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MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

DESIGN PROJECT III: DEPR031 [080814903]


COURSE GUIDE/LOG BOOK
2016
TOPIC:
..

STUDENTS NAME:...............................
STUDENTS REG.NO
SIGN

MENTOR NAME:
SIGN

NB.
There is no Supplementary or Special Examination in this subject.

Name of Lecturer

Prof.P.A.Owolawi

Office

No. 2-3-18-7

Telephone

031 907 7250

Fax No

031 907 7249

E-Mail

owolawi@mut.ac.za

Facebook ID

Owolawi Pius Adewale

Skype ID

Pius _owo

Consultation times

To be discussed with students at beginning of


each semester

CONSULTATION TIMES
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday

Head of Department
Room number
Telephone
Fax No

:
:
:
:

Prof. P.A.Owolawi
No. 2-3-18-7
031 907 7250
031 907 7249

Departmental Secretary :

Mrs C. Mthembu

Contact details

031 907 7249

Lectures
Practicals
Tutorials

:
:
:

2 Periods/ week (Arranged)


6 Periods/ week
At the Mentors discretion

Lecture Venues

Students to be advised at beginning of each


semester

Practical Venue
Tutorial Venue

:
:

Check Timetable
Check Timetable

Dr TM Walingo

Page 2

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Duration of Course
1.

16 weeks

Welcome and Introduction


Welcome to the nationally accredited programme of Design Project III in
the Department of Electrical Engineering that you will be doing at this
institution. The Department of Electrical Engineering, in support of MUTs
mission statement, undertakes to provide well-qualified Diplomates to the
private and public sector by maintaining the highest academic standards.
In this course you will be introduced to both the theoretical and practical
applications of Engineering Research, Project Management, and Design to
the real world situation.
The purpose of this Learners Guide is:

2.

To provide you with useful information that will assist you in mastering
the course outcomes, which are the end results of this process that you
will be engaged with.
To provide you with information on the teaching methods, mentors and
mentee duties and responsibilities.
To equip you in advance with the outcomes that will be achieved in the
course and the knowledge necessary to achieve these outcomes.
To give you in advance the criteria by which you will be assessed and
the assessment methodologies that will be employed to ensure that
you have reached a satisfactory level of competence in the various
outcomes.

Purpose of this Subject


The aim of this course is to synthesize and consolidate the theoretical
foundations in the field of Electrical Engineering that the student has built
up throughout their academic career towards the diploma.
The student credited with this subject should be able to:

Identify a technological problem, formulate it and propose a technical


solution to the problem.
Integrate all the knowledge acquired in the preliminary courses towards
the diploma for solving a technical problem.
Perform a high level design and component fabrication in a cutting
edge laboratory.
Acquire enough problem analysis techniques to apply to day to day
design problems.
Develop reasonable technical documentation for any project that
should be undertaken.
Acquire presentation skills, including language, to effectively
communicate the knowledge to other members.
Develop teamwork through working with fellow students, lecturers,
consultants and Technical Lab staff.

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

3.

Educational Methodology
The course is a synthesis of skills and knowledge that the students will
have gained from lower levels in the programme. Students are equipped
through formal and non-formal lectures with the following basic skills:
Project Management, Research Methodology, Report Writing, Presentation
and Project Design Skills. Extensive use is made of the Media Centre, the
Computer Simulations Laboratory, Control Systems Laboratory, Process
Instrumentation Laboratory, Electrical Machines Laboratory, Senior
Projects Laboratory and the ultra modern PCB plant. The course is mainly
based on self-study. Other means such as arranged lectures and regular
consultations with project mentors are employed.

4.

Mentor Selection and Consultation


Each student will be allocated the Course Supervisor and a Project
Mentor. These will be drawn from subject specialists from within the
department and from practising technologists in industry. The student is
instructed to:

5.

Consult with the mentor a minimum of once in a week for the duration
of the course.
Ensure that the mentor signs the logbook and assigns continuous
evaluation marks.
Ensure that the Design Project Supervisor(s) sign(s) the logbook on a
monthly basis as indicated.
Follow the guidance of the Mentor and report any problems early to the
mentor.
Students working in industry will be required to have a second
mentor at their place of work to liaise with the Universitys mentor. The
second mentor should meet ECSA mentoring requirements and should
fill in and submit the form attached in this document together with
certified copies of qualifications for approval by the Departmental
Committee for Design Project. Students should visit and consult with
the Universitys mentor and supervisor at least once a month. This
requirement cannot be replaced with telephonic or other means of
communication.

Pre-Requisites
Institutional admission pre-requisite requirements for Electrical
Engineering apply, as set out in the Engineering Faculty Handbook i.e. a
pass in,

6.

Projects II

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

The Institutional Policy on RPL applies. See the Head of Department for
advice.

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

7.

THE SPECIFIC OUTCOMES AND EMBEDDED KNOWLEDGE

Specific outcomes with Assessment Criteria


Learning outcomes
SO1:

Learning
and Essential embedded
Teaching Activities
knowledge

INVESTIGATE AND UNDERSTAND THE PROCESS OF ENGINNERING PROBLEM DEFINITION

Identify, investigate and


understand the necessity
of the project.

Develop
a
research
strategy
towards
completion of the project.

Apply the principles of


project management in
project planning.

The need for the project is clearly understood.


The project title is clearly selected.
The project objectives and compromises are
elaborated.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

The resources required for the project and


their availability is clearly presented.
The need for a thorough project literature
survey.
The project stakeholders and their roles are
clearly presented.
Research methodology tools and plans are
clearly defined.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory
and
principles
concerning
the
project
research
methodology

The project life cycle from conception to


commissioning to decommissioning is clearly
presented.
Project planning techniques are clearly
understood.
Project costing and the estimation is clearly

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory
and
principles associated
with
project
management
and
planning

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Theory
and
principles associated
with
project
definition
The necessity of well
chosen topic

Specific outcomes with Assessment Criteria


Learning outcomes

Learning
and Essential embedded
Teaching Activities
knowledge

presented
Develop a proposal for
the solution of the
defined problem

A good project proposal featuring all aspects


of the project is clearly presented.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory
and
principles associated
with proposal writing
techniques.

