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The Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations, 2006

is developed
by the City Government of Davao and its constituents
With technical assistance from the
Department of Environment and Natural Resources-
United States Agency for International Development
(DENR-USAID) Philippine Environmental Governance (EcoGov) Project
under USAID Contract No. PCE 1-00-99-00002-00 Task Order No. 813.

The views expressed and opinions contained in this report are those
of the authors and are not intended as statements of policy
of USAID or the authors parent organization.

Reproduction of this report in part or whole by any means is restricted without


written permission from the City Government of Davao.

Lines, paragraphs, sections, and other contents which shall be derived


from this technical report must be quoted within the context
for which the purpose of this report was made.
quotations must be attributed to:
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations,2006
as source.
Coastal Resources Management - Technical Working Group
Rocelio T. Tabay
Jovencio T. Umaguing
CITY AGRICULTURIST OFFICE

Radzini Oledan- Estomagulang


Meriam Faith P. Palma
OFFICE OF THE CITY PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR

Arnel C. Llido
Rhoderick A. Aviles
Marie Antonette S. Pana
CITY ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES OFFICE

Richie Lanticse
SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD
COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Mr. Crisanto E. Estabillo


Ms. Michel D. Angelo
COASTAL AND MARINE MANAGEMENT DIVISION
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES
Region XI

Mr. Efren Amalejo


Ms. Aida Bautista
Ms. Theresa Lepardo
COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES OFFICE
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES

PHILIPPINE ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE (EcoGov2) PROJECT


Acknowledgement
The Coastal Resource Management Technical Working Group (CRM TWG) assisted by the USAID-
funded Philippine Environmental Governance (EcoGov2) Project would like to sincerely acknowledge the
warm support of the following people, whom without their help, this task will not be completed.

Hon. Rodrigo R. Duterte


City Mayor

Office of the City Administrator


Atty. Wendel E. Avisado

City Planning and Development Office


Mario Luis J. Jacinto
Cresencia de la Victoria
Denton Siapno
Luz Imsave Obial
Araceli Malate
Lito Jopson

City Agriculture Office


Jose Sargado
Joselito Tabora
Estelita Pilar Valdez
Jackielou Franco
Alice Barcelo
The Agricultural Technologists and Staff of the Fisheries Resource Management Services

City Environment and Natural Resources Office


Ann Victoria G. Silvosa
Engr. Jocelyn Z. Espina
Martin T. Obrero

Department of Environment and Natural Resources


RED Ricardo L. Calderon
RED Edilberto S. Buiser
RTD Emmanuel E. Isip

DENR Coastal and Marine Management Division


Jeruel Aguhob
Leland Briones
Ariel Pliego
Arlyn Gasang

DENR CENRO
Ryan Revilla
Our warmest appreciation also goes to the following members of the Legislative Department who gave
their time and financial support in the conduct of the community consultation:

Committee on Environment and Natural Resources


Committee on Agriculture
Sangguniang Panglunsod
Hon. Atty. Arnolfo Ricardo B. Cabling
Hon. Leonardo R. Avila III
Hon. Conrado D. Baluran
Mr. Leo Ariel Pepino
Ms. Lenny Deles
Ms. Eva Claire Trinidad

The CRM TWG would also like to graciously thank the following who accepted our invitation to
participate during the Barangay Validation Consultation Workshops:

Hon. Antonio Lu and the people of Brgy. 27-C


Hon. Edwardo B. Millondaga and the people of Brgy. 22-C
Hon. Hernani Verde and the people of Brgy. 31-D
Hon. Odelon Yngayo and the people of Brgy. 21-C
Hon. Amil Manding and the people of Brgy. 23-C

Hon. Danilo Andoy and the people of Brgy. Bago Aplaya


Hon. Celso Tizon and the people of Brgy. 76-A
Hon. Jessi Mar Culaste and the people of Brgy. Dumoy
Hon. Jimmy Poliquit and the people of Brgy. Matina Aplaya
Hon. Artemio Jimenez and the people of Brgy. Talomo Proper

Hon. Nonato Bolos and the people of Brgy. Centro


Hon. Alberto Almoroto and the people of Brgy. Lapu-Lapu
Hon. Arturo Yu and the people of Brgy. Leon Garcia
Hon. Leonardo Dagohoy and the people of Brgy. Duterte

Hon. Dioscoro Sampaga and the people of Brgy. Pampanga


Hon. Juanito Flores and the people of Brgy. Sasa
Hon. Salvador S. del Rosario and the people of Brgy. Vicente Hizon Sr.

Hon. Guillermo Gomez and the people of Brgy. Bunawan


Hon. Romeo Cabling and the people of Brgy. Ilang
Hon. Jeannette N. Rodas and the people of Brgy. Lasang
Hon. Arnold Apostol and the people of Brgy. Panacan
Hon. Danilo Deles and the people of Brgy. Tibungco

Hon. Francisco Lonzaga and the people of Brgy. Binugao


Hon. Lolito Sucayre and the people of Brgy. Daliao
Hon. Ramon Reyes and the people of Brgy. Lizada
Hon. Racman Lingas and the people of Brgy. Sirawan
Our data gathering would not be complete without the cordial support of the following:

Philippine Ports Authority XI


8th District Philippine Coast Guard
206th Tactical Helicopter Squadron, Tactical Operations Group, Philippine Air Force

City Tourism Office


DENR Environmental Management Bureau
Task Force Pawikan
Association of Fisherfolks of Davao City
Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources XI
Cristie Navacilla-Garcia
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Davao City Coastal Zone Management:


Situation and Recommendations

The coastal and marine resources of Davao City contribute significantly to the economy of the
City and livelihood of its constituents. The city waters cover an area of 19,827 hectares, about
10 % of the total area of Davao Gulf which is a major fishing area and priority biodiversity
conservation area in the Celebes Sea.

26 out of the 182 barangays of Davao are in coastal areas. Notably, 43 percent or 104,204
households out of the total 240,057 households in the city living in the coastal areas are directly
dependent on the resources of the sea for their survival.

Among the major uses of these resources are coastal land areas which are settlement centers
and fishery resources which are important sources of livelihood and income for a significant
portion of the Citys population. The fisheries is also the basis for a major trade industry.

The coastal waters of Davao City is a common fishing ground. Information gathered through
PCRA 2002 and validated during the Barangay Consultation of 2005 show that fishers in a
certain barangay are not confined in their coastal barangay for their fishing operations.

The estimated total fishery in Davao City is 6,600 metric tons (mt). Of this 4,446 mt and 2,157
mt came from commercial and municipal fishing, respectively. The estimated total value of the
capture fisheries production amounted to P488 million.

Another significant use of the Citys coastal land areas are commercial establishments and
industries situated within the coastal barangays. There are 6,390 commercial establishments
registered as of 2004. These commercial establishments have high economic value to the Citys
local economy. Total Gross Sales in 2004 amounted to P30 Billion. These establishments also
generate employment among the local people. As of 2004, 20,117 employees were benefiting
from the operations of these establishments.

However, despite the substantial reliance on coastal and marine resources, the socio-economic
and ecological values of the coastal areas have not been sufficiently addressed and taken into
account in the citys development programs.

The increasing economic activities have taken its toll on the resources which poses an urgent
need for an integrated management effort towards the sustainable development of these
resources.

Part of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed by the City Government with the
Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)-XI and the Philippine
Environmental Governance Project 2 (EcoGov 2) last June 9, 2005 was directed towards
improving coastal resources management. It identifies technical assistance in the determination
of coastal management zones as the framework for an integrated city-wide CRM plan. This is in
recognition of the need to arrive at a consensus on priority use areas and provide relevant
strategic recommendations that will harmonize present and prospective development of coastal
and marine resources in the City.
A series of community based consultations and zoning workshops were undertaken
where the following major issues surfaced:
improper waste management, primarily human and solid waste, followed by
industrial waste, oil spills and waste water directly threaten public health and
safety in these areas.
illegal fishing activities which continue to endanger the livelihood of fisherfolks
directly dependent on the marine resources. Overfishing is attributed to the
use of superlights, presence of commercial fishing vessels and active gears
including the installation of payaos within the 10 kilometer distance from the
shore.
informal coastal settlements which not only strain the resources of the sea but also
conflicts with other resource use. They are also significant waste generators. Thus,
priority for housing and sanitation programs will bring about very high socio-economic
and ecological benefits.
resource-use conflicts among various water and land base activities such as port
construction, seaweed farming, informal coastal settlements in mangrove areas, as
shown in the matrix of resource use interactions
incidents of oil spills and improper discharge of industrial wastes from maritime vessels
and coastal industries have been reported to affect fisherfolks and their activities.

Despite the prospective positive socio-economic benefits the different coastal development
activities ( i.e. marine transport, heavy industries, tourism, settlements), the costs of the negative
environmental impacts outweigh the positive socio-economic impacts considering that only a
few benefit directly from most of these activities.

Overall Recommendations
This report presents the current uses of the Citys coastal zone. In Summary, there are two
critical management interventions in order to sustain the use of the coastal resource:
1. Rationalize and resolve conflicting resource uses by adopting a coastal zoning scheme
consistent with the City Comprehensive Land Use Plan; and
2. Create an accountable body that will oversee coastal resource management.

1. Adoption of an Integrated Coastal and Marine Zoning Scheme

Coastal and city water zoning is a development planning tool to identify development
opportunities, rationalize and harmonize priority use areas and manage current and prospective
resource use conflicts towards integrated coastal zone management. Decisions to designate
management zones and the supporting policies and guidelines should be anchored on the
principles of sustainable development, equitable use and allocation of benefits, and good
environmental governance.
The specific objectives of the proposed coastal and marine management zones are:
to identify biodiversity conservation areas to rehabilitate critical habitats and
protect endangered species;
to designate priority use areas for the different major socio-economic
activities in the coastal and marine areas of the City;
to identify specific resource use conflicts that need to be addressed

The five proposed management zones and priority considerations for each zone is described
below.

i. Biodiversity Conservation Zone


The biodiversity conservation zone will be comprised of mangrove rehabilitation areas, fish
sanctuaries and endangered species (sea turtle, whale shark) conservation areas. The most
frequently suggested area for mangrove rehabilitation are Brgy. Lasang and Bunawan. Moreover,
the mouth of the Davao River and Lipadas River as well as the shoreline from Matina Aplaya
down to Lizada are also potential areas for mangrove rehabilitation.
The establishment of fish sanctuaries were suggested in a number of barangays to increase
fishery productivity and/or prevent illegal fishing: Barangays Lasang, Bunawan, Sasa, Dumoy,
Lizada and Daliao. To increase recovery rates and local improvement of fishery productivity,
protected areas should be at least 20 hectares (i.e. core no take and buffer sub zones).
Punta Dumalag which is a marine turtle nesting area and Lasang which is also an area
where whale sharks are seen are priority areas for species conservation areas. Both
areas were also identified as research areas and potential ecotourism areas.

ii. Fishery Management Zones


The city waters cover an area of 19,827 hectares or about 10 % of the total area of
Davao Gulf which is a major fishing area in the Celebes Sea region. Fishing activities in
the city waters are intensive.

