Fig 6-57, an error message is issued as shown in Fig 6-59. Click OK and you can modify the offset option.

For example, if you choose Automatic smoothing option, you can create an offset after

Sample Chapter

smoothing the input surfaces. In this case, the offset result will differ from the exact offset

and a warning message is issued as shown in Fig 6-60.

exact offset and a warning message is issued as shown in Fig 6-60. Fig 6-59 Error

Fig 6-59 Error Message

exact offset and a warning message is issued as shown in Fig 6-60. Fig 6-59 Error

Fig 6-60 Warning Message

148

You can specify the maximum deviation from the exact one by choosing the Manual smoothing option. If the output deviates from the exact offset, a warning message is issued and you can create offset by skipping the error by clicking YES or modify options in the Offset Surface Definition dialog box. If you click YES in the warning message box, the sub-elements to remove are displayed in the Offset Surface Definition dialog box with the preview of the offset.

Note that you can skip the erroneous surfaces to be offset by selecting in the Sub-Ele- ment to remove tab in the Offset Surface Definition dialog box whether you choose a smoothing option or not.

Surface Definition dialog box whether you choose a smoothing option or not. Sample Chapter Fig 6-61
Surface Definition dialog box whether you choose a smoothing option or not. Sample Chapter Fig 6-61
Surface Definition dialog box whether you choose a smoothing option or not. Sample Chapter Fig 6-61

Sample Chapter

Surface Definition dialog box whether you choose a smoothing option or not. Sample Chapter Fig 6-61
Surface Definition dialog box whether you choose a smoothing option or not. Sample Chapter Fig 6-61

Fig 6-61 Manual Smoothing

149

Ch 6: Surface Operations

Exercise 06

Using Offset Surface - 1

ch06_006.CATPart

Let’s complete a model by using the given part. Note that geometrical sets are defined in the Spec Tree for you to efficiently manage the output elements.

Spec Tree for you to efficiently manage the output elements. Fig 6-62 Given Part and the
Spec Tree for you to efficiently manage the output elements. Fig 6-62 Given Part and the

Fig 6-62 Given Part and the Result

Creating an Offset Surface

1.

Open the given part.

Sample Chapter

2.

surface -15mm along the Z direction as shown in Fig 6-63.

Make the “offset_surface” GS(geometrical set) in a work object and offset the given

GS(geometrical set) in a work object and offset the given Fig 6-63 Offset Surface Created Creating

Fig 6-63 Offset Surface Created

Creating a Line for Profile

1.

Hide the “skin” GS and define the “swept_surface” GS in a work object.

2.

Click the Line icon in the Wireframe toolbar.

3.

Select elements for the point and direction option, and enter 45mm in the End input

box. Click the Reverse Direction button if required so that the line is created inwards as shown in Fig 6-64.

150

Fig 6-64 Line Created Creating Swept Surface Sample Chapter 1. defined in a work object.

Fig 6-64 Line Created

Creating Swept Surface

Sample Chapter

1.

defined in a work object.

Click the Sweep icon in the Surfaces toolbar. Note that the “swept_surface” GS is still

2.

Show the “skin” GS.

3.

Press the Explicit button in the Profile type option and choose With reference surface

in the Subtype dropdown list.

4. Select the line created in Fig 6-64 as the profile and select Sketch.2 as the guide curve.

5. Select Split.1 in the “skin” GS as the support surface and hide the “skin” GS. Note that

you can hide or show elements while you are operating a command by right clicking on an element in the Spec Tree.

6. Enter 50 deg in the Angle input box and choose the angle sector such that the swept

surface is created as shown in Fig 6-65.

