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ARB

 

GC5 Understanding of the re- lationship between people and

and their environment, and the

Understanding of:

.1 the needs and aspirations of

GC9 Adequate knowledge of physical problems and technolo-

so as to provide them with internal

 

Criteria

 

General Criteria

buildings, and between buildings

gies and the function of buildings

   

GC1 Ability to create architec- tural designs that satisfy both

Ability to:

.1 prepare and present building

dia, and in response to a brief;

design that integrates and satisfies

need to relate buildings and the spaces between them to human

conditions of comfort and protec- tion against the climate.

General Attributes

GA1

aesthetic and technical require-

design projects of diverse scale, complexity, and type in a variety

needs and scale.

building users;

Knowledge of:

.1 principles associated with de- signing optimum visual, thermal and acoustic environments;

Ability to generate design pro- posals using understanding of a body of knowledge, some at the current boundaries of professional

of contexts, using a range of me-

.2 understand the constructional and structural systems, the envi-

.2 the impact of buildings on the environment, and the precepts of sustainable design;

.3 the way in which buildings fit

.2 systems for environmental com- fort realised within relevant pre- cepts of sustainable design; .3 strategies for building services,

into their local context.

practice and the academic disci- pline of architecture

GA2

Ability to apply a range of com- munication methods and media to present design proposals clear- ly and effectively

ronmental strategies and the reg- ulatory requirements that apply to the design and construction of a comprehensive design project; .3 develop a conceptual and critical approach to architectural

GC6 Understanding of the pro- fession of architecture and the role of the architect in society, in particular in preparing briefs that take account of social factors.

Understanding of:

and ability to integrate these in a design project.

GC10 The necessary design skills to meet building users’ require- ments within the constraints im-

posed by cost factors and build- ing regulations

Have the skills to:

GA3

the aesthetic aspects of a build- ing and the technical require-

GC2 Adequate knowledge of

Knowledge of:

.1 critically examine the financial

Understanding of the alternative materials, processes and tech- niques that apply to architectural design and building construction

GA4

ments of its construction and the needs of the user.

the histories and theories of archi- tecture and the related arts, tech-

.1 the nature of professionalism and the duties and responsibilities

of architects to clients, building us- ers, constructors, co-professionals

and the wider society; .2 the role of the architect within the design team and construction

factors implied in varying building types, constructional systems, and

specification choices, and the

impact of these on architectural design;

GC11 Adequate knowledge of

Ability to evaluate evidence, ar- guments and assumptions in or-

nologies and human sciences.

industry, recognising the impor- tance of current methods and

.2 understand the cost control mechanisms which operate dur- ing the development of a project;

der to make and present sound judgments within a structured

.1 the cultural, social and intellec- tual histories, theories and tech-

trends in the construction of the built environment;

.3 prepare designs that will meet building users’ requirements and

discourse relating to architectural culture, theory and design

nologies that influence the design

of buildings;

.3 the potential impact of building

comply with UK legislation, ap- propriate performance standards

GA5

Knowledge of the context of the architect and the construction in- dustry, and the professional qual- ities needed for decision making in complex and unpredictable circumstances

.2 the influence of history and

theory on the spatial, social, and technological aspects of archi- tecture; .3 the application of appropriate theoretical concepts to studio design projects, demonstrating a

projects on existing and proposed communities

GC7 Understanding of the methods of investigation and preparation of the brief for a de- sign project.

Understanding of:

.1 the need to critically review precedents relevant to the func-

and health and safety require- ments.

the industries, organisations, reg- ulations and procedures involved in translating design concepts into buildings and integrating plans

GA6

GC3 Knowledge of the fine arts

tion, organisation and technologi-

into overall planning.

Ability to identify individual learn- ing needs and understand the

as an influence on the quality of

architectural design.

cal strategy of design proposals; .2 the need to appraise and pre-

Knowledge of:

have knowledge of:

personal responsibility required for

Knowledge of:

pare building briefs of diverse

. the fundamental legal, profes-

further professional education.

.1 how the theories, practices and

technologies of the arts influence

scales and types, to define client

and user requirements and their

GC8 Understanding of the struc-

sional and statutory responsibilities of the architect, and the organ-

jects, and how these are defined

architectural design; .2 the creative application of the

appropriateness to site and con- text;

isations, regulations and proce- dures involved in the negotiation

fine arts and their relevance and

.3 the contributions of architects

and approval of architectural de-

impact on architecture; .3 the creative application of such work to studio design projects, in terms of their conceptualisation and representation.

GC4 Adequate knowledge of urban design, planning and the skills involved in the planning pro-

and co-professionals to the formu- lation of the brief, and the meth- ods of investigation used in its preparation.

tural design, constructional and engineering problems associated with building design

signs, including land law, develop- ment control, building regulations and health and safety legislation; .2 the professional inter-relation- ships of individuals and organ- isations involved in procuring and delivering architectural pro-

cess.

Understanding of:

through contractual and organi-

Knowledge of:

.1 the investigation, critical ap-

knowledge of structural principles

specification choices.

sational structures;

.1 theories of urban design and the planning of communities;

praisal and selection of alterna- tive structural, constructional and

.3 the basic management theo- ries and business principles relat-

.2 the influence of the design and

material systems relevant to archi-

ed to running both an architect’s

development of cities, past and present on the contemporary built environment;

.3 current planning policy and

tectural design; .2 strategies for building con- struction, and ability to integrate

and construction techniques;

practice and architectural pro- jects, recognising current and emerging trends in the construc- tion industry.

development control legislation, including social, environmental and economic aspects, and the relevance of these to design de- velopment.