The finalization and enactment of the City Fisheries Ordinance being drafted by the Sangguniang
Panlungsod Committee on Environment and Natural Resources should be prioritized. The
provisions on institutional arrangements, prohibited acts, user fees, issuance of licenses and
permits and, fines and penalties and delineation of fishery subzones as appropriate should be
incoporates. The formulation of the local fishery ordinance defining city waters will also
enhance enforcements of fishery laws which are presently being implemented based only on the
national law, the Philippine Fisheries Code (RA 8550).

Capture Fisheries/Fishing Areas

The Capture Fisheries/Fishing Area shall cover the entire city waters of Davao City. The
conduct of fishing activities in this area shall be subject to regulations on permits, licenses, fishing
gears, fishing boats and other requirements as prescribed or as may be prescribed by the
appropriate City Ordinance/s and national laws. This should be accompanied by the
strengthening of fishery and coastal law enforcement.
It was proposed that the use of any form of fishnets one half kilometer from the shoreline along
the entire coastline of Davao City be prohibited, and this subzone be reserved exclusively for
small scale fishermen using hook and line. In the case of Davao River, it was suggested that two
(2) km. from the mouth of the river be reserved exclusively for hook and line fishermen, and gill
nets be allowed only beyond 2 kms. These were suggested to facilitate monitoring of the illegal
fishers and prevent further degradation of coastal habitats, and improve the catch of small
fishers.

No commercial special fishing permits can be issued given that the citys municipal waters do not
extend beyond 10 kms. from shore.

Aquaculture

Zones for specific mariculture activities ( e.g. seaweed farming) should be delineated and subject
to regulations on permits, licensing and other requirements as may be prescribed by the
appropriate City Ordinance/s. Expansion of seaweed farms and fish cages should be rationalized
to avoid obstruction of navigational routes and resource use conflicts with other uses.

Pollution from brackish culture ponds should be mitigated and compliance to environmental
standards strictly enforced.

iii. Coastal Settlement Zones

The Coastal Settlement Zone shall be established in accordance with the Comprehensive Land
Use Plan of the City. The City Planning and Development Office shall ensure that the
establishment of the Coastal Settlement Zone is consistent with the Comprehensive Land Use
Plan and zoning regulations of the City. Designation of relocation areas for informal coastal
settlers should be incorporated in the city development planning. The improvement of
sewerage and sanitation facilities to ensure public health and safety in coastal areas that may be
highly vulnerable to natural hazards should be given priority.

Considering that coastal settlement areas are significant domestic waste generators,
Information, Education and Communication activities of the city on SWM to increase
knowledge on coastal households on the impacts of their SWM and WWM activities on
coastal resources should be prioritized and included in the development of the city
ISWM plan. Joint venture with private sector on installation of sewerage and sanitation
facilities (e.g. social corporate responsibility) should be pursued.
iv. Marine Transport, Navigation and Coastal Industrial Zone

The Marine Transport, Navigation and Coastal Industrial Zone will be comprised of the existing
ports/fish landing development areas, navigation areas and coastal areas where medium and
heavy industries are located, The marine transportation of Davao City is an important sector
contributing both to local and national economic activities. The seaports in the City are
considered one of the largest in the country and are considered major support facilities that
have made the City a leading regional center in Mindanao Region.

Expansion of industrial areas should be consistent with the zoning regulations of the
City. Strict implementation of issuances of FLC, and charging of penalties and fees for
non-compliance with required waste management facilities.

The Navigation Lanes Areas within the city waters shall be identified and established in
coordination with the appropriate national government agencies and should take into primary
consideration maritime transport safety.

Environmental fee system for major waste generators should be established as a means
to subsidize public environmental services such as water quality monitoring.

v. Recreation and Tourism Zone

The Recreation and Tourism Zone will be established based on the Comprehensive Land Use
Plan of the City including the priority area in Barangay Matina Aplaya -- Times Beach Area under
Presidential Proclamation No. 20. Inventory of recreation and tourism establishments and the
development and implementation of monitoring program for coastal tourism facilities,
establishments and services should be incorporated in the city tourism masterplan.

2. Create an accountable body that will formulate the city wide CRM plan and oversee
implementation of the CRM programs

The lack of an accountable body in the local government unit that will address the varied needs
and challenges within the coastal zones results into fragmented and uncoordinated initiatives
that threaten the sustainability of the coastal resources. Having an LGU-based office that is
responsible for a cohesive implementation of CRM programs will help ensure that government
is responsive to the needs of the people and environment.
Table of Contents

Introduction...................................................................................................................1
A. Background and Rationale .......................................................................................................................................................................1
B. Process and Activities Undertaken ..........................................................................................................................................................2
Coastal Settlements .....................................................................................................4
A. Profile of Coastal Settlements in Davao City .........................................................................................................................................4
B. Issues and Problems...............................................................................................................................................................................10
Solid Waste and Wastewater................................................................................................................................................................................ 10
Public Health Concerns ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Resource Use Conflicts........................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
C. Management Interventions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................................11
Settlement Programs ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 11
Solid Waste Management Programs ..................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Wastewater Management Programs...................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Data Gaps..............................................................................................................................................................................................................15

Fisheries Sector.......................................................................................................... 16
A. Status of Fisheries Sector in Davao City ..............................................................................................................................................16
Capture Fisheries................................................................................................................................................................................................... 16
Aquaculture Fisheries ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 21
Mariculture.............................................................................................................................................................................................................23
B. Issues and Problems...............................................................................................................................................................................25
Decline in Fish Catch and Income ....................................................................................................................................................................... 25
Illegal Fishing and Overfishing ............................................................................................................................................................................. 25
Habitat Degradation and Water Pollution........................................................................................................................................................... 25
Resource-Use Conflicts ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
C. Management Interventions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................................27
Fisheries Law Enforcement.................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Drafting of City Fisheries Ordinance .................................................................................................................................................................... 28
Assistance to Fisherfolks ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 29

Coastal Habitats and Species Protection............................................................. 30


A. Status of Coastal Habitats in Davao City .............................................................................................................................................31
Coral Reef Areas.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 31
Mangroves..............................................................................................................................................................................................................32
Seagrasses ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................33
B. Issues and Problems...............................................................................................................................................................................34
Degradation of Coastal Habitats........................................................................................................................................................................... 34
C. Management Interventions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................................35
Species Conservation.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 35
Establishment and Management of Fish Sanctuaries ........................................................................................................................................... 38
Coastal and Riverbank Rehabilitation and Management ..................................................................................................................................... 41
General Recommendations .................................................................................................................................................................................... 43

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


i
Marine Transportation, Navigation and Coastal Industries ............................ 44
A. Status of Marine Transportation in Davao City....................................................................................................................................44
B. Navigational Lane of Davao City...........................................................................................................................................................47
C. Coastal Industries ....................................................................................................................................................................................47
D. Issues and Problems...............................................................................................................................................................................50
Marine Transportation ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 50
Coastal Industries .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 53
E. Management Interventions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................................53
Marine Transportation Sector................................................................................................................................................................................ 53
Coastal Industries .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 55
D. Data Gaps ...............................................................................................................................................................................................56
Tourism and Recreation .......................................................................................... 57
A. Profile of Coastal Tourism in Davao City.............................................................................................................................................57
Tourist Attractions and Establishments ................................................................................................................................................................ 58
Coastal Tourism..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 59
B. Issues and Challenges.............................................................................................................................................................................60
Coastal Water Pollution........................................................................................................................................................................................ 60
Expired Foreshore Lease Contracts (FLCs)............................................................................................................................................................ 62
Other Resource-Use Conflicts................................................................................................................................................................................. 62
C. Management Interventions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................................62
Tourism Programs ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 62
Presidential Proclamation 20................................................................................................................................................................................ 63
Ecotourism.............................................................................................................................................................................................................63
D. Data Gaps ...............................................................................................................................................................................................64
Synthesis and General Recommendations........................................................... 65
A. Resource Use Issues and Impacts..........................................................................................................................................................65
B. General recommendations ......................................................................................................................................................................67
C. Proposed Coastal and Marine Management Zones ...............................................................................................................................67
Biodiversity Conservation Zone ............................................................................................................................................................................. 68
Fishery Management Zones ................................................................................................................................................................................... 72
Coastal Settlements................................................................................................................................................................................................ 74
Marine Transport and Coastal Industrial Zone..................................................................................................................................................... 75
Recreation and Tourism Zones.............................................................................................................................................................................. 76

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ii
List of Tables and Figures

Table 1. Barangay Cluster Consultation and Zoning Workshops Conducted......................................................................... 3


Table 2 . Coastal Barangays per District........................................................................................................................................... 4
Table 3. Population and Number of Households per Barangay................................................................................................. 5
Table 4. Number of fisherfolks and fishing banca per barangay as of 2005. .....................................................................17
Table 5. List of Common Types of Gears with Corresponding Fish Species and Average Reported Catch per Unit
Effort .........................................................................................................................................................................................................18
Table 6. Capture Fisheries Production, 2002-2004.....................................................................................................................19
Table 7. Top 16 Fish Species Production, November 2004 to October 2005.....................................................................20
Table 8. Fishpond Production, 2005 ................................................................................................................................................22
Table 9. Fish Cage Production, 2005...............................................................................................................................................23
Table 10. Seaweed Production, 2005..............................................................................................................................................24
Table 11. Reported Status of Coral Reef Areas, Davao City (2002 & 2005) .....................................................................31
Table 12. Estimated Mangrove Areas in Davao City...................................................................................................................32
Table 13. Reported Status of Seagrass Areas in Selected Barangays , Davao City ............................................................33
Table 14. Number of Pawikan Tagged and Released.................................................................................................................37
Table 15. Recorded Sightings of Whale Sharks in Barangay Lasang .....................................................................................37
Table 16. Ecological Profile of the proposed Agdao and Lasang Fish Sanctuaries.............................................................39
Table 17. Status of Replanting Initiatives of Mangrove & Malubago spp. Along Coastal and Riverbank Barangays of
Davao City. ..............................................................................................................................................................................................42
Box 2. Port Facilities, Equipment and Services, Port of Sasa. ....................................................................................................45
Table 18. Shipping Statistics, Sta. Ana Pier, 2004......................................................................................................................46
Table 19. Shipping Statistics, Port of Sasa, 2004.........................................................................................................................46
Table 20. Profile of Private Ports, Davao City................................................................................................................................48
Table 21. Port Statistics, At Berth Only, 2004 ..............................................................................................................................49
Table 22. Record of Oil Spillages, Davao City ...............................................................................................................................50
Table 23. Schedule of Fees, Shore Reception Facilities..............................................................................................................52
Table 24. Types and Number of Tourism Sites in Davao City .................................................................................................58
Table 25. Beach Resorts, Davao City...............................................................................................................................................59
Table 26. Total Coliform Level of Bathing Beaches, Davao City and Island Garden City of Samal, 2004 ..................60