SO2: INVESTIGATE ANALYZE AND UNDERSTAND ENGINEERING PROJECT DESIGN


Develop the
basic
project
hardware
technical design from
first principles

Technical knowledge of the design and the


limitations are clearly presented.
A block diagram of the design is clearly
understood and presented.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory
and
principles associated
with block approach
design

Strategy for producing a


well presented technical
design.

Design components are clearly understood


Specifications for the design components are
clearly provided.
Schematic diagram for the design is clearly
produced

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory,
principles
and practical design
presentation

Acquire
expertise
in
software development

Methods of software development are clearly


understood and applied.

Flow charts and pseudo codes are clearly


presented.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations

Theory
principles
software
development

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

and
of

Specific outcomes with Assessment Criteria


Learning outcomes

SO3:

Learning
and Essential embedded
Teaching Activities
knowledge

Skills of good program design are clearly


mastered.

Workshops

INVESTIGATE UNDERSTAND AND APPLY THE ART OF PROJECT TESTING AND REDESIGN

Develop a simulation
platform
for
the
developed
hardware
design.

Simulation techniques are clearly mastered


Simulation software is clearly understood

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory and practice


with
simulation
softwares

Investigate the hardware


design and redesign

(Results)

Ability to get good simulation results.


Ability to make alternative design choices for
components and other materials towards
good results.
Ability to endure testing and retesting until
final results are achieved.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory and working


knowledge hardware
design

Ability to source funds and procure the design


components.
Issues of component specifications are clearly
enforced.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory and working


knowledge
of
component
procurement

Acquire expertise in final


design
material
(components)

procurement

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Specific outcomes with Assessment Criteria


Learning outcomes

Learning
and Essential embedded
Teaching Activities
knowledge

Develop a simulation
platform and simulate the
developed software

Ability to apply modern software development


techniques.

Ability to identify and debug programs is


mastered.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory and working


knowledge
of
simulation

Develop
a
practical
working project model
(prototype)

Practical project testing on various test beds


e.g. bread board can be clearly done.
Skills of prototype testing and retesting
(trouble shooting) are presented.
Ability to make alternative design choices for
components and other materials towards
good results.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory and working


knowledge of project
models

SO4:

INVESTIGATE UNDERSTAND AND APPLY THE ART OF PROJECT PRESENTATION

Develop
project
packaging skills.

Project fabrication and PCB design skills


should be evident.
Project packaging skills e.g. casing are clearly
demonstrated.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory and working


knowledge of project
packaging

Develop
results Ability to choose the relevant suitable results
presentation skills
for presentation.

Research
Group discussions

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Theory
and
working knowledge

Specific outcomes with Assessment Criteria


Learning outcomes

Learning
and Essential embedded
Teaching Activities
knowledge

Ability to use research presentation tools to


present the results.

Develop
Project Oral presentation skills are clearly presented.
presentation skills

Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

of
results
presentation.

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory
and
principles of project
presentation.

Develop
projects Ability to produce a detailed technical report
technical reporting skills
for the whole project

(Document)

Research
Group discussions
Presentations
Consultations
Workshops

Theory
and
principles of project
documentation.

Theory
and
principles of Design
Projects III

SO5:

FINAL PROJECT EVALUATION

Qualifying for Design Ability of presenting a good technical design


Projects III at MUT
Oral presentation ability.
Practical presentation ability

Dr TM Walingo

Page 10

Presentations

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

8.

Evaluation of the Programme and Assessment Criteria


The evaluation of the programme is carried out by Senate in conjunction
with ECSA and consultations with experts from industry.
The assessment of learning outcomes will be by continuous evaluation.
To pass the course the student must obtain a final mark of 50%, which will
be a sum total of the four continuous evaluation components.
Continuous Evaluation Structure and Marks
Item

Due Date

Draft Project Proposal


Final Project Proposal

08th 12th Feb 2016


15th 19th Feb 2016

Project Model/Prototype

25th 29th Apr 2016

Project
Documentation/Report
and
Mock presentation with
peers

03rd May 2016

Final Project Presentation


+
Project Evaluation with
external examiners

23rd 27th May 2016

06th May 2016

TOTAL

Dr TM Walingo

Mark Allocated

Page 11

100%

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

9.

RECOMMENDED REFERENCES

http://www.electrical-online.com/wiringdiagrams.htm
http://www.smartdraw.com/specials/electrical.asp?
id=187880&gclid=CNGH6aHPq58CFQYNDQodQFlO1w
http://www.scribd.com/doc/6931476/L4-Transfer-Function-Block-Diagram
http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6252446/description.html
http://www.rff.com/flowchart_samples.htm
http://www.agilemodeling.com/artifacts/flowChart.htm
http://www.smartdraw.com/specials/ppc/flow-chart.htm?
id=45103&gclid=CIzMx9nQq58CFUKZ2AodixQ70g
http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6916211/description.html
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/breadb.htm
http://www.play-hookey.com/digital/experiments/breadboard_sockets.html
http://raphael.mit.edu/WillcoxASEE04.pdf
http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?is=0333922247
http://asee.morrisville.edu/pdf/Schneider%202007%20-%20Engineering
%20Applications%20in%20Calc.pdf
http://www.airborn.com.au/method/layout.html

10.

