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JSS Mahavidyapeetha

Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering,


Mysuru- 570 006
(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU, Belagavi)

Department of Master Computer Applications


Scheme and Syllabus
I to VI Semester

2014 2017

Scheme of Teaching and Examination


First Semester MCA

1.

SL.
No.

MCA120

MCA110

Subject
Code

Fundamentals of Computer
Organization

Discrete Mathematical Structures

Professional Communication and


Ethics

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

Total

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

CIE

50

50

50

50

50

SEE

50

50

100

100

100

100

100

Total

Marks

2.
MCA130
Problem Solving using C

MCA

Credits

3.
MCA140
Introduction to Unix

MCA

Exam Duration
(Hrs)

4.
MCA150

IT & Digital Electronics Lab

MCA

Contact
Hours

5.
MCA13L

C programming Lab

50

Teaching
Department

6.
MCA14L

Course Title

7.

50

650

250

400

29

23

MCA

Unix Laboratory

MCA15L

20

8.

Total

Page 1 of 8

Second Semester MCA

Scheme of Teaching and Examination

2.

1.

SL.
No.

MCA230

MCA220

MCA210

Subject
Code

Management Information System

Data Structures and File Handling

Object Oriented Programming with


C++

System Software

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

1.0

4.0

5.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

Total

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

CIE

50

50

50

50

50

SEE

50

50

50

100

100

100

100

100

Total

Marks

3.
MCA240
Data communications

MCA

Credits

4.
MCA250
Research Methodology
Paper Presentation-1

MCA

Exam Duration
(Hrs)

5.
MCA260
System Software Lab

MCA

Contact
Hours

6.
MCA21L
OOPs with C++ Lab

50

Teaching
Department

7.
MCA22L

Course Title

8.

50

700

250

450

31

25

MCA

Data Structures and File Handling


Lab

MCA23L

21

9.

Total

Page 2 of 8

Third Semester MCA

Scheme of Teaching and Examination

2.

1.

SL.
No.

MCA330

MCA320

MCA310

Subject
Code

Programming Using Java

Analysis & Design of Algorithms

Computer Networks

Database Management Systems

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

2.0

5.0

4.0

4.0

5.0

4.0

Total

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

CIE

50

50

50

50

50

SEE

50

50

50

100

100

100

100

100

Total

Marks

3.
MCA340
Operating System

MCA

Credits

4.
MCA350
Paper Presentation-II

MCA

Exam Duration
(Hrs)

5.
MCA360
DBMS Lab

MCA

Contact
Hours

6.
MCA31L
ADA Lab

50

Teaching
Department

7.
MCA33L

Course Title

8.

50

700

250

450

33

27

MCA

Java programming Lab

MCA34L

22

9.

Total

Page 3 of 8

Fourth Semester MCA

Scheme of Teaching and Examination

1.

SL.
No.

MCA420

MCA410

Subject
Code

Software Engineering

Advanced Java Programming

Web Programming

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

1.0

2.0

4.0

4.0

5.0

4.0

4.0

Total

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

CIE

50

50

50

50

50

SEE

50

50

100

100

100

100

100

Total

Marks

2.
MCA430
Elective-I

MCA

Credits

3.
MCA44X
Elective II

MCA

Exam Duration
(Hrs)

4.
MCA45X
Seminar

MCA

Contact
Hours

5.
MCA46S
Web Programming Lab

50

Teaching
Department

6.
MCA41L

Course Title

7.

50

650

1.0

250

400

29

25

MCA

Advanced Java Lab

MCA42L

20

8.
Total

Page 4 of 8

2.

1.

SL.
No.

MCA443

MCA442

MCA441

Subject
Code

Advanced Algorithms

Advanced Data Structures

Multimedia Systems

Digital Image Processing

5.

4.

3.

2.

1.

SL.
No.

MCA455

MCA454

MCA453

MCA452

MCA451

Subject
Code

Compiler Design

Enterprise Resource Planning

Computer Graphics

System Simulation and modeling

Cryptography and Network Security

Course Title

Elective II

3.
MCA444
Advanced DBMS

Elective I

4.
MCA445

Course Title

5.

Page 5 of 8

Fifth Semester MCA

Scheme of Teaching and Examination

3.

2.

1.

SL.
No.

MCA54X

MCA530

MCA520

MCA510

Subject
Code

Elective IV

Elective III

Programming Using C# .NET

Data Mining and Data Warehouse

Object Oriented Modeling & Design


Patterns

Course Title

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

MCA

Teaching
Department

1.0

1.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

5.0

4.0

Total

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

CIE

50

50

50

50

50

SEE

50

50

100

100

100

100

100

Total

Marks

4.
MCA55X
Software Design Laboratory

MCA

Credits

5.
MCA51L

Programming Using C# .NET Lab

50

Exam Duration
(Hrs)

6.
MCA53L

Contact
Hours

7.

50

650

2.0

250

400

30

25

MCA

Mini Project

MCA56P

20

8.
Total

Page 6 of 8

1.

Sl.
No

MCA542

MCA541

Subject
Code

Information Retrieval and Web Mining

Software Architecture

Computer Vision & Pattern Recognition

4.

2.

1.

Sl. No.

MCA555

MCA554

MCA553

MCA552

MCA551

Subject code

Cloud Computing

Network Management

Big Data and Analytics

Software Testing and Practices

Business Intelligence

Elective IV

2.
MCA543
Distributed Operating System

5.

Elective III

3.
MCA544
Operation Research

Course Title

4.
MCA545

Course Title

5.

Page 7 of 8

1.

SL.
No.

MCA61P

Subject
Code
Course Title

Project Work

Total

Sixth Semester MCA

25.0

Total

100

100

CIE

150

150

SEE

250

250

Total

3 Hours / Batch of
5 students

Marks

25

25.0

Credits
L

25

Exam Duration
(Hrs)

Contact
Hours

Scheme of Teaching and Examination

Teaching
Department

MCA

Semester

150

25

25

25

27

25

23

Credits

Credit Pattern for MCA Course

Total

Page 8 of 8

I Semester

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II Semester

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Theory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

04

Laboratory
00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA210

System Software

Computer Organization

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2.

Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Event-1 Quiz, Event-2. Test] Total Marks: 50 [10* 5].
Semester End Exam [ Total Marks:100 Marks, Duration: 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The objective of this course is to teach the students:
1.
Different parameters of machine architecture, relationship between system software and machine
architecture.
2.
Basics design principles and implementation of assemblers.
3.
The role and working of linkers and loaders, the structure and working of editors and interactive
debugging systems.
4.
Working and design of macro processors.
5.
The concept, structure and purpose of lexers and parsers.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
Understand basics of system software, machine architecture, different data formats and addressing
modes in SIC & SIC/XE.
2.
Understand structure and working of assemblers, design principles.
3.
Learn loader and linker functionalities, structure of editors and interactive debugging systems.
4.
Understand the working, design and structures of a macro processor.
5.
Learn fundamentals of scanner or Lexer and Parser and implement the lexer and parser using LEX and
YACC tools.

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Machine Architecture

06 Hours

Introduction, System Software and Machine Architecture, Simplified Instructional Computer (SIC) - SIC
Machine Architecture, SIC/XE Machine Architecture, SIC Programming Examples.
UNIT:2 - Assemblers

12 Hours

Basic Assembler Function - A Simple SIC Assembler, Assembler Algorithm and Data Structures, Machine
Dependent Assembler Features - Instruction Formats & Addressing Modes, Program Relocation.
Machine independent Assembler Features Literals, Symbol-Definition Statements, Expression, Program
Blocks, Control Sections and Programming Linking, Assembler Design Operations - One-Pass Assembler,
Multi-Pass Assembler, Implementation Examples - MASM Assembler.
UNIT:3 - Loaders, Linkers, Editors and Debugging Systems

14 Hours

Basic Loader Functions - Design of an Absolute Loader, A Simple Bootstrap Loader, Machine-Dependent
Loader Features Relocation, Program Linking, Algorithm and Data Structures for a Linking Loader;
Machine-Independent Loader Features - Automatic Library Search, Loader Options, Loader Design Options Linkage Editor, Dynamic Linkage, Bootstrap Loaders, Implementation Examples - MS-DOS Linker.
Text Editors - Overview of Editing Process, User Interface, Editor Structure, Interactive Debugging Systems Debugging Functions and Capabilities, Relationship With Other Parts Of The System, User-Interface Criteria.
UNIT:4 - Macro Processor

08 Hours

Basic Macro Processor Functions - Macro Definitions and Expansion, Macro Processor Algorithm and Data
Structures, Machine-Independent Macro Processor Features - Concatenation of Macro Parameters, Generation
of Unique Labels, Conditional Macro Expansion, Keyword Macro Parameters, Macro Processor Design
Options - Recursive Macro Expansion, General-Purpose Macro Processors, Macro Processing Within Language
Translators, Implementation Examples - MASM Macro Processor, ANSI C Macro Processor.
UNIT:5 - Lex and Yacc

12 Hours

Lex and Yacc - The Simplest Lex Program, Recognizing Words With LEX, Symbol Tables, Grammars, ParserLexer Communication, A YACC Parser, The Rules Section, Running LEX and YACC, Using LEX - Regular
Expression, Examples of Regular Expressions.
Using YACC Grammars, Recursive Rules, Shift/Reduce Parsing, What YACC Cannot Parse, A YACC
Parser - The Definition Section, The Rules Section, Symbol Values and Actions.

TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:


1.
2.
3.

Leland. L.Beck, D Manjula: System Software, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education, 2010.
John.R.Levine, Tony Mason and Doug Brown: Lex and Yacc, O'Reilly, SPD, 2009.
D.M.Dhamdhere: System Programming and Operating Systems, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw - Hill, 2008.

ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:


1. http://techterms.com/definition/systemsoftware.

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Theory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

Laboratory

04

00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA220

Object Oriented Programming with C++

C Programming

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz.
Projects, Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the students:
1.
Overview of C++. Understand the difference between C and C++.
2.
OOPs concepts and building blocks of OOPs. Sample C++ programs. Briefing friend functions, copy
constructors, generic functions and classes.
3.
The concepts of inheritance, multiple base classes, constructors and destructors.
4.
The concepts of polymorphism and its types.
5.
The concepts of I/O system basics, file I/O , exception handling and STL ( Standard Template Library).

COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:
1.
Write C++ programs by using oops features.
2.
Use constructors and destructors.
3.
Program using inheritance with multilevel base classes.
4.
Categorize compile time polymorphism and runtime polymorphism
5.
Use exception handling to catch various kinds of errors. Understand the STL( Standard Template
Library) features.