7. Click OK

151

Ch 6: Surface Operations

Ch 6: Surface Operations Fig 6-69 Trimming END of Exercise Exercise 07 Sample Chapter Using Offset
Ch 6: Surface Operations Fig 6-69 Trimming END of Exercise Exercise 07 Sample Chapter Using Offset

Fig 6-69 Trimming

Ch 6: Surface Operations Fig 6-69 Trimming END of Exercise Exercise 07 Sample Chapter Using Offset
END of Exercise

END of Exercise

Exercise 07

Sample Chapter

Using Offset Surface - 2

ch06_007.CATPart

Let’s create the model shown in Fig 6-70 by using the given part. Note that geometrical sets are defined in the Spec Tree for you to manage the output elements efficiently.

sets are defined in the Spec Tree for you to manage the output elements efficiently. 154

154

Fig 6-70 Model to Create

Dividing the Domain of Sketch

1. Double click Sketch.1 in the PartBody.

2. Break the arcs A and B at the intersection designated by the arrows to separate the

domains.

designated by the arrows to separate the domains. A B Fig 6-71 Break Sample Chapter Creating
designated by the arrows to separate the domains. A B Fig 6-71 Break Sample Chapter Creating
A B
A
B

Fig 6-71 Break

Sample Chapter

Creating Solid Bodies

1. Switch to the Part Design workbench.

2. Define the PartBody in a work object.

3. Create a 50 mm Pad feature with the outer profile as shown in Fig 6-72.

4. Hide the Pad feature and define the “cutter” body in a work object.

5. Create a 50 mm Pad feature as shown in Fig 6-73.

body in a work object. 5. Create a 50 mm Pad feature as shown in Fig

Fig 6-72 PartBody

body in a work object. 5. Create a 50 mm Pad feature as shown in Fig

Fig 6-73 Cutter

155

Chapter

9

Multi-Sections Surface,

Blend and Fill

Chapter 9 Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill After completing this chapter you will understand - how
Chapter 9 Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill After completing this chapter you will understand - how

After completing this chapter you will understand

- how to create a multi-sections surface.

- how to connect surfaces using the Blend com- mand.

- how to create a Fill surface.

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

9.1 Multi-Sections Surface

You can create a surface by connecting two or more sections. You can also specify guide curves that have been created across the sections.

Fig 9-1 shows an example of a multi-sections surface with only sections. You can control the shape of the output surface by the shape of each section. On the other hand, if you specify guides, you can control the shape of the output surface more precisely by the shape of the curves across the sections as shown in Fig 9-2.

shape of the curves across the sections as shown in Fig 9-2. Sample Chapter Fig 9-1
shape of the curves across the sections as shown in Fig 9-2. Sample Chapter Fig 9-1

Sample Chapter

Fig 9-1 Multi-Sections with Sections

in Fig 9-2. Sample Chapter Fig 9-1 Multi-Sections with Sections Fig 9-2 Multi-Sections with Sections and
in Fig 9-2. Sample Chapter Fig 9-1 Multi-Sections with Sections Fig 9-2 Multi-Sections with Sections and

Fig 9-2 Multi-Sections with Sections and Guides

230

9.1.1 Surface with Sections

You can create a multi-sections surface by selecting sections in order. Note that you have to define two or more sections when you are defining only sections.

By selecting sections one by one, the arrow is displayed on each section, which informs you of the location of the start point of the section and the sweeping direction. This com- mand creates a surface by connecting the start points of each section and sweeping toward the arrow direction along each section. Therefore, aligning the start point and direction of the arrow are very important in creating a satisfactory surface. You can reverse the direc- tion of the arrow by clicking the arrow head.

To practice creating this type of surface, open the file ch09_fig3.CATPart. Click the Multi-Sections Surface icon in the Surfaces toolbar and select the given curves one by one in order. Click OK in the dialog box, then you can create a multi-sections surface as shown in Fig 9-3.

Sample Chapter

you can create a multi-sections surface as shown in Fig 9-3. Sample Chapter Fig 9-3 Creating
you can create a multi-sections surface as shown in Fig 9-3. Sample Chapter Fig 9-3 Creating
you can create a multi-sections surface as shown in Fig 9-3. Sample Chapter Fig 9-3 Creating

Fig 9-3 Creating Multi-Sections Surface

231

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

9.1.2 Surface with Sections and Guides

You can create multi-sections surface by selecting sections and guides in order.

