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Disciplined agile software delivery is an evolutionary (iterative and incremental) approach to delivery which regularly

Disciplined agile software delivery is an evolutionary (iterative and incremental) approach to delivery which regularly produces high quality software in a cost effective and timely manner. It is performed in a highly collaborative and self-organizing manner within an appropriate governance framework, with active stakeholder participation to ensure that the team understands and addresses the changing needs of its stakeholders. Disciplined agile delivery teams provide repeatable results by adopting just the right amount of ceremony for their situation.

1.Scrum is a lightweight agile process framework used primarily for managing and controlling iterative and

1.Scrum is a lightweight agile process framework used primarily for managing and controlling iterative and incremental projects of all types.

2.Scrum is:

Lightweight because it has few prescribed elements

i) Three roles:

ii) Four meetings: Sprint Planning, Daily Scrum, Review,Retrospective

iii)Four artifacts:

Team, Scrum Master (often a Project Manager), Product Owner

Product Backlog, Sprint Backlog, Burndown chart , Impediment Backlog.

3. Agile because it maximizes responsiveness to changing customer needs

4. A process framework because it is not a process, but a collection of practices and concepts around which a process can be built

XP is an Agile software development method which is intended to improve productivity and introduces

XP is an Agile software development method which is intended to improve productivity and introduces checkpoints where new requirements can be adopted.

The concept of XP is to focus on:

1.Goals

2.Activities

3.Values

4.Principles

5.Practices

1.The Goal of XP is to produce High Quality Software. 2.XP attempts to reduce the
1.The Goal of XP is to produce High Quality Software. 2.XP attempts to reduce the

1.The Goal of XP is to produce High Quality Software. 2.XP attempts to reduce the cost of changes by having multiple short development cycles ,rather than one long one.

1.Listening:Programmers must listen to the customers, to understand what "business logic " is needed .

2.Designing: To avoid complexity the software structure and complexity is designed. ii.Lets assume its a very complex software.To design this sw architecture is divided into separate components.Good designing will remove lots of dependencies between the sw components.This means changes in one component will not effect the other sw component.

3.Coding:

4.Testing:

Communication : The goal is to give all developers a shared view of the system
Communication : The goal is to give all developers a shared view of the system

Communication : The goal is to give all developers a shared view of the system which matches the view held by the customer.

Simplicity : XP Encourages starting with the simplest solution , extra functionality can be added later.

Feedback:From customer ,team.It is closely related to communication and simplicity.

Courage:It enables developers to feel comfortable with refactoring their code when necessary.

Respect: Includes respect for others as well as self respect.

Assuming Simplicity : This is about treating every problem as if its solution were extremely simple.

Embracing Change:Its about not working against changes but embracing them.

Pair Programming : Knowledge Transfer: Two programmers work together at one workstation . Sharing knowledge

Pair Programming :

Knowledge Transfer:

Two programmers work together at one workstation .

Sharing knowledge about the software with the team.

Test driven development: Negative tests are written even before the code is coded.

1.Eliminating Waste 2.Amplifying Learning 3.Deciding as Late as Possible 4.Delivering as Fast as Possible 5.Empowering

1.Eliminating Waste 2.Amplifying Learning 3.Deciding as Late as Possible 4.Delivering as Fast as Possible 5.Empowering the Team 6.Building Integrity In 7.Seeing the Whole

1.Scrum Roles. 2.Scrum Artefacts. 3.The Sprint Meetings. 4.Scrum Framework Complete Picture. 5.Starting Scrum.

1.Scrum Roles. 2.Scrum Artefacts. 3.The Sprint Meetings. 4.Scrum Framework Complete Picture. 5.Starting Scrum.

1.Scrum Roles

1.Scrum Roles
1.Managing the Stakeholders. 2.Gathering the requirements. 3.Managing and prioritizing the Product Backlog. 4.Working on a

1.Managing the Stakeholders. 2.Gathering the requirements. 3.Managing and prioritizing the Product Backlog. 4.Working on a shared vision. 5.Managing the release plan. 6.Accepting or rejecting the software at the end of each iteration. 7.Helps to define the meaning of Done.

1.Process Facilitator . 2.Managing Impediment Backlog. 3.Empowering and shepherding the team. 4.Helps to create

1.Process Facilitator . 2.Managing Impediment Backlog. 3.Empowering and shepherding the team. 4.Helps to create information radiators. 5.Helps in building self organizing team.

Self-organising teams .
Self-organising
Self-organising

teams.

2.Scrum Artefacts

S crum m a nda te s only four a rte fa cts :

1.Product Ba cklog 2.S print Ba cklog 3.Burndown Cha rt 4.Im pe dim e nt Ba cklog

Product Backlog

1.Product Backlog is a list of work items.