FORMAT OF DOCUMENT

Introduction
A technician who is unable to communicate effectively with his superiors or
colleagues will never receive due credit for his/her work. Information must be
transmitted in a clear and concise manner in order to enable decisions to be made.
The most popular method of technical communication is via the report.
Points to consider before starting your report
The following should be considered prior to starting your report:
1. Why is the report being written?
2. Have the contents been planned in a manner that can be easily understood by the
reader?
3. Who will read the report? This decides the level of technical information that is to
be included.
Suggestions to improve the quality and presentation of your report
1. Choose a short, meaningful title.
2. Include as many tables and diagrams as you think are appropriate. Remember
that a single diagram will often clarify what would otherwise be a very confused
paragraph.
3. Use a simple, clear style of writing. Long and involved sentences are a hindrance
to easy understanding and often contain grammatical errors.
Format of the Start of the Report: Title Page and Plagiarism Declaration
The format to be followed for the title page and plagiarism declaration is shown
below:

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

A Project Report on

SPEED CONTROL OF DC MOTOR BY USING PWM


TECHNIQUE
BY
P.A.Owolawi (072210234)
Submitted in the Faculty of Engineering : Department of Electrical Engineering
in a partial fulfillment of the requirement to award the

National Diploma in Electrical Engineering: Specialization e.g. Process


Instrumentation

at the
Mangosuthu University of Technology
Under the esteemed guidance of

Dr. P.A.Owolawi

Student Signature/Date

..
Mentor signature/Date

..
Subject leader Signature/ Date

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

PLAGIARISM DECLARATION
1. I know and understand that plagiarism is using another persons work and pretending it is
ones own, which is wrong.
2. This report / project / essay is my own work.
3. I have appropriately referenced the work of other people I have used.
4. I have not allowed, and will not allow, anyone to copy my work with the intention of
passing it off as his/her own work.

..
Student Name/Student No

Student Signature/Date

REPORT LAYOUT
PRELIMINARIES
The preliminaries will include the following, each on a new page. The page numbering
format should be different to the main body of the report.
Acknowledgements
You can use this section to express your gratitude to those who assisted you with your
project. Only necessary with large reports and should not be used to increase the size of your
document.
Abstract
A brief(one paragraph) clear and concise summary of the contents of the report, stating your
results and conclusions.
Table of Contents
The contents list must contain the main and sub-paragraph headings and the respective page
numbers. The table of contents is formatted using right tab stops with dot leaders.
List of Figures and/or Tables
List of Constants and Abbreviations

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION
The objective of the introduction is to acquaint the reader with the problem and to point out
the purpose and significance of the report. Clearly define the specifications and scope of the
project.
CHAPTER 2 - DESIGN
System Block Diagram: Give the systems block diagram including signals and discuss the
function of each stage (block on the diagram).
The body contains the primary message of the report, described in detail. The subject matter
discussed in the body must be logically developed and presented in a manner that is easy for
the reader to understand. All aspects of your design are to be discussed in this section.
Circuit Diagram: Draw the circuit diagram and clearly indicate all its different stages. The
methodology used to design your circuit must also be discussed in this chapter. For example,
if you were designing a driver circuit to provide sufficient current to operate the car motors,
then you must describe the operation of this circuit and also mention the points taken into
consideration during the selection of the driver transistor/s or integrated circuit. All
information on the selected components can be found in the respective data sheets and
application notes. Calculations are to be shown wherever necessary. Also mention any safety
features that you may have incorporated in your design. For example, you may have used an
opto-coupler to isolate the micro-controller from the motor driver circuit.
CHAPTER 3 - CONSTRUCTION
CHAPTER 4 - TESTING
Procedures used to test various stages of the project must be included here.
Software and software design: For micro-controller based projects, the software flowchart
must be given. For high-level programming, the top-down design should be included.
Certain aspects of the software, such as any calculations used must also be detailed in this
chapter. The complete software listing must be shown in an annexure.
CHAPTER 5 - RESULTS
All results obtained during testing should be documented and compared to expected results.
Remember, a graphical representation of your results is usually more meaningful and
therefore preferable to tabulated results.
CHAPTER 6 - CONCLUSION
This chapter discusses the efficiency of the systems design and the conclusions arrived at,
based upon the performance of the design ascertained during the testing stage. You may also
Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

make any worthwhile recommendations, to improve the performance of your project, in this
chapter.
REFERENCES
All references used to design your system must be given and all references used must be
referred to in the text. The following format must be adhered to when listing references:
[1] Cebekhulu R, Groenewald S, Naidoo T, Students Guide to Project Design. Prentice-Hall,
2000.
[2] Astronomy 161 The Solar System, available at:
http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/time/coordinates.html [10 September 2007]
[3] Chambers W R, Dictionary for Science and Technology. Pearson, 2009.
[4] Bose N K, Digital Filters, Theory and Applications, 2nd Edition. Elsevier Science
Publishing Company, New York, 1975.
[5] ANSI/IEEE Standard 488.1, IEEE Standard Digital Interface for Programmable
Instrumentation. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, New York, 1987.
Note that for website references, the actual website page reference must be used and NOT
simply the generic website address (see [2] above). The date the website is accessed must
also be included.

ANNEXURES
The following are examples of the type of data that could appear in an annexure:
Complete Circuit Schematic
PCB Layout
Bill of Materials (costing table)
Full Code Listings
Data sheets should be included as an annexure only if certain details on the datasheet need to
be referenced in your text. If details on the datasheet are not needed as a reference in the
body of the report, the datasheets should NOT be included.

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

10.

PROBLEMS RELATED TO ACCESS TO FACILITIES

A class representative must be elected by the end of the first week of lectures. All
contact details of the class rep must be submitted to the lecturer. The role of the
class rep is to ensure that all students in this course have access to the required,
working facilities. In the event of problems encountered with any access, whatsoever
deemed necessary, e.g. no internet, lab equipment not functioning, no resource
material, etc., the following procedure must be followed:
i. The case must be brought to the attention of the lecturer immediately, in
writing.
ii. The lecturer will submit his/her written motivation, with the written notification
from the class rep, to the HoD and Control Technician, in the case of nonfunctional labs.
iii. The class rep is required to acknowledge, by means of a lab equipment
audit with the Technician, the status of lab equipment on a routine basis.
iv. It is the responsibility of the class rep to ensure that any matter, as raised
with the lecturer, is discussed at the next departmental meeting and
remedial actions put in place.
v. If, at a point of an assessment, problems arise due to non-functional
facilities, the assessment will in no way be cancelled. If students fail any
assessment, due to access to facilities, the relevant authorities will be
accountable.
vi. If problems to access to facilities are not resolved within a week, the
relevant authorities will be accountable.