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 Introduction

6 Hours

Overview of C++, Sample C++ program, Different data types, operators, expressions, and statements, arrays
and strings, pointers & user-defined types. Function components, argument passing, inline functions, function
overloading, recursive functions.
UNIT:2 Classes and Objects

14 Hours

Class Specification, Class Objects, Scope resolution operator, Access members, Defining member functions,
Data hiding, Constructors, Destructors, Parameterized constructors, Static data members, Functions. Friend
functions, Passing objects as arguments, Returning objects, Arrays of objects, Dynamic objects, Pointers to
objects, Copy constructors, Generic functions and classes, Applications. Operator overloading using friend
functions such as +, - , pre-increment, post-increment, [ ] etc., overloading <<, >>.
UNIT:3 Inheritance

10 Hours

Base Class, Inheritance and protected members, Protected base class inheritance, Inheriting multiple base
classes; Constructors, Destructors and Inheritance, Passing parameters to base class constructors, Granting
access, Virtual base classes.
UNIT:4 Virtual function and Abstract classes

10 Hours

Virtual function, Calling a Virtual function through a base class reference, Virtual attribute is inherited, Virtual
functions are hierarchical, Pure virtual functions, Abstract classes, Using virtual functions, Early and late
binding.
UNIT:5 I/O System Basics, File I/O, Exception Handling and STL

12 Hours

C++ stream classes, Formatted I/O, I/O manipulators, fstream and the File classes, File operations. Exception
handling fundamentals, Exception handling options. STL: An overview, containers, vectors, lists, maps.

TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:


1.Herbert Schildt: The Complete Reference C++, 6th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill 2013.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://www.nptelvideos.com/video.php?id=2178&c=28
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming
3. http://www.computerhope.com/jargon/c/cplus.htm

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Theory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

Laboratory

04

00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA230

Data Structures and File Handling

Problem solving using C

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, 2 Events [Practical assignment]] Marks : 50 [10*5 Events]
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. Design of abstract data types.
2. Linear data structures and their application in problem solving and programming.
3. Non-linear data structures and their application in problem solving and programming.
4. To construct linked data structures using pointers, self-referential structures and recursion.
5. To accommodate, access the data from and into Files.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Understand Abstract data types such as arrays, structures, strings and polynomials.
2. Implement various ADTs such as STACK, QUEUE, and LIST.
3. Implement various searching and sorting algorithms.
4. Able to implement efficient linear and non-linear data structures.
5. Incorporate data in File format.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Introduction to Data Structures

10 Hours

Information and its meaning: Abstract Data Types, Sequences as Value Definitions, ADT for Varying length
character Strings, Data Types,Pointers and review of Pointers, Data Structures. Arrays : Array as an ADT,
Using One-dimensional Arrays, Implementing One-Dimensional Arrays, Arrays as Parameters, Handling of

Character Strings and Character Strings


UNIT 2: The Stack

12 Hours

Definition and examples , Primitive operations, Example, The stack as an ADT, Representing stacks
,Implementing the pop, push operations, Examples for infix , postfix, and prefix expressions, Basic definition
and Examples. Applications of Stacks: Expression Evaluations, Expression conversion, Recursion. Recursive
definition and processes, Factorial function, Multiplication of natural numbers, Fibonacci sequence, Binary
search, Properties of recursive definition or algorithm. Binary search, Towers of Hanoi problem.
UNIT 3:Queues and Lists

10 Hours

The queue and its sequential representation, the queue as ADT, Basic operations, Priority queue, Array
implementation of a priority queue. Linked lists, inserting and removing nodes from a list, Linked
implementations of stacks, Linked implementation of queues, linked list as a data Structure. Example of list
operations. Allocating and freeing dynamic variables, linked lists using dynamic variables, Non integer and
non-homogenous lists.
UNIT 4: Linked Lists

8 Hours

Other list structures: Circular lists, Stack as circular lists, doubly linked lists. Application of linked lists: Stacks,
queues, double-ended queues, priority queues. Sorting and Searching: Applications and implementation.
Bubble sort, Heap Sort, Merge Sort. Basic Search Techniques, Tree searching: Inserting into a Binary Search
Tree, Deleting form a binary search tree.
UNIT 5: File Handling

12 Hours

What is a File? Types of Files, Basic operations and on File: Algorithmic Notations, Searching an ordered file,
Indexed sequential search.
Binary Trees and Graphs
Tree types, Tree representation, Tree traversals, Binary Search Tree and Operations, AVL Tree and Operations,
Threaded binary trees and operations The Graph Abstract Data Type. Representations of graph
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Data Structures Using C by Aaron.M.Tenenbaum, Yedidyah Langsam and Moshe J. Augenstein , 2e
2ndEdition, 2008.
2. Horowitz, Sahni, Anderson-Freed: Fundamentals of Data Structures in C, 2nd Edition, Universities Press,
2007.
3. Debasis Samanta: Classic Data Structures, 2nd Edition, PHI, 2009.

4. Richard F. Gilberg and Behrouz A. Forouzan: Data Structures A Pseudocode Approach with C, Cengage
Learning, 2005.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://www.tutorialspoint.com/Data-Structures-in-C-Online-Training/classid=13
2. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/106105085/

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Theory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

02

52

Credits
Theory
05

Laboratory

03

Course No

Course Title

MCA240

Management Information Systems

00

Pre Requisites

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2.

1.

Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events [Case studies conducted in tutorials will
be considered as events for the theory] Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are :
1. Introduces concepts of system, system components and development techniques with case studies.
2. Explains the need and importance of information system.
3. Explains the design, development and management techniques of information system.
4. Provides the details about strategic planning, Enterprise resource planning, Supply chain management.
5. To explains the concepts of business process re-engineering & technology of information system.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be :
1. Able to understand and develop the MIS especially for business environment through the case studies.
2. Can integrate the information system to business systems.
3. Able to understand strategic management of business & developing of business process.
4. Able to understand concepts of business process re-engineering.
5. Make decisions to support MIS and DSS.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Systems Engineering & Information and Knowledge

10 Hours

System concepts, system control, types of systems, handling system complexity, Classes of systems, General
model of MIS, Need for system analysis, System analysis for existing system & new requirement, system

development model, MIS & system analysis. Information concepts, classification of information, methods of
data and information collection, value of information, information: A quality product, General model of a
human as information processor, Knowledge.
UNIT:2 - Introduction of MIS and Development of MIS

10 Hours

MIS: Concept, Definition, Role of the MIS, Impact of MIS, MIS and the user, Management as a control system,
MIS support to the management, Management effectiveness and MIS, Organization as system. MIS:
organization effectiveness. Development of long range plans of the MIS, Ascertaining the class of information,
Determining the information requirement, Development and implementation of the MIS, Management of
information quality in the MIS, Organization for development of MIS, MIS development process model.
UNIT: 3 - Strategic Management of Business & Developing Business/IT Strategies/ITSolutions 10 Hours
Concept of corporate planning, Essentiality of strategic planning, Development of the business strategies, Type
of strategies, short-range planning, tools of planning, MIS: strategic business planning. Planning fundamentals
(real world cases), Organizational planning, planning for competitive advantage, (SWOT Analysis), Business
models and planning. Business/IT planning, identifying business/IT strategies, Implementation Challenges,
Change management., Developing business systems, (real world case), SDLC, prototyping, System
development process, implementing business system.
UNIT: 4 - Business Process Re-Engineering & Technology of Information System

10 Hours

Introduction, Business process, process model of the organization, value stream model of the organization,
what delay the business process, relevance of information technology, MIS and BPR. Introduction, Data
processing, Transaction processing, Application processing, information system processing, TQM of
information systems, Human factors & user interface, Strategic nature of IT decision, MIS choice of
information technology.
UNIT:5 - Decision Making and DSS, Electronic Business Systems & Client Server Architecture and EBusiness Technology:
12 Hours
Decision making concepts; decision making process, decision-making by analytical modeling, Behavioral
concepts in decision making, organizational decision-making, Decision structure, DSS components, and
Management reporting alternatives. Enterprise business system Introduction, cross-functional enterprise
applications, real world case, Functional business system, - Introduction, marketing systems, sales force
automation, CIM, HRM, online accounting system, Customer relationship management, ERP, Supply chain
management. Client server architecture, implementation strategies, Introduction to E-business, model of E
business, internet and World Wide Web, Intranet/Extranet, Electronic, Impact of Web on Strategic
management, Web enabled business management, MIS in Web environment.

TUTORIALS:
GUIDELINES :
1. Weekly 2 hours of tutorial session.
2. Students are made to work on case studies. For example
a. College Management System.
b. Hospital Management System.
c. Retail Shop Management System.
d. Hotel Management System. Etc.
3. Group of two students has to identify a system for case study.
4. For selected case study students has to develop a system by applying theoretical concepts what they
study in the class.
5. Students in parallel to the theory have to generate the document on system.
6. The same as to be presented by the students in the tutorial classes.
7. Presentations will be considered as I and II events of MIS theory.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Waman S Jhawadekar: Management Information System, 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill. Reprint 2011
2. James A OBrien and George M Marakas: Management Information System, 7th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill,
2006 (Indian special edition).
3. Ralph M Stair and George W Reynolds: Principles of Information Systems, 7th Edition, Thomson,2010 .
4. Steven Alter: Information Systems - The Foundation of E-Business, 4th Edition, Pearson Education, 2010
5. Mahadeo Jaiswal and Monika Mital: Management Information System, , Oxford University Press. 2009
6. Effy Oz: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition, Thomson Course Technology,2011.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. www.mu.ac.in/mis
2. http://www.tutorialspoint.com/management_information_system/mis_tutorial

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Theory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

04

Laboratory
00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA250

Data Communications

Basic Computer Concepts,


Computer Organization.

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz.
Projects, Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.] Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1.
To understand the basic concepts of data communications, data networks, and the internet.
2.
To get the insight into the LAN and WAN architectures.
3.
To understand data communications terminology.
4.
Have an insight of data transmission and transmission media techniques.
5.
Understand Internet Applications Electronic Mail, WWW and Multi media.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
Summarize the basic concepts, principles and techniques of data communications..
2.
To enumerate the layers of OSI and TCP/IP model and further to explain the functions of each layer and
to implement the same.
3.
Identify the different types of network topologies and protocols.
4.
To specify and identify deficiencies in existing protocols.
5.
To illustrate datagram and internet socket programming.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Introduction

12 Hours

Data Communications; Networks; The Internet; Protocols and Standards; Layered Tasks; ISO OSI Reference
Model; Layers in the OSI Model; TCP/IP Protocol Suite/ Architecture; Addressing; Traditional internet-Based

Applications; Multimedia.
UNIT:2 - Data Communications

12 Hours

Data Transmission Concepts and Terminology; Analog and Digital Data Transmission; Periodic Analog
Signals; Digital Signals; Transmission Impairments; Channel Capacity; Performance Factors; Guided
Transmission Media; Wireless Transmission.
UNIT:3 - Data Communication Techniques

10 Hours

Digital Data Communication Techniques: Asynchronous and Synchronous Trans mission; Types of Error;
Error Detection; Error Correction; Data Link Control: Flow and Error Control; High Level Data Link Control;
Multiplexing: Frequency Division Multiplexing; Synchronous Time Division Multiplexing; Statistical Time
Division Multiplexing.
UNIT:4 - Local and Wide Area Networks

10 Hours

Background; Topologies and Transmission Media; LAN Protocol Architecture; Bluetooth; Cellular Telephone
Networks; Satellite Networks; Optical Networks; Architecture; ATM Networks; ATM LANs.
UNIT:5 - Internet Applications

08 Hours

Internet Applications Electronic Mail and Network Management; Internet Applications Multimedia; Internet
Applications World Wide Web.

TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:


1.
2.
3.
4.

William Stallings, Data and Computer Communications, 10th Edition, Pearson, 2013.
C. Murali, Data Communications & Computer Networks, Fillip Learning, 2012.
B. A. Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, 4th Edition, McGraw Hill, 2010.
Fred Halsall, Data Communications, Computer Networks and Open Systems, 4th Edition, Pearson
Education, 2005.

ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:


1. www.camiresearch.com/Data_Com_Basics/data_com_tutorial.html.
2. www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk.

Course Course
Year Semester

Course
Type

Credits

Contact Hours/ Week


Theory

Theory

01

01

Laboratory
00

Total Hours/
Semester

Tutorials
00

14

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA260

Research Methodology and Paper Presentation-1

Basic Computer Concepts

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [2 Events: Presentation, Projects, Group discussion, assignments, etc.]
Marks: 50 [25* 2 Events].
2. Semester End Exam : NA
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To familiarize the student with the dimensions and methods of research.
1. To orient the student to make an informed choice from the large number of alternative methods
and experimental designs available.
2. To familiarize the student with the nature of research and scientific writing
COURSE OUTCOMES:
The Research Methodology and Paper Presentation Course prepare students to attain the course
objectives by ensuring that students demonstrate achievement of the following Course outcomes.
After completing this course, the students should be able to execute the following steps for any
research oriented problem chosen.
1. Problem definition.
2. Development of an approach to the problem,
3. Research design formulation

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Research design and methods Research design Basic Principles- Need of research
design-Features of good design Important concepts relating to research designObservation and
Facts, Laws and Theories, Prediction and explanation, Induction, Deduction, Development of ModelsDeveloping a research plan - Exploration, Description, Diagnosis, and Experimentation - Determining
experimental and sample designs.
UNIT: 2 - Qualitative and Quantitative Research: Qualitative research Quantitative research
Concept of measurement, causality, generalization, and replication. Merging the two approaches.
UNIT: 3 - Measurement: Concept of measurement what is measured? Problems in measurement in
research Validity and Reliability. Levels of measurement Nominal, Ordinal, Interval, Ratio.
UNIT: 4 Types of Research methods: Descriptive research, Historical research and Experimental
research.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Research Methodology: A Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners, RanjitKumar,Paperback 14 Jan
2014.
2. Introduction Research Methods 4e Paperback Import, Catherine Dawson, May 2009.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. www.aabri.com/manuscripts/11985.pdf .
2. www.amazon.in/Research-Methodology-Methods-Tools-Techniques

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Laboratory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

48

Credits
Theory
01

00

Laboratory
03

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA21L

System Software Laboratory

Unix & C- Programming

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2. 1. Internal Assessment [Test-1 + Test-2 + Observation book + Record + Viva : 15 + 15 + 05 + 05 +10]
3.
Total Marks: 50
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The objective of this course is to teach the students:
1. The need and importance of Lex and Yacc tools.
2. Various regular expressions and their appropriate usage.
3. Structure of a Lex and Yacc program.
4. To write, analyze and run lex programs
5. To write, analyze and run Yacc programs
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Understand the need and importance of Lex and Yacc tools.
2. Understand and the usage of different regular expressions.
3. Understand the structure and working principle of Lex and Yacc programs.
4. Write, execute and debug the Lex programs.
5. Write, execute and debug the Yacc programs.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS COVERED:
Lex Programs
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

To count the number of vowels and consonants in a given string.


To count the number of characters, words, spaces and lines in a given input file.
To count the number of positive and negative integers and positive and negative fractions.
To check whether the given sentence is a simple or compound sentence.
To count the number of strings, commands and drives.

6. To count the number of lines in a given c program, also eliminate them and copy the program into a s
separate file.
7. To count the number of scanf and printf statements in a c program and replace them with readf and
writef statements.
8. To recognize a valid arithmetic expression and identify the identifiers and operators present, print them
separately.
9. To recognize and count the number of identifiers in a given input file.
10. To read data from a input file and count the number of characters, spaces, words and lines, write the output
to a separate file.
11. To read data from a input file and count the number of characters, spaces, words and lines, write the output
to a separate file using command line arguments.
12. To count number of vowels, consonants, digits and spaces in a given input string.
13. To count the number of chars, spaces, digits and lines from a given data from the command line.
14. To count the number of comment lines from a C++ program file and remove the comments and write the
output a new file.
15. To check the entered day is a week day or week end.
16. To check the given date falls under which quarter of the year.
Yacc Programs
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

To test the validity of a simple expression involving operators +,-,*,/.


To recognize nested IF control statements and display the number of levels of nesting.
To test the valid arithmetic expression that uses operators +,-,* and /.
To recognize a valid variable, which starts with a letter, followed by any number of letters or digits
To evaluate an arithmetic expression involving operators +,-,* and /:
To recognize strings aaab, abbb, ab and a using the grammar (anbn, n>=0)
To recognize the grammar (anb, n>=10)
To demonstrate what Yacc cannot parse

TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:


1. John.R.Levine, Tony Mason and Doug Brown: Lex and Yacc, O'Reilly, SPD, 1999.
2. John.R.Levine: Flex and Bison, O'Reilly, SPD, 2012
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://dinosaur.compilertools.net/

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Laboratory

Theory

Course No
MCA22L

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

48

Credits

01

00

Laboratory
03

Course Title
Object Oriented Programming with C++ Laboratory

Pre Requisites
C Programming

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. 1. Internal Assessment [Test-1 + Test-2 + Observation book + Record + Viva : 15 + 15 + 05 + 05 +10]
2.
Marks: 50

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1.
Simple programs on C and C++.
2.
OOPs concepts and building blocks of OOPs. Programs on friend functions, copy constructors, generic
functions and classes.
3.
Implementation of inheritance, multiple base classes, constructors and destructors.
4.
Implementation of polymorphism and its types.
5.
Concepts of I/O system basics, file I/O , exception handling and STL ( Standard Template Library).

COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
Differentiate the C and C++ programming.
2.
Implement friend functions, Copy constructors and Generic functions.
3.
Implement inheritance, multiple base classes, constructors and destructors.
4.
Implement virtual function and abstract classes.
5.
Code for file I/O and Implement exception handling.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS COVERED:
Programs around Class & Object creation
1. Given that an EMPLOYEE class contains the following members: Data Members: Employee_Number,
Employee_Name, Basic, DA, IT, Net_SalMember Functions: to read data, to calculate Net_Sal and
to print data members.
Write a C++ program to read data on N employees and compute the Net_Sal of each employee (DA =
52% of Basic and Income Tax = 30% of the gross salary).

2. Define a STUDENT class with USN, Name, and Marks in 3 tests of a subject. Declare an array of 10
STUDENT objects. Using appropriate functions, find the average of the two better marks for each
student. Print the USN, Name and the average marks of all the students.
Programs on Inheritance and Polymorphism Functions & Operator overloading, Virtual
functions, Generic functions.
3. Write a C++ program to create a class called COMPLEX and implement the following overloading
functions ADD that return a complex number
ADD(a, s2) where a is an integer (real part) and s2 is a complex number. And ADD(s1, s2) where
s1 and s2 are complex numbers.
4. Write a C++ program to create a class called LIST (linked list) with member functions to insert an
element at the front as well as to delete an element from the front of the list. Demonstrate all the functions
after creating a list object.
5. Write a C++ program to create a template function for Quicksort and demonstrate sorting of integers and
doubles.
Program on Polymorphism - Operator overloading
6

Write a C++ program to create a class called STACK using an array of integers.
following operations by overloading the operators + and -:

Implement the

s1 = s1 + element; where s1 is an object of the class STACK and element is an integer to be pushed on
the top of the stack
s1 = s1- ; where s1 is an object of the class STACK. - operator pops the element.
Handle the STACK empty and full conditions. Also display the contents of the stack after each operation,
by overloading the << operator.
Programs on overloading >>operator and application on creation of date.
7. Write a C++ program to create a class called DATE. Accept two valid dates in the form dd/mm/yy.
Implement the following operations by overloading the operators + and -. After every operation
display the results by overloading the operator <<.

no_of_days = d1 d2; where d1 and d2 are DATE objects, and no_of_days is an integer
d2 = d1 + no_of_days; where d1 is a DATE object and no_of_days is an integer

8. Create a class called MATRIX using two-dimensional array of integers. Implement the following
operations by overloading the operator ++ which checks the compatibility of two matrices to be added
and subtracted. Perform the addition and subtraction by overloading the + and operators respectively.

Display the results by overloading the operator <<.


If (m1==m2) then m3 = m1+m2 and m4 = m1-m2 else display error.
Programs on data structures operation.
9. Write a C++ program to create a class called STUDENT with data members USN, Name and Age.
Using inheritance, create the classes UGSTUDENT and PGSTUDENT having fields as Semester, Fees
and Stipend. Enter the data for at least 5 students. Find the semester-wise average age for all UG and PG
students separately.
10. Write a C++ program to create a class called STRING and implement the following operations. Display
the results after every operation by overloading the operator <<.

STRING s1 = VTU
STRING s2 = BELGAUM
STRING s3 = s1 + s2 (Use copy constructor).

11. Write a C++ program to create a class called BIN_TREE (Binary Tree) with member functions to
perform in-order, preorder and post-order traversals. Create a BIN_TREE object and demonstrate the
traversals.
12. Write a C++ program to create a class called EXPRESSION. Using appropriate member functions
convert a given valid Infix expression into postfix form. Display the infix and postfix
expressions.
Additional Programs:
1. Write a program to overload the function to fine the area of a circle, area of rectangle and area of square.
2. Write a program to overload the functions push & pop for integer stack and double stack .
3. Write a recursive function to find the factorial of an integer.
4. Write a C++ program to create a template function for bubble sort and demonstrate sorting of integers
and doubles.
5. Write a C++ program to design a template class which holds the stack of integers and double.
6. Write a program to find the maximum of three numbers using inline function.
7. Write a program to overload the operators + - ++ = to add the object of class Location contains two
parameters longitude & latitude.