.3 the physical properties and characteristics of building mate- rials, components and systems, and the environmental impact of

e.g.: this section shows the abil- ity to identify individual learning needs and understand the per- sonal responsibility required for further professional education,

GA6

 
 

therefore:

 
     
Magic School of Green Technology, Tainan, Tai- wan. Left: Entrance Right: Interior featuring ventilation stack and
Magic School of Green
Technology, Tainan, Tai-
wan.
Left: Entrance
Right: Interior featuring
ventilation stack and nat-
ural lighting
The Greenest Schools on Earth:

An investigation into the benefits of sustainable

schools

MSc

Architecture

Thesis

Msc Architecture: Advanced Environmental & Energy Studies (AEES)

Modules studied and the papers written for them:

Environmental Impacts of Buildings

Passive House Standards should be extended across the UK construc- tion industry

Sustainable Construction Materials:

Theory and Practice

Deriving appropriate criteria for as- sessing the sustainability of building materials

Abstract

In order to arrest the progress of climate change and help secure resources for future

generations, it is necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reliance on fossil

fuel, by using less energy. Buildings are significant consumers of energy, embodied

and in-use, and as such present us with great opportunities in this endeavour. Schools appear in all communities to some extent and would seem to be a good starting point. However, sustainable technologies and strategies are still being developed and therefore they are not always successful in producing the energy savings they aim for.

For that reason, this paper asks, ‘what are the other benefits to be gained from green

schools?’ Improved performance, teaching, and wellbeing have been suggested. The paper also acknowledges the possibilities for raising environmental awareness in the young, together with the wider community. Three exemplar schools declaring superior sustainability credentials were selected as

case studies, within which to investigate these claims of wider beneficial aspects.

The results of the building user centred research had mixed results, but did suggest

that user satisfaction is improved, and that students attending the schools become

significantly more aware of environmental issues. The study concludes that more

Environment and energy in the global context

All new UK dwellings should be

constructed with flood adaptation

measures built-in

Climate comfort and building per- formance

Re-contextualizing the Notion of Comfort - a Critique

Building services: an environmental perspective; Brown

fields and Contaminated land

Should carbon emissions targets be the only consideration when de- ciding between reuse or demolition and rebuilding of UK housing stock?

research is needed into the ways in which communities can gain from green schools.

ARB GC5 Understanding of the re- lationship between people and and their environment, and the Understanding

Bali Green School, Indonesia. Above left: Interior with stack ventilation. Above right: Exterior

ARB GC5 Understanding of the re- lationship between people and and their environment, and the Understanding

Sing Yin School, Hong Kong. Above left: Interior with wind turbine. Above right: USGBC award

Principles of light: artificial and nat- ural; Daylight factor; Sunlight and solar gain in buildings; Princi- ples of Hydro power and Biomass

Passive solar design strategies can contribute to the UK objective of zero carbon new-build homes from

2016

Cities, Public Health and Environ- mental Issues

Planning policy can support the health of UK citizens as well as re- ducing CO2 emissions

Ecological Modernisation and Sus- tainable Development

Post-Occupancy Evaluation: An In-

evitable Step Toward Sustainability - a Critique

References:

https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/

postgraduate-courses

GA 3, 4, 5 GC 1.3 GC 2.1 GC 5.1, 5.2, 5.3 GC 6.2, 6.3 GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3 GC 9.1, 9.2, 9.3

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

The fabric of the town centre is checked

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

From Subway to tower

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Process Book observation. Greenery in the street.

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Travelling at roof level on the highway

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

St Georges Square

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Footprints in the snow denote the route behind the buildings

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Process Book observation. Ground level should be aban-

doned to traffic. Green space created above.

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Different scales of buildings

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Alley

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

The newer slab buildings are visible through the spaces where the older buildings have been demolished

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Traffic

The fabric of the town centre is checked From Subway to tower Process Book observation. Greenery

Vertical Project Work GROUP 18 ELEVATIONS 1:1000 BY LOUISA MEAD

Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower

Walking Sketch

Lunar House to Croydon

Clocktower

Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower
Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower
Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower
Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower
Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower
Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower
Walking Sketch Lunar House to Croydon Clocktower

Kingston

University

BA

Architecture

Research for Final Project: Croydon Town Centre

Walking Sketch

Sketches were made every fifty

steps from Lunar House tower to the

Croydon Clocktower. This method shows differences in density and grain of the city.

Sketchbook

Visits to Croydon were recorded using a working sketchbook.

Traffic is an inescapable element in

the landscape of Croydon.

Vertical Project

Students from all levels in the school

worked together in teams to pro- duce a comprehensive record of the buildings in the town centre.

Process Book

Students were required to produce a process book to record the de- velopment of the project and other observations.

GA2

GC 2.1, 2.2

GC 4.3

GC 6.3

GC 7.1

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Environmental testing equipment:

acoustic, wind speed and light meters

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Massing sketches - public and private space

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

View from behind the site. Creating a new access path.

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

View from behind the site. Creating a new access path and reusing the space under the buildings.

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space
Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Results: Natural light and Noise on site plan

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Massing sketches - new access route from the college and public space

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Interior of Kitchen showing views to neighbouring office

block to the west

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

View - mending the street front

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Circulation diagrams in collage

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

View - ‘mending’ the street front

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Interior of flat showing views to Croydon Railway station to

the east

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

View from behind the site. Creating a new access path and reusing the space under the buildings.

Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space
Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space
Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space
Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space
Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space
Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space
Environmental testing equipment: acoustic, wind speed and light meters Massing sketches - public and private space

Kingston

University

BA

Architecture

Research for Final Project: Site Investigation

Environmental testing

Environmental factors effecting design were tested on site. Unfor- tunately access was blocked from the actual site, but readings were taken from the surrounding area.