Dr TM Walingo

Page 19

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

SECTION A: PROJECT PROPOSAL


{To be completed by Mentor and submitted for final evaluation by the external
examiner} Note: the external examiners mark will be recorded for the
candidate and failure to submit your proposal as at when due will result to 10%
PENALTY ON YOUR PROPOSAL MARK

Proposal Mark (PPM)

These are the items that will be submitted to external examiner by


the course co-ordinator:
1. Printed proposal document: follow the guidelines for proposal writing
2. Project proposal marksheet( mark allocated by mentor) see section A
3. Printed Power point presentation (your presentation to your mentor must be
done in power point.
4. Blank marksheet for external examiner( Blank section A)

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Example of a good
proposal

Content of your proposal


Title of your project
Aim
Purpose
Introduction/Abstract
Literature Review
Methodology
Block Diagram
Circuit Diagram
Description
Project Plan
Project cost /Budget
Expected results
References

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

WIRELESS ENERGY METER USING RF


COMMUNICATION

AIM:
The main aim of this project is to monitor and record the power meter reading using
RF Technology.

PURPOSE:
The purpose of this project is to send the information to the control section by using
RF technology about the power meter reading.

INTRODUCTION/ABSTRACT:
LITERATURE REVIEW:
METHODOLOGY:
BLOCK DIAGRAM:
POWER SUPPLY:

Step Down
Transformer

Dr TM Walingo

Bridge
Rectifier

Page 22

Filter
Circuit

Regulator
section

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

CONTROL SECTION:

Power supply
MICRO CONTROLLER

RF
RECEIVER

DECODER

PC

Dr TM Walingo

MAX
232

Page 23

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

METER SECTION :

LCD
Power supply
Power supply

Micro controller
EEPROM

OPTO
COUPLER

RF TRANSMITTER

Energy Meter

ENCODER

RELAY

HOME
APPLIANCE

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM :
DESCRIPTION:
Now-a-days technology has developed to a large extend. At the same time the need
for systems with automation and high security are preferred. So, by using one of the best
technologies available i.e. RF we are designing an automatic power meter reading system for
commercial and domestic purposes. For paying electricity bills we have to go to e-seva for
paying the bills, this is very time consuming process and in electrical department side there

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

may be a chance of errors in noting the units and issue of monthly bills. By using this project
we can avoid such problems.
The system is consists of RF digital Power meters installed in every consumer unit and
an electricity system at the energy provider side. The RF Digital Power Meter is a single phase
digital kWh power meter with embedded RF encoder and decoder which utilizes the RF network
to send its power usage reading using encoder back to the energy provider wirelessly. A working
prototype of the system was build to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of automatic
meter reading, billing and notification through the use of RF network.

This project is aimed to develop a system to provide security by intimating the


condition of energy meter reading to the control section. There are two sections in this
project, makes use of a RF transmitter to send the messages resembling the condition.
The main objective of this project is to design a wireless energy meter system with the
help of RF technology. For measuring energy consumed by the user we are going to use one
digital energy meter, at the same time as it uses 1unit the count will be displayed in LCD and
automatically one message will send through RF communication. In this project we are using
bulb as a load. On LCD we are going display No of units consumed in that time. Up to end no
of units consumed and total amount to be pay will update according to the power
consumption.
HARDWARE COMPONENTS:
1. 8051
2. Power supply
3. RF Transmitter & Receiver
4. Relay
5. Energy Meters
6. LCD
7. Buzzer
8. Loads
SOFTWARE TOOLS:
1. Embedded C

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

2. Keil IDE
3. Uc-Flash or ISP
4. Express PCB

PROJECT PLAN:
PROJECT COST/BUDGET :

RESULT:
This kind of project is very effective and can be used for recording the energy consumed by
user.

REFERENCES : IEEE Citation Style Guide


Any citation style is set up to give the reader immediate information about sources cited in
the text. In IEEE citations, the references should be numbered and appear in the order they
appear in the text. When referring to a reference in the text of the document, put the number
of the reference in square brackets. Eg: [1]
The IEEE citation style has 3 main features:
The author name is first name (or initial) and last. This differs from MLA style where
authors last name is first.
The title of an article (or chapter, conference paper, patent etc.) is in quotation marks.
The title of the journal or book is in italics.
These conventions allow the reader to distinguish between types of reference at a glance. The
correct placement of periods, commas and colons and of date and page numbers depends on
the type of reference cited. Check the examples below. Follow the details exactly. Eg.: put
periods after author and book title, cite page numbers as pp., abbreviate all months to the first
three letters (eg. Jun.)
Check the distinctions between print and electronic sources (especially for journals) carefully.
Print References
Book
Author(s). Book title. Location: Publishing company, year, pp.
Example:
W.K. Chen. Linear Networks and Systems. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1993, pp. 123-35.
Book Chapters
Author(s). Chapter title in Book title, edition, volume. Editors name, Ed. Publishing
location: Publishing company, year, pp.
Example:

Dr TM Walingo

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Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

J.E. Bourne. Synthetic structure of industrial plastics, in Plastics, 2nd ed., vol. 3. J. Peters,
Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964, pp.15-67.
Article in a Journal
Author(s). Article title. Journal title, vol., pp, date.
Example:
G. Pevere. Infrared Nation. The International Journal of Infrared Design, vol. 33, pp. 5699, Jan. 1979.
Articles from Conference Proceedings (published)
Author(s). Article title. Conference proceedings, year, pp.
Example:
D.B. Payne and H.G. Gunhold. Digital sundials and broadband technology, in Proc. IOOCECOC, 1986, pp. 557-998.
Papers Presented at Conferences (unpublished)
Author(s). Papers title, Conference name, Location, year.
Example:
B. Brandli and M. Dick. Engineering names and concepts, presented at the 2 nd Int. Conf.
Engineering Education, Frankfurt, Germany, 1999.
Standards/Patents
Author(s)/Inventor(s). Name/Title. Country where patent is registered. Patent number, date.
Example:
E.E. Rebecca. Alternating current fed power supply. U.S. Patent 7 897 777, Nov. 3, 1987.
Electronic References
Books
Author. (year, Month day). Book title. (edition). [Type of medium]. Vol. (issue). Available:
site/path/file [date accessed].
Example:
S. Calmer. (1999, June 1). Engineering and Art. (2nd edition). [On-line]. 27(3). Available:
www.enggart.com/examples/students.html [May 21, 2003].
Journal
Author. (year, month). Article title. Journal title. [Type of medium]. Vol. (issue), pages.
Available: site/path/file [date accessed].
Example:
A. Paul. (1987, Oct.). Electrical properties of flying machines. Flying Machines. [On-line].
38(1), pp. 778-998. Available: www.flyingmachjourn/properties/fly.edu [Dec. 1, 2003].
World Wide Web
Author(s)*. Title. Internet: complete URL, date updated* [date accessed].
M. Duncan. Engineering Concepts on Ice. Internet: www.iceengg.edu/staff.html, Oct. 25,
2000 [Nov. 29, 2003].
Odd Sources
Newspaper
Author(s)*. Article title. Newspaper (month, year), section, pages.
Examples:
B. Bart. Going Faster. Globe and Mail (Oct. 14, 2002), sec. A p.1.
Telehealth in Alberta. Toronto Star (Nov. 12, 2003), sec. G pp. 1-3.
Dissertations and Theses
Author. Title. Degree level, school, location, year.
Example:
S. Mack. Desperate Optimism. M.A. thesis, University of Calgary, Canada, 2000.
Lecture
Lecturer(s). Occasion, Topic: Lecture title. Location, date.

