Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 6

UTZ Program indicators 2016 (version 3.

0)
This indicator list is under development. For some of the indicators, data has been collected from the start of the program (version 1.0). Other indicators have been introduced mid 2014 (version
2.0). The last update has taken place in January 2016 (version 3.0). The start of data collection is indicated in this list. For the more recently launched indicators, data collection and data analysis
has just started. Reporting will depend on the value and quality of data. This list will be regularly updated in line with data needs.
Level 2+ 3 Indicators are an indication of priority topics; the actual studies cover many more indicators, depending on evaluation questions and methodology.
Start
Focus areas for further research (level 2/3)
Monitoring

Impact Area

Outcomes

Indicators (all Certificate Holders)

8.1 Long term goals (sector)

8.6 Expected outcomes


(industry/sector)

Indicators (level 1)

Sustainability of the sector:


(Volumes/Market share)

1. Secure and growing supply of UTZ


certified products

Total Certified Production Volume*

1.0

Certified Production Volume per Origin

1.0

# of Certificate Holders by type*

1.0

# of countries where UTZ products are produced*

1.0

# of products*

1.0

Duration of participation in the program


(since 1st year of certification)*
# CoC Certificate holders entering & leaving the program
in last year*
1. Certified supply meets market
Supply-demand ratio
requirements (volume, quality, origin)

Version

1.0

Producer member satisfaction of participation in the


program*

2.0

Reasons for not renewing Certification

1.0

% of UTZ certified volume sold per origin

1.0

% of UTZ certified volume sold per Producer member

2.0

% of UTZ certified volume bought per buyer

2.0

2. Secure and growing demand for UTZ


Total Certified Sales Volume
certified products

Focus areas for Level 2/3 studies

1.0

Industry invests in and


rewards sustainable
production

Sustainability of the sector:


Reach /inclusiveness

# of registered supply chain members by type

1.0

# of active supply chain members

1.0

# of countries where UTZ products are sold*

1.0

Certified Volume traced

1.0

3. Sustainable practices are recognized


Average premium per product, per origin
and rewarded by the market

1.0

Industry member satisfaction of participation in the


program

Evolvement and distribution of premium along chain

4. Increased efficiency, trust and


collaboration in supply chain
5. Increased Investments in supply
Chain

Increased efficiency , trust and collaboration in the


supply chain (case studies)
Investments made (start-up and ongoing costs) to get
to the level of certification
Other investments in supply chains and producer
groups (projects beyond certification)

6. The costs of sustainable production


are internalized and shared

Assessment of costs and benefits along the chain


(TBD)

7. UTZ is recognized as a brand


endorser

# SKU's with UTZ claim/logo

1.0

# of brands actively communicating about UTZ

8. Sustainable farming is inclusive

Type of certificate holders in the program


(% group/individual)*

1.0

Dominant labor model in group*

2.0

Dominant level of mechanization in group*

Type of producer groups in the program


(% trader/farmer based)
Total # certified group members*
Total # certified entities (farmers)*
Total certified crop area*
Total certified farm area *
# Workers employed by certificate holders, by type
(Permanent/Seasonal) *
# workers employed by certificate holders, by gender
(M/F)*
# Workers living on production site (individual
certification only)
# permanent (year-round) workers on certified crop
group member farms (group certification only)
# Group members entering and leaving the program in
the last year*
# Certified group members in year 1,2,3,4, 4+ of
certification

1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
1.0

# of workers (permanent/seasonal) employed by


certified group members *

Gender of UTZ certified group members*

2.0

Age of certified group members (categories)*

Average farm size of certified group members

2.0

Farm size of certified group member (categories)*

1.0

Share of new (uncertified) producers entering the


program*

Share of Certificate holders covered by multiple


certifications*
Share of certified production volume covered by multiplecertifications*
Geographic location of certified production area *
8.3 Desired impacts:

8.4 Expected outcomes (farm)

Indicators (level 1)

1. Long term economic


viability and increased
resilience of farms;

1. Increased long term farm


profitability, productivity & risk
management

Actual production volume/ha (trend)*

3.0
2.0
Version
2.0

Example indicators (Level 2/3)


Case studies of costs-benefits of certification;
development over time
Actual/perceived change in gross and net revenue
from certified crop*
Perception that farming is a viable option for their
children*
Investments in farm/productive assets*