Figure 1. Davao City Coastal Map...................................................................................................................................................... 5


Figure 2. Map showing Daycare and Health Centers within Coastal Barangays................................................................... 8
Figure 3. Map showing Public Schools within Coastal Barangays............................................................................................... 9
Figure 4. Volume of Wastes Collected, Coastal Barangays, Davao City.................................................................................13
Figure 5. Coastal Habitat Distribution in Matina Aplaya............................................................................................................36
Figure 6. Coastal Habitat Distribution in Lasang and Bunawan, Davao City........................................................................39
Figure 7. Interaction Matrix of the Major Coastal and Marine Resource Uses. ..................................................................66

Box 1. Socio-Economic Indicators, Davao City................................................................................................................................. 7


Box 2. Port Facilities, Equipment and Services, Port of Sasa. ....................................................................................................45

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


iii
List of Maps and Annexes

Map 1 Fishing Gears


Map 2 Aquaculture Activities
Map 3 Fisheries and Coastal Enforcement Issues
Map 4 Coastal Habitats and Proposed Marine Protected Areas
Map 5 Coastal Land Development Map Navigation, Marine Transport and Coastal
Industries; Tourism and Recreation
Map 6 Coastal Land Tenure and Zoning
Map 7 Proposed Zoning Map

Annex 1 Establishments / Individuals in Davao City with Foreshore Lease Contracts (FLCs)
as of December 2004
Annex 2 Establishments in Coastal Barangays of Davao City with Environmental Clearance
Certificates (ECCs) as of December 2005
Annex 3 Beach Resorts and Recreation Establishments in the Coastal Barangays of Davao City
Annex 4 Tally of Issues and Recommendations in relation to the current major marine and
coastal uses raised during the barangays cluster consultation and zoning workshops
Annex 5 Relative Environmental and Socio-Economic Impacts of Coastal and Marine Resource
Uses / Major Activities (i.e. land-based and sea-based)
Annex 6 Summary of proposed zones and locations during the barangay council validation and
6 barangay cluster (C1-C6) consultation and zoning workshops
Annex 7 List of Major Coastal Industries and types of wastes generated
Annex 8 Summary of Davao City Coastal Zone Issues & Recommendations for Specific
LGU Offices

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


iv
Chapter 1
Introduction

A. Background and Rationale

The coastal and marine resources of Davao City contribute significantly to the economy
of the City and livelihood of its constituents. Found in the western section of Davao
Gulf, Davao City with 60.1 kms (CPDO 2004) has one of the longest shoreline among all
coastal cities in the country. The city waters cover an area of 19,827 hectares, about 10
% of the total area of Davao Gulf which is a major fishing area and priority biodiversity
conservation area in the Celebes Sea. The socio-economic and ecological value of the
coastal and marine resources of the City have not been sufficiently assessed and taken
into account in the citys development programs. There are clear indications that these
resources are highly threatened by increasing economic activities and the urgent need
for integrated management efforts towards the sustainable development of these
resources.

Part of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed by the City Government with
the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)-XI and the Philippine
Environmental Governance Project 2 (EcoGov 2) last June 9, 2005 is directed towards
improving coastal resources management alongside forestry and solid waste
management. Specific to CRM, the MOA identifies technical assistance in the
determination of coastal management zones as the framework for an integrated city-
wide CRM plan. This is in recognition of the need to arrive at a consensus on priority

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


1
use areas and provide relevant strategic recommendations that will harmonize present
and prospective development of coastal and marine resources in the City. In relation
with this, a CRM Technical Working Group (TWG) was designated to take the lead in
the conduct of studies, data gathering and barangay consultations as necessary steps in
coming-up with a coastal zonation scheme. The TWG is composed of representatives
from the City Planning and Development Office (CPDO); City Agriculturist Office
(CAO), City Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO), Sangguniang
Panlungsod (SP) Committee on Environment and Natural Resources, DENR Community
Environment and Natural Resources Office (DENR CENRO); DENR-Coastal and
Marine Management Division (CMMD) and EcoGov 2.

B. Process and Activities Undertaken

This document is a product of a series of activities conducted by the CRM TWG. The
initial activities focused on the inventory and gathering of secondary information. The
TWG also conducted coastal ocular scanning which increased the groups appreciation
of coastal areas and facilitated collation of additional information on current resource
uses and issues. Coastal habitat surveys in 10 coastal barangays were conducted with
technical assistance from CMMD to determine distribution and relative total areas of
coral reef, seagrass and mangroves. The information was summarized and thematic maps
on coastal habitats, fishing, aquaculture, coastal development (settlement, industry,
tourism) and issue maps for validation, and to facilitate discussions on issues, resource-
use conflicts and consensus per zone during the community consultations. The
objectives of the barangay cluster consultation and zoning workshops were:

To facilitate gathering of local knowledge through community mapping of


coastal and marine resources, current resource use, and of issues and
concerns;
To present, validate and enrich the coastal assessment results prepared
by the TWG;
To get management recommendations from the local community
members to address priority issues identified; and
To facilitate discussion and agreement on a proposed city coastal
zonation scheme that will be the framework for the city coastal
development plan.

The first consultation was conducted with the representatives of barangay councils from
all the coastal barangays to apprise them of the planned barangay cluster consultations
and zoning workshops. The 26 coastal barangays were grouped into 6 clusters. Each
cluster is composed of 4 to 5 barangays. Each barangay was asked to send at least 10
representatives. Barangays included in each cluster and schedule of the said workshops
are presented in Table 1.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


2
Table 1. Barangay Cluster Consultation and Zoning Workshops Conducted

Cluster Date Venue Barangay Number of


Participants
Barangay Barangay council 41
November 17, Lispher Inn
Council representatives of
2005
Validation coastal barangays
Workshop
Lasang 2
November 21, MTRC, Bajada
Bunawan 14
2005
I Tibungco 9
Ilang 16
Panacan 7
Sasa 13
November 22, MTRC, Bajada
Pampanga 8
2005
II Lapu-lapu 8
San Juan 8
Hizon 9
22-C 9
November 23, Felis Resort, Matina
21-C 7
IV 2005 Aplaya
31-D 11
Bucana 5
Matina Aplaya 11
November 29, Felis Resort, Matina
Talomo Proper 5
V 2005 Aplaya
Bago Aplaya 3
Dumoy 3
Daliao 14
November 29, Felis Resort, Matina
Lizada 10
VI 2005 Aplaya
Sirawan 10
Binugao 6
Gov. V. Duterte 11
December 1, MTRC, Bajada
Leon Garcia Sr. 1
III 2005
27-C 0
23-C 3
TOTAL 244

This technical report documents the situational analysis of the five major coastal and
marine use sectors: (1) coastal settlement; (2) fisheries; (3) biodiversity conservation; (4)
marine transport, navigation and coastal industries; and (5) tourism and recreation. For
each sector, primary and secondary ecological, socio-economic, socio-cultural and
institutional information are summarized. The major issues, management initiatives and
recommendations based on community consultations and technical evaluations are
discussed.

The last chapter synthesizes the issues, resource-use interactions and arising resource
use conflicts which highlight the need for an integrated city-wide coastal and marine
resource development plan. It also presents options and considerations for proposed
coastal zonation scheme which can serve as the coastal and marine resources
management framework.
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
3
Chapter 2
Coastal Settlements

A. Profile of Coastal Settlements in Davao City

Twenty-six (26) of the 182 barangays of Davao City are coastal. (See Figure 1). These
coastal barangays are distributed in the three congressional districts (See Table 2). With
the Citys number of households totaling to 240,057 in 2000, 43% or 104,204
households are situated in coastal areas. This translates to 38% or 430,758 of the total
City population (~1.2 M in 2000) being heavily dependent on coastal areas for
settlement. Coastal barangays with highest numbers of households are Bunawan,
Bucana, Talomo Proper, Sasa and Pampanga. Table 2 shows population and number of
households per barangay.