Dr TM Walingo

Page 27

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Example:
S. Maw. Engg 251. Class Lecture, Topic: Speed skating. ICT 224, Faculty of Engineering,
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Oct. 31, 2003.
E-mail
Author. Subject line of posting. Personal E-mail (date).
Example:
J. Aston. RE: new location, okay? Personal e-mail (Jul. 3, 2003).
Internet - Newsgroup
Author or Topic*, Title, Complete network address, date when it was updated [date
accessed].
Example:
G.G. Gavin. Climbing and limb torsion #3387, USENET: sci.climb.torsion, Apr. 19, 2000
[Oct. 4, 2002].
* if you cant find this information, exclude it.
Exact page number References
To refer readers to specific page numbers in a text, use the number of the reference followed
by a colon (:) and the page numbers.
Example:
Johnson suggests that citing will lead to a decrease in being cited for plagiarism [1:28-29].
The [1] refers to the numbered reference
And the 28-29 refers to the pages being cited.

Dr TM Walingo

Page 28

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

NOTE:
ALL STUDENTS
MUST REQUEST FOR
SAMPLE OF A GOOD
DOCUMENTATION
FROM THEIR
MENTOR
.

Dr TM Walingo

Page 29

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY


NATIONAL DIPLOMA: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
DESIGN PROJECTS III: DEPR031 080814903

Mentorship Acceptance Form: Design Project III

Students working in industry will be required to have a second mentor at their place of work to liaise
with the Universitys mentor. The second mentor should meet ECSA mentoring requirements and should
fill in and submit the form attached in this document together with certified copies of qualifications for
approval by the departmental committee. Students should visit and consult with the Universitys mentor
and supervisor at least once a month. This requirement cannot be replaced with telephonic or otherwise
means of communication.

Students Surname and Initials:_____________________________________________________

Students Registration Number : ___________________________________________________

Discipline: _______________________________________________________________________

Dr TM Walingo

Page 30

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Semester

Date from:

to:

Employers Name and Address:

No of
weeks:
Position Held:

Mentors Name and Address:


Mentors
Signature:
ECSA Registration No:
Date:

Declaration by Mentor: I hereby confirm that I am conversant with the requirements for Mentorship as set out in
.., and that I am prepared to substantiate my view expressed herein at an interview, should the
Mangosuthu University of Technologys Electrical Engineering Design Project III Evaluation Pannel require me to do
so.

Name of Mentor: ______________________________________________________________________________


Qualifications: __________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
ECSA Registration: __________________________________ Registration No: __________________

Employer: _____________________________________
Signature of Mentor: ________________________________

Tel/Cell. No: ____________________________


Date: ____________________________

NB. This report should be accompanied by certified copies of qualifications


It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the relevant documentation is
correctly submitted on time. If not submitted before the start of the final examination
Dr TM Walingo

Page 31

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

the student will not be evaluated, which will result in failure.

RUBRIC FOR DESIGN PROJECT III: PROPOSAL


Signature of Student: ________________________________

Date: _________________

Final
marks/
100%
Student name
Student No
Module Title
Project Title
Name of
assessor

Writing

Introduction

Dr TM Walingo

The writers decisions about focus,


organization, style/tone, and content
made reading a pleasurable
experience. Writing could be used
as a model of how to fulfill the

Page 32

The writer has made good


decisions about focus,
organization, style/tone, and
content to communicate clearly
and effectively. The purpose and

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

The writers decisions ab


focus, organization,
style/tone, and/or content
sometimes interfere with
clear, effective

assignment. The purpose and focus


of the writing are clear to the reader
and the organization and content
achieve the purpose well. Writing
follows all requirements for the
project.

focus of the writing are clear to


the reader and the organization
and content achieve the purpose
well. Writing follows all
requirements for the project.

communication. The purp


of the writing is not fully
achieved. All requiremen
the project may not be
fulfilled.

Writing flows smoothly from one


idea to another. The writer has taken
pains to assist the reader in
following the logic of the ideas
expressed. Sequencing of ideas
within paragraphs and transitions
between paragraphs make the
writers points easy to follow.

Sentences are structured and


word are chosen to communicate
ideas clearly. Sequencing of
ideas within paragraphs and
transitions between paragraphs
make the writers points easy to
follow.

Sentence structure and/o


word choice sometimes
interfere with clarity. Nee
to improve sequencing of
ideas within paragraphs a
transitions between
paragraphs to make the
writing easy to follow.

Writer is at ease with content


and able to elaborate and
explain to some degree.

Writer is uncomfortable w
content. Only basic conce
are demonstrated and
interpreted.

Writing

Clarity of
writing

Writing

Demonstration Demonstration of full knowledge of


of
the subject with explanations and
elaboration.
knowledge

Organization

Flow of
information

Information is presented in a logical, Information is presented in a


interesting way, which is easy to
logical manner, which is easily
follow.
followed.

Work is hard to follow as


there is very little continui

Proposal
Layout

Proposal
Content

All the content suggested in the


proposal layout is fully detailed in
the proposal and report format is
consistent throughout including
heading styles, fonts, margins, white
space, etc.