By selecting guide curves, you can control the shape of the output surface on the boundary across the sections. You can also control the internal shape of the surface more precisely by specifying guides between the first and the last guide curves. Guides are arranged ac- cording to the sweep direction of the sections regardless of the selection order. However, it is recommended to select the guides in accordance with the sweep direction.

To practice creating this type of surface, open the file ch09_fig4.CATPart. Click the Multi-Sections Surface icon in the Surfaces toolbar and select the given curves one by one in order. Select the Guides tab in the Multi-Sections Surface Definition dialog box and click the selection area as specified by A in Fig 9-4. Then select the guide curves in order: G1, G2 and G3. By clicking OK, you can create a multi-sections surface with guides as shown in Fig 9-4.

a multi-sections surface with guides as shown in Fig 9-4. Sample Chapter G2 G3 A G1

Sample Chapter

G2 G3 A G1
G2
G3
A
G1

Fig 9-4 Creating Multi-Sections Surface with Guides

232

9.1.3 Conditions of Sections and Guides

When you are defining guides, the following conditions have to be fulfilled.

guides, the following conditions have to be fulfilled. End point of sections or guides have to

End point of sections or guides have to be on the boundary curves as specified by A

-

in Fig 9-5. - End points of the last sections and guides have to be coincident with each other as specified by B in Fig 9-5.

-

Internal sections and guides have to intersect each other as specified by C in Fig 9-5.

have to intersect each other as specified by C in Fig 9-5. If the conditions are
have to intersect each other as specified by C in Fig 9-5. If the conditions are

If the conditions are not fulfilled, an error is encountered as shown in Fig 9-6.

B A A C A B A
B
A
A
C
A
B
A
B
B
B
B

Sample Chapter

Fig 9-5 Conditions for Sections and Guides

in Fig 9-6. B A A C A B A B B Sample Chapter Fig 9-5
in Fig 9-6. B A A C A B A B B Sample Chapter Fig 9-5

Fig 9-6 Error Message

233

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

Exercise 01

Creating Guide Curve

ch09_001.CATPart

Let’s create a multi-sections surface after creating an internal curve. Note that the internal guides or sections have to intersect each other.

internal guides or sections have to intersect each other. Fig 9-7 Given Part Creating a Reference

Fig 9-7 Given Part

Creating a Reference Plane

1.

Open the given file.

Define the Geometrical Set.1 in a work object.

2.

3.

required. The model view of Fig 9-8 is isometric.

Create a reference plane by offsetting the zx plane by 20mm. Move the plane symbol if

Sample Chapter

zx plane by 20mm. Move the plane symbol if Sample Chapter Fig 9-8 Creating Reference Plane
zx plane by 20mm. Move the plane symbol if Sample Chapter Fig 9-8 Creating Reference Plane

Fig 9-8 Creating Reference Plane

Creating a Sketch

1. Define the sketch plane on the reference plane. If the sketch plane is oriented, you can

press the Isometric View icon in the View toolbar. You can turn off the Grid option in the

Visualization toolbar.

2. Click the Intersect 3D Elements icon in the Operations toolbar.

3. Select three curves for the intersection as shown in Fig 9-9. You may need to create the

intersection points one by one with an earlier version of CATIA V5.

234

Fig 9-9 Creating Intersection Points 4. Click OK in the Intersection dialog box. Three intersection

Fig 9-9 Creating Intersection Points

4. Click OK in the Intersection dialog box. Three intersection points are created as desig-

nated by the arrows in Fig 9-10.

5. Click the Spline icon in the Profile toolbar and select the three intersection points in

order to create a spline as shown in Fig 9-11. Note that each point of the spline has to pass through the corresponding intersection point.