Table 2 . Coastal Barangays per District


District II District I District III

Lasang 27-C Daliao


Bunawan 23-C Lizada
Tibungco 22-C Sirawan
Ilang 21-C Binugao
Panacan 31-D
Sasa Bucana
Pampanga Matina Aplaya
Hizon Talomo Proper
Lapu-Lapu Bago Aplaya
Agdao Centro Dumoy
Governor Vicente Duterte
Leon Garcia, Sr.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


4
Figure 1. Davao City Coastal Map

Paquibato
COASTAL BARANGAYS
Lasan OF DAVAO CITY
Calinan
Bunawa
Total Number of Brgys : 26
Tibungc
Total Land Area : 9,339.79 Has
Bunawan
Ilan Total Population : 431,513
Total # of HHs : 89,761
Panaca

Sas

Tugbok Pampang

Buhangin
Lapu-

Centr
Brgy 27-
Gov. Vicente
Agdao Brgy 23-
Leon Garcia
Talomo Poblacion Brgy 22-

Brgy 21-

Brgy 31-
D AV
AO R
I V
ER

Bucan

Toril Matina

Talom
F
L
U
Bago
O
G
Dalia
A
V
A Dumo
D Lizad

Sirawa
Est. Coastal Zone Area : 19,827.50 Has
Binuga Est. Shore length : 60.1 kms

Source: CPDO, 2005

Table 3. Population and Number of Households per Barangay


Coastal Barangays Population Number of Households

Bunawan 18,204 18,199


Bucana 58,082 12,237
Talomo Proper 47,034 10,064
Sasa 40,640 8,405
Pampanga 32,715 6,647
Panacan 28,047 5,895
Tibungco 27,402 5,425
Matina Aplaya 25,032 5,231

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


5
Coastal Barangays Population Number of Households

Daliao 18,142 3,767


Dumoy 16,082 3,472
Bago Aplaya 11,634 2,671
Lizada 11,604 2,463
San Juan Centro 12,035 2,422
23-C 10,759 2,162
Leon Garcia Sr. 10,368 2,138
Ilang 9,775 1,945
Lapu-Lapu 8,463 1,775
Gov. Vicente Duterte 7,180 1,625
Lasang 7,462 1,524
31-D 6,253 1,339
21-C 6,295 1,285
22-C 5,534 1,144
Sirawan 5,010 961
Binugao 4,410 889
27-C 2,596 519
TOTAL 430,758 104,204
Source: CPDO, 2004

The Citys rising population and prevalence of poverty in coastal areas have continued
to worsen the situation. The increasing economic needs of the coastal people vis--vis
their financial incapacity to cope with corresponding expenses have resulted in their
decision to squat within the coastal areas. This has been aggravated by the absence of
policy that prohibits and penalizes such action, and lack of housing programs which will
address shelter needs of the said sector. Box 1 presents socio-economic indicators for
the City.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


6
Box 1. Socio-Economic Indicators, Davao City

Average population growth rate (Davao City, 2000) : 2.38%


Average population growth rate (Coastal barangays, Davao City): 3.09
Annual per capita poverty threshold (Davao, 2002): P11, 489/mo.
Annual per capita food threshold (Davao, 2002): P7,751/mo.
% of households in coastal areas in subsistence threshold level (above P4,500 income/mo.):
22%
% Employment of HH Heads: 92.92% (SRA-MBN Survey, 2000 Ref Period July-Dec 1999)

Source: NSCB, 2002 and CPDO, 2004

Basic government services are also provided by the city government for the coastal
communities.

The city operates 84 daycare centers within the 26 coastal barangays. This is 17% of the
489 daycare centers distributed around the 182 barangays of Davao City. Children with
ages 3 to 5 years old have the opportunity to learn prior to their formal schooling.
Healthcare services for the coastal communities are provided through 36 public health
centers. Each center provides basic health needs like government nutrition program,
immunization, and reproductive health services. Figure 2 shows the distribution of the
daycare and healthcare centers within the coastal barangays.

Public education is another government service that is available to the coastal


communities. There are 48 elementary and 14 secondary public schools within the
coastal barangays. These schools are also supported with the Reading Habit Promotion
Program of the city government where library services & reading materials are provided
to selected schools in order to promote literacy. Location of these public education
centers are shown in Figure 3.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


7
Figure 2. Map showing Daycare and Health Centers within Coastal Barangays

Source: CPDO, 2006

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


8
Figure 3. Map showing Public Schools within Coastal Barangays

Source: CPDO, 2006

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


9
B. Issues and Problems

Solid Waste and Wastewater

Coastal settlements in Davao City pose significant threats to the Citys coastal
resources due to solid waste and wastewater pollution which also directly threaten
public health and safety in these areas. Improper solid waste management (SWM) is a
major problem within the coastal areas. The lack of SWM activities and necessary
supporting policies in these areas has resulted in dumping of wastes under the houses.
Reports of the coastal clean-up activities (i.e. Limpyo Baybay) of the City reveal that
volume of wastes generated by coastal households averages to 16,000.00 kilos/day.
These wastes are mostly composed of non-biodegradable wastes like plastics.

SRA-MBN Survey Results of the City in 2004 records that only 12% of the total number
of households in the coastal areas has access to sanitary toilets. Because of the lack of
sewerage and sanitation facilities, human waste is directly disposed into the City waters.
This is alarming considering the high density of coastal inhabitants along the shoreline of
the City. These SWM and WWM issues contribute significantly to the degradation of
the quality of the Citys coastal waters.

Public Health Concerns

Poor solid and wastewater management activities within the densely populated coastal
settlements are causes for concern for public health and safety. Based on the results of
the Participatory Coastal Resource Assessment (PCRA) conducted in 2002 by the City
Agriculturist Office and DENR-XI, residents in these areas are most vulnerable to
water-borne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid fever, hepatitis, skin diseases and respiratory
illnesses such as tuberculosis, asthma and emphysema have likely resulted from existing
SWM and WWM problems.

Resource Use Conflicts

Among the major issues raised during the barangay cluster consultations are resource-
use conflicts related to various types of coastal pollution that have far reaching negative
socio-economic and ecological impacts on recreation and tourism, fisheries, and
biodiversity conservation. In some areas the location of informal coastal settlements
directly interferes with other coastal and marine activities.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


10
The specific resource-use conflicts related to coastal settlements raised during the
workshops are:
Water pollution due to domestic wastes affecting adjacent tourism and
recreation facilities in Barangays Sasa and Agdao Centro; and seaweed
and fish cage culture particularly in Barangays Tibungco, Panacan and Sasa
Destruction of mangrove areas due to expansion of settlements in
barangays Bago Aplaya, Matina Aplaya, Bucana, Bunawan and Lasang

C. Management Interventions and Recommendations

Settlement Programs

The Citys Comprehensive Land Use Plan indicates that a total of 11,512 hectares are
allocated for residential purposes. (See Annex 7. Coastal Land Tenure and Zoning). The
Comprehensive Shelter Development Plan aims to develop new sites and service areas;
provide basic services like water, light, roads and ensure the security of tenure in
resettlement areas; ensure the economic upliftment through the provision of livelihood
opportunities and upgrade the settlement areas.

Recommendations to immediately mitigate negative effects of settlements in coastal


areas are:
Designation of coastal settlement and/or relocation areas. Community
consultations should be conducted to arrive at consensus on settlement
areas in conflict with mangrove areas. Special consideration should be
given to indigenous peoples (e.g. badjaos situated at Isla Verde, Matina
Aplaya).
Passage of City Ordinance defining uses and mechanisms for coastal
settlements, particularly the informal settlers.

Solid Waste Management Programs

Limpyo Baybay is a coastal clean-up initiative of the Office of the Mayor which started
on September 2004. The Task Force Limpyo Baybay, created under Executive Order
No. 13 Series of 2004, is mandated to: 1) collect solid wastes in Citys coastal
barangays; 2) segregate and characterize collected wastes; and 3) assist in conduct of
SWM IEC activities. All coastal barangays conduct coastal clean-up every 3rd Sunday of
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
11
the month led by coastal barangay officials. Starting January 2005, the barangay level
efforts were complemented by barangay environmental aides who were tasked to
collect garbage every day in their respective barangays. Major activities done in support
of the said program are towards clean-up of coastal and riverbank areas of the City.
The highest total volume of garbage collected during the 3rd week coastal clean up was
recorded at the start of the program in September 2004 during the International
Coastal Clean Up Day when 243,480 kilos of garbage was collected. A year after, on
September 2005 the total volume collected was 189,540 kilos. Averaging the data
generated by the coastal clean-up activities from January to December 2005, it can be
inferred that total daily solid waste generated in coastal settlements amounts to about
16,000 kilos/day. Of the total barangays covered by the clean-up activities, Bucana (2,174
kilos/day), Ilang (1,874 kilos/day), Matina Aplaya (1,582 kilos/day), Tibungco (1,477
kilos/day) and Panacan (1,334 kilos/day) are the top barangays generating the highest
volume of wastes (CENRO, 2005).

The City has already formed its Ecological Solid Waste Management Board (ESWMB)
through City Ordinance No 044-02 series of 2002 and barangay SWM committees.
Respective Barangay ordinances were passed to support barangay level solid waste
management activities. These include establishment of Barangay Material Recovery
Facilities (MRF), composting and segregation.

Various civic and private organizations have supported these initiatives. An example is
Barangay Daliao assisted by the Davao City Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SWM
program).

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


12
Figure 4. Volume of Wastes Collected, Coastal Barangays, Davao City

Volume of Wastes Collected, Coastal Barangays, Davao City

300,000

250,000
n=25

n=28
200,000
kilos

150,000

n=23
n=22
n=24
100,000
n=28
n=27 n=25
n=21
n=22
50,000
n=8 n=26
n=28 n=26
n=25
n=25

-
ry

ly
ay
04

05

ril
er

ne

st

er
r

ch

r
r

r
be

be
be

be

be
Ju

gu
Ap
ua
ob

ob
M
ar
p-

n-

Ju
em

em
em

em

em
Au
br

M
Ja
Se

ct

ct
O
O

Fe
ov

ov
pt
ec

ec
Se
N

N
D

D
Month

Source: Limpyo Baybay Report, 2005, n= number of barangays (CENRO, 2005)

While Limpyo Baybay is a commendable SWM initiative, this is insufficient to address


the serious waste management concerns in the coastal areas. The following efforts are
recommended to address SWM and WWM issues within the coastal areas:
Development and legitimization of Integrated Solid Waste Management
(ISWM) Plan for the City. The said ISWM Plan should identify specific
strategies for coastal barangays and mandate development and
implementation of ISWM Barangay Program;
Review, update and enforce existing City Ordinance on SWM, identifying
fines and penalties for dumping of domestic wastes into the City waters
as well as creation of SWM Office that will be responsible to implement
the ISWM Plan;
Strengthening of Information, Education and Communication (IEC)
activities of the City on SWM to increase knowledge of coastal
households on the impacts of their SWM and WWM activities on the
coastal resources. Households should be enjoined to take on a more
active role in addressing the waste management regularly in their own
homes rather than relying on community aide workers or the periodic
coastal clean-ups. An accompanying material which can be disseminated
is the Report on Water Quality of the City conducted by EMB of DENR.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


13
Also, the Health Office of the City should create a database of reported
illnesses occurring in coastal barangays. This may serve as a baseline data
in studying public health effects of coastal settlements;
Conduct of independent regular water quality monitoring by the City. An
outside party maybe contracted to undertake the said activity for the
City. This will evaluate impacts of proposed ISWM Plan activities.
Dissemination of results of water quality monitoring may be considered a
valuable option that seeks to increase awareness of the public on impacts
of improper SWM practices. Expansion (from Bucana to Lasang) of the
coverage of water quality monitoring being conducted by EMB is also
proposed. Present monitoring stations are limited to selected beaches
only.
Environmental fee system for major waste generators should be
established as a means to subsidize public environmental services such as
water quality monitoring

Wastewater Management Programs

The absence of an effective wastewater management program critically contributes to


increasing water pollution in the City. Since only 12% of the total households within the
area have access to sanitary toilets, wastewater has been a major problem. However,
the City has started IEC activities for coastal households on hygiene and sanitation
through the City Health Office. These activities include: house-to-house campaign,
immunization and distribution of IEC materials.