Circulation and Massing sketches

Multiple massing and circulation diagrams were made to trial differ-

ent access routes, building arrange- ments and the buildings

GA 1, 2

GC 1.3

GC 4.1

GC 5.1, 5.3

GC 6.3

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Site model of Croydon with interventions

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Model of possible facade treatment

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Model of possible new public space

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public
Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Precedent Study - Unite d’Habitation, Le Corbusier

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public
Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public
Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public
Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Precedent study - Gifu Kitagata Apartments, SANAA

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Interior view from downstairs room

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Interior view from balcony

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

Facade with glazed shutters

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

View from the entrance hall

Site model of Croydon with interventions Model of possible facade treatment Model of possible new public

View from the upper floor sleeping area

Kingston

University

BA

Architecture

Research for Final Project: Centre for Older People and Young Peoples Housing

Circulation and Massing Models

Multiple massing and circulation models were made to trial different access routes, building arrange- ments and the buildings

Precedent Studies

Gifu Kitagata by SANAA and Unite d’Habitation by Le Corbusier were selected as two relevant housing scheme precedents. Studies were made of the quality of the interior space, the organisation and circu- lation of the buildings, and the ide- als that they represented for their designers.

Model of Apartment Space

A model was constructed at 1:50 scale and various furniture was also made to explore the nature of the interior space (models with furniture not photographed).

Glazed shutters were added to the exterior which echoed the vertical louvres on the day centre part of the building.

The shutters were also a way of capturing heat from the sun in the balcony area to heat the rest of the apartment during cooler months.

GA 1, 2, 3, 4

GC 1.1, 1.3

GC 2.1, 2.2, 2.3

GC 3.1

GC 4.1, 4.2

GC 5.1, 5.3

GC 7.1

GC 8.3

GC 10.3

GC 6.3

Vertical louvres Vertical louvres Reinforced Reinforced Concrete Concrete RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300 Column
Vertical louvres
Vertical louvres
Reinforced
Reinforced
Concrete
Concrete
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
Column
Column
500 x 500
500 x 500
Reception
Delivery
Garden
cycle
Access
store
store
Kitchen
Kitchen
Storage
REINFORCED CONCRETE
BEAM
700 X 300 X 300
Bifold Doors
Vertical louvres
Covered
walkway and
sunshading
Bifold Doors
Louvre
Fencing
GARDEN
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
5m high
DINING
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
Bifold Doors
Excercise
Room
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
Garden
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
Changing
Changing
Room
Room
High level windows
Allotments
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300
Arts
Vertical louvres
and
Crafts
Area
Louvre
Fencing
5m high
GROUND FLOOR

Plans 1:200

@ A1

Young People's Housing and Elderly Day Centre Louisa Mead

Bifold Interior Shutters Exterior Glazed Shutters FLAT SEDUM ROOF FIRST FLOOR Young People's Housing (Also floors
Bifold
Interior
Shutters
Exterior
Glazed
Shutters
FLAT
SEDUM
ROOF
FIRST FLOOR
Young People's
Housing
(Also floors 3, 5, 7, 9)
Flexible Flexible
Skills Skills
Sharing Sharing
Area Area
Room Room
Flexible
Skills
Sharing
Area
Room
Office
Talks
and
Classes
Louvre
Fencing
5m high

FIRST FLOOR

Kingston

University

BA

Architecture

Final Project:

Young People’s Housing and Older People’s Day

Centre

Brief

Our brief for the final project was

loose, the only specification being

that the intervention should include

a day centre for older people and

housing for young people. The pro-

ject should increase density in the

CBD.

Skills Sharing

I am convinced that this configura-

tion offers an excellent opportunity

for transfer of skills from one group

to another. Such as the youth ele-

ment helping the older people with

IT or the elderly sharing their skills

in dressmaking and cookery for in-

stance.

My design includes a private gar-

den for use by both groups, where

vegetables can be grown on a

communal allotment.

Re-purposing Space

The position of my building will

also create and define a new

public space in Croydon, and

a route through the dead-

space behind and including

underneath Southern House.

Vertical louvres Vertical louvres Reinforced Reinforced Concrete Concrete RC BEAM 700 X 300 X 300 Column

Re-using the space behind the site and under Southern House

GA 1, 2, 3

GC 11.1

GC 10.2

GC 9.1, 9.2, 9,3

GC 7.1, 7.2

GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3

GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3

GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

GC 5.1, 5.3

GC 6.3

Soil Pipe FLAT SEDUM ROOF Rainwater Downpipe Exterior Glazed Shutters FLAT SEDUM ROOF SECOND FLOOR Young
Soil Pipe
FLAT
SEDUM
ROOF
Rainwater
Downpipe
Exterior
Glazed
Shutters
FLAT
SEDUM
ROOF
SECOND FLOOR
Young People's
Housing
(Also floors 4, 6 8)
Mezzanine Floor of
Flats 1:100
Consulting
Consulting
Room
Room
IT Room
Office
Staff Kitchen
Staff room
Louvre
Fencing
5m high
SECOND FLOOR
Older People's Centre

Plans 1:200

@ A1

Young People's Housing and Older People's Centre Louisa Mead

window at high level Bifold Interior Shutters Exterior Glazed Shutters TOP FLOOR Young People's Housing -
window at high level
Bifold
Interior
Shutters
Exterior
Glazed
Shutters
TOP FLOOR
Young People's
Housing - wheelchair
accessible flats
Talks
and
Classes
Louvre
Fencing
5m high

ROOF Older People's Centre

Kingston

University

BA

Architecture

Final Project:

Young People’s

Housing and Older

People’s Day

Centre

Floor Plans

GA 1, 2, 3

GC 11.1

GC 10.2

GC 9.1, 9.2, 9,3

GC 7.1, 7.2

GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3

GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3

GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

GC 5.1, 5.3

GC 6.3

Kingston Line of open Patio Shutter Detail A 1 in 12 Slope (watershed) Falls West to
Kingston
Line of open Patio Shutter
Detail A
1 in 12 Slope (watershed)
Falls West to East
Detail C
University
Detail B
Patio Shutter
1:20
1:20
1:20
Sedum Plants
Growing Medium
Green Roof System: Sky Garden GR
Green Roof Protection Board
Root Barrier, Root Guard (tm)
BA
Wall Construction
250mm Concrete Type 5
120mm Thermal Insulation
2mm Vapour Barrier
30mm Counter Battens
26mmTounge and Groove
boards fixed with
concealed screws
Hand/Guard Rail
1m High Min.
Drain underneath
patio, drains to
rainwater
storage tank,
for garden irrigation
Architecture
Irrigation Pipe
Waterproof Membrane
26mm
Flashing
Insulation Polyurethane Foam (t=35)
timber
Mastic
decking
Vapour Barrier
Sealant
Final Project:
30
ROOF
Young People's
Housing
Lift
Lift
maintenance
maintenance
B
B
Young People’s
Housing and Older
People’s Day
Centre
Lift
maintenance
Detail Sections and Site Plan
Talks
and
Classes
ROOF
Older People's Centre
Detail D
Roof Construction
1:20
Studwork Partitions: Construct using 75x50 C16/SC3
graded timber studs at 450mm ctrs. Head and cill
plates 2no. 75x50 C16/SC3. Provide half hour fire
resistance by lining room sides of studwork with
Detail E
Detail F
1:20
1:20
Site Plan 1:1250
Sedum Plants
Site Plan 1:1250
190mm Growing Medium
50mm Green Roof System: Sky Garden GR
160mm Cellular Glass Insulation
2mm
Vapour Barrier
250mm Concrete Type 5 power
floated, laid to falls
Green Roof System
Irrigation Pipe
15mm plasterboard and 3mm plaster skim coat.
Where plans indicated a requirement for one hour fire
resistance then line both sides of studwork with 2 layers
of 15 mm plasterboard, ensuring that all joints between
layers are staggered,then finish in 3mm plaster skim coat.
Fill all voids in studwork with min. 25mm thick crown wool
suspended between studs. All studwork partitions to have
adequate support;Where studwork walls are to be raised
directly off a concrete slab or beam and block floor
ensure that a flexible dpc is provided under cill plates.
Floor Construction
26mm Timber Floor boards
120mm concrete screed
Heating pipes tied to mesh at a
depth of 25-40mm below the
surface for maximum efficiency
Reinforcement Mesh
40mm Acoustic and 75mm
Thermal Insulation
2mm Vapour Barrier
125mm 30N Concrete
Ground Bearing Floors: 120mm min. c.s. screed
(reinforced with approved anti-crack mesh)
poured over 120mm Celotex Tuff-R Zero GA3000Z
insulation slabs ( Alternative insulation: 100mm
Jabfloor Type 70 of 2 layers of 50mm Jabfloor Type
70) installed in accordance with manufacturer's
instructions onto 250mm min. thk 1:2:4 sulphate
resisting concrete oversite poured over 1200g
polythene damp proof membrane, laid over a
layer sand blinding on well compacted and
clean hardcore bed (depth no to exceed 600mm).
Cut insulation to suit depth of screed plus insulation
thickness and install as upstand to floor perimeter.
1200g membrane to be turned up all perimeter
walls behind finishes and lapped with horizontal
dpc in walls.
Double Glazed
Curtain Wall
Unit
Timber
Shutter
Detail B
Detail E
Detail D
Detail A
Detail C
A
A
A
A
GA 1, 2, 3
300mm concrete
pile foundation
Detail F
Section A-A
GC 11.1
1:100
@ A1
GC 10.2
GC 9.1, 9.2, 9,3
Young People's Housing and Elderly Day Centre
Louisa Mead
GC 7.1, 7.2
N
N

GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3

GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3

GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

GC 5.1, 5.3

GC 6.3

Personal Research One Room Apartments Section A-A Section A-A Purpose built studio apartments known as “one
Personal
Research
One Room
Apartments
Section A-A
Section A-A
Purpose built studio apartments
known as “one rooms” are very
common in Korea. They are com-
pact spaces for single people, usu-
ally featuring wet room style bath-
rooms and underfloor heating.
Mezzanine sleeping platforms with
reduced head-height are a com-
mon element.
Many young people find that the
Mezzanine Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Mezzanine Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
small space is perfectly adequate
for the needs of one person and it
is preferable to live in a small space
alone, rather than share a larger
property with others. They are eco-
nomic to heat and easy to keep
clean.
Having become accustomed to
this kind of accommodation it was
frustrating to find housing in other
countries where these studios are
unusual, such as China.
Main Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Main Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Housing for Young People project Version 1
Housing for Young People project Version 2
38.8m 2
29.4m 2
Whilst living abroad, I have record-
ed the living spaces of myself and
friends. The mean gross internal
floor area (calculated in accord-
ance with reference to the Techni-
cal Housing Standards – Nationally
Described Space Standard 2015)
was 26.2m 2 .
This experience led me to revisit an
earlier project for single young per-
sons housing, to see if the one room
model could be applied to it.
The original apartment had a gross
internal floor area of 38.8m 2 where-
as the resulting studio had 29.4m 2 .
25m2
It is noted that the recommended
minimum gross internal floor area
for a one bedroom, one storey, one
person dwelling in the UK is 37m 2 .
Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1
Purpose built apartment, China
One Room, Korea
One Room, Korea
One Room, Korea
One Room, Korea
32.5m 2
27.3m 2
25.7m 2
19.5m 2
25m 2
Reference:
https://www.gov.uk/government/
uploads/system/uploads/attach-
ment_data/file/524531/160519_Na-
tionally_Described_Space_Stand-
ard
____
Final_Web_version.pdf
GA 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
GC 1.2, 1.3
GC 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3
GC 5.1, 5.3
GC 7.1, 7.2

Main Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1

Mezzanine Floor Plan

Purpose built apartment, China

28.6m 2

Main Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1

Mezzanine Floor Plan

Converted apartment, China

19m 2

Main Floor Plan 1:100 @ A1

One Room, Korea

27.7m 2

Mezzanine Floor Plan

GC 10.1, 10.3

GC 11.1

GC 6.3

Sant Agostino 1:250 @A3, Ink and pencil on paper Detail Sant Agostino, Ink and pencil on