6. Exit the sketcher.

Sample Chapter

intersection point. 6. Exit the sketcher. Sample Chapter Fig 9-10 Intersection Points Fig 9-11 Spline Creating
intersection point. 6. Exit the sketcher. Sample Chapter Fig 9-10 Intersection Points Fig 9-11 Spline Creating

Fig 9-10 Intersection Points

Fig 9-11 Spline

Creating Multi-Sections Surface

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Hide all planes and sketch axis.

Click the Multi-Sections Surface icon in the Surfaces toolbar.

Select the sections as shown in Fig 9-12. Reverse the arrow direction if required.

Click the guide selection area and select guides as shown in Fig 9-12.

Click Preview and OK in the dialog box.

235

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

G1 G2 G3
G1
G2
G3

Fig 9-12 Creating Multi-Sections Surface

END of Exercise

END of Exercise

Sample Chapter

9.1.4 Continuity

When the first and/or last sections are on the existing surface, you can apply tangency or curvature continuity at the first and/or last section and the multi-sections surface can be connected smoothly to the existing surfaces. The same is true for guides. The following two cases have to be considered when you are applying continuity with the existing sur- faces.Note that curvature continuity is not available for lower versions of CATIA V5.

When you are using only sections, you can apply either tangency or curvature continu- ity with the existing surface all the time provided that the first and/or last section ity with the existing surface all the time provided that the first and/or last section curves are on the surface.

When you are using sections and guides, and you are applying tangency with the end surfaces that possess the first and last sections (S1 and S2 in Fig 9-14), the surfaces that possess the first and last sections (S1 and S2 in Fig 9-14), the end guides (G1 and G3 in Fig 9-14) have to be tangent or curvature continuous with the edges of the sup-

236

port surface connected by the guides. The internal guide(G2 in Fig 9-14) also have to be tangent or curvature continuous with the existing surface. The same is true for the surfaces that contain the first and last guides.

for the surfaces that contain the first and last guides. Fig 9-13 Tangency Using Only Sections
for the surfaces that contain the first and last guides. Fig 9-13 Tangency Using Only Sections

Fig 9-13 Tangency Using Only Sections

G1 S2 G2 G3
G1
S2
G2
G3

S1

Sample Chapter

Fig 9-14 Condition for Tangency

G1 S2 G2 G3 S1 Sample Chapter Fig 9-14 Condition for Tangency Fig 9-15 Tangency Using

Fig 9-15 Tangency Using Sections and Guides

237

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

If you try to apply continuity for section 1 and section 2 shown in Fig 9-16, an update error is encountered.

2 shown in Fig 9-16, an update error is encountered. Fig 9-16 Error in Tangent Condition
2 shown in Fig 9-16, an update error is encountered. Fig 9-16 Error in Tangent Condition

Fig 9-16 Error in Tangent Condition

Exercise 02

Applying Continuity

ch09_002.CATPart

You can apply tangency with the existing surface at the first and last sections according to the following process.

1.

Sample Chapter

Open the given file.

2. Click the Multi-Sections Surface icon in the Surfaces toolbar.

3. Select the first section and support as shown in Fig 9-17 and choose Tangent in the

Continuity dropdown list.

4. Select the second section.

a n g e n t in the Continuity dropdown list. 4. Select the second section.
a n g e n t in the Continuity dropdown list. 4. Select the second section.