8. Write a program to create class Library , which contain methods to add the book , issue book and return
book. Attribute : Title , ISBN , Author etc.,
9. Write C++ Program to demonstrate the hierarchy of execution of constructors when inheritance is
involved.
10. Write a C++ program to read a files FILE_NAME1 and FILE_NAME2, merge the contents of both
files into FILENAME3. If a file not exist add exception handling mechanism to display File not exist
message for the user.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1.Herbert Schildt: The Complete Reference C++, 6th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill 2013.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://www.nptelvideos.com/video.php?id=2178&c=28
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming
3. http://www.computerhope.com/jargon/c/cplus.htm

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

Laboratory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

48

Credits
Theory
01

Laboratory

00

03

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA23L

Data Structures and File Handling Lab

C Programming

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [Test-1+Test-2+Observation book + Record + Viva : 15 + 15 + 05 + 05 +10=50marks]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. Design of Abstract data types.
2. Linear data structures and their application in problem solving and programming.
3. Non-linear data structures and their application in problem solving and programming.
4. To be able to form linked data structures using pointers, self-referential structures and recursion.
5. Able to accommodate, access the data from and into Files.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Able to understand the importance of structure and abstract data type, and their basic usability in different
applications through different programming languages.
2. Able to analyze and differentiate different algorithms based on their time complexity.
3. Able to understand the linked implementation, and its uses both in linear and non-linear data structure.
4. Able to understand various data structure such as stacks, queues, trees, graphs, etc. to solve various computing
problems.
5. Able to implement various kinds of searching and sorting techniques, and know when to choose which technique.

LIST OF EXPERIMENTS COVERED:


1. Write a C program to perform basic operations on rational numbers using structures
2. Write a C program to perform basic operations on two vectors
a. Define a vector
b. Union of two vectors

c. Intersection of two vectors


3. Write a C program to maintain book details using a structure. Book information consists of ISBN, Title,
Author, and Price. Give a C statement to allocate the array of structures for N books information
dynamically and later extend/shrink the same to M.
4. Write a C program to define a structure of employee with following data items:
[Employee name,Employee address, Employee DOB, Employee salary, Date of joining, Department
number, Job title]
Perform the following functions:
a. Insert N employees information
b. Search for a particular employee details
c. Edit the information after search.
d. Swap two employees information
e. Display the list of all the employees
5. Write a C program to perform basic operations on 2 or more complex numbers.
[Complex number is an ADT represented in the form of a+ib]
STACK
6. Write a C program to perform the basic operations on a stack of book information (MAX=5). Book
information consists of ISBN, Number of pages, Author, and Price.
7. Write a C program to evaluate the validity of an expression
8. Write a C program to evaluate a postfix expression.
9. Write a C program to convert an expression from infix to postfix.
10. Write a C program to implement dual stack in a single structure with two independent top pointers
REMARK: here top1 moves from left to right 1.e, with -1 as initialization and top2 moves from right
to left with n as initialization
let the program have appropriate message in view of remarking all possible conditions.
Implement the above program for a structure called furniture with details model no, type name, and
price let the array get generated dynamically
11. Write a C program to implement multiple stack of integers.
NOTE: use 2dimentional array to represent the stack and additional of 1dimentional array to store the
top pointer values correspondingly.
QUEUES
12. Write a C program to perform basic operations on queue of integers the program should provide the
appropriate message to handle all concerned conditions
13. Write a C program to perform basic operations on list of students information stored in circular queue.
Let student information include regno, course title, year of study

14. Write a C program to implement dual queue.


LINKED LIST
15. Write a C program to implement stack using linked list.
16. Write a C program to implement queue of structure pen using linked list.
17. Write a C program to create the students mark list based on the rank. Let the student record contain
student-id, name, total marks.
18. Write a C program to perform operations on a list of integers.
a. Creation of list
b. Insertion of new element [At Front, from rear, based on the position]
c. Deletion of a node [At Front, from rear, based on the position]
d. Display the list
e. Replace the content of one element by another element.
f. Swap two nodes
19. Write a C program to perform the following operations on doubly linked list.
a. Creation of list by :
Insertion [ At beginning, At end, In between ]
Deletion [ At beginning, At end, In between ]
b. Display all the nodes.
c. Swap two nodes based on specific criteria.
TREES
20. Write a C program to perform / implement the binary tree using array and hence perform the following
a. To print the left and right child of specified node
b. To print all the ancestors of a specified node
c. To print all the node in a specific level
d. To print only the leaf node
21. Write a C program to perform / implement the binary tree using linked list and hence perform the
following
a. To print the left and right child of specified node
b. To print all the ancestors of a specified node
c. To print all the node in a specific level
d. To print only the leaf node
22. Write a C program with recursive routines to traverse the binary tree in all possible orders
a. Create a tree
b. Pre-Order traversal
c. In-Order traversal
d. Post-Order traversal
23. Write a C program to construct a heap of n integers and hence sort them using heap sort algorithm
24. Write a C program to demonstrate round robin scheduling algorithm

25. Implement the search techniques


a. Linear Search
b. b. Binary Search
FILES
26. Implement Indexed sequential file storing, searching and retrieving.
27. Implement Hashing (File).

TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:


1. Data Structures Using C by Aaron.M.Tenenbaum, Yedidyah Langsam and Moshe J. Augenstein , 2e
2ndEdition, 2008.
2. Horowitz, Sahni, Anderson-Freed: Fundamentals of Data Structures in C, 2nd Edition, Universities
Press, 2007.
3. Debasis Samanta: Classic Data Structures, 2nd Edition, PHI, 2009.
4. Richard F. Gilberg and Behrouz A. Forouzan: Data Structures A Pseudocode Approach with C,
Cengage Learning, 2005.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://www.tutorialspoint.com/Data-Structures-in-C-Online-Training/classid=13
2. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/106105085/
3. http://www.dreamincode.net/forums/topic/39357-data-structure-project/

III Semester

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IV Semester

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

Credits

II

IV

Theory

04

Contact Hours/ Week


Theory

Laboratory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

04

00

52

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA410

Web Programming

Unix, Computer concepts

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz.
Projects, Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. The course helps to learn principle and techniques for client-side programming using XHTML, CSS,
JavaScript, and Perl.
2. The curriculum includes designing for web standards, accessibility, usability, and workflow for web
design.
3. Emphasis is on separating the content, structure, and presentation of communications for screen, print,
or other media using standards-based extensible markup language (XML) technologies.
4. To Understand various technologies like PHP,RUBY.
5. To develop scripting languages.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Understand and apply basic design and usability principals when creating content for the internet.
2. Demonstrate practical skills in workflows and methods used to create websites within a professional
environment.
3. Make informed and critical decisions regarding client development using XHTML and JavaScript.
4. Design and implement reasonably sophisticated server-side applications using one or more suitable
technologies.
5. Have the knowledge to critically analyze and evaluate web applications. Construct websites using a
variety of skills and techniques.

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Fundamentals of Web, XHTML, CSS

10 Hours

Internet, WWW, Web Browsers and Web Servers, URLs, MIME, HTTP, Security, The Web Programmers
Toolbox.XHTML: Basic syntax, Standard structure, Basic text markup, Images, Hypertext Links. Lists, Tables,
Forms, Frames.CSS: Introduction, Levels of style sheets, Style specification formats, Selector forms, Property
value forms, Font properties, List properties, Color, Alignment of text, The box model, Background images,
The <span> and <div> tags, Conflict resolution.
UNIT:2 - JavaScript

12 Hours

Overview of JavaScript, Object orientation and Javascript, Syntactic characteristics, Primitives, operations, and
expressions, Screen output and keyboard input, Control statements, Object creation and modification, Arrays,
Functions, Constructors, Pattern matching using regular expressions, Errors in scripts, Examples. JavaScript
and HTML Documents, Dynamic Documents with Javascript.The JavaScript execution environment, The
Document Object Model, Element access in Javascript, Events and event handling, Handling events from the
Body elements, Button elements, Text box and Password elements, The DOM 2 event model, The navigator
object, DOM tree traversal and modification. Introduction to dynamic documents, Positioning elements,
Moving elements, Element visibility, Changing colors and fonts, Dynamic content, Stacking elements,
Locating the mouse cursor, Reacting to a mouse click, Slow movement of elements, Dragging and dropping
elements.
UNIT:3 - XML

10 Hours

Introduction, Syntax, Document structure, Document type definitions, Namespaces, XML schemas, Displaying
raw XML documents, Displaying XML documents with CSS, XSLT style sheets, XML processors, Web
services. Perl, CGI Programming
Origins and uses of Perl, Scalars and their operations, Assignment
statements and simple input and output, Control statements, Fundamentals of arrays, Hashes, References,
Functions, Pattern matching, File input and output; Examples.
UNIT:4 CGI,PHP

10 Hours

The Common Gateway Interface; CGI linkage; Query string format; CGI.pm module; A survey example;
Cookies Origins and uses of PHP, Overview of PHP, General syntactic characteristics, Primitives, operations
and expressions, Output, Control statements, Arrays, Functions, Pattern matching, Form handling, Files,
Cookies, Session tracking.

UNIT:5 - Ruby, Rails

10 Hours

Origins and uses of Ruby, Scalar types and their operations, Simple input and output, Control statements,
Arrays, Hashes, Methods, Classes, Code blocks and iterators, Pattern matching. Overview of Rails, Document
requests, Processing forms, Rails applications with Databases, Layouts.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Robert W. Sebesta: Programming the World Wide Web, 8th Edition, Pearson education, 2014.
2. Chris Bates: Web Programming Building Internet Applications, 3rd Edition, Wiley India, 2007.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:

1. www.w3schols.com
2. www.afterhoursprograming.com

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Theory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

Laboratory

04

00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA420

Advanced Java

Java Programming
Language.

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation,Projects,
Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. To develop, design and maintain web-based enterprise applications effectively.
2. Use of JDBC for parameterized queries, batch processing and transaction management.
3. Design Patterns while writing an application.
4. Component-based Java software using JavaBeans.
5. To update and retrieve the data from the databases using SQL.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Develop server side applications using Servlet.
2. Develop web applications using JSP.
3. Illustrate the usage of JAVA Beans.
4. Provide web services using EJB .
5. Demonstrate sever side component models.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1- Servlet

10 Hours

Servlet Structure, packaging, HTML building utilities, Lifecycle, Single Thread model interface, Handling
Client Request: Form Data, Handling Client Request: HTTP Request Headers. Generating server Response:

HTTP Status codes, Generating server Response: HTTP Response Headers, Handling Cookies, Session
Tracking.
UNIT:2 -JSP
12 Hours
Overview of JSP Technology, Need of JSP, Benefits of JSP, Advantages of JSP, Basic syntax, Invoking java
code with JSP scripting elements, creating Template Text, Invoking java code from JSP, Limiting java code in
JSP, using jsp expressions, comparing servlets and jsp, writing script lets. For example Using Script lets to
make parts of jsp conditional, using declarations, declaration example. Controlling the Structure of generated
servlets: the JSP page directive, import attribute, session attribute, isElignore
attribute, buffer and auto flush attributes, info attribute ,errorPage and is errorPage attributes, is Thread safe
Attribute, extends attribute, language attribute, Including files and applets in jsp Pages, using java beans
components in JSP documents
UNIT:3 -Java Beans And Annotation

10 Hours

Creating Packages, Interfaces, JAR files and Annotations. The core java API package, New java. Lang Sub
package, Built-in Annotations. Working with Java Beans. Introspection, Customizers, creating java bean,
manifest file, Bean Jar file, new bean, adding controls, Bean properties, Simple properties, Design Pattern
events, creating bound properties, Bean Methods, Bean an Icon, Bean info class, Persistence ,Java Beans API.
UNIT:4 - Introduction To EJB

10 Hours

The Problem domain, Breakup responsibilities, Code Smart not hard, the Enterprise java bean specification.
Components Types. Server Side Component Types, Session Beans, Message Driven Beans, Entity Beans, The
Java Persistence Model. Container services. Dependency Injection, Concurrency, Instance pooling n caching,
Transactions, security, Timers, Naming and object stores, Interoperability, Life Cycle Callbacks, Interceptors,
platform integration. Developing your first EJB. Preparation, Definitions, naming conventions, convention for
the Examples, coding the EJB, the contract, the bean Implementation class, out of Container Testing,
Integration Testing.
UNIT:5 - Server Side Component Models

10 Hours

The Stateless Session Bean, the Stateful Session Bean, the Singleton Session Bean, Message- Driven Beans.
EJB and PERSISTENCE. Persistence Entity manager Mapping Persistence objects, Entity Relationships.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Marty Hall, Larry Brown. Core Servlets and Java Server Pages. Volume 1: Core Technologies. Second
Edition.
2. Java 6 Programming Black Book, Dreamtech Press. 2012.
3. Andrew LeeRubinger, Bill Burke. Developing Enterprise Java Components. Enterprise JavaBeans

3.1.Oreilly.
4.