Some of the content suggested


in the proposal layout is fully
detailed in the proposal and
Report format is generally
consistent.

Few of the content sugge


in the proposal layout is f
detailed in the proposal a
Many departures from
required report format.

Power Point

Proposal
Presentation

Demonstrate full use of power point


tool bar: design, animation, slide
show etc

Partially demonstrate full use of


power point tool bar: design,
animation, slide show etc

Demonstrate use of few


power point tool bar: desi
animation, slide show etc

Figures &
Graphs

Format &
captions

Departmental format is observed in


all figures and graphs. Captions
effectively communicate content and
All figures are effectively interpreted
and discussed in the report.

Minor departures from required


format or inconsistencies
between figures and graphs.
Captions effectively
communicate content and Most

Many departures from


required format or
inconsistencies between
figures and graphs. Capti
are ineffective in

Dr TM Walingo

Page 33

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Departmental format is observed in


all tables. Captions effectively
communicate content.

figures are properly interpreted


and important features noted.
Minor departures from required
format or inconsistencies
between tables. Captions
effectively communicate content.

communicating content a
Many figures are not
interpreted. Important
features are not
communicated or
understood.

Many departures from


required format or
inconsistencies between
tables. Captions are
ineffective in communicat
content.

Engineering
tools and
software

Engineering

Tables

Effectiveness

tools

Computer-based tools and technical


software were used extensively in
the project; new software was
learned as needed

Computer-based tools and


technical software were used
partially in the project; new
software was learned as needed

All tables are effectively interpreted


and discussed in the report.

Most tables are properly


interpreted and important
features noted.

Citations consistent with format.

Use of MS
Project tool

Project tool

Dr TM Walingo

Working with Project, Setting Up


Project Files, Creating Tasks,
Linking and Timing Tasks, Creating
Resources, Assigning Tasks to
Resources, Working with Views,
Fine-Tuning the Project Schedule,
Tracking and Managing a Project,
Viewing and Reporting Project
Information and Sharing Projects

Page 34

Technical software was n


utilized; no attempt was
made at learning new
software

Many tables are not


interpreted. Important
features are not
communicated or underst
Minor inconsistencies referring to Many inconsistencies
tables.
referring to tables.

Working with Project, Setting Up


Project Files, Creating Tasks,
Linking and Timing Tasks,
Creating Resources, Assigning
Tasks to Resources, Working
with Views, Fine-Tuning the
Project Schedule, Tracking and
Managing a Project, Viewing

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Working with Project, Set


Up Project Files, Creatin
Tasks, Linking and Timing
Tasks, and Creating
Resources,

Equations

Format &
Citation

Departmental format is observed in


all equations. Citations consistent
with format.

Minor departures from required


format or inconsistencies
between equations. Minor
problems with citation of
equations. Some symbols not
properly defined.

Many departures from


required format. Many
problems with citation of
equations. Many symbol
not properly defined.

Mechanics

Spelling &
Grammar

Negligible errors.

Minor errors.

Several errors.

Readability

Noise-Free

Report was free of noise issues.

Some instances of noise.

Many instances of noise

References

References

Reference section complete,


Minor inadequacies in references Inadequate list of referen
comprehensive and follows required or inconsistencies in format.
or failure to follow require
format.
format.

Overall
Performance
Points
Required

Exceptional

Acceptable

Marginal (D-Level)

100-80%

79-55%

54-49%

Additional feedback from examiner (required)

Dr TM Walingo

Page 35

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

RUBRIC FOR DESIGN PROJECT III: PROTOTYPE


Final
marks/
100%
Student name
Student No
Module Title
Project Title
Name of
assessor

Appropriate technology
(drawings, prototype,
other medium)
to perform
task

Clearly identifies a range


of possible alternative
technologies to create an
understanding of the
product and chooses the
most appropriate to
perform the task.

Construction or drawings.

Evidence of thorough work Evidence of work done on Students left some stuff
appropriate to the time
the project. Project is seen undone due to lack of work or
allotted, drawings or
as complete.
time.
prototype were complete
with attention to detail.

No e

Computers and Software

Computer-based tools and


technical software were
used extensively in the
project; new software was
learned as needed

Computer-based tools and


technical software were
somewhat utilized; some
effort was put into learning
new software as needed

Computer-based tools and


technical software were partially
utilized; some effort was put into
learning new software as needed

Tech
no a
new

Grammar/Mechanics:
Correct grammar and usage
that is appropriate for
audience(s)

Presentation contains no
grammar errors; sentences
are free of jargon, complete
and easy to understand

Presentation has no serious


grammar errors; sentences
are mostly jargon-free,
complete and
understandable

Presentation may contain some


grammar or sentence errors;
sentences may contain jargon or
are too long or hard to follow

Pres
gram
are l
exce

Very good

Fairly done

Poo

Very good

Fairly done

Poo

1. Soldering: Neatness. Excellently done

Applies selected
technology to perform the
task with some efficiency
and effectiveness.
Displays understanding of
the results.

Uses selected technology


inaccurately to perform task
ineffectively and inefficiently,
while demonstrating only a
minimal understanding of
purpose and results.

Mak
tech
purp

2. Soldering: Joint
Condition.
3. Board Population:
General aesthetic
appeal.
1. Board Population:

Dr TM Walingo

Excellently done

Page 36

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Spacing between
components.
2. Board population:

Squareness of
components.
3. PCB Design:
Technical
considerations.
1. PCB Design:
General aesthetic
appeal.

Excellently done

Very good

Fairly done

Poo

The presentation was


summed up clearly and
effectively, with key points
emphasised.

The presentation was


summed up clearly.

An attempt was made to conclude


the presentation.

The
up c

The presentation was


Answering questions from summed up clearly and
audience/ examiner/mentor effectively, with key points
emphasised.

The presentation was


summed up clearly.

An attempt was made to conclude


the presentation.