Fig 9-17 Selecting First Sections

238

G2

G2 S1 G1 S3 G2 S2 Fig 9-42 Surface Information Sample Chapter G1 S1 G3 S2
G2 S1 G1 S3 G2 S2 Fig 9-42 Surface Information Sample Chapter G1 S1 G3 S2

S1

G2 S1 G1 S3 G2 S2 Fig 9-42 Surface Information Sample Chapter G1 S1 G3 S2
G1 S3
G1
S3
G2 S1 G1 S3 G2 S2 Fig 9-42 Surface Information Sample Chapter G1 S1 G3 S2

G2

G2 S1 G1 S3 G2 S2 Fig 9-42 Surface Information Sample Chapter G1 S1 G3 S2

S2

Fig 9-42 Surface Information

Sample Chapter

G1

G1 S3 G2 S2 Fig 9-42 Surface Information Sample Chapter G1 S1 G3 S2 Fig 9-43
S1 G3
S1
G3
G2 S2 Fig 9-42 Surface Information Sample Chapter G1 S1 G3 S2 Fig 9-43 Switched Guides

S2

Fig 9-43 Switched Guides and Sections

Spine controls the shape of U constant isoparametric curves. You can create an isopara- metric curve using the Isoparametric Curves icon in the Wireframe toolbar.

To practice formation of the U constant curve, open the file ch09_fig42.CATPart. Create a multi-sections surface by choosing the sections and guides as shown in Fig 9-43. Then click the Isoparametric Curves icon in the Wireframe toolbar and create the U constant parametric curve as shown in Fig 9-44. Note that if you do not need to specify a spine explicitly, the spine is calculated automatically.

251

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill U Constant Curve Fig 9-44 Isoparametric Curve Now, double
Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill U Constant Curve Fig 9-44 Isoparametric Curve Now, double

U Constant Curve Fig 9-44 Isoparametric Curve

Now, double click the multi-sections surface, click the spine tab in the Multi-Sections Definition dialog box, click the Spine selection box and select the curve named spine.2 in the Spec Tree as the spine. An error is encountered as shown in Fig 9-45. Note, because the spine controls the construction of U constant isoparametric curve while satisfying the sections and guides, the possibility of error increases as the number of guides increases.

Sample Chapter

increases as the number of guides increases. Sample Chapter Fig 9-45 Error in Spine Click OK
increases as the number of guides increases. Sample Chapter Fig 9-45 Error in Spine Click OK

Fig 9-45 Error in Spine

Click OK in the error message box and remove the second guide, i.e. Curve.12 by select- ing it in the guide tab and pressing the Remove button. Click Preview, then the surface is previewed as shown in Fig 9-46. Click OK to create a multi-sections surface with two guides and a spine specified.

You can compare the effect of spine by changing spines given in the file. Fig 9-47 shows the multi-sections surfaces and U constant isoparametric curves with different spines.

252

Not Joined Fig 9-54 Symmetry Sample Chapter Fig 9-55 Completed Model END of Exercise 259
Not Joined Fig 9-54 Symmetry Sample Chapter Fig 9-55 Completed Model END of Exercise 259

Not Joined

Fig 9-54 Symmetry

Not Joined Fig 9-54 Symmetry Sample Chapter Fig 9-55 Completed Model END of Exercise 259
Not Joined Fig 9-54 Symmetry Sample Chapter Fig 9-55 Completed Model END of Exercise 259
Not Joined Fig 9-54 Symmetry Sample Chapter Fig 9-55 Completed Model END of Exercise 259

Sample Chapter

Not Joined Fig 9-54 Symmetry Sample Chapter Fig 9-55 Completed Model END of Exercise 259
Not Joined Fig 9-54 Symmetry Sample Chapter Fig 9-55 Completed Model END of Exercise 259

Fig 9-55 Completed Model

END of Exercise

END of Exercise

259

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

9.2 Blend

Using the Blend command in the Surfaces toolbar, you can connect two edges or curves by applying continuity with the surface to be connected. You can apply point, tangency or curvature continuity.

The Tension, Closing Points and Coupling/Spine options are available in each tab in the Blend Definition dialog box. Using the Tension option, you can modify the shape of the blend surface by modifying the tension values. Note that the Tension is available only when you are applying tangency or curvature continuity.