Michael Sikora, EJB 3 Developer Guide, A practical guide for developers and architects to the
Enterprise Java Beans Standard, Shroff Publishers & Distributors PVT LTD. July 2008.

5. Herbert Schildt, Java The Complete Reference, Eight Edition. Comprehensive coverage of the Java
Language. Tata McGraw-Hill Edition 2011.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1.

http://clickbeldon.com/tocadv.htm

Contact Hours/ Week


Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Theory

Credits
05

Theory

Laboratory

Tutorials

03

00

02

Course No

Course Title

MCA430

Software Engineering

Total Hours/
Semester
52

Pre Requisites

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz.
Projects, Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. To assist the student in understanding the basic theory of software engineering, and to apply these basic
theoretical principles to a group software development project.
2. To help students to develop skills that will enable them to construct software of high quality software
that is reliable, and that is reasonably easy to understand, modify and maintain.
3. To foster an understanding of why these skills are important.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. An ability to identify, formulate, analyze, and solve problems, as well as identify the computing
requirements appropriate to their solutions.
2. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate software based systems, components, or programs of
varying complexity that meet desired needs, satisfy realistic constraints, and demonstrate an accepted
design and development principles.
3. An ability to apply knowledge of computing, mathematics, science, and engineering appropriate to the
discipline, particularly in the modeling and design of software systems and in the analysis of tradeoffs
inherent in design decisions.
4. An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for professional practice.

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1

10 Hours

Overview Introduction: Professional Software Development Attributes of good software, software


engineering diversity, IEEE/ ACM code of software engineering ethics, case studies ,Software Process & Agile
Software Development Software Process models: waterfall, incremental development, reuses oriented,
Process activities; Coping with change, The rational Unified process. Agile methods, Plan-driven and agile
Development, Extreme Programming, Agile project management, Scaling agile methods.
UNIT:2

12 Hours

Requirements Engineering Functional and non-functional requirements, The software requirements document,
Requirements specification, Requirements engineering processes, Requirement elicitation and analysis,
Requirements validation, Requirements management System Modeling, Architectural Design & Design and
implementation Context models, Interaction models, Structural models, Behavioral models, ModeldrivenEngineering.
UNIT :3

10 Hours

Software architecture: the role of software architecture, architectural views, component and connector view,
Architectural styles for C&C view, Documenting architectural design. Design concepts, Function oriented
design, detailed design, verification, matrix (Complexity matrix for function oriented design).
UNIT 4

10 Hours

Component-based software engineering Components and component model, CBSE process, Component
composition Distributed Software engineering Distributed system issues, Client-server computing,
Architectural patterns for distributed systems, Software as a service. Planning a software Project.
UNIT 5

10 Hours

Process planning, Effort estimation, Project scheduling and staffing, Software configuration Management
plan, Quality plan, Risk Management, Project monitoring plan. Software Testing fundamentals, Black-box
testing, White-box testing, Testing process.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering, Third Edition Pankaj Jalote Springer (for North and
South America, Europe, Australia, parts of Asia/Africa Narosa Publishing House (for Indian
subcontinent, Indonesia, parts of Asia and Africa.)

2. Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach, 7th Edition, Roger S Pressman, R. S. Pressman &
Associates, Inc. 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. https://www.iiitd.edu.in/~jalote/
2. Software Engineering Tutorial, www.tutorialspoint.com/software_engineering/

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Elective

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

04

Course No

Course Title

MCA441

Digital Image Processing

Laboratory
00

Pre Requisites
--

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz,
Projects, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. Provide the student with the fundamentals of digital image processing.
2. Give the students a taste of the applications of the theories taught in the subject. This will be achieved
through the project and some selected lab sessions.
3. Introduce the students to some advanced topics in digital image processing should time permit.
4. Give the students a useful skill base that would allow them to carry out further study should they be
interested and to work in the field.
5. Practical approach will be guided through MATLAB tool.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Understand image formation and the role human visual system plays in perception of gray and color
image data.
2. Learn the signal processing algorithms and techniques in image enhancement and image restoration.
3. Acquire an appreciation for the image processing issues and techniques and be able to apply these
techniques to real world problems.
4. To conduct independent study and analysis of image processing problems and techniques.
5. Get broad exposure and understanding of various applications of image processing in industry,
medicine, and defense.

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 Introduction and the fundamentals of Image Processing

12 Hours

Origins of Digital Image Processing, examples, Fundamental Steps in Digital Image Processing, Components
of an Image Processing System, Elements of Visual Perception, A Simple Image Formation Model, Basic
Concepts in Sampling and Quantization, Representing Digital Images, Zooming and Shrinking Digital Images,
Some Basic Relationships Between Pixels, Linear and Nonlinear Operations.
UNIT 2: Image Enhancement using Spatial Domain

9 Hours

Some Basic Gray Level Transformations, Histogram Processing, Enhancement Using Arithmetic/Logic
Operations, Basics of Spatial Filtering, Smoothing Spatial Filters, Sharpening Spatial Filters, Combining
Spatial Enhancement Methods.
UNIT 3: Image Enhancement in Frequency Domain

9 Hours

Image Enhancement in the Frequency Domain, Introduction to the Fourier Transform and the Frequency,
Domain, Smoothing Frequency-Domain Filters, Sharpening Frequency Domain Filters, Homomorphic
Filtering.
UNIT 4: Image Restoration

11 Hours

A Model of the Image degradation/Restoration process, Noise Models, Restoration in the Presence of Noise
OnlySpatial Filtering, Periodic Noise Reduction by Frequency Domain Filtering, Linear, Position-Invariant
Degradations , Estimating the Degradation Function, Inverse Filtering ,Minimum Mean Square Error (Wiener)
Filtering.
UNIT 5: Morphology and Image Segmentation

11 Hours

Preliminaries, Dilation and Erosion, Opening and Closing, The Hit-or-Miss Transformation, Some Basic
Morphological Algorithms. Detection of Discontinuities, Edge Linking and Boundary Detection, Thresholding,
Region-Based Segmentation, Patterns and Pattern Classes, Recognition Based on Decision-Theoretic Methods,
Structural Methods.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Rafel C Gonzalez and Richard E. Woods: Digital Image Processing, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education, 2008.
2. A. K. Jain: Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing, Pearson, 2004.
3. S.Jayaraman, S.Esakkirajan, T.Veerakumar: Digital Image Processing, TataMcGraw Hill, 2011.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://www.imageprocessingplace.com/

Course
Year

Course
Semester

II

IV

Contact Hours/ Week


Course Type

Credits
Theory

Elective

Course No

04

Laboratory

04

Course Title

MCA442
Multimedia Systems
COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:

00

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester
52

01

Pre Requisites
Fundamentals of Computer

1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz.
Projects, Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. To present a step-by-step approach to multimedia systems design.
2. To introduce multimedia standards and compression and decompression technologies.
3. To provide a detailed analysis of the various storage technologies.
4. Understand the constraints on multimedia systems and the range of technologies available to multimedia
systems designers and integrators.
5. Have an insight into how the quality of multimedia systems is perceived and how this relates to the design of
multimedia input, output and editing systems.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Understand how scientific researchers view multimedia systems.
2. Have insight into the state-of-the-art in the prominent areas of scientific multimedia research including social
computing, advanced Internet technologies, speech recognition, robotics, computer vision, video tracking, and
biometrics.
3. Have insight into building a multimedia system from diverse core technologies.
4. Have insight into the challenges and limitations of current multimedia systems.
5. Build a prototype multimedia system.

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 -

Introduction, Media and Data Streams, Audio Technology

11 Hours

Multimedia Elements; Multimedia Applications; Multimedia Systems Architecture; Evolving Technologies for
Multimedia Systems; Defining Objects for Multimedia Systems; Multimedia Data Interface Standards; The
need for Data Compression; Multimedia Databases.
Media: Perception Media, Representation Media, Presentation Media, Storage Media, Transmission Media,
Information Exchange Media, Presentation Spaces & Values, and Presentation Dimensions; Key Properties of a
Multimedia System: Discrete & Continuous Media, Independence Media, Computer Controlled Systems,
Integration; Characterizing Data Streams: Asynchronous Transmission Mode, Synchronous Transmission
Mode, Isochronous Transmission Mode; Characterizing Continuous Media Data Streams.
UNIT:2 - Sound

11 Hours

Sound: Frequency, Amplitude, Sound Perception and Psychoacoustics; Audio Representation on Computers;
Three Dimensional Sound Projection; Music and MIDI Standards; Speech Signals; Speech Output; Speech
Input; Speech Transmission.
Graphics and Images, Video Technology, Computer-Based Animation
Capturing Graphics and Images Computer Assisted Graphics and Image Processing; Reconstructing Images;
Graphics and Image Output Options. Basics; Television Systems; Digitalization of Video Signals; Digital
Television; Basic Concepts; Specification of Animations; Methods of Controlling Animation; Display of
Animation; Transmission of Animation; Virtual Reality Modeling Language.
UNIT:3 - Data Compression

12 Hours

Storage Space; Coding Requirements; Source, Entropy, and Hybrid Coding; Basic Compression Techniques;
JPEG: Image Preparation, Lossy Sequential DCT-based Mode, Expanded Lossy DCT-based Mode, Lossless
Mode, and Hierarchical Mode. H.261 (Px64) and H.263: Image Preparation, Coding Algorithms, Data Stream,
H.263+ and H.263L; MPEG: Video Encoding, Audio Coding, Data Stream, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, MPEG-7;
Fractal Compression.
UNIT:4-

Optical Storage Media

13 Hours

History of Optical Storage; Basic Technology; Video Discs and Other WORMs; Compact Disc Digital Audio;
Compact Disc Read Only Memory; CD-ROM Extended Architecture; Further CD-ROM-Based Developments;
Compact Disc Recordable; Compact Disc Magneto-Optical; Compact Disc Read/Write; Digital Versatile Disc.
Content Analysis
Simple Vs. Complex Features; Analysis of Individual Images; Analysis of Image Sequences; Audio Analysis;

