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ASSIGNMENT 1

Drawing
Grade 1,2
Alyssa Fortin, Jeri Vilches, Brittany Young
Rationale
When thinking about what we want the students to learn and
what skills we want them to develop, we thought that starting with line
would be best. Line is the most basic form used in art, and has been
for centuries. As the Program of Studies states, learning about and
understanding the different types and qualities of line is necessary in
early artistic development. The students should experiment with the
many types and learn how they can use them to create and build
relationships between imagination and reality.
Seeing as the grade 1s are exploring their kinesthetic
developmental stage, this unit allows them to "be the art" through
movement at life-size. The students get to explore the diversity of line
by placing themselves in the picture.
Considering the fact that we are working with younger grades
(1,2), we can assume that their understanding of line is minimal to
none. In the curriculum under Drawing Concepts, it says to use a
variety of drawing media in an exploratory way to see how each one
has its own characteristics. This goes to show that the students are
being formally introduced to different art styles for the first time, and
only as an exploration. In this case, as we are focusing primarily on
line, it is important that we indulge them in the basics and allow them
to experiment with the many types in order to better understand their
purpose in both the real world and art world.
By bringing them to Composition in the Shape of a Pod, the
students are introduced to a large number of line drawings inspired by
something as simple as a poppy seed. This helps the students
understand the connection between drawing real and natural things
through line. The show also sheds light on the concept of
transformation and turning an object into something else. By seeing
real life examples of different kinds of lines and what they can be used
for, the students are then encouraged to take something of their own
and be creative with it through drawing.
Summary
Throughout the lessons, the students will learn how to make a
variety of lines, and use them as a form of expression. The first
assignment will focus primarily on gaining knowledge about lines and
practicing making them on their own, through both drawing and using
their bodies. The second will help the students connect lines to the real

ASSIGNMENT 1

world through storytelling and visuals, while the third requires the
students to use line to draw a found object that represents them.
Lesson 1
This lesson will focus primarily on the introduction of line and
immersing the students into both a hands-on and kinesthetic
understanding of the concept. They will be shown different types of
lines (curvy, horizontal, vertical, diagonal, zig-zag, etc.) and how to
make them. They will be given pieces of paper and pencils so that they
can practice drawing them themselves as we go through them. Once
they get a chance to draw them, they will be asked to make the lines
with their bodies. How would they look? In what way would they have
to shape their bodies to make these specific lines?
Lesson 2
The students will be read a story that has images representing
strong visual lines (i.e. Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett
Johnson). As the story gets read, the children will be asked what kind of
lines they see. At the end of the story, they will be asked how the lines
made them feel. They will then pick a type of line that they feel they
can identify with. What would this look like? Next, the students will get
into pairs and trace each other on large pieces of paper. This way they
are representing each other using a long, continuous line. The students
can add colour and other things to their silhouettes to make them
more unique.
Lesson 3
A few days before this lesson, the students will be asked to bring
an object from home that they feel represents them. They will draw
these objects on paper using a variety of tools (pen, pencil, crayon,
marker, charcoal, etc.). They will be encouraged to draw it in their own
way as long as the viewer can tell what the object is. The students are
welcome to add colour to their drawings as well. Line quality and the
relationships to form line are explored in this lesson, emphasizing on
how their emotions and feelings may connect to vertical, horizontal,
wavy or energetic lines.