Sant Agostino 1:250 @A3, Ink and pencil on paper

Detail Sant Agostino, Ink and pencil on paper Location map of Sant Agostino, San Gimignano Left:
Detail Sant Agostino, Ink and pencil on paper
Location map of Sant Agostino,
San Gimignano
Left: Campanile of Sant Agostino, 1:20 @ A1 Ink and
pencil on paper with Photoshop
Sant Agostino 1:250 @A3, Ink and pencil on paper Detail Sant Agostino, Ink and pencil on

Top Floor of Corinthian House, 1:20 @ A1 pencil on paper

Sant Agostino 1:250 @A3, Ink and pencil on paper Detail Sant Agostino, Ink and pencil on

Corinthian House Axonometric 1:250

Sant Agostino 1:250 @A3, Ink and pencil on paper Detail Sant Agostino, Ink and pencil on

Plan of Croydon 1:2500

Kingston

University

BA

Architecture

Comparison Study

San Gimignano and Croydon Town Centre

The drawings are part of an exper-

imentation in the way a drawing is produced and and its relation to what it wants to express. The Corin- thian House drawings were under-

taken first in AutoCAD and finished

in pencil, which suited the strong

clean lines of its design, whereas

use of pencils and drawing board

was more appropriate to the

church of Sant Agostino, built from

hand made bricks and featuring

decorative embellishments to it’s

facade.

Right: Facade detail of Corinthian House, Pencil on Paper

GA 2, 3 GC 2.1, 2.1, 2.3 GC 3.1 GC 4.1, 4.2 GC 5.3 GC 7.1
GA 2, 3
GC 2.1, 2.1, 2.3
GC 3.1
GC 4.1, 4.2
GC 5.3
GC 7.1
George Square, Croydon Screenprint The stratified colours highlight the prevalent layered vertical and horizontal design of

George Square, Croydon

Screenprint

The stratified colours highlight the prevalent layered vertical and horizontal design of buildings in Croydon

Subway, Croydon Soft ground aquatint on paper
Subway, Croydon
Soft ground aquatint on paper

The high rise buildings contrast sharply with the many underground spaces in Croydon

George Square, Croydon Screenprint The stratified colours highlight the prevalent layered vertical and horizontal design of

Croydon Town Centre

Photo aquatint on paper

The different shades denote public, private and semi-private space within the town centre

Kingston

University

BA

Architecture

Prints of Croydon

Printmaking

A continuation of the theme of un- derstanding the city by means of

representing it.

Printmaking has many parallels with building design. Fundamentally the print is built up in stages from the foundations and framework to the decorative flour- ishes. The process is creative in the productive sense as well as the ex- pressive. On a prosaic level, the process de- mands that the artist plans care- fully the desired output from the selection of the paper and printing method to the order of tasks in- volved in each stage.

GA 2

GC 2.1, 2.1, 2.3

GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3

GC 4.1, 4.2

GC 5.3

Various views of Keeling House Aquatint prints entrance / exit entrance / exit 0 5 10
Various views of Keeling House Aquatint prints entrance / exit entrance / exit 0 5 10
Various views of Keeling House Aquatint prints entrance / exit entrance / exit 0 5 10
Various views of Keeling House Aquatint prints entrance / exit entrance / exit 0 5 10

Various views of Keeling House

Aquatint prints

entrance / exit entrance / exit 0 5 10 15m 0 5 10 15m AutoCAD drawings
entrance /
exit
entrance /
exit
0
5
10
15m
0
5
10
15m
AutoCAD drawings for model
BEDROOM
WALKWAY
LIVING ROOM
BEDROOM
BEDROOM
LIVING ROOM
BEDROOM
Various views of Keeling House Aquatint prints entrance / exit entrance / exit 0 5 10

Timber form for the plastic mould

Various views of Keeling House Aquatint prints entrance / exit entrance / exit 0 5 10