To practice creating a blend surface, open the file ch09_fig56.CATPart. Click the Blend icon in the Surfaces toolbar and select First curve and First support. Then select

Second curve and Second support consecutively. Choose Curvature in the First con-

tinuity and the Second continuity dropdown lists as shown in Fig 9-56. Click OK in the dialog box, then you can create a blend surface as shown in Fig 9-56.

260

Sample Chapter

in the dialog box, then you can create a blend surface as shown in Fig 9-56.

Fig 9-56 Blend Surface

ch09_005.CATPart

Connecting Surfaces with Blend Surface

Exercise 05

Let’s connect two surfaces by using the blend surface. We will apply tangent continuity and trim out the unnecessary parts.

apply tangent continuity and trim out the unnecessary parts. Fig 9-57 Model for Exercise Creating Extremum
apply tangent continuity and trim out the unnecessary parts. Fig 9-57 Model for Exercise Creating Extremum

Fig 9-57 Model for Exercise

Creating Extremum

You can control the location of the closing point and coupling method in creating a blend

Sample Chapter

surface as we did in creating the multi-sections surface. We will create the extremum

points along the y direction on the given curves to locate closing points for each curve.

1. Click the Extremum icon in the Wireframe toolbar.

2. Select a curve and the zx plane as the direction and click Preview and OK to create an

extremum point as shown in Fig 9-58.

3. Create another extremum point as shown in Fig 9-59.

as shown in Fig 9-58. 3. Create another extremum point as shown in Fig 9-59. Fig
as shown in Fig 9-58. 3. Create another extremum point as shown in Fig 9-59. Fig

Fig 9-58 Creating an Extremum Point

261

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

Creating Fill Surface and Boundary Curves

1. Open the given part in the GSD workbench. Note that the “surface” geometrical set is

in a work object.

2.

Create a fill surface as shown in Fig 9-68.

3.

Click the Boundary icon in the Wireframe toolbar.

4.

Choose Tangent continuity in the Propagation type dropdown list and select the fill

surface.

5. Select the limit 1 point and limit 2 point to create half of the boundary curve as shown

in Fig 9-69. Note for the arrow direction.

curve as shown in Fig 9-69. Note for the arrow direction. Sample Chapter Fig 9-68 Fill
curve as shown in Fig 9-69. Note for the arrow direction. Sample Chapter Fig 9-68 Fill

Sample Chapter

Fig 9-68 Fill Surface

Fig 9-69 Half Boundary Curve

Multi-Sections Surface

1. Create an extrude surface as shown in Fig 9-70 that will be used as the tangent support.

You have to join the two curve features Join.2 and Join.3 to select as a profile of Extrude

by right clicking on the Profile selection box. Choose the zx plane as the direction of extrude.

266

clicking on the Profile selection box. Choose the zx plane as the direction of extrude. 266
clicking on the Profile selection box. Choose the zx plane as the direction of extrude. 266

Fig 9-70 Extrude Surface

2.

Click the Multi-Sections Surface icon in the Surface toolbar.

3. Select Section 1, Support 1, Section 2, Section 3, Support 3 and then select the bound-

ary curve created in Fig 9-69 as a guide as shown in Fig 9-71. Note the arrow directions in each section.

4. Hide all curves, points and extrude surface as shown in Fig 9-71.

Section Direction
Section Direction
and extrude surface as shown in Fig 9-71. Section Direction Sample Chapter Fig 9-71 Multi-Sections Surface
and extrude surface as shown in Fig 9-71. Section Direction Sample Chapter Fig 9-71 Multi-Sections Surface
and extrude surface as shown in Fig 9-71. Section Direction Sample Chapter Fig 9-71 Multi-Sections Surface

Sample Chapter

Fig 9-71 Multi-Sections Surface

Completing the Model

1. Create a symmetric copy of the multi-sections surface with respect to the zx plane.

2. Join the three surfaces as shown in Fig 9-72. You can display the half cut model by

clicking the Dynamic Sectioning icon and choosing the zx plane. You may need to re- verse the section view direction by right clicking on the section plane.

3.