In relation with the absence of a comprehensive wastewater management program for


the City, the following are recommended:
Conduct of study on wastewater problems in coastal settlements. An
inventory on the number of specific households without sanitation
facilities and, number and existing types of sanitation facilities is an initial
step which can be undertaken. This will serve as benchmark for analyses
of costs and options for the Citys WWM programs for coastal
barangays;
Budget allocation for installation of sewerage and sanitation facilities. This
implies that the City has to subsidize investments on such facilities; and
Joint venture with private sector on installation of sewerage and
sanitation facilities ( e.g. social corporate responsibility)

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


14
Data Gaps

More information on the following will provide better indication of the waste problem
in the coastal barangays:
Contribution of coastal household solid wastes and wastewater to water
quality of the City;
Numbers and types of sicknesses reported which are attributable to solid
wastes and wastewater in coastal barangays; and
Types of solid waste generated in coastal barangays and corresponding
volume.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


15
Chapter 3
Fisheries Sector

A. Status of Fisheries Sector in Davao City


People living in the coastal areas are engaged in a variety of livelihood activities.
However, the fisheries sector has remained an important source of livelihood and
income for a significant portion of coastal households in the City. Moreover, fisheries
provide a major source of food for the residents as well as the basis for a major trade
industry. The fisheries production sector is composed of capture (municipal and
commercial) and aquaculture activities. In addition, there are a variety of fishery related
ancillary industries that provide various business opportunities in the City.

Capture Fisheries

Fishing Communities and Practices

There are 2,559 registered fisherfolks in the City (See Table 4). Of the total population
of fisherfolks, 884 are full-time fishermen, 668 are part-time and 988 are involved in
shell gathering, fish selling (middlemen fish vendors) and fish processing. These
fishermen support an average household of 6 household members. Thus, at least 15,240
individuals belonging to the poorest sector of the community are directly dependent on
fishing for subsistence income. These figures are minimum estimates given that there are
still about 20-25% of the fisherfolks who are not yet registered.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


16
On the average, fish is sold at P 60-70 per kilo, depending on the type of fish. The
average daily fish catch is 3-5 kilos. This gives an estimated average daily gross fishing
income of Php 180.00. The per capita poverty threshold of Davao City is P 11,488.00
per month and the per capita food threshold is P 7,751.00 per month. Clearly, fishers
who are solely dependent on fishing earn an income even lower than the per capita food
threshold and are among the indigent sectors in the City.

There are 1,552 fishing bancas listed in the City Agriculturist Office as per Fisherfolk
Registration conducted in 2005. 864 are motorized while 688 are non-motorized.
Motorized bancas land an average of 3-5 kilos of fish per fishing trip while non-
motorized bancas produces 2-3 kilos per trip.

Table 4. Number of fisherfolks and fishing banca per barangay as of 2005.


Fishing banca
Population of
Coastal Barangay Fisherfolks* Part Time Full Time
Non- Non-
Motorized Motorized Motorized Motorized

District 1
21-C 61 16 11 16 12
22-C N/A - - - -
23-C 66 33 6 19 -
27-C N/A - - - -
31-D 48 8 10 9 13
Bago Aplaya 69 13 32 6 9
Bucana 322 8 24 102 99
Dumoy 132 20 25 8 5
Matina Aplaya 198 4 14 40 21
Talomo Proper 183 32 6 4 6
District II
Bunawan 123 15 10 18 35
Gov. Vicente Duterte 63 9 24 6 23
Ilang 56 29 3 9 15
Lapu-Lapu 130 17 17 17 15
Lasang 113 15 9 27 30
Leon Garcia Sr. 45 11 18 - -
Pampanga 29 - 8 - -
Panacan 143 34 1 30 25
San Juan Centro 73 15 10 7 11

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


17
Fishing banca
Population of
Coastal Barangay Fisherfolks* Part Time Full Time
Non- Non-
Motorized Motorized Motorized Motorized
Sasa 89 8 14 33 8
Tibungco 133 15 10 31 25
District III
Binugao 48 10 8 18 12
Daliao 205 15 8 44 8
Lizada 168 25 16 29 12
Sirawan 62 20 12 19 8
TOTAL 2,559 372 296 492 392
Source: CAO, 2005
*included as fisherfolks are shell gatherers, fish vendors, fish processors, etc.

The major fishing gears used by municipal fishermen from Davao City are the hook and
line (pasal, palangre, undak-undak, sagiwsiw), gill nets (palaran, panamban, pante) and fish
traps (bentol, bubo, bunsod) with an average fishing trip of 6 hours and a catch per unit
effort of 3-5 kilos per fishing trip (See Table 5). The reported fishing areas for the
different types of gears are shown in Map 1 indicating extensive use of city waters for
fishing activities, including gleaning for seashells which supplements the daily food
requirements of coastal communities.

Fishermen use the coastal waters of Davao City as a common fishing ground.
Information gathered through PCRA 2002 and validated during the Barangay
Consultation of 2005 show that fishers in a certain barangay are not confined in their
coastal barangay for their fishing operations. For example, a fisherman using hook & line,
gill net and fish traps from Brgy. Centro operates as far as Lasang in the North, Talomo
Bay in the South or even in the municipal waters of Samal Island.

Table 5. List of Common Types of Gears with Corresponding Fish Species and Average Reported
Catch per Unit Effort
Common Used Gears Fish Species Composition Catch per unit Effort

Hook and Line


Undak Tamban, caraballas, andohao, salaysalay, 3 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
matambaka, pirit, timbungan, solid, diwit, hrs./fishing trip
bilong-bilong
Tonton Katambak, indangan, lapu-lapu, solid, 2-3 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
talakitok, pagi, molmol, diwit hrs./fishing trip
Palangre Katambak, indangan, lapu-lapu, solid, 5 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
talakitok, pagi hrs./fishing trip

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


18
Subid Balo, caraballas, matambaka, liplipan, nocus, 3 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
malasugue, bariles hrs./fishing trip
Net (gill nets, lift nets, beach siene)
Pante Moro-moro, timbungan, caraballas
Baling Anchovy, shrimp, gobies 3-5 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
hrs./fishing trip
Palaran Taman, matambaka, bilong-bilong,
caraballas
Traps
Bubo Crabs, siganid, pata, nocus, lambay, 2-3 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
pasayan, talakitok, timbongan, lagao, hrs./fishing trip
kiampao
Fish corrals Crabs, siganid, pata, nocus, lambay, 5-10 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
pasayan, talakitok, timbongan, lagao, hrs./fishing trip
kiampao
Panggal Crabs, siganid, pata, nocus, lambay, 2-3 kgs./fishing trip (average of 6
pasayan, talakitok, timbongan, lagao, hrs./fishing trip
kiampao
Source: PCRA, 2002. Updated During Barangay Consultation, 2005.

Fisheries Production and Market

The estimated total fishery in Davao City is 6,600 metric tons (mt). Of this 4,446 mt
and 2,157 mt came from commercial and municipal fishing, respectively. (See Table 6).
The total value of the capture fisheries production amounted to P488 million. Significant
decreases can be observed in the capture fisheries production from 2002-2004.

Table 6. Capture Fisheries Production, 2002-2004


Capture 2002 2003 2004
Fisheries
Sector Volume (mt) Value Volume (mt) Value Volume (mt) Value
(000) (000) (000)

Commercial 6,120.0 263,714.0 6,438.0 388,835.0 4,446.5 355,309.9


Municipal 1,857.0 95,736.0 2,634.0 133,436.0 2,157.0 132,807.0
Total 7,977.0 359,450.0 9,072.0 522,271.0 6,603.4 488,116.9
Source: BAS (Bureau of Agricultural Statistics), 2004

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


19
The estimated annual production of the top 16 major fish species based on the fish
catch monitoring conducted by Fishery Technicians from the City Agriculturist Office
from November 2004 to October 2005 are shown in Table 7. The top five include
roundscad, tuna and tuna-like fishes, sardines, big-eyed scad and anchovy comprise 52%
of the estimated production.

The bulk of the capture fisheries production is usually brought to the local public
markets in their respective barangays. Almost all the coastal barangays have their own
public market including some makeshift market outlets. Considering that the fish catch is
not aggregated, these are easily absorbed by the barangay public markets while some
members of the fisherfolk family peddle their fish catch to the neighbors or even in
subdivisions. However, for large quantities of fish catch, these are delivered to the
bigger public markets such as Agdao, Bankerohan and Toril in Davao City or even in
Panabo, Davao del Norte.

Likewise, a portion of these fish production lands in the hands of small-scale fish
processors. Their usual produce consists of dried fish, smoked fish and salted fish. The
kind and quantity of their processed product depend on the availability and price of their
raw materials (usually sardines, anchovies, and scads) and these are marketed in their
makeshift barangay market outlets, delivered in supermarkets or peddled in their
barangay and nearby subdivisions and offices.

Table 7. Top 16 Fish Species Production, November 2004 to October 2005


Species Common Name Annual Production (mt), 2005

Roundscad Moro moro / galunggung 45.6


Tuna & Tuna like fishes Bariles / tulingan / karaw 44.1
Sardine Tamban 31.8
Big eyed scad / crevalle Matambaka / saminsamin 28.0
Anchovy Bolinao 25.3
Goatfish Timbongan / saramulyete 22.9
Crevalle / short bodied Talakitok / hasahasa 20.2
Fusiliers Solid 19.9
Octopus Kugita 18.4
Emperor fish Katambak 13.4
Indian mackerel Caraballas / tamarong 13.2
Flying fish Bangsi 12.0
Groupers Lapu-lapu 10.7
Crabs Lambay / alimango 10.3
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
20
Species Common Name Annual Production (mt), 2005

Garfish Balo 9.9


Gobies Nylon / hipon 6.8
TOTAL 332.5
Source: CAO, 2005

Ancillary Industries

The fisheries industry has opened up business opportunities in support or as a


consequence to the fisheries activities. There are four ice plants established at Talomo,
Dumoy and Daliao to cater to the ice requirements needed. Ice storage facilities are
installed in particularly all public markets to ensure ice supply to maintain the freshness
of aquatic produce.