Plaster model pieces, fresh from the mould

Kingston University BA Architecture Tower - Typology Study Studying with care volume, facade, articulation, proportion, material-
Kingston
University
BA
Architecture
Tower - Typology
Study
Studying with care volume, facade,
articulation, proportion, material-
ity, colour, grain, texture, relation
to context, transparancy, structure
and composition, contact with
the ground and massing using a
hands on approach to the process
of making, developing a volumetric
and material language.
Keeling House 1955
Denys Lasdun
Keeling house is relevant to my in-
terest in post-war social housing, as
it was part of an attempt to replace
the substandard, bomb damaged
accommodation in city centres
with decent homes.
Lasdun tried to preserve the positive
social aspects of the surrounding
victorian streets within the tower.
The apartments themselves were
two-storey maisonettes, the typical
shape of an east-end terrace.
The rhythm and layering of the fea-
tures on the facade echo the char-
acteristics of the rows of houses in
the surrounding streets, although
using modernist treatments. The
concrete elements lend themselves
naturally to the medium of casting
using plaster.
Process
In order to understand the organ-
isation, circulation and flow of the
building, I obtained CAD drawings
from the architects responsible for
the renovation of Keeling House in
1999.
From this I constructed timber forms
for all of the elements of the fa-
cade.
A plastic mould was then produced
by heat-forming plastic around the
timber forms.
The plaster was poured and set.
Finally all of the plaster pieces were
mounted on timber board.
GA 2
GC 2.1, 2.1, 2.3
GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GC 1.2, 1.3
GC 4.1, 4.2
GC 3.1
GC 5.1, 5.3
GC 7.1
GC 9.1
Work Experience Existing building line Planning Proposed building line Application Red Bricks to match existing 24°
Work
Experience
Existing building line
Planning
Proposed building line
Application
Red Bricks to
match existing
24°
Drawings
Work Experience
1 Lancaster Avenue
Front Elevation 1:100
1 Lancaster Avenue
Rear Elevation 1:100
Section A-A 1:100
Applications for planning permission
made up a large proportion of my
experience at work.
As well as preparing the drawings
and documents for submission to
the local authority, I performed site
surveys, obtained quotes and wrote
specifications for the construction
study
living room
wc
Existing building line
Proposed extension
hall
Natural Slate Roof
living room
empty
Ground
kitchen
Red Bricks to match existing
Level at
front of
property
VOID
Existing Upper Terrace
West Elevation 1:100
Terrace
living room
FFL
dining
A
A
A
A
T
e
r
r
a
c
e
Existing building line
work.
My local area in Hertfordshire and
North London has numerous areas
of green belt; listed buildings and
conservation areas; which meant
negotiations with the local authority
and countless drawing alterations
in order to obtain satisfactory results
for clients.
Projects included new build and
commercial premises, however
most of the work concerned con-
version, renovation and extension
of existing residential property.
An example of the numerous plan-
ning approvals applied for and ob-
tained is:
N
Proposed extension
Velux
Garden Room Extension
L
a
i
d
t
o
L
a
w
n
Natural slate
Roof
Red Bricks to
match existing
Basement
G F FFL
Floor
Plan
Garden Wall
1:100
L
a
i
d
t
o
L
a
w
n
Terrace FFL
Basem't FFL
Ground Floor Plan 1:100
A garden room rear extension to a
semi-detached Victorian mansion
in Hertfordshire. The property is in a
conservation area, which necessi-
tates the use of matching red bricks
and natural slate roof, but did not
compromise the design of the ex-
East Elevation 1:100
tension dramatically.
East Elevation 1:100
West Elevation 1:100
Ground
Level at
rear of
property
North (Front) Elevation 1:100
South (Rear) Elevation 1:100
527.5000
Basement Level Plan 1:100
Ground Floor Plan 1:100
1134.0000
1243.4595
1322.0000
First Floor Plan 1:100
Second Floor Plan 1:100
GA 1, 2, 3, 5
GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
GC 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
GC 4.2, 4.3
GC 5.1, 5.2, 5.3
GC1 2.1, 2.2
GC 4.2, 4.3
GC 5.1, 5.3
GC 6.1, 6.2, 6.3
GC 7.1,7.2, 7.3
GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3
GC 9.1, 9.2, 9.3
GC 10.1, 10.2, 10.3
GC 11.1, 11.2, 11.3
property boundary
property boundary
property boundary
property boundary
property boundary
mh
storage
patio
hall
store
store
empty
bedroom
bath-
room
bedroom
property boundary
property boundary
utility
kitchen
wc
hall
dining
bedroom
study
bathroom
hall
shower
room
terrace
living room
living room
bedroom
bedroom
property boundary
C D internal fans to duct to outside air A internal fans to duct to outside
C
D
internal fans
to duct to
outside air
A
internal fans
to duct to
outside air
internal fans
to duct to
outside air
internal fans
to duct to
outside air
C
a
m
d
e
n
H
i
g
h
S
t
r
e
e
t
NOTE:-
No change to front
C
D
elevation proposed
Stub
Stack
255
253
251
261
259
257
255
253
251
249
Bath
Bath
Bath
Bath
259
257
Bed 2
Bed 1
Bed 2
Bed 2
Bed 2
Shop
Bath
1637
Raised section,
boxed in
to accommodate
2m head height
below
Shop
Shop
Shop
Shop
C o u r t
Y a r d
C a m d e n
H i g h
S t r e e t
Bed 1
Existing Rear Elevation
Bed 1
Bed 1
Bed 1
C
parapet
Bed 2
Existing Sectional Side Elevatiion
wall
( thro' No 251)
Court
existing RWP
existing RWP
Yard
110 SVP
existing
SMOKE DETECTORS:
A
RWP
unused
C
D
Flat Roof
unused
Contractor is to ensure that a mains wired (with battery backup)
smoke detector is provided to the ground floor hall and first floor
landing. Detectors to be ceiling mounted within 3m of all
bedroom doors and within 7m of the ground floor doors to dining,
lounge and kitchen areas. All detectors should be interlinked.
existing
RWP
on plan, denotes wall type described below
Office
Proposed Second Floor Plan 1:50
shop
C a m d e n
H i g h
S t r e e t
Office
basement
Flat
Court
Existing brickwork to be
internally lined with 67.5mm
Kingspan Kooltherm K18
insulated drylining board and
5mm skim to achieve a u value
of 0.3W/m2K
Independent sound testing to be
carried out at completion of
works and certificates provided
by UKAS accredited or ANC