Applications.
UNIT:5- Data and File Format Standards

15 Hours

Rich-Text Format; TIFF File Format; Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF); MIDI File Format; JPEG DIB
File Format for Still and Motion Images; AVI Indeo File Format; MPEG Standards; TWAIN
Multimedia Application Design
Multimedia Application Classes; Types of Multimedia Systems; Virtual Reality Design; Components of
Multimedia Systems; Organizing Multimedia Databases; Application Workflow Design Issues; Distributed
Application Design Issues.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Ralf Steinmetz, Klara Narstedt: Multimedia Fundamentals: Vol 1-Media Coding and Content Processing,
2nd Edition, Pearson Education, 2003.
2. Prabhat K. Andleigh, Kiran Thakrar: Multimedia Systems Design, PHI, 2003.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.K.R Rao, Zoran S. Bojkovic and Dragorad A. Milovanovic: Multimedia Communication Systems:
Techniques, Standards, and Networks, Pearson Education, 2006.
2. Nalin K Sharad: Multimedia information Networking, PHI, 2002.
3. Computer Graphics and Multimedia - Anirban Mukhapathyay, Aruop Chattopadhyay - Vikas Publishing Ltd
Second Edition.
4. Multimedia Technology & Applications- David Hillman Galgotia Publications Pvt Ltd. - Second Edition.
5. Fundamental of Multimedia - Ze-Nian Li & M. S. Drew.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. www.Tutorialpoint.com.
2. www.hometutors.in.
3.www.turorindia.net.
4. www.academia.edu.

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Theory
(Elective)

Theory
04

Course No

MCA443

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
04

Laboratory
00

Course Title

Pre Requisites

Advanced Data Structures

Basic data structures,


Programming using
C/C++, Design of
Algorithms.

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2.

Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, 2 Events [Practical Assignments] Marks: 50


Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1.
To provide an advance knowledge of data structures in representation schemes, hashing, and queues.
2.
To study and analyze various advance trees such as, B-trees, AVT and Red-Black trees.
3.
To study the importance of pattern matching algorithms in real time applications.
4.
To develop an application using various data structures.
5.
To evaluate the efficacy and performance of the applications developed.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
Understand fundamentals concepts of data handling.
2.
Understands the concepts of Queues (various forms of Queues with respect to real time applications)
and Search trees.
3.
Understands how the pattern matching algorithms have their importance in real time applications.
4.
Development and evaluation of the performance of an application.
5.
Designing the application with suitable / appropriate data structures and evaluating the performance.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1-

12 Hours

Dictionaries, linear list representation, skip list representation, operations insertion, deletion and searching, hash
table representation, hash functions, collision resolution-separate chaining, open-addressing-linear probing,
quadratic probing, double hashing, rehasing, extendible hashing, comparison of hashing and skip lists.

UNIT:2 -

10 Hours

Priority Queues Definition, ADT, Realizing a priority queue using heaps, Definition, insertion, deletion,
external sorting model for external sorting, multi-way merge, poly-phase merge.
UNIT:3 -

10 Hours

Search trees, Binary search trees, Definition, ADT, Implementation, Operations Searching, Insertion and
Deletion, AVT tress, Definition, Height of an AVL tree, Operations Insertion, Deletion, and Searching,
Introduction to Red-Black and Splay trees, B-trees, B-tree of order m, height of a B-tree, insertion, deletion and
searching, Comparison of search trees.
UNIT:4 -

10 Hours

Pattern Matching and trees: Pattern matching algorithms Brute force, the Boyer Moore algorithm, the Knuth
Morris-Pratt algorithm, Standard Trees, Compressed Trees, Suffix Trees.
UNIT:5 -

10 Hours

Sorting and Searching: Advanced sorting techniques, Red-black trees, 2-3 trees, Generation of Binary Strings,
Geometric computation problems.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Data Structures. Algorithms and Applications in C++, S. Sahni, University Press (India) Pvt. Ltd, 2nd Edition.
2. Data Structures and Algorithms in C++, Michael T. Goodrich, R. Tamassia and Mount, John Wiley and Sons.
3. Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++, Mark Allen Weiss, Pearson Education.

ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:


1.
2.
3.
4.

http://www.jkinfoline.com/php-arrays/307-advanced-data-structures-and-algorithms.html
http://jeffe.cs.illinois.edu/teaching/datastructures/projects.html
https://courses.csail.mit.edu/6.851/spring12/lectures/
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-851-advanced-datastructures-spring-2012/lecture-videos/

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Elective

Credits
Theory
04

04

Laboratory
00

Tutorials
00

Total Hours/
Semester
52

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA444

Advanced Algorithms

Design and Analysis of


Algorithms

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz, Projects,
Assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. Understand fundamentals of algorithms, use of five different asymptotic notations, and recurrence
equations.
2. Understand of important graph algorithms such as, Bellman-ford, Johnsons & Ford-Fulkerson.
3. To get the advance concept of algorithms, such as FFT and Number theoretic algorithms.
4. To understand, advance string matching algorithms and probabilistic algorithms.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Understand basic notion of algorithm, growth of functions, and recurrence equations. Implement various
searching and sorting algorithms.
2. Have thorough understand of graph algorithms.
3. Implement FFT and string matching algorithms.
4. Incorporate efficient algorithms into the applications they write.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT 1: Review of Analysis Techniques

12 Hours

Growth of Functions: Asymptotic notations; Standard notations and common functions; Recurrences and
Solution of Recurrence equations- The substitution method, The recurrence tree method, The master method;
Amortized Analysis: Aggregate, Accounting and Potential Methods.

UNIT 2: Graph Algorithms

10 Hours

Bellman - Ford Algorithm; Single source shortest paths in a DAG; Johnsons Algorithm for sparse graphs; Flow
networks and Ford-Fulkerson method; Maximum bipartite matching.
UNIT 3: Polynomials and the FFT & Number -Theoretic Algorithms:

12 Hours

Representation of polynomials; The DFT and FFT; Efficient implementation of FFT. Elementary notions; GCD;
Modular Arithmetic; Solving modular linear equations; The Chinese remainder theorem; Powers of an element;
RSA cryptosystem; Primality testing; Integer factorization
UNIT 4: String-Matching Algorithms:

10 Hours

Nave string Matching; Rabin - Karp algorithm; String matching with finite automata; Knuth-Morris-Pratt
algorithm; Boyer Moore algorithms.
UNIT 5: Probabilistic and Randomized Algorithms:

8 Hours

Probabilistic algorithms; Randomizing deterministic algorithms, Monte Carlo and Las Vegas algorithms;
Probabilistic numeric algorithms.
REFERENCES / TEXT BOOKS:
1. T. H Cormen, C E Leiserson, R L Rivest and C Stein: Introduction to Algorithms, 3rd Edition, PrenticeHall of India, 2010.
2. Kenneth A. Berman, Jerome L. Paul: Algorithms, Cengage Learning, 2004.
3. Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Sahni, S.Rajasekharan: Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms, University Press,
2007.
4. Anany Levitin: Introduction to the Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Pearson Education, 2011.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. https://www.coursera.org/course/algo

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Theory
(Elective)

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

04

Laboratory
00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA445

Advanced DBMS

Database Management
Systems

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2.
3.
4.

1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz.
Projects, Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.] Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are :
1. To introduce the concept of advanced DBMS, its benefits and related technologies.
2. To introduce the concept of advanced DBMS implementation.
3. To make students to understand different indexing concepts.
4. To make students to understand different query optimization techniques.
5. To make students to understand how to use databases in most recent technologies.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will able to:
1. Understand and concept of advanced DBMS and benefits and related technologies.
2. Understand the DBMS implementation concepts.
3. Understand the different query optimization techniques.
4. Understand how to and where to implement of different indexing concepts.
5. Understand how to use databases in most recent technologies.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT I

10 Hours

Over view of Storage and Indexing, Disks and Files : Data on external storage; File organizations and indexing;
Index data structures; Comparison of file organizations; Indexes and performance tuning Memory hierarchy;
RAID; Disk space management; Buffer manager; Files of records; Page formats and record formats

UNIT II

10 Hours

Tree Structured Indexing : Intuition for tree indexes ;Indexed sequential access method; B+trees, Search,
Insert, Delete, Duplicates, B+trees in practice Hash-Based Indexing : Static hashing, Extendible hashing, Linear
hashing, comparisons Overview of Query Evaluation, External Sorting : The system catalog, Introduction to
operator evaluation; Algorithm for relational operations.
UNIT III

10 Hours

Introduction to query optimization; Alternative plans; A motivating example; what a typical optimizer does.
When does a DBMS sort data? A simple two-way merge sort; External merge sort Evaluating Relational
Operators : The Selection operation; General selection conditions; The Projection operation;.
UNIT IV

10 Hours

The Join operation; The Set operations; Aggregate operations; The impact of buffering. A Typical Relational
Query Optimizer Translating SQL queries in to Relational Algebra; Estimating the cost of a plan; Relational
algebra equivalences; Enumeration of alternative plans; Nested sub-queries; other approaches to query
optimization Physical Database Design and Tuning.
UNIT V

12 Hours

Introduction ;Guidelines for index selection ,examples; Clustering and indexing; Indexes that enable index-only
plans, Tools to assist in index selection; Overview of database tuning; Choices in tuning the conceptual
schema; Choices in tuning queries and views; Impact of concurrency; DBMS benchmarking. More Recent
Applications: Mobile databases; Multimedia databases; Geographical Information Systems; Genome data
management.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Raghu Ramakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke : Database Management Systems,3rd Edition,McGrawHill,2003.
2. Elmasri and Navathe:Fundamentals of Database Systems,5th Edition,Pearson Education,2007.
3. Conolly and Begg:Database Systems,4th Edition,Pearson Education,2002.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1.
2.

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/adbms/
http://www.slideshare.net/Jasour/advanced-database-lecture-nores.

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Theory
(Elective)

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

Laboratory

04

00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA451

Cryptography and Network Security

Computer Networks

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Quiz, Projects,
assignments, Viva-Voce etc.]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Principles and practices of cryptography and network security: classical systems, symmetric block
cipher (AES, other contemporary symmetric ciphers).
Basic concepts of Public-key cryptography (RSA) algorithms.
Theory and techniques of hash functions and authentication.
Concepts of key management, key exchange and signature schemes.
E-mail & web security and Firewalls.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Explore different attacks in a computer network and its security services.


Understand the principles and techniques of symmetric key encryption and public key encryption
Understand the security policies (such as authentication, integrity and confidentiality), as well as
protocols to implement such policies in the form of message exchanges.
Explore Pretty Good Privacy in Secured Electronic Mailing and Key management.
Understand Web Security, Secure Electronic Transaction, Intruder detection and Firewalls.

TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 Introduction and Classical Encryption Technique:

9 Hours

OSI Security Architecture, Security Attacks, Security Services, Security Mechanism, Model for Network
Security. Symmetric Cipher Model, Substitution Techniques, Transposition Techniques.

UNIT:2 - Block Ciphers, Public Key Cryptography and Key Management:

12 Hours

Block Cipher Principles, The Data Encryption Standard, Block Cipher Design Principles and Modes of
operation, Evaluation Criteria for AES, AES Cipher-Encryption and Decryption, Data Structure, Encryption
Round. Principles of Public Key Cryptosystem, RSA algorithm, Key management, Diffie Hellman Key
exchange.
UNIT:3 - Message Authentication and Hash Function, Authentication Applications:

11 Hours

Authentication Requirement, Authentication Functions, Message Authentication Code, Hash Functions, Digital
Signatures, Digital Signature Standard. Kerberos, X.509 Authentication Service.
UNIT:4 - Electronic Mail Security and IP Security:

10 Hours

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), S/MIME, IP Security Overview; IP Security Architecture; Authentication Header;
Encapsulating Security Payload; Combining Security Associations; Key Management.
UNIT:5 - Web Security and System Security:

10 Hours

Web security Considerations; Secure Socket layer (SSL) and Transport layer Security (TLS); Secure Electronic
Transaction (SET), Intruders, Intrusion Detection, Firewall Design Principles- Characteristics, Types of
Firewall and Firewall Configuration.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. William Stallings, Cryptography and Network Security Principles and Practices, 4th Edition,
Pearson Education, 2009.
2. Behrouz A. Forouzan and Debdeep Mukhopadhyay: Cryptography and Network Security, 2nd Edition,
Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.
3. Atul Kahate, Cryptography and Network Security 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company,
2010.
4. Network Security Private Communication in a public world, Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman & Mike
Speciner, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., New Delhi, 2011

5. Network Security Essentials Applications and Standards, William Stallings, Pearson Education, New Delhi,
2010
6. Network Security: The Complete Reference by Roberta Bragg, Mark Phodes-Ousley, Keith Strassberg Tata
Mcgraw-Hill, 2009.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. https://mrajacse.wordpress.com/2012/01/06/cryptography-network-security-ebooks/
2. www.williamstallings.com/Crypto/Crypto4e.html

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

IV

Theory
(Elective)

Theory
04

Course No

MCA452

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Laboratory

04

Course Title

System Simulation and Modeling

00

Pre Requisites
Basics of Probability
Statistics and Queuing,
Analysis of Algorithms.

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2.

Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, 2 Events [Practical Assignments] Marks: 50


Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1.
Technique to analyze and predict the behavior of existing or proposed systems by experimenting with
representative models of the systems.
2.
Discrete-event and Continuous system simulation and incorporates design of experiment considerations
for planning and executing simulation runs in an efficient manner.
3.
Analyze specified systems such as Call centers, Inventory systems, Queuing models and environmental
dynamics.
4.
Verification and Validation of the simulated systems.
5.
Post analysis of the developed /simulated system
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
Analyze existing system, their behavior, need for simulation
2.
Initiate to simulate a real time system.
3.
Work with existing system: Call Centers, Inventory system.
4.
Study and understand the system specific to Queuing system.
5.
Validate the input and output process of the simulated system.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 Introduction:

10 Hours

When simulation is the appropriate tool and when it is not appropriate; Advantages and disadvantages of
Simulation; Areas of application; Systems and system environment; Components of a system; Discrete and

continuous systems; Model of a system; Types of Models; Discrete-Event System Simulation; Steps in a
Simulation Study. Simulation examples: Simulation of queuing systems; Simulation of inventory systems;
Other examples of simulation
Unit 2 General Principles, Simulation Software:

12 Hours

Concepts in Discrete-Event Simulation: The Event-Scheduling / Time- Advance Algorithm, World Views,
Manual simulation Using Event Scheduling; List processing. Simulation in Java; Simulation in GPSS.
Statistical Models in Simulation:
Review of terminology and concepts; Useful statistical models; Discrete distributions; Continuous
distributions; Poisson process; Empirical distributions.
Unit 3 Queuing Models:

10 Hours

Characteristics of queuing systems; Queuing notation; Long-run measures of performance of queuing systems;
Steady-state behavior of M/G/1 queue; Networks of queues.
Random-Number Generation, Random-Variate Generation:
Properties of random numbers; Generation of pseudo-random numbers; Techniques for generating random
numbers.Tests for Random Numbers. Random-Variate Generation: Inverse transform technique; AcceptanceRejection technique; Special properties.
Unit 4 Input Modeling:

12 Hours

Data Collection; Identifying the distribution with data; Parameter estimation; Goodness of Fit Tests; Fitting a
non-stationary Poisson process; Selecting input models without data; Multivariate and Time-Series input
models.
Output Analysis for a Single Model:
Types of simulations with respect to output analysis; Stochastic nature of output data; Measures of performance
and their estimation; Output analysis for terminating simulations; Output analysis for steady-state simulations.
Unit 5 Verification and Validation of Simulation Models, Optimization:

8 Hours

Model building, verification and validation; Verification of simulation models; Calibration and validation of
models, Optimization via Simulation
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Jerry Banks, John S. Carson II, Barry L. Nelson, David M. Nicol: Discrete-Event System Simulation,
4th Edition, Pearson Education / PHI, 2007(Reprint 2013).
2. Lawrence M. Leemis, Stephen K. Park: Discrete Event Simulation: A
First Course, Pearson /
Prentice-Hall, 2006.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://www.mi.fuberlin.de/inf/groups/agech/teaching/2012_SS/L_19540_Modeling_and_Performance_
Analysis_with_Simulation/02.pdf
2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20345550

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Theory
(Elective)

Theory

Course No

MCA453

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
04

Laboratory

04

00

Course Title

Pre Requisites

Computer Graphics

Fundamental of Computer
Organization

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. 1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, 2 Events [Practical assignment] Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. 2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1.
Primitive I/O devices, functionalities.
2.
To learn all forms of transformation of diagrams, its implementation.
3.
2D / 3D geometric transformations.
4.
Object / World Viewing.
5.
Curves and Animation.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
To understand the basic I/O devices and their attributes.
2.
To implement the 2D /3D geometric transformations.
3.
World Views / 2D / 3D viewing.
4.
Curves and its properties.
5.
To develop an application related to animation.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Graphics Output Primitives and Attributes

12 Hours

Introduction to open GL, Coordinate reference frames, Specifying two dimensional world coordinate reference
frame in Open GL, Open GL point functions, Open GL line functions, Line drawing algorithms, Circle
generation algorithms, Ellipse generation algorithms, Fill area primitives, Polygon fill areas, OpenGL polygon
fill area functions, General scan line polygon fill algorithm, Fill methods for areas with irregular boundaries,
Open GL fill area attribute functions.

UNIT:2 - Two Dimensional and Three - Dimensional Geometric Transformations:

12 Hours

Basic two dimensional geometric transformations, Matrix representations and homogeneous coordinates,
Inverse transformations, Two dimensional composite transformations, Other two dimensional transformations,
Three dimensional Translation, Rotation, Scaling, Other three dimensional transformations, Affine
transformations, Open GL geometric transformation functions.
UNIT:3 - Two Dimensional Viewing:

10 Hours

The two dimensional viewing, Clipping window, Normalization and viewport transformations, Clipping
algorithms, Two dimensional point clipping, Two dimensional line clipping algorithms, Polygon fill area
clipping, Curve clipping, Text clipping.
UNIT:4 - Three Dimensional Viewing:

12 Hours

The three dimensional viewing concepts, Three dimensional viewing pipeline, Three dimensional viewing
coordinate parameters, Transformation from world to viewing coordinates, Projection transformations,
Orthogonal projections, Oblique parallel projections, Perspective projections, The viewport transformation and
three dimensional screen coordinates
UNIT:5 - Curves and Computer Animation

8 Hours

Bezier spline curves, Raster methods for computer animation, Design of animation sequences, Traditional
animation techniques, General computer animation functions
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Donald Hearn, M.Pauline Baker, Computer Graphics with Open GL, Pearson (Indian Edition), Third
Edition.(2011)
2. Edward Angel, Interactive Computer Graphics A top down approach using Open GL, Pearson, Fifth
Edition.
3. Peter Shirley, Steve Marschner, 'Computer Graphics, Cengage Learning (Indian edition),2009.

ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:


1.
2.

http://coolmar.eu/pdff/donald-hearn-computer-graphics-ebook.pdf
http://www.cs.rit.edu/~ncs/Courses/570.shtml

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Theory
(Elective)

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

52

Credits
Theory
04

Laboratory

04

00

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA454

Enterprise Resource Planning

Management Information
System

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2.
3.
4.

1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Any 2 Events from the list [Test, Presentation, Quiz.
Projects, Group discussion, assignments, Viva-Voce etc.] Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].
2. Semester End Exam [ 100 Marks, 3 Hours]
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are :
1. To introduce the concept of ERP, its benefits and related technologies.
2. To introduce the concept of ERP implementation.
3. To make students to understand different business models required in ERP.
4. To make students to understand where ERP can be used and its market opportunities.
5. To make students to understand the future of ERP and its importance.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Understand the concept of ERP its benefits and related technologies.
2. Understand the ERP implementation concepts.
3. Understand the different business models required for the ERP.
4. Understand how to and where to implement the ERP in business enterprises.
5. Understand the importance and future developments of ERP.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - INTRODUCTION TO ERP

9 Hours

Overview, Benefits of ERP, ERP and Related Technologies, Business Process Reengineering, Data
Warehousing, Data Mining, Online Analytical Processing, Supply Chain Management.

UNIT:2 - ERP IMPLEMENTATION

12 Hours

Implementation Life Cycle, Implementation Methodology ,Hidden Costs, Organizing Implementation,


Vendors, Consultants and Users ,Contracts , Project Management and Monitoring.
UNIT:3 - BUSINESS MODULES

10 Hours

Business Modules in an ERP Package, Finance, Manufacturing, Human Resource, Plant Maintenance,
Materials Management, Quality Management, Sales and Distribution.
UNIT:4 - ERP MARKET

10 Hours

ERP Market Place, SAP AG, PeopleSoft ,Baan Company , JD Edwards World Solutions Company , Oracle
Corporation ,QAD , System Software Associates.
UNIT:5 - ERP PRESENT AND FUTURE

11 Hours

Turbo Charge the ERP System, EIA, ERP and ECommerce, ERP and Internet, Future directions in ERP.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Alexis Leon, ERP Demystified, Tata McGraw Hill, 2010.
2. Joseph A. Brady, Ellen F. Monk, Bret J. Wangner, Concepts in Enterprise Resource Planning,
Thomson Learning, 2011
3. Vinod Kumar Garg and N.K .Venkata Krishnan, Enterprise Resource Planning - concepts and
Planning, Prentice Hall, 1998, Reprint 2006.
4. Jose Antonio Fernandz, The SAP R /3 Hand book, Tata McGraw Hill.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. www.scribesoft.com/ebook-the_business_case_for_integrating_erp
2. www.deltek.co.uk /erp

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Elective

Credits
Theory
04

04

Laboratory

Tutorials

00

00

Total Hours/
Semester
52

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA455

Compiler Design

System Software,
Lex & Yacc

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1.
2.

Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Written Tests, Event-1 Quiz, Event-2. Test] Total Marks: 50 [10* 5].
Semester End Exam [ Total Marks:100 Marks, Duration: 3 Hours]

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The objective of this course is to teach the students:
1.
Fundamentals compilers and lexical analysis.
2.
Syntax formulation with Grammars and Parsers.
3.
Syntax translation and generation of intermediate code.
4.
Storage organization and allocation concepts.
5.
Code generation basic blocks and deign of code generators.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.
Understand basic concepts of compiler, lexers and parsers.
2.
Know Syntax and analysis of syntax.
3.
Understand Syntax-Directed Translation and Intermediate code generation.
4.
Implement Storage Organization concepts.
5.
Design code generators.
TOPICS COVERED:
UNIT:1 - Introduction, Lexical analysis

8 Hours

Language processors; The structure of a Compilers; The evolution of programming languages; The science of
building a compiler; Applications of Compiler technology; Programming language basics; Lexical analysis:
The Role of Lexical Analyzer; Input Buffering; Specifications of Tokens; Recognition of Tokens.

UNIT:2- Syntax Analysis

18 Hours

Introduction; Context-free Grammars; Writing a Grammar; Top-down Parsing, Bottom-up Parsing;


Introduction to LR Parsing: Simple LR, More powerful LR parsers; Using ambiguous grammars; Parser
Generators.
UNIT:3 - Syntax-Directed Translation and Intermediate code generation

14 Hours

Syntax-Directed definitions; Evaluation order for SDDs; Applications of Syntax directed translation; Syntaxdirected translation schemes. Variants of syntax trees; Three-address code; Types and declarations; Translation
of expressions; Type checking; Control flow; Back patching; Switch statements; Intermediate code for
procedures.
UNIT:4 - Run-Time Environments

6 Hours

Storage Organization; Stack allocation of space; Access to non-local data on the stack; Heap management;
Introduction to garbage collection.
UNIT:5 - Code Generation

6 Hours

Issues in the design of Code Generator; The Target language; Addresses in the target code; Basic blocks and
Flow graphs; Optimization of basic blocks; A Simple Code Generator.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Alfred V Aho, Monica S. Lam, Ravi Sethi, Jeffrey D Ullman: Compilers-Principles, Techniques and Tools,
2nd Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2007.
2. Charles N. Fischer, Richard J. leBlanc, Jr.: Crafting a Compiler with C, Pearson Education, 2008.
3. Andrew W Apple: Modern Compiler Implementation in C, Cambridge Univ. Press, 2004.
4. Kenneth C Louden: Compiler Construction Principles & Practice, Thomson Education, 2003.
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1.
2.

http://nptel.ac.in/courses/106108052/1
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/compiler_design/

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

Credits

II

IV

Laboratory

01

Contact Hours/ Week


Theory

Laboratory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

03

00

48

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA41L

Web Programming Laboratory

Unix, Computer concepts

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [Test-1 + Test-2 + Observation book + Record + Viva : 15 + 15 + 05 + 05 +10]

Marks: 50
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

To practice markup language.


To practice embedded dynamic scripting on client side internet programming.
To practice web development techniques on client-side.
To write functions in html, validate using regular expressions.
To design Webpage for applications.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Acquire knowledge about functionalities of World Wide Web.
2. Design of client side validation using scrip[ting languages.
3. Able to design front end web page and connect to back end databases.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS COVERED:
1. Develop and demonstrate a XHTML document that illustrates the use external style sheet, ordered list,
table, borders, Padding, color, and the <span> tag.
2. Develop and demonstrate a XHTML file that includes JavaScript script for the following problems:
a) Input: A number n obtained using prompt.
Output: The first n Fibonacci numbers.
b) Input: A number n obtained using prompt.
Output: A table of numbers from 1 to n and their squares using alert.
3. Develop and demonstrate a XHTML file that includes JavaScript script that uses functions for the
following problems:

a) Parameter: A string Output: The position in the string of the left-most vowel.
b) Parameter: A number Output: The number with its digits in the reverse order.
4. a) Develop and demonstrate, using JavaScript script, a XHTML document that collects the USN (
the valid format is: A digit from 1 to 4 followed by two upper-case characters followed by two digits
followed by two upper-case characters followed by three digits; no embedded spaces allowed) of the
user. Event handler must be included for the form element that collects this information to validate the
input. Messages in the alert windows must be produced when errors are detected.
b) Modify the above program to get the current semester also (restricted to be a number from 1 to 8).
5. a) Develop and demonstrate, using Javascript script, a XHTML document that contains three short
paragraphs of text, stacked on top of each other, with only enough of each showing so that the mouse
cursor can be placed over some part of them. When the cursor is placed over the exposed part of any
paragraph, it should rise to the top to become completely visible.
b) Modify the above document so that when a paragraph is moved from the top stacking position, it
returns to its original position rather than to the bottom.
6. a) Design an XML document to store information about a student in an engineering College affiliated to
VTU. The information must include USN, Name, Name of the College, Brach, Year of Joining, and email id. Make up sample data for 3 students. Create a CSS style sheet and use it to display the
document.
b) Create an XSLT style sheet for one student element of the above document and use it to create a
display of that element.
7. a) Write a Perl program to display various Server Information like Server Name, Server Software,
Server protocol, CGI revision etc.
b) Write a Perl program to accept UNIX command from a HTML form and to display the output of the
command executed.
8. a) Write a Perl program to accept the User Name and display a greeting message randomly chosen from
a list of 4 greeting messages.
b) Write a Perl program to keep track of the number of visitors visiting the web page and to display this
count of visitors, with proper headings.
9. Write a Perl program to display a digital clock which displays the current time of the server.
10. Write a Perl program to insert name and age information entered by the user into a table created using
MySQL and to Display the current contents of this table.
11.Write a PHP program to store current date-time in a COOKIE and display the Last visited on date-time
on the web page upon reopening of the same page.
12. Write a PHP program to store page views count in SESSION, to increment the count on each refresh,
and to show the count on web page.
13. Create a XHTML form with Name, Address Line 1, Address Line 2, and E-mail text fields. On
submitting, store the values in MySQL table. Retrieve and display the data based on Name.
14. Using PHP and MySQL, develop a program to accept book information viz. Accession number, title,
authors, edition and publisher from a web page and store the information in a database and to search for
a book with the title specified by the user and to display the search results with proper headings.

TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:


1. Harvey & Paul Deitel & Associates, Harvey Deitel and abbey Deitel, Internet and World Wide Web,
Fifth Edition, Pearson Education,2011.
2. Mike Mcgrath ,PHP & MySQL in easy steps, Tata McGraw Hill,2012..
ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:
1. http://php.net/manual/

2. www.webbasedprogramming.com

Contact Hours/ Week

Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course Type

II

IV

Laboratory

Tutorials

Total Hours/
Semester

00

48

Credits
Theory
01

00

Laboratory
03

Course No

Course Title

Pre Requisites

MCA42L

Advanced Java Laboratory

Knowledge of basic Java


language

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. 1. Internal Assessment [Test-1 + Test-2 + Observation book + Record + Viva : 15 + 15 + 05 + 05 +10]
2.
Marks: 50
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course are to teach the student:
1. Learn how to use Java servlet in the role of Web application control.
2. Understand how JSPs can help to separate Web logic and functionality from page layout.
3. Explore how to make JSPs smaller and more powerful with JSTL, custom tags and expression language.
4. Learn the fundamentals of JDBC and using the different interfaces in the JDBC API.
5. Explore strategies in the exchange of data between Web pages (views) and business processing (model).
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Define the problem and write large programs.
2. Develop programs with Servlets, Jsp, EJB.
3. Compose more complex programs from simpler parts.
4. Develop a database projects using JDBC and its interfaces.
5. Write the simplest possible program that solves a given problem while explaining to the reader how it
solves that problem.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS COVERED:
1. Write a JAVA Servlet program to implement a dynamic HTML using Servlet (user name and password
should be accepted using HTML and displayed using a Servlet).
2. Write a JAVA Servlet program to download a file and display it on the screen (A l i n k h a s t o
b e provided in HTML, when the link is clicked corresponding file has to be displayed on Screen).

3. Write a JAVA Servlet program to implement RequestDispatcher object (use include () and forward ()
methods).
4. Write a JAVA Servlet program to implement and demonstrate get() and post() methods(using
HTTPServlet class).
5. Write a JAVA Servlet program to implement sendRedirect() method(using HTTP sServlet class).
6. Write a JAVA Servlet program to implement sessions (using HTTP Session Interface).
7. Write a JAVA JSP program to :
a.print 10 even and 10 odd numbers.
b. Write a JAVA JSP Program to implement verification of a particular user login and display
a welcome page.
8. Write a JAVA JSP Program to get student information through a HTML and create a JAVA Bean class,
populate Bean and display the same information through another JSP.
9. Write a JSP program which uses <jsp:plugin> tag to run a applet.
10. Write a JSP program which implements nested tags and also uses TagSupport class.
11. Develop an EJB application that demonstrates Session Bean.
12. Develop an EJB application that demonstrates Entity Bean.
13. Develop an EJB application that demonstrates MDB.
TEXT BOOKS / REFERENCES:
1. Marty Hall, Larry Brown. Core Servlets and Java Server Pages. Volume 1: Core
Technologies. Second Edition.
2. Java 6 Programming Black Book, Dreamtech Press. 2012.
3. Andrew LeeRubinger, Bill Burke. Developing Enterprise Java Components. Enterprise JavaBeans
3.1.Oreilly.
4.

Michael Sikora, EJB 3 Developer Guide, A practical guide for developers and architects to the
Enterprise Java Beans Standard, Shroff Publishers & Distributors PVT LTD. July 2008.

ADDITIONAL LEARNING SOURCES:


1. http://www.scribd.com.
2. http://clickbeldon.com/tocadv.htm

Contact Hours/ Week


Course
Year

Course
Semester

Course
Type

Credits

II

IV

Seminar

02

Theory

Laboratory

00

Course No

Course Title

MCA46S

Seminar

00

Tutorial
s
02

Total Hours/
Semester
32

Pre Requisites

COURSE ASSESSMENT METHOD:


1. Internal Assessment [5 Events: 3 Intermediately Evaluation, 1 Synopsis submissionand Presentation and
Final Demo and Evaluation ]
Marks: 50 [10* 5 Events].

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The main objectives of this course :
1. To provide flat form for students to improve presentation skills.
2. To motivate students to engage in research activity.
3. To engage students community in application development process.
4. To enable the students to analyze the real world case studies.
5. Enable the students to interact with knowledge communities.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
1.
Demonstrate the knowledge acquired in the chosen subject area.
2.
Interact with research community.
3.
Develop small applications on their own
4.
Analyze the real world problems very effectively.
5.
Do presentation very effectively.

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