No a
the p

2. PCB Design: Cost


effectiveness of
design.
Conclusion of topic

Safety

Clearly understand the


understand the safety:
Partially understand the safety:
safety: design, lab and
design, lab and
design, lab and environmental
environmental impact of the environmental impact of the impact of the project
project
project

No u
lab a
proje

Functionality and
troubleshooting

Functioning, understand
Functioning, understand
components, circuit
components, circuit
diagram and troubleshoot if diagram and partially
reconfigure
troubleshoot if reconfigure

Functioning, partially understand


components, circuit diagram and
troubleshoot if reconfigure

Not
com
parti

Overall Performance

Exceptional

Acceptable

Marginal (D-Level)

[Una

Points Required

100-80%

79-55%

54-49%

48-0

Additional feedback from examiner (required)

Dr TM Walingo

Page 37

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

RUBRIC FOR DESIGN PROJECT III: DOCUMENTATION


Final
marks/
100%
Student name
Student No
Module Title
Project Title
Name of
assessor

Writing

Introduction

The writers decisions about focus,


organization, style/tone, and content
made reading a pleasurable
experience. Writing could be used
as a model of how to fulfill the
assignment. The purpose and focus
of the writing are clear to the reader
and the organization and content
achieve the purpose well. Writing
follows all requirements for the
project.

The writer has made good


decisions about focus,
organization, style/tone, and
content to communicate clearly
and effectively. The purpose and
focus of the writing are clear to
the reader and the organization
and content achieve the purpose
well. Writing follows all
requirements for the project.

The writers decisions ab


focus, organization,
style/tone, and/or content
sometimes interfere with
clear, effective
communication. The pur
of the writing is not fully
achieved. All requiremen
the project may not be
fulfilled.

Writing

Clarity of
writing

Writing flows smoothly from one


idea to another. The writer has taken
pains to assist the reader in
following the logic of the ideas
expressed. Sequencing of ideas
within paragraphs and transitions
between paragraphs make the
writers points easy to follow.

Sentences are structured and


word are chosen to communicate
ideas clearly. Sequencing of
ideas within paragraphs and
transitions between paragraphs
make the writers points easy to
follow.

Sentence structure and/o


word choice sometimes
interfere with clarity. Nee
to improve sequencing of
ideas within paragraphs a
transitions between
paragraphs to make the
writing easy to follow.

Writing

Demonstration Demonstration of full knowledge of


of
the subject with explanations and
elaboration.
knowledge

Organization

Flow of
information

Dr TM Walingo

Writer is at ease with content and Writer is uncomfortable w


able to elaborate and explain to content. Only basic conce
some degree.
are demonstrated and
interpreted.

Information is presented in a logical, Information is presented in a


interesting way, which is easy to
logical manner, which is easily
follow.
followed.

Page 38

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Work is hard to follow as


there is very little continu

Organization

Division of
information

All information is located in the


appropriate section.

Report

Format

Report format is consistent


Report format is generally
throughout including heading styles, consistent.
fonts, margins, white space, etc.

Many departures from


required report format.

&

Some information is in the wrong Many items are in the wro


section.
section.

aesthetics

Figures &
Graphs

Format &
captions

Departmental format is observed in


all figures and graphs. Captions
effectively communicate content.

Minor departures from required


format or inconsistencies
between figures and graphs.
Captions effectively
communicate content.

Many departures from


required format or
inconsistencies between
figures and graphs. Capti
are ineffective in
communicating content.

Figures &
Graphs

Effectiveness

All figures are effectively interpreted


and discussed in the report.

Most figures are properly


interpreted and important
features noted.

Many figures are not


interpreted. Important
features are not
communicated or
understood.

Figures &
Graphs

Citations

Citations consistent with format.

Minor inconsistencies referring


to figures.

Many inconsistencies
referring to figures.

Tables

Format &
captions

Departmental format is observed in


all tables. Captions effectively
communicate content.

Minor departures from required


format or inconsistencies
between tables. Captions
effectively communicate content.

Many departures from


required format or
inconsistencies between
tables. Captions are
ineffective in communicat
content.

Tables

Effectiveness

All tables are effectively interpreted


and discussed in the report.

Most tables are properly


interpreted and important
features noted.

Many tables are not


interpreted. Important
features are not
communicated or
understood.

Dr TM Walingo

Page 39

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Tables

Citations

Citations consistent with format.

Minor inconsistencies referring to Many inconsistencies


tables.
referring to tables.

Equations

Format &
Citation

Departmental format is observed in


all equations. Citations consistent
with format.

Minor departures from required


format or inconsistencies
between equations. Minor
problems with citation of
equations. Some symbols not
properly defined.

Many departures from


required format. Many
problems with citation of
equations. Many symbol
not properly defined.

Mechanics

Spelling

Negligible errors.

Minor errors.

Several errors.

Mechanics

Grammar

Negligible errors.

Minor errors.

Several errors.

Readability

Noise-Free

Report was free of noise issues.

Some instances of noise.

Many instances of noise

References

References

Reference section complete,


Minor inadequacies in references Inadequate list of referen
comprehensive and follows required or inconsistencies in format.
or failure to follow require
format.
format.

Overall
Performance
Points
Required

Exceptional

Acceptable

Marginal (D-Level)

100-80%

79-55%

54-49%

Additional feedback from examiner (required)

Dr TM Walingo

Page 40

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

RUBRIC FOR DESIGN PROJECT III: ORAL PRESENTATION


Final
marks/
100%
Student name
Student No
Module Title
Project Title
Name of
assessor

Content: Importance of topic, Topic is tightly focused and


relevance, accuracy of facts, relevant; presentation
overall treatment of topic
contains accurate
information with no fact
errors

Topic is adequately focused Topic would benefit from more


and relevant; major facts
focus; presentation contains some
are accurate and generally fact errors or omissions
complete

Topi
pres
error

Organization/Clarity:
Appropriate introduction,
body, and conclusions; logical
ordering of ideas; transitions
between major points

Most ideas are in logical


order with adequate
transitions between most
major ideas; presentation is
generally clear and
understandable

Some ideas not presented in


proper order; transitions are
needed between some ideas;
some parts of presentation may be
wordy or unclear

Idea
orde
majo
pres

Completeness: Level of
Presentation provides good
detail, depth, appropriate
depth and detail; ideas well
length, adequate background developed; facts have
of information
adequate background;
presentation is within
specified length

Presentation provides
adequate depth; few
needed details are omitted;
major ideas adequately
developed; presentation is
within specified length