Switch to the Part Design workbench and define PartBody in a work object.

4.

Click the Close icon in the Surface-Based Features toolbar and select the joined

surface.

5. Hide the Join feature, then you can see the solid body as shown in Fig 9-73.

267

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill

Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill Fig 9-72 Joined Surfaces Sample Chapter Fig 9-73 Solid
Ch 9: Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill Fig 9-72 Joined Surfaces Sample Chapter Fig 9-73 Solid

Fig 9-72 Joined Surfaces

Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill Fig 9-72 Joined Surfaces Sample Chapter Fig 9-73 Solid Body END
Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill Fig 9-72 Joined Surfaces Sample Chapter Fig 9-73 Solid Body END
Multi-Sections Surface, Blend and Fill Fig 9-72 Joined Surfaces Sample Chapter Fig 9-73 Solid Body END

Sample Chapter

Fig 9-73 Solid Body

END of Exercise

END of Exercise

268

Chapter

14

Lamp Shade

Chapter 14 Lamp Shade After completing this chapter you will understand - how to create a
Chapter 14 Lamp Shade After completing this chapter you will understand - how to create a

After completing this chapter you will understand

- how to create a model for a lamp shade.

Ch 14: Lamp Shade

14.1 Lamp Shade

In this chapter, we will learn how to create a model for a lamp shade as shown in Fig 14-1 following the brief guidelines. We will use the following commands.

- Creating Curves and Curve Operations

- Defining Law using Function

- Multi-Sections Surface - Transformation - Surface Analysis Sample Chapter Fig 14-1 Lamp Shade 326
-
Multi-Sections Surface
-
Transformation
-
Surface Analysis
Sample Chapter
Fig 14-1 Lamp Shade
326

14.2 Modeling Process

14.2 Modeling Process Curves Revolve Sample Chapter Join and Trim Multi-Sections Surface ThickSurface Locking Part 327

Curves

14.2 Modeling Process Curves Revolve Sample Chapter Join and Trim Multi-Sections Surface ThickSurface Locking Part 327
14.2 Modeling Process Curves Revolve Sample Chapter Join and Trim Multi-Sections Surface ThickSurface Locking Part 327
14.2 Modeling Process Curves Revolve Sample Chapter Join and Trim Multi-Sections Surface ThickSurface Locking Part 327

Revolve

14.2 Modeling Process Curves Revolve Sample Chapter Join and Trim Multi-Sections Surface ThickSurface Locking Part 327

Sample Chapter

Join and Trim

Multi-Sections Surface

14.2 Modeling Process Curves Revolve Sample Chapter Join and Trim Multi-Sections Surface ThickSurface Locking Part 327
14.2 Modeling Process Curves Revolve Sample Chapter Join and Trim Multi-Sections Surface ThickSurface Locking Part 327

ThickSurface

Locking Part

327

Ch 14: Lamp Shade

14.3 Detailed Process

14.3.1 Basic Surface

1. Create a sketch on the yz plane as shown in Fig 14-2.

2. Revolve the sketch by 360°.

plane as shown in Fig 14-2. 2. Revolve the sketch by 360°. Sample Chapter Fig 14-2
plane as shown in Fig 14-2. 2. Revolve the sketch by 360°. Sample Chapter Fig 14-2

Sample Chapter

in Fig 14-2. 2. Revolve the sketch by 360°. Sample Chapter Fig 14-2 Basic Surface 14.3.2

Fig 14-2 Basic Surface

14.3.2 Sine Curve

We will create a sine curve on a cylindrical surface which will be used for creating a frill surface.