Outlets for fishing paraphernalia (marine engines, fishing nets, nylon twine, fish hooks,
etc.) are found in downtown Davao, Toril, Tibungco, and Bunawan for easier access by
the fisherfolk.

The Fish Port at Daliao, although it caters mainly to foreign fishing vessels, houses 6 fish
processors with an annual capacity of about 550 tons. The major fish species processed
are tuna and tuna-like species (tuna fillet, cubes) and octopus. 80% of the processed
products are exported to the United States and Japan, 10% are delivered to institutional
buyers like hotels and restaurants while the remaining 10% are disposed at the local
markets.

There exist in Matina Aplaya an informal dockyard in which fishing boats are built or
docked for repairs. This gives opportunity for the local skilled workers to be employed.

The transport industry also benefits from the fishing industry by ferrying the produce
from the fish landing areas to the different market outlets. Big companies at the fish port
usually have their own fleet of transport vehicles but small-scale fishermen avail of the
public utility vehicles (PUJs, tricycles and tri-sikad - a pedal-powered bicycle with
sidecar).

Aquaculture Fisheries

Aquaculture fisheries activities of the City are fish culture in brackish water fishponds,
sea cages, and seaweed farming. The reported estimated total aquaculture production
from Davao City was 665 mt (2002), 626.6 (2003) and 517.2 (2004) valued at Php 53.3
M and Php 33.0M in 2002 and 2004 respectively.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


21
Inland Fishpond Culture

Currently, there are 124 hectares of brackish water fishponds producing bangus and
tilapia. These fishponds are located in Bunawan, Lasang, Dumoy, Lizada, Binugao and
Sirawan. Small-scale fishponds are also found in Barangays Bucana and Dumoy culturing
bangus and tilapia. Crab culture in ponds is also practiced in Lasang and Barangay
Bucana. Likewise, culture of bangus fry up to fingerling stage exists in Barangays Bucana
and Lasang. These are marketed to the neighboring fishpond operators for rearing into
marketable sizes. (See Map 2 Aquaculture Map).

The average annual production of the fish ponds ranges from 3.5 mt per ha to 4 mt per
ha. (See Table 8). In 2005, total of 423 mt of bangus and tilapia were produced from
fishponds estimated to be worth about Php 31,725,000.00.

Table 8. Fishpond Production, 2005


Location Area (has) Fish Species Average Annual Total Annual
Production Production (mt)
(mt/has)

Fishponds
Bunawan 22.0 Bangus 3.5 77.0
Lasang 69.3 Bangus 3.5 242.0
Dumoy 4.0 Tilapia 3.5 12.0
Lizada 14.0 Bangus / Tilapia 3.5 32.0
Binugao 10.0 Bangus 3.5 40.0
Sirawan 5.0 Bangus 3.5 20.0
TOTAL 124.3 423.0
Source: CAO, 2005

Most of the cultured fish are disposed in the local markets for public consumption or as
inputs to fish processors (e.g. boneless bangus, fish tapa). Also, a sizable portion of the
bangus production is sold in juvenile stage for use as tuna baits by Taiwanese
commercial fishers at the Davao Fish Port at Toril, Davao City. A total of 1,234,700
bangus juveniles were purchased by these commercial fishermen in 2005 infusing about
Php 6,173,000.00 to the local economy.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


22
Mariculture

Mariculture activities in the City waters are usually conducted from October to June
because during the prevalence of the southwest monsoon or habagat in July to
September, the sea is rough and unsuitable for both fish cage culture and seaweed
farming.

Fish Cages

Currently, fish cage culture within city waters cover a total area of 200 m2. These fish
cages are in Barangays Sasa, Agdao Centro, Matina Aplaya, Bunawan and Daliao. (Map 2.
Aquaculture Map). Bangus and siganids are the usual fish species cultured in floating fish
cages. Groupers and lobsters have been tried as culture species but due to scarcity of
fry/fingerlings of the said species coupled with very high cost of feeds; these were
stopped in favor of Bangus and Siganids. A total of 6.4 mt of bangus and siganid were
produced in 2005 (See Table 9) valued at about Php500, 000.00.

Table 9. Fish Cage Production, 2005


Location Area (sq.m.) Fish Species Average Annual Total Annual
Production Production (mt)
(mt/has)

Fish cages
Sasa 36 Bangus / Siganid 1.2 1.2
Centro 36 Siganid 0.8 0.8
Matina Aplaya 72 Bangus / Siganid 1.2 2.4
Bunawan 36 Bangus / Siganid 1.2 1.2
Daliao 20 Bangus / Siganid 0.8 0.8
TOTAL 200 6.4
Source: CAO, 2005

Seaweed Farming

Presently, a total of 33.5 hectares are used for seaweed production. These seaweed
production areas are located in Barangays Tibungco, Ilang, Panacan and Dumoy (Map 2.
Aquaculture Activities). Seaweed species cultured are the Eucheuma spp. and
Kappaphycus spp. The former is marketed fresh (Php 25-30 per kilo) for local
consumption while the latter is sold in dried form (Php 35-37 per kilo). A private buying
station has been set-up in Tibungco for ready market of the produce. These are then
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
23
transported to Cebu for processing into various food ingredients as well as numerous
industrial uses. A total of 322 mt of seaweeds were produced in 2005. (See Table 10).
Average annual production of seaweeds ranges from 8 to 10 mt per ha. The estimated
cost of seaweeds produced in Davao is about Php 11,354,000.00.

Table 10. Seaweed Production, 2005


Location Area (has) Fish Species Average Annual Total Annual
Culture Production Production (mt)
(mt/has)

Seaweed Farms
Tibungco 26 Kappaphycus spp. 10 260
Ilang 5 Kappaphycus spp. 8 40
Sasa 1 Euchema spp. 8 8
Panacan 1 Euchema spp. 10 10
Dumoy 0.5 Kappaphycus spp. 8 4
TOTAL 33.5 322
Source: CAO, 2005

Seaweed production has provided additional income to our fisherfolks, especially our
Muslim brothers, along the coastal areas. Likewise, these floating seaweed farms directly
protect the corals and seagrasses underneath from unnecessary disturbance. As
observed during the coastal habitat assessment conducted by the EcoGov Technical
Working Group, seagrass beds under the seaweed farms are growing luxuriantly while
the corals are maintained in good condition.

Ancillary Industries

The aquaculture industry opens up business opportunities for suppliers of production


inputs like fertilizers, feeds and fry/fingerlings for fishponds, nets, feeds, and fish
fingerlings for fish cages, and nylon twine, floats and planting materials for seaweeds
aside from generating employment for the operation of these projects.

Davao City is home to three big feed companies like B-Meg, Vitarich and Julu. Likewise,
a local buying station for seaweeds was set up in Tibungco and, just recently, a seaweed
processing plant was established in Lizada.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


24
B. Issues and Problems

Decline in Fish Catch and Income

Several issues and problems challenge the fisheries sector of the City. Foremost of these
is the evident decline in capture fisheries production of the Citys waters. (See Table 6).
The major causes of the decline identified during the workshop consultations are
rampant illegal fishing practices, overfishing and coastal habitat degradation.

Illegal Fishing and Overfishing

Dynamites and fine meshed nets (baling) are still being used in Talomo Bay Area
particularly in Bago Aplaya, Dumoy, Sirawan and Binugao. Active gears and compressors
have also been observed in Ilang, Tibungco, Bunawan and Lasang (See Map 3. Fisheries
and Coastal Enforcement Issues).

Aside from the use of fine mesh nets, overfishing is attributed to the use of superlights
in fishing grounds of Talomo Bay comprising the Barangays of Matina Aplaya, Talomo,
Bago Aplaya, Dumoy, Daliao, Lizada, Sirawan and Binugao. In addition to this,
commercial fishing vessels and active gears have also been seen plying along waters of
Talomo Bay. During an ocular inspection, with the aide of a Global Positioning System
(GPS) unit, a composite Team from BFAR XI, City Agriculturist Office, Sangguniang
Panglungsod and the CFARMC found that some fish shelters or payaos have been
installed by commercial fishermen within 10 kilometer distance from the shore (See Map
3. Fisheries and Coastal Enforcement Issues). Operation of commercial fishing activities
(the payao is an accessory gear) within municipal/city waters is prohibited under RA
8550. In fact several committee hearings were conducted to address this issue with the
group of commercial fishers requesting that they be given ample time to recover from
their investments for the said payaos. However, fishery law enforcers are adamant that
they will arrest any commercial fishing vessel operating within the city waters.

Habitat Degradation and Water Pollution

Mangrove denudation is primarily caused by illegal cutting of mangroves and conversion


of mangrove areas into fishponds and illegal settlements. Coral reefs like mangrove areas
serve as breeding grounds and feeding areas of fishes have been observed to be
damaged and in most areas even pulverized by dynamite fishing activities. Cases of coral
gatherings have been reported at Tibungco, Sasa, Daliao and Matina Aplaya while sand
mining was reported in Barangay Talomo. These corals and sand were used as fillers for
low-lying settlement areas or walls for establishments along the coastal areas.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


25
Water pollution is also considered a major reason for fish catch decline. Fish kills have
been reported in Lizada where a seaweed processing plant is being constructed. In fact,
a committee hearing was conducted at the Sangguniang Panlungsod to investigate the
recent incident as reported by Nagkahiusang Lumulupyo sa Lawis, Inc. Coastal waters off
Sasa to Bunawan is a major fishing area. However these coastal barangays have been
declared as industrial zone. Factories, oil depots, ports and wharfs pose a threat to the
coastal environment including fishery productivity. In particular, oil spills, solid wastes
and wastewater from these facilities have also threatened the Citys fisheries
production. (See Table 22. Record of Oil Spillages, Davao City).