# and type of other cash crops grown on the farms

2.0

% of total revenue coming from certified crop*


Perceived vulnerability to shocks

2. Quality meets market demand

TBD

3. Optimal farm efficiency

% change of total inputs (labor, fertilizer, pesticides)


used per kg of product; compared to recommended
use
Record keeping and use of records for decision making

4. Optimal yield

Actual Production Volume (reported)*

2.0

% change in actual production (kg/ha)

2.0

Change in productivity related practices (key


parameters)
Access to inputs (Availability, Affordability,
Knowledge); Technological environment
Change in actual production on group member level
(compared to benchmark or control group)*

12. Stronger groups providing better


services

% of group members that apply farm rejuvenating


techniques

3.0

% of group members that apply soil fertility practices

3.0

# and type of services provided by the group*

2.0

Quality of services provided

Actual production volume purchased by the group*

2.0

% of group members making use of services

% of certified farmer group members total produce


that is sold through the farmer group as certified
Better & more transparent group
management

2. Farmers make a living


income & have a decent
standard of living; Workers
earn a living wage

Living wage/Living income

Proportion of cash premium paid to the group members


in cash

2.0

Perception of group members that the group acts in


the benefit of its members *

Use of UTZ premium by the certificate holder

2.0

Lowest daily wage for workers; cash wages and in kind


benefits, M/F separately *

2.0

Calculate Living wage/ Living income benchmark


(Aligned tool with ISEAL LW/LI group)*

Lowest daily wage for workers; permanent & seasonal


workers separately *

3.0

Net HH income (compared to Living Income)*

Type of in kind benefits provided to workers

3.0

Wage level/ prevailing wages


(compared to LW /wage ladder)*

Wage improvement plan Y/N

3.0

Perceived change in financial situation*

Perceived change in quality of life*

Change in Assets (using PPI or similar)*

Investments in basic services & infrastructure*

5. Workers benefit from labor rights


and basic services

4. Better health

5. Children go to school

6. Natural resources are


safeguarded

6. Healthy and safe living & working


conditions

7. No Child Labor (ref ILO)

8. Optimal soil quality/ healthy soil

Agreed collective bargaining agreement (CBA) on wages


with workers Y/N

2.0

# and type of CBAs (TBD)

Policy to prevent sexual harassment Y/N

3.0

Worker satisfaction

Source of drinking water for worker's domestic use

3.0

# of serious work related incidents (or illness) over


the last year

Distance to safe drinking water for worker's domestic


use

3.0

Are there communities in the group that have limited


access to primary education? (Y/N)

3.0

Child labor occurrence and rehabilitation cases

# of child labor liaisons appointed

3.0

School attendance for children of certified farmers of


school going age (versus school attendance for
children of non-certified farmers)- by gender

# cases of child labor were identified by child labor


liaisons or IMS in the last year

3.0

% identified child labor cases assisted (through


remediation or referral) in the last year

3.0

use of inorganic fertilizer y/n

1.0

use of organic fertilizer y/n

1.0

8. Optimal water quality

Amount of fertilizer applied; Type of fertilizer applied.


Number of applications
Soil health*
Water quality*
Type of water quality protection measures

9. Reduced waste & pollution

7. Reduced GHG emissions

10. Efficient use of energy

The producer applies pesticides Y/N

1.0

Active ingredients on the UTZ Watch List used by


certified producers

3.0

# and type of IPM practices implemented (individual


certification only)

3.0
Carbon footprint (TBD)

10. efficient use of water


8. Contribution to biodiversity
protection
Intermediate outcomes
Effective training on UTZ
program

Effective Code/Effective audits

11. Protection of natural habitats


Strategies
1/2 Facilitate training of trainers;
provide tools & guidance

Mapping of certificate holders (based on GPS


coordinates)
# Farmers trained as a requirement by the standard in
the last calendar year*
% of female participants in the UTZ related training
events in the last year

2.0

Liters of water used per kg of produce


Tree cover density and diversity (dominant production
system)*; methodology tbd

3.0

Type of farmers trained; Type of training*

3.0

Quality of training

Training topics covered per year

3.0

(perceived) improvement of knowledge & practices

Awareness raising topics covered per year


# of Technical Assistants in the group (ratio per group
member)

3.0

4. Provide meaningful and practical


Codes of Conduct

# Non-compliances by criteria/topic and by CB

2.0

5. Manage the certification process

# Non-compliances by criteria/topic and by CB

2.0

# of internal inspectors in the group (ratio per group


member)

3.0

* Also in ISEAL Common Core Indicators

3.0