Additional depth needed in places;


important information omitted or
not fully developed; presentation is
too short or too long

Pres
adeq
omit
pres

Grammar/Mechanics:
Correct grammar and usage
that is appropriate for
audience(s)

Presentation has no serious Presentation may contain some


grammar errors; sentences grammar or sentence errors;
are mostly jargon-free,
sentences may contain jargon or
complete and

Dr TM Walingo

Ideas are presented in


logical order with effective
transitions between major
ideas; presentation is clear
and concise

Presentation contains no
grammar errors; sentences
are free of jargon, complete
and easy to understand

Page 41

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Pres
gram
are l

understandable

are too long or hard to follow

exce

Documentation: Proper
support and sourcing for
major ideas, inclusion of
visual aids that support
message

Effective message support


provided in the form of facts
and visual aids; sourcing is
current and supports major
ideas

Adequate message support


provided for key concepts
by facts and visual aids;
sourcing is generally
adequate and current

Some message support provided


by facts and visual aids; sourcing
may be out dated or thin, visual
aids need work

Littl
prov
are m
sour

Delivery: Adequate volume,


appropriate pace, diction,
personal appearance,
enthusiasm/energy, posture,
effective use of visual aids

Good volume and energy;


proper pace and diction;
avoidance of distracting
gestures; professional
appearance; visual aids
used effectively

Adequate volume and


energy; generally good
pace and diction; few or no
distracting gestures;
professional appearance;
visual aids used adequately

More volume/energy needed at


times; pace too slow or fast; some
distracting gestures or posture;
adequate appearance; visual aids
could be improved.

Low
slow
gest
appe

Interactions: Adequate eye


contact with audience, ability
to listen and/or answer
questions

Good eye contact with


audience; excellent listening
skills; answers audience
questions with authority and
accuracy

Fairly good eye contact with Additional eye contact needed at


audience; displays ability to times; better listening skills
listen; provides adequate
needed; some difficulty answering
audience questions
answers to audience
questions

Little
audi
unea
audi

Conclusion of topic

The presentation was


summed up clearly and
effectively, with key points
emphasised.

The presentation was


summed up clearly.

An attempt was made to conclude


the presentation.

The
up c

Answering questions from


audience

The presentation was


summed up clearly and
effectively, with key points
emphasised.

The presentation was


summed up clearly.

An attempt was made to conclude


the presentation.

No a
the p

Overall Performance

Exceptional

Acceptable

Marginal (D-Level)

[Una

Points Required

100-80%

79-55%

54-49%

48-0

Additional feedback from examiner (required)

Dr TM Walingo

Page 42

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

1
PROTOTYPE PEER-REVIEW

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


MENTOR NAME

PROTOTYPE EXAMINER

Dr P Owolawi

Prof P Naidoo

Mr W Ndlovu

Mr R Chidzonga

Mr GP Yuma

Mr KW Ngidi

Mr R Chidzonga

Ms P Mtetwa

Dr P Owolawi

Mr. M. Mosalaosi

Mr R Mpontshane

Mr C Rutters

Mr A Lonappan

Mr W Ndlovu

Dr C Mulangu

Mr R Mpontshane

I.O.Elujide

10

Mr A Lonappan

Prof. P Naidoo

11

Mr GP Yuma

Mr TK Magenuka

12

Mr J Rwafa

Mr KW Ngidi

13

Mr TK Magenuka

Mr A Lonappan

14

Dr C Mulangu

Ms P Mtetwa

Dr TM Walingo

Page 43

COMMENTS

Mr C Rutters

N/A

N/A

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

15

Mr G Aiyetoro

Mr J Rwafa

16

I.O.Elujide

Mr J Rwafa

N/A

NAME
1

Mr S Gumede

Mr C Rutters

Ms N Lunyeni

Dr P Owolawi

Mr L Nzimande

Mr R Chidzonga

Mr N Mthembu

Mr R Chidzonga

Mr. Metebula

Dr P Owolawi

Mr. N Mngomezulu

Dr P Owolawi

Mr. S.E. Ngcobo

Mr C Rutters

Mrs.H.N.Sigwebela

Mr C Rutters

Dr TM Walingo

Page 44

N/A

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY


NATIONAL DIPLOMA: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
DESIGN PROJECT III: DEPR031 [080814903]
Weekly register
2016

TOPIC:.
STUDENTS NAME:........................................................................................................................
STUDENTS REG.NO

Week

Date

Student
Signature

Mentor
Signature

Short Report

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Dr TM Walingo

Page 45

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

11

MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY


NATIONAL DIPLOMA: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

DESIGN PROJECT III: DEPR031 [080814903]


TOPIC:
..

STUDENTS NAME:...............................
STUDENTS REG.NO
SIGN

MENTOR NAME:
SIGN

Collect this form from your mentor. A completed form will be filled by both student and his/her
mentor and then submit a copy to Prof. Owolawi for registration of your Design Project 3
topic.Dr TM Walingo
Page 46 Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi
Note: you are not considered register until this form is submitted to Dr. Owolawi ON or
BEFORE 20th Of February, 2015.

Additional Information for Design Project III Students in 2014


Choose your project from the available project list.
Go to the respective lecturer (mentor) to get approval-below form must be signed by the both parties
and return to Dr.owolawi for registration on or before as stated in the study guide. Note the form is
with your mentor.

Read your study guide and comply with instructions, dates and rules
Please attend your classes as schedule on the timetable.
A copy of your proposal, power point, video clip of your prototype, documentation of project design III
must be kept by all students for reference purposes. Note, it would not be used for evaluation
purposes.
Note that all submission dates are important.
Failure to submit at the specified date means for first day 10%, 2nd day 20% and 3rd day 30%
and 4th day 100% penalty of the total mark for that section of the design project.
Please read the rubric for the all evaluations and make sure you meet the entire marking scheme as
designed. No excuse for your failure because all the requirements for evaluation are presented in the
rubrics in your study guide.
Sign consultation register with your mentor at least once in a week.

Dr TM Walingo

Page 47

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi

Good luck in your design Project III this semester, 2016

Dr TM Walingo

Page 48

Revised, January 2016 Prof. P.A. Owolawi