Domestic wastes from coastal settlements are also major sources of water pollution
that destroy fish habitats. Almost all imaginable waste materials have been observed in
the coastal areas ranging from plastics, broken household appliances and even human
wastes (See Figure 2. Volume of Wastes Collected, Davao City)

Resource-Use Conflicts

Other coastal uses have negative impacts on the fisheries productivity of city waters.
The current and prospective resource-use conflicts brought up during the barangay
cluster consultations and field surveys are as follows:

Current

Mangrove areas are being used as settlements in Barangays Lasang,


Bunawan, Bucana and Matina Aplaya. These were observed during the
coastal habitat assessment conducted by the EcoGov TWG and validated
during the Barangay Consultation Workshop.
Mariculture structures are being compromised by industrialization. The
booming seaweed industry at Tibungco is affected by the establishment of
a port in the area. In fact some seaweed operators have already accepted
payment in exchange of their seaweed farms which are directly along the
path of the ships/vessels that will dock in the said port. Also, a few years
back, a seaweed farm in Dumoy was run-over by a foreign vessel
destroying the seaweed farm. Fortunately, the said foreign company paid
for the damages incurred.
Unregulated establishment/construction of fish corals along Barangay
Bucana and Lasang slow down the flow of water to and from the inland
areas affecting the supply of water for brackishwater fishponds inland.
The establishment of a seaweed processing plant in Lizada poses threat of
pollution to the beach resort directly in front of the plant. (Please see 2nd
paragraph, Habitat Degradation)

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


26
Conflicts due to competition for mariculture areas and shore access are
experienced in Barangay Tibungco. Likewise, due to lack of regulations,
some seaweed farms block the passage of some fishing bancas to their
docking areas

Prospective

The new port being constructed at Tibungco is perceived to be a threat


to the growing seaweeds industry in the area.
The proposal to establish fish sanctuaries is considered by some as a
restriction in traditional fishing grounds that will result in decline in
current fish catch. (E.g. in Barangay Lasang, Bunawan and Matina Aplaya.

C. Management Interventions and Recommendations

Fisheries Law Enforcement

The City Agriculturist Office has organized Fisheries and Aquatic Resource Management
Councils (BFARMCs) in 23 of the 26 coastal barangays. These Barangay FARMCs paved
the way for the organization of the City FARMC. The said FARMCs assist the barangays
and the City in the formulation and implementation of policies, plans and programs for
the management, conservation, protection and sustainable development of fisheries and
aquatic resources. Executive Order No. 48, series of 2004, officially recognizes the
CFARMC as the official representative of the fisherfolk sector of the City. Annual
budget allocation for the CFARMC amounts to P500, 000.

To enhance the participation of the fisherfolk community in the implementation of


Fishery Laws, Rules and Regulations, the City organized the Barangay Coast Watch
Teams (BCWT) in all the 26 coastal barangays. These BCWTs feed information to the
Fishery Law Enforcement Teams (FLET) which will then respond to the information
given.

In support to the Fishery Law Enforcement, the city purchased four (4) patrol bancas for
the use of the four (4) FLET organized. Likewise, in partnership with the Bureau of
Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) through the Fisheries Resource Management
Project (FRMP), these community-based law enforcers were provided with hand-held
radios, binoculars and other navigational gadgets for use in the patrol operations.

However, these have not been sufficient to curtail rampant illegal fishing activities within
the City waters (Map 3. Fisheries and Coastal Law Enforcement Issues). Because of the
long coastline of the City, each of the four patrol bancas covers an average of 15
kilometers coastline affecting its effectiveness and efficiency.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


27
Drafting of City Fisheries Ordinance

The proposed City Fisheries Ordinance is being drafted through the initiative of the
Sangguniang Panlungsod Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. Specific
aspects of the Ordinance being looked into are provisions on institutional arrangements
(responsible Office to implement the Ordinance and corresponding functions),
prohibited acts, user fees, issuance of licenses and permits and, fines and penalties. The
formulation of the local fishery ordinance defining city waters will also enhance
enforcements of fishery laws which are presently being implemented based only on the
national law, the Philippine Fisheries Code (RA 8550).

The following are recommended to support improved fisheries management:


Strengthening of Fisheries Law Enforcement through
o Additional patrol bancas together with fuel and oil allocation
o Conduct of fisheries law enforcement trainings
o Strengthening of Barangay Coast Watch Teams and other
enforcement groups;
Zoning of city waters with specified areas for particular fishery activities
(e.g. mariculture, hook and line non-motorized boats, appropriate
guidelines for stationary gears including payaos);
Drafting, legitimization and implementation of City Fisheries Management
Plan;
Definition of users of City waters. Only registered fishers of Davao City
will be allowed to fish in the Citys fishing zone. Fishers from outside the
City will be required to secure a fishing permit from the City. Otherwise,
they will be advised not to operate in the City waters;
Registration and Licensing. A City registration and licensing system shall
be implemented. This should be supported by the Citys Fisheries
Ordinance;
Identification of prohibited gears, granting of incentives and disincentives
will be among the provisions in the proposed fisheries Ordinance; and
Intensive IEC and advocacy programs

Dealing with the problem of overfishing by reducing fishing effort requires a


comprehensive but doable approach by using a combination of all the abovementioned
approaches together with the establishment of marine sanctuaries and livelihood
incentives (See discussion below).

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


28
Assistance to Fisherfolks

The City Agriculturist Office, through the Interim Fisheries Resource Management
Services (IFRMS), provides Extension and Regulatory Services to the fisherfolk of Davao
City. However, the present technical manpower is insufficient to effectively cover the 26
coastal barangays stretching to more than 60 kilometers coastline. Assistance to
fisherfolk may include, among others:

Fisheries Division be legitimized and additional technical personnel be


recruited for a better implementation of fisheries plans and projects;
Additional budget allocation to carry out the fisheries plans and projects;
and
Livelihood trainings with seed capitalization. Priority livelihood assistance
should be as incentives to those undertaking fisheries management (e.g.
for Community-based Fishery Law Enforcers and marine sanctuary
practitioners)

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


29
Chapter 4
Coastal Habitats and Species Protection

Coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses have high ecological and economic values. Coral
reefs serve as feeding and breeding grounds to different species of fishes and
invertebrates. Mangrove trees prevent soil erosion by protecting coastal areas from
strong wave action. They are sources of food, livelihood and tourism to coastal
communities. Also, they are de facto repository of coastal run-off from rivers, coastal
sewage and pollutants from agriculture and industrial establishments. (Uychiaoco et al,
2002).

On the other hand, mangroves and seagrasses are important in the following areas: 1)
prevention of erosion and resuspension of sediment through stabilization of bottom
substrate through complex root system; 2) improvement of water quality through
retardation of water movement promoting deposition of suspended solid in the water
column; 3) efficient nutrient cycling through nutrient absorption and its availability to the
environment after the decomposition processes; 4) habitat provision for marine
organisms; and 5) support of high primary production.

The continued existence of two endangered marine species reported in Davao city, i.e.
sea turtles and whale sharks are dependent on the integrity of these coastal habitats and
the quality of coastal waters in Davao City.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


30
A. Status of Coastal Habitats in Davao City

Coral Reef Areas

Coral reefs in Davao City estimated from satellite images taken in 2000, cover a total
area of about 130 has (See Map 4. Coastal Habitat). Based on the Participatory Coastal
Resource Assessment (PCRA) conducted last 2002, majority of these are in poor
condition except for those found in Daliao that are still in good condition while the
corals in Dumoy and Ilang are in fair condition. The poor condition of the reef areas was
also the general observation during the manta tow survey conducted in 2005.

The biggest coral areas found during the 2005 survey in 10 barangays were in Barangays
Daliao, Sirawan and Lizada. These coral areas approximately measure 30.6 hectares
which are observed to be in poor condition, while in Barangay Matina Aplaya, corals are
found to be in fair condition with an approximate area of 29.75 hectares.

Table 11. Reported Status of Coral Reef Areas, Davao City (2002 & 2005)
Barangay Coral Reef Condition (PCRA Manta Tow Surveys, 2005, 10
2002) selected sites

Matina Aplaya No data Fair condition


Bago Aplaya Poor condition Poor condition
Binugao Poor condition Poor condition
Bunawan Poor condition Poor condition
Agdao Centro No data Poor condition
Daliao Good condition Poor condition
Dumoy Fair condition No data
Gov. Vicente Duterte Poor condition No data
Ilang Fair condition No data
Lapu-lapu No data No data
Lasang No data Fair condition
Leon Garcia Poor condition No data
Lizada Toril Poor condition Poor condition
Pampanga No data No data
Sasa No data No data
Sirawan Poor condition Poor condition
Talomo Poor condition No data

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


31
Barangay Coral Reef Condition (PCRA Manta Tow Surveys, 2005, 10
2002) selected sites

Tibungco Poor condition Fair condition


Bucana Poor condition No data
Source: Adopted from CMMD, CAO and City ENRO data, 2005

Live Coral Cover:


0-25%: poor; 26-50%: fair; 51-75%: good; >75%: excellent

Mangroves

The estimated total mangrove areas including areas with associate vegetation and
converted areas with sparse mangroves from satellite images are about 200 hectares
(See Map 4.Coastal Habitat). However, based on field surveys in 2005 in selected 10
coastal barangays, the remaining mangrove areas are estimated to be only 35.12
hectares (CMMD-DENR 2005). Of these, majority is described to be secondary
growth. These are dominated by Rhizophora and Sonneratia spp. Majority of these
mangrove areas are in Lasang, Bunawan, Lizada, Bago Aplaya, Bucana and Matina Aplaya.
It is interesting to note that Barangay Lizada has the most Nipa sp. Most of the
mangrove areas were observed to be in poor condition i.e. observed cuttings, presence
of domestic solid waste and presence of informal settlers.

Table 12. Estimated Mangrove Areas in Davao City


Barangay Has. of Mangroves

Bago Aplaya 3.174


Bunawan 9.125
Binugao 0.746
Centro No mangroves
Daliao No data
Dumoy No data
Gov. Vicente Duterte No mangroves
Ilang No data
Lapu-lapu No mangroves
Lasang 12.00
Lizada Toril 8.967
Matina Aplaya 4.608
Pampanga No mangroves

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


32
Barangay Has. of Mangroves

Sasa No data
Talomo No data
Tibungco No mangroves
Bucana No data
27-C No data
Source: CMMD-DENR XI, CAO and City ENRO, 2005

Seagrasses

The estimated total seagrass areas within Davao City waters from satellite images taken
in 2000 are about 190 hectares. The seagrass areas in 10 coastal barangays during the
field surveys in 2005 are estimated to be about 130 has. The major species reported are
Enhalus acoroides, Cymodocea rotundata and Halophila ovalis. Majority of these seagrasses
are in Barangays Bunawan and Lasang. As observed during the survey, most of the
seagrass areas are in poor condition. The sea grass areas are given less importance by
the communities due to limited knowledge on the importance and significance of the
ecosystem.