registered contractors.
Section A-A (existing)
A
C
D
Yard
Roof
A
Flat Roof
To include walls, floors, stairs
and SVPs etc.
D
Proposed Ground Floor Plan 1:100
Shop
Shop
Shop
Shop
A
Bath
Kitchen
Shop
Living
unused
unused
unused
unused
unused
unused
unused
unused
Living
Living
Living
Living
Bedroom
Raised level
255
257
259
255
257
259
255
257
259
251
253
Living
253
253
flooring
A
A
Class A or B Condensing boiler provided in
accordance with SEDBUK requirements with the
condensate outlet to be taken to the fould drainage
system
6
C
a
m
d
e
n
H
i
g
h
S
t
r
e
e
t
Existing Second Floor Plan
Existing First Floor Plan
Provide mechanical ventilation
ducted to outside air, see
ventilation note.
1
Existing Ground Floor Plan
Kitchen
Kitchen
Kitchen
Kitchen
Kitchen
New
Seperating
New sanitary units to
wall
connect to existing
B
B
A
S&VP and drain to
existing manhole.
Existing drains to be
checked and
confirmed by
exposure prior to
works commencing to
E
D
C
B
internal fans
to duct to
outside air
SVP with
internal fans
to duct to
outside air
internal fans to
duct to outside air
ensure proposed
connections can be
made
Drainage
W a l k w a y
internal fans
to duct to
outside air
Existing
110 SVP
run
rodding eye
FOUL WATER DRAINAGE
TO EXISITNG DRAIN
positioned
SVP with
New steel walkway ( with balustrade ) at rear
over existing ground floor roofs to new entrance
doors
below
rodding eye
walkway
A
Double roof
joists to
support new
roof timbers
on plan, denotes wall type
described below
Proposed First Floor Plan 1:50
Court
C
Yard
Construction Detail
Provide mechanical ventilation
ducted to outside air, see
ventilation note.
on plan, denotes wall type
described below
D
FIRE STOPPING OF SOIL VENT PIPES AND
SERVICES:
All pipes passing through floors are to be fitted with
'Quelfire' fire stop collars. All pipes to be wrapped in
25mm min Crown mineral wool and contained within
45x45mmm min timber carcassing. Boxing in to be
lined on room faces with 2 layers of 15mm Gyproc
plasterboard.
LEAD DETAIL
NOT TO SCALE
Construction Detail A
ROOF CONSTRUCTION UNCHANGED
110 SVP
Roof
insulation to
run between
rafters to top
of wall
270 mm min mineral wool laid between existing joists
NOTE:
DETAIL SHOWN IS FOR UPGRADING
EXISTING CONSTRUCTION IN
CONVERSION WORKS AND FOR NEW
BUILD' WORKS.
WHERE CONTRACTOR DOES NOT
WISH TO USE 'GYPGLASS' PRODUCTS
SPECIFIED, ALTERNATIVES MAY
USED AS FOLLOWS:
BOILER INSTALLATIONS:
25MM MIN. THK MINERAL WOOL OF
DENSITY 80 TO 100Kg/m3 MAY BE
All boiler types to have a
SEDBUK rating of at least
78% and installation details
to be agreed by building
control prior to installing.
Timber trimmers
2280
USED INSTEAD OF 25mm 'GYPGLASS
6405' SLABS LAID OVER EXISTING
FLOORBOARDS.
to support
2280
Walkway Balustrade
minimum 1100 high
staircase
to Engineer's
SVP
100MM UNFACED ROCK FIBRE LAID
BETWEEN JOISTS WITH DENSITY OF
AT LEAST 10Kg/m3.
THERMOSTATIC VALVES:
Horizontal rails
secured to walls
with circular C.I.
brackets finished
in black paint.
details
branch
running
New radiators to include
thermostatic valves.
under
walkway
ALL OTHER VARIATIONS TO
CONSTRUCTION TO BE AGREED WITH
L.A. BUILDING INSPECTOR PRIOR TO
COMMENCING WORKS.
DETAIL OF EXISTING FLOOR TO
SEPERATING FLOOR [1:20]
FLOATING LAYER METHOD.
New steel walkway ( with
balustrade ) at rear over existing
ground floor roofs to new entrance
doors. Installed to manufacturers
instructions.
Area raised to
accommodate
stair bulkhead
below
25
Walkway Level
25
2565
2424
2424
6
Walkway
2000
Level
18
900
New steel stairs from 1st floor level to new
walkway level and existing Court Yard level
(nominal 170mm rise 250mm going 1200mm
landings).
Installed to manufacturers instructions.
2000
16
15
2000
Court Yard
CC oo uu rr tt
YY aa rr dd
Level
900
2000
Existing staircase
removed and
doorway bricked
up to match
existing
8
Upgrade seperating floor
to provide 1 hour fire
resistance as per
Construction Detail A
Camden
Common Entrance Stairway:
400
Risers 170mm, Goings
High Street
250mm
UNCHANGED
Section C-C 1:50
259
Sloping ceiling insulation
between and under rafters
as described in main notes.
Maintaining 50mm air path
along rafter legth.
Junctions between
seperating
floors and walls: Where the
joists are at right angles to
the
wall, spaces between the
floor joists should be sealed
with
full depth timber blocking
and
the junction between the
ceiling
and wall should be sealed
with tape or caulked with
sealant.
Check exsiting roof for
adequate ventilation
openings. At least
25000mm2 mer metre run of
eaves required to soffits and
5000mm2 per metre run at
high level required.
Compartment
walls to be of one
hour fire resisting
construction
carried up to the
underside of
the roof (so there
are no
gaps between
flats)
Section D-D 1:50
Means of Escape windows:
750mm high x 450 wide clear opening
and 1100mm max. above FFL
261
259
257
255
253
251
249
New dormer
windows to be
lead clad with
timber sash
windows painted
white see
construction notes
'Exposed Dormer
Wall'.
New sash windows in
existing mansard roof
New SVP terminates
900mm min. above
openings
Ventilation at
least
equal to
continuous
strip 10mm wide.
Walkway
Balustrade
minimum
750
1100 high
ALL FIRST FLOOR
WINDOWS
TO BE 1 HOUR FIRE
RESISTANT
540
Indication of
Indication of
window
Code 4 lead
flashing dressed
into wall
FLAT
entrance
Walkway
position
door position
C o u r t
Y a r d
Position of ground
floor rear
extensions to
shops
Position posts to support
walkway, taken down to
party walls between
shops.
(To Structural Engineer's
details.)
New Section of roof,
replacing exisiting glass
roof
PITCHED ROOF ''COLD'' CONSTRUCTION:
New section of roof formed to match pitch of existing glass roof (approx 30ฐ).Use 50x150 C16 rafters
at 400mm max ctrs. Ceiling joists 50x150 C16 @400mm ctrs to be lapped with and nailed to rafters.
Rafter feet to be secured to 100x75 double roof joists using s.s. truss clips or framing anchors.
Extent of rafters forming sloping ceiling are to be insulated using Kingspan Thermapitch insulation
boards (75mm thickness between rafters with 50mm thickness underlining to rafters). Ceiling finish in
12.5mm plaster board with painted plaster skim coat.
shop
Proposed Rear Elevation 1:100
Section B-B 1:50
basement
Section A-A 1:50
25
18
16
15