2.Items may be added to the backlog by anyone ,But Product Owner will determine the order in which they will be executed by the team.

3.Requirements are emergent, & we do not and cannot know up front every detail about what we want in a product.

4.It's a living document and requires constant grooming to keep it current and useful.

5.Many new items will be added over time.

6.existing items are disaggregated to multiple, smaller items;

7.some items may be removed on realizing that a desired feature is no longer needed.

8.items need to be sized in order to determine the likely relationshipbetween value, time and cost.

9.Its preferable, to create and maintain the Product Backlog as a set of stories.

10.The stories are commonly written from the perspective of a user of the product.

Product Backlog

Items

Size

1.Software Development Methodology – Agile Presentation

18

2.Gmat Preparation

20

3.Login Functionality for Loans

12

4.Submitting an application for loan

10

5.Web service call to 3rd party to retrieve info

14

6.Processing the loan

18

7.Booking the loan

15

8.Sending generated documents to user.

14

Task Board / Sprint Backlog

Task Board / Sprint Backlog G m a t Take 2 Mock Tests

Gmat

Take 2 Mock Tests

G m a t Take 2 Mock Tests
Stories Agile Presentation L o g i n F u n c t i o
Stories Agile Presentation L o g i n F u n c t i o

Stories

Agile Presentation

Login Functionality

To Do

i.3 Chapters PPT Preparation . ii.Clear Understanding of 3 Chapters.

1.Coding Jsp ,Controller Classes

2.Verifying data with DB values 3.Home Page 4.Error Page

In Progress

Done

1 st chapter PPT

Coding Jsp pages

Phys ica l re pre s e nta tio n o f the lis t o f work the y ha ve com m itte d to

Do

during the curre nt s print.

Sprint Burndown Chart

Sprint Burndown Chart 1.Sprint 1 will contain 50 story points and 14 days for previous Sprint

1.Sprint 1 will contain 50 story points and 14 days for previous Sprint backlog.

2.Teams use the sprint Burndown chart to track the product development effort remaining in a sprint and to monitor its progress.

3.X axis to display working days

4.It will be a leading indicator of whether it will meet its commitment at the end of the sprint or not.

, Y axis to display remaining effort.

1.A Product-Burndow n-Chart depicts story points of all user stories in the so called product

1.A Product-Burndown-Chart depicts story points of all user stories in the so called product backlog. 2.The chart displays story points for each completed sprint, so it depicts the completion of requirements over time. 3.Backlog and Product-Burndown-Chart is usually updated at the end of each sprint. 4.New user stories can be added and/or removed before each sprint planning meeting. 5.Used to show the team and stakeholders how many sprints will be needed to implement all remaining user stories or how many user stories can be completed in the remaining time.

Impediment Backlog

1.Telephone is not working.

2.Daily metting rooms are not available.

3.Required softwares are not installed in team members system.

4.Need clarification on some User story by customer.

5.Conflicts among team members.

1.The im pe dim e nt ba cklog is s im ply the

pre ve nting the te a m

from progre s s ing

curre nt lis t of things tha t a re o r im proving.

2.The s e a re things the S crum Ma s te r m us t bulldo ze out o f the wa y in he r

ne ve r-e nding que s t to he lp the

te

a m be

the

b e s t the y

ca n.

3.The Sprint Meetings

3.The Sprint Meetings 1.The s print is the he a rtbe a t of the S

1.The s print is the he a rtbe a t of the S crum cycle .

2.It is bo okm a rke d by sprint planning a t the s ta rt a nd by the sprint review a nd sprint retrospective a t the e nd.

3.The le ngth o f the s print is fixe d a nd is ne ve r e xte nde d. Mo s t S crum te a m s choo s e two , thre e or fo ur we e ks a s the ir s print d ura tio n.

4.E a ch da y

in S crum is s trictly time-boxed. This m e a ns tha t is ha s a m a xim um dura tion.

during the s print the te a m ho lds a daily Scrum meeting. E ve ry m e e ting

Sprint Planning - Part 1

Sprint Planning - Part 1 de ta ile d requirements workshop . 2.The product owne r

de ta ile d requirements workshop.

2.The product owne r pre s e nts the s e t of fe a ture s he would like a nd the

1.Pa rt 1 of s print pla nning (S P1) is re a lly a

te a m a s ks que s tions to unde rs ta nd

to e na ble the m to com m it to de live ring the fe a ture during the s print.

the re quire m e nts in s ufficie nt de ta il

3.The te a m a lone de cide s wha t it ca n de live r in the s print,ta king into a ccount the s print dura tion, the s ize a nd curre nt ca pa bilitie s of its

m e m be rs , its de finition of DONE., a ny known holida y s or le a ve da y s a nd

a ny a ctions it com m itte d to during the re tros pe ctive he ld prior to this .