Creating a Cylindrical Surface

1. Create a plane at a distance of -25mm from the xy plane.

2. Create a Φ 175mm circle on the plane and extrude it by 25mm along the +z direction.

328

Cylindrical Surface Fig 14-3 Cylindrical Surface Creating a Law 1. Click the Law icon in
Cylindrical Surface Fig 14-3 Cylindrical Surface Creating a Law 1. Click the Law icon in

Cylindrical Surface Fig 14-3 Cylindrical Surface

Creating a Law

1. Click the Law icon in the Knowledge toolbar.

2. Click the Destination selection box in the Law Editor dialog box and select the loca-

Sample Chapter

tion of the law in the Spec Tree. You can select either a geometrical set, ordered geomet-

rical set or Part Body. In this model, suppose that you are creating a law in the “lamp” part

under the “wireframe/frill” geometrical set.

3. Click OK in the Law Editor dialog box. The dialog box is expanded as shown in Fig

14-5.

3. Click OK in the Law Editor dialog box. The dialog box is expanded as shown
3. Click OK in the Law Editor dialog box. The dialog box is expanded as shown

Fig 14-4 Law Editor

329

Ch 14: Lamp Shade

4.

twice to create two parameters as designated by A in Fig 14-5. You can enter your own

parameter name.

5. Enter an equation as specified by in Fig 14-5. You can enter the parameter name in the equation on the left by double clicking one of the parameters of A in Fig 14-5.

6. Click OK in the Law Editor dialog box. A law is registered in the Spec Tree as shown

in Fig 14-6.

Select Length as the type ( in Fig 14-5) and click the New Parameter of type button

( in Fig 14-5) and click the New Parameter of type button Note that the parameter
( in Fig 14-5) and click the New Parameter of type button Note that the parameter
( in Fig 14-5) and click the New Parameter of type button Note that the parameter
( in Fig 14-5) and click the New Parameter of type button Note that the parameter

Note that the parameter on the right hand side of the equation, i.e. FormalReal.2, can have a value ranging from 0 to 1. The equation entered in Fig 14-5 expresses a sine wave of 14mm amplitude and that makes six periods between 0 and 1. The sine wave is shifted by 7mm along the FormalReal.1 direction.

A Sample Chapter
A
Sample Chapter

Fig 14-5 Equation for Law

by 7mm along the FormalReal.1 direction. A Sample Chapter Fig 14-5 Equation for Law Fig 14-6

Fig 14-6 Law in Spec Tree

330

Creating a Sine Curve

1. Extract the lower edge of the cylindrical surface that was created in Fig 14-3 as a curve.

2. Split the extracted curve with respect to the yz plane leaving half as specified by in

Fig 14-7.

3. Offset the half curve on the cylindrical surface along the z direction. Use the law creat-

ed in Fig 14-6 as the Constant.

Use the law creat- ed in Fig 14-6 as the Constant . Fig 14-7 Half Curve
Use the law creat- ed in Fig 14-6 as the Constant . Fig 14-7 Half Curve

Fig 14-7 Half Curve

Sample Chapter
Sample Chapter

Fig 14-8 Sine Curve

331

Ch 14: Lamp Shade

14.3.3 Creating Other Curves

In this section, we will create curves that are required to create frill surfaces by using the multi-sections surface command. Note that the frill surface has to be tangent connected to the basic surface. Therefore, you have to create curves for sections or guides such that you can apply tangent continuity. In this model, we will apply tangent continuity for a section.

First Guide Curve

1. Create an extremum point as specified by in Fig 14-9. You can use the Extremum command in the Wireframe toolbar and extract a desired point.

2. Create reference plane

3. Create intersection curve

2. Create reference plane 3. Create intersection curve by selecting a passing point and a line.
2. Create reference plane 3. Create intersection curve by selecting a passing point and a line.

by selecting a passing point and a line.

by intersecting the reference plane

point and a line. by intersecting the reference plane and basic surface. 4. Create spline on

and basic surface.

4. Create spline on plane as shown in Fig 14-9. Note that the spline has to be tangent

as shown in Fig 14-9. Note that the spline has to be tangent with the intersection
as shown in Fig 14-9. Note that the spline has to be tangent with the intersection

with the intersection curve

at point A .

Sample Chapter