Work

Experience

Building Control

Applications

Work Experience

Building regulation applications

were a priority in the practices I have worked in. In addition to drawing the detailed drawings in accordance with the Approved Documents, I priced materials and

assisted with inspections on site,

answered queries from contractors and liaised with building control of-

ficers. I briefed Structural Engineers

and incorporated the resulting cal- culations into construction draw- ings. When necessary I performed SAP calculations using the dedicated software to support our applica- tions Projects included new build and commercial premises, however most of the work concerned con- version, renovation and extension of existing residential property.

An example of one of the many Building Regulation applications is:

Conversion of Upper Floors to Five Flats

A row of five shops on Camden

High Street in North London func-

tioned only at ground floor level.

The upper stories were derelict and

uninhabited. There were no stairs to access them. This project involved the reinstate-

ment of five dwelling spaces to

the upper floors as well as provid- ing a new common access route to them . Individually the flats re- quired installation of new stairways, plumbing and electrical wiring and the building envelope had to be upgraded to meet thermal and

acoustic standards.

GA 1, 2, 3, 5 GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 GC 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 GC 4.2, 4.3 GC 5.1, 5.2, 5.3 GC1 2.1, 2.2 GC 4.2, 4.3 GC 5.1, 5.3 GC 6.1, 6.2, 6.3 GC 7.1,7.2, 7.3 GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3 GC 9.1, 9.2, 9.3 GC 10.1, 10.2, 10.3 GC 11.1, 11.2, 11.3

BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,

BSc

Architecture

Architectural History Studies

Illustrations

A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree, was to research and illustrate architectural styles from the periods we studied

Beautiful hand drafted lettering is a goal which I still aspire to.

BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
BSc Architecture Architectural History Studies Illustrations A requirement of he Architectural History unit of the degree,
GA 2, 3 GC 9.2 GC 8.1, 8.3 GC 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GA 2, 3
GC 9.2
GC 8.1, 8.3
GC 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GC 1.2, 1.3
GC 4.1, 4.2
GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GC 5.2, 5.3
GC 7.1
GC 9.1
BSc Architecture Community Centre Conversion Project Community Centre Conversion to Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) The brief

BSc

Architecture

Community Centre Conversion Project

Community Centre Conversion to Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB)

The brief for this second year design project was to convert the main hall space of an existing 1960’s community centre in Bedfordshire.

Method

  • I obtained the original drawings

from the local authority offices,

which were stored on microfiche.

As the drawing units were imperial,

  • I had to convert the measurements

to metric scale before entering them onto AutoCAD (Release 12).

CAD drawings were used to ex-

plore different ways to divide the space and also by making a physi-

cal model. The final drawings were

made by hand with Rotring pens, then copied and coloured with coloured pencils.

Section C-C at 1:20 includes col- lage, using tin foil to denote glazing and some printed paper to give texture.

Design

The accommodation provided in the new design included: a waiting area; reception; meeting area; of-

fice and storage space; a library;

two semi private meeting spaces and two private meeting spaces; w.c.s. The circular spaces were intended to encourage a feeling of security and warmth in the building users, who may be feeling nervous or traumatised by the issues that have brought them to the CAB.

One of the cylinders reaches full ceiling height to give total privacy, while another leaves a
One of the cylinders reaches full
ceiling height to give total privacy,
while another leaves a void above
for a more open atmosphere.
The cylindrical rooms and reception
desk provide a division between
public and private space where
the staff have their office accom-
modation.
GA 1, 2, 4
GC 2.1, 2.3
GC 3.3
GC 1.1, 1.3
GC 4.2
GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GC 5.1
GC 7.2, 7.3
GC 6.3
@ A1
@ A1
@ A1 Location Plan 1:250 @ A1 @ A1 BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre

Location Plan 1:250 @ A1

@ A1
@ A1

BSc

Architecture

Final Project - Community Theatre

The brief for the final design project

was to design a community theatre

on a greenfield site in Bedfordshire.

Students visited similar projects around London to research the requirements, circulation, design, practical considerations and vari- ous forms of theatre design.

Adjacent to the site, a new com- munity sports centre had recently been completed, featuring sun- shading louvres and exposed brick- work to the exterior. The facade treatment of the new building ech- oes this.

The community theatre is a func- tional design, and includes: seat- ing for 153 theatregoers; dressing

rooms; office space; storage; set

storage; set workshop; a confer- ence room; control room; manage-

ment offices; practice studio; cafe

area; reception area; wcs;

box office sales; green room and

bar.

GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3 GC 2.2, 2.3 GC
GA 1, 2, 3
GC 11.1
GC 10.3
GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3
GC 2.2, 2.3
GC 6.1, 6.2, 6.3
GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3
GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GC 5.1, 5.3
GC 7.3

Axonometric drawing showing interior of auditorium from backstage area

GC 9.1, 9.2, 9.3

BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC
BSc
Architecture
Final Project -
Community
Theatre
GA 1, 2, 3
GC 11.1
GC 10.3
GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3
GC 2.2, 2.3
GC 6.1, 6.2, 6.3
GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3
GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GC 5.1, 5.3
GC 7.3
GC 9.1, 9.2, 9.3
BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC
BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC

BSc

Architecture

Final Project - Community Theatre

BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC

GA 1, 2, 3

GC 11.1

GC 10.3

GC 8.1, 8.2, 8.3

BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC
BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC
BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC
BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC
BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC
BSc Architecture Final Project - Community Theatre GA 1, 2, 3 GC 11.1 GC 10.3 GC

GC 2.2, 2.3

GC 6.1, 6.2, 6.3

GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3 GC 5.1, 5.3 GC
GC 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
GC 4.1, 4.2, 4.3
GC 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
GC 5.1, 5.3
GC 7.3

GC 9.1, 9.2, 9.3