4.The product owne r m us t b e pre s e nt during this m e e ting to le a d the

te

a m in the right dire ction a nd to a ns we r que s tions —a nd the y will ha ve

m

a ny.

5.The S crum Ma s te r m us t e ns ure tha t a ny othe r s ta ke holde r ne e de d to he lp the te a m unde rs ta nd the re quire m e nts is pre s e nt or on ca ll.

6.Any ne w ba cklog ite m s for inclus ion in the curre nt s print a nd not pre vious ly e s tim a te d will b e s ize d im m e dia te ly d uring this m e e ting.

This not, howe ve r, a n e xcus e to

a void groom ing the b a cklog!

7.At the e nd of S P 1 the te a m com m its to the Product Owne r wha t the y be lie ve the y ca n de live r in the form of running tested features.

8. My re com m e nda tion to m os t te a m s is to do commitment-based

planning.

9.The ba cklog ite m s the te a m ha s com m itte d to is ca lle d the selected product backlog.

Sprint Planning - Part 2

1.If pa rt 1 is a re quire m e nts works hop, pa rt 2 of s print pla nning (S P2) is a design workshop.

2. In this s e s s ion the te a m colla bora te s to cre a te a high-le ve l de s ign of the fe a ture s it ha s com m itte d to de live r.

3.An outcom e

of this

s e s s ion is

the

s print ba cklog,

4.This is m os t ofte n re pre s e nte d on a phy s ica l task board.

Daily Scrum Meeting

Daily Scrum Meeting 1.The da ily S crum m e e ting is NOT for re

1.The da ily S crum m e e ting is NOT for re porting pro g re s s to the S crum Ma s te r or Product Owne r or a nyo ne e ls e . The Pro duct Owne r m a y a tte nd or m a y not!

2.The S crum Ma s te r m a ke s s ure , tha t e a ch te a m s om e work for the ne xt 24 hours .

3.Any im pe dim e nts to do ing this work a re bulldo ze d out of the wa y a s fa s t a s po s s ible .

m e m be r ha s

s igne d up fo r

4.The

S crum Ma s te r a ls o e ns ure s the

m e e ting is

re s tricte d to 15 m inute s .

5.The

te a m m e e ts to co m m unica te a nd s ynchronis e its wo rk. S ince the te a m

is colla bora ting, this is e s s e ntia l to e ns uring continue d progre s s a nd a vo iding

work blocka ge s . The te a m will a ls o continuous ly a s s e s s its own pro gre s s towa rds a chie ving its sprint goal.

Sprint Review

Sprint Review 1.Its a de m o ns tra tion of the ne w fe a

1.Its a de m o ns tra tion of the ne w fe a ture s (code d, te s te d a nd us a b le pie ce o f s o ftwa re ) the te a m ha s co m ple te d during the s print.

2.its prim a ry purpos e is to inspect wha t the te a m ha s de live re d a nd ga the r fe e db a ck from the a tte nde e s to adapt the pla n for the s ucce e ding s print.

3.The focus of the s print re vie w is the product the te a m is building.

4.Pa rticipa nts in the s print re vie w typica lly include the product owne r, the S crum te a m , the S crum Ma s te r, m a na ge m e nt, cus tom e rs a nd de ve lo pe rs fro m o the r proje cts .

Sprint Retrospective

Sprint Retrospective 1.The retrospective is focussed on the process. 2.T he way in which the Scrum

1.The retrospective is focussed on the process.

2.The way in which the Scrum team is working together, including their

skills and the software development practices and tools they are

3.The sprint retrospective is restricted to the members of the Scrum team— Product Owner, development team members and ScrumMaster.

4.Purpose is to inspect at a deep level how the team is collaborating and to take action to improve.

5.This often requires deep introspection and sharing, which in turn requires a secure environment.

using.

technical

that is the

performing and

safe and

4.Scrum Framework

4.Scrum Framework

5.Starting Scrum

Obvious ly you ne e d a S crum te a m . This m e a ns a Product Owne r, a S crum Ma s te r a nd five to nine te a m m e m be rs . The n follow this s e que nce of s te ps .

1. Tra in the S crum Te a m in the ba s ics of S crum

2. E s ta blis h the vis ion

3. Write us e r s torie s to form the product ba cklog

4. Orde r the ba cklog ite m s by bus ine s s va lue

5. S ize the ba cklog ite m s

6. Re -orde r the ba cklog, a s ne ce s s a ry, b y a dditiona l fa ctors

7. Cre a te the initia l re le a s e pla n

8. Pla n the firs t s print