Table 13. Reported Status of Seagrass Areas in Selected Barangays , Davao City
Barangay Sea Grass Condition (PCRA Surveys, 2005, 10 Selected sites,
2002) Has

Bago Aplaya No data 1.278


Binugao No data No sea grass area
Bunawan Fair condition 25.816
Centro No data 2.44
Daliao No data 2.190
Dumoy Good condition No data
Duterte Poor condition No data
Ilang Good condition No data
Lapu-lapu No data No data
Lasang No data 68.664
Leon Garcia Poor condition No data
Lizada Toril Good condition 0.393
Matina Aplaya No data 4.225
Pampanga No data No data
Panacan No data No data

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


33
Barangay Sea Grass Condition (PCRA Surveys, 2005, 10 Selected sites,
2002) Has

Sasa No data No data


Sirawan Poor condition No data
Talomo No data No data
Tibungco Poor condition 24.143
Bucana No data No data
27-C No data No data
Source: PCRA 2002, CMMD-DENR, CAO and City ENRO, 2005

Seagrass cover:
0-25%: poor; 26-50%: fair; 51-75%: good; >75: excellent

B. Issues and Problems

Degradation of Coastal Habitats

Insufficient Coastal Law Enforcement

Illegal cutting of mangroves has been a critical concern in Barangays Matina Aplaya,
Panacan, and Bucana. Likewise, various destructive fishing gears as well as aquaculture
structures (Map 2. Aquaculture Activities; Map 3. Fisheries and Coastal Enforcement
Issues) pose continuous threats to coral reef areas and seagrass beds as mentioned in
the fisheries section.

Threatened Endangered Species

Degradation of coastal habitats threaten critical habitats of endangered species


particularly the marine turtle nesting areas in Matina Aplaya and the extensive seagrass
area in Lasang where whale sharks have been sighted.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


34
Resource-Use Conflicts

The degradation of Coastal habitats is exacerbated by various resource use conflicts


raised during the barangay cluster consultations and observations during the field
surveys:

Port structures have been constructed on coral and seagrass areas in


Barangay Tibungco. The posts of the ports were buried in coral areas
which prevent penetration of sunlight that is essential to the corals
survival. Sea grasses were affected by reclamation activities in the area
also.
Informal settlements are situated within mangrove areas in Barangays
Bago Aplaya, Matina Aplaya, Bucana, Bunawan and Lasang. Degradation of
mangrove areas has been brought about by cutting of mangroves to free
space for settlement structures, improper disposal of domestic solid
wastes and wastewater due to lack of sewerage and sanitation facilities.
The proposal to establish fish sanctuaries is considered by some as a
restriction in traditional fishing grounds that will result in further decline
in fish catch bringing about low income for the fishermen. For example,
the proposed site for Lasang Fish Sanctuary which has fair coral cover
and extensive seagrass beds is a major fishing ground within the area.
This is related with the lack of available alternative livelihood within the
area. (OIDCI, BCRMP, 2005). The limited logistical support in
implementing coastal law enforcement discourages communities in the
establishment of said sanctuaries.

C. Management Interventions and Recommendations

Species Conservation

Marine Turtles

A major biodiversity conservation effort of the City Government is the Pawikan


Sanctuary. The Pawikan Sanctuary has been established at Punta Dumalag in Barangay
Matina Aplaya through Resolution No. 02504-03 to serve as a nesting ground of
hawksbill sea turtle. In relation with this, the Marine Turtle Protection and Conservation
Task Force has been created through Executive Order 29-2003 as the primary group
responsible to initiate and implement activities related to marine turtle conservation.
This Task Force is composed of the Mayor or his authorized representative as the

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


35
Chairperson, Chairperson of the Environment and Natural Resources Committee of
the Sangguniang Panglungsod or his authorized representative as the Vice Chairperson
and members, including: City Administrator, City Environment and Natural Resources
Officer, City Agriculturist, City Planning and Development Coordinator, Barangay
Captain of Matina Aplaya, Davao City Police Office, landowner or his authorized
representative, DENR-XI representative, DA-XI representative, DIDP Project
Management Office representative and 2 NGO representatives. In support of these
initiatives, a MOA was signed in 23 January 2004 between Davao Light and Power
Company, Inc. with the city Government of Davao and DENR to implement the Marine
Turtle and Dugong Conservation Project.

Since 2002, a total of 50 turtles have been tagged and released in the area, 30 of which
were tagged in 2005 (Task Force Pawikan 2005 Annual Report & DENR-PAWD
inventory report).

Figure 5. Coastal Habitat Distribution in Matina Aplaya

783500 784000 784500 785000 785500 786000 786500

PANABO CITY
779500 779500

DAVAO CITY

779000 779000
STA. CRUZ

MAP SHOWING THE HABITAT


778500 778500 DISTRIBUTION AND COMPLEXITY
OF BRGY. MATINA APLAYA
DAVAO CITY
MARINE TURTLE SANCTUARY LEGEND:
Seagrass - 4.225 hactares
Mangrove - 4.114 hactares
778000 778000 Mangrove Reforestation - 0.494
Corals - 29.681 hactares
Manta Tow
Road
River

777500 777500 Surveyed by:

CMMD STAFF &


CITY ENRO STAFF

777000 777000

Prepared by:
DAVAO GULF
DENR XI-CMMD
783500 784000 784500 785000 785500 786000 786500
MAP DATUM: LUZON-MINDANAO PHILIPPINES
1:18280 ZONE 51

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


36
Table 14 shows the number of marine turtle sightings in the area documented in the
logbook of the said PO.

Table 14. Number of Pawikan Tagged and Released


2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

4 Lack of data 2 4 14 30*


Source: Task Force Pawikan

*Data gathered from DENR and TFPD. Increase in tagged and released turtles could imply that constituents are
more aware of their responsibilities because of frequent media exposures

Whale Sharks

The proposed conservation area for whale sharks or butandings is located at Brgy.
Lasang i.e. practically the whole barangay coastal waters. Barangay Lasang is adjacent to
a highly industrialized area but still has relatively fair and good condition of its seagrass,
corals and mangroves. The said conservation initiative is proposed to be managed by a
Peoples Organization in the area.

Table 15. Recorded Sightings of Whale Sharks in Barangay Lasang


DATE NO. OF INDIVIDUALS TIME APPROX LENGTH (m)

Jan 2005 1 6am-1pm 3


March 20, 2005 1 3-5am 5
March 27, 2005 1 4pm 5
April 2005 1 3pm 8
May 17, 2005 2 4pm 5&7
May 25, 2005 1 3pm 4
Source: PO Logbook as of May 27, 2005

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


37
The following recommendations are deemed necessary to institutionalize marine species
conservation in the city:

The establishment of a turtle sanctuary in Matina Aplaya should be


legitimized and a management plan formulated; and
Establishment and Management of Conservation Area for Whale Sharks
or Butandings in Lasang.
Plan formulation for both proposed species conservation areas should
detail the organizational structure and functions of the management body,
its membership and tasks and responsibilities. It should provide a short-
term action plan and a strategic framework agenda wherein sufficient
budgets are allocated for the activities. The legitimization process should
allow for sufficient social preparation and meaningful participation by
stakeholders. (See discussion below).

Establishment and Management of Fish Sanctuaries

Two fish sanctuaries are proposed to be established by the City Lasang Fish Sanctuary
in Barangay Lasang (Figure 3) and Agdao Fish Sanctuary in Barangay Centro (Figure 4).
Site surveys in the proposed fish sanctuary in Agdao have been conducted since 2002 by
the International Marine Alliance (IMA). Assessment in the proposed fish sanctuaries
was conducted by DENR-CMMD in 2005. The ecological profiles of the two proposed
sanctuaries are summarized in Table 16.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


38
Figure 6. Coastal Habitat Distribution in Lasang and Bunawan, Davao City.
9150
7 0 92000
7 92500
7 9300
7 0 93500
7 9400
7 0 9450
7 0 9500
7 0 9550
7 0 9600
7 0 N

035
8 00
035
8 00

PANABO CITY

030
8 00
030
8 00

DAVAO CITY

STA. CRUZ
0250
8 0
0250
8 0

MAP SHOWING THE HABITAT


DISTRIBUTION AND COMPLEXITY
0200
8 0
0200
8 0
OF BRGY. BUNAWAN &
BRGY. LASANG, DAVAO CITY
LEGEND:
Bunawan Coral s - 6.959 hac tares
Las ang Cor als - 3.876 hactares
Bunawan Mangrove - 9.125 hactar es
Las ang Mangrov e - 12.00 hactares
05
8 100
Proposed fish 05
8 100

Bunawan Seagrass - 25.816 hactares


Las ang Seagrass - 68.664 hactares

sanctuary Bunawan Fish pond - 5.996 hactares


Las ang Fish pond - 46.951 hactar es

LF
Bunawan Seaweeds - 2.922 hac tares

Las ang Fish Corral

GU 00
8 100
Las ang Fishcage
00
8 100

Bunawan/Lasang Build-up

AO
Bunawan Manta Tow
Road

00
8500

D AV 05
8 000
Riv er

Surveyed by:

CMMD STAFF &


0000
8
0000
8

CITY ENRO

99500
7

Prepared by:
99500
7

DENR XI-CMMD
99000
7
99000
7

MAP DATUM: LUZON-MINDANAO PHILIPPINES


9150
7 0 92000
7 92500
7 9300
7 0 93500
7 9400
7 0 9450
7 0 9500
7 0 9550
7 0 9600
7 0

ZONE 51
1:25000

Table 16. Ecological Profile of the proposed Agdao and Lasang Fish Sanctuaries
Bio-Physical Agdao Fish Sanctuary* Lasang Fish Sanctuary**
Description

Size 6.95 has 3.08 has


Reef Condition 85% coral cover Live coral cover: 45.99%, consist
73% live coral mostly of Acropora branching types
12% dead coral

Species Identified More than 40 commercial fish More than 15 commercial fish species
species identified identified
31 species of hard and soft corals
25 indicator fish species identified
Invertebrate species, e.g.
echinoderms, shells, etc.
Others Adjacent to mangrove area (12.05 has)
and seagrass beds (64.51 has)
Source: *IMA report, 2000;**CMMD report, 2005

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


39
Based on OIDCI-FRMP report, many barangays have expressed interest to establish
marine sanctuaries. Based on the fair status of coastal habitats other potential areas (i.e.
Barangays Lizada, Matina Aplaya, Lasang, and Bunawan) were identified during 2005
CMMD survey.

Site Selection for Fish Sanctuaries

The establishment and management of these fish sanctuaries should be


supported by local communities. As fishery stakeholders are concerned
about the potential loss of fishing ground areas, effort should be taken in
relation to Information, Education and Communications campaigns. This
should involve both broad awareness campaigns on the importance of the
proposed marine sanctuary areas and at the same time more solid
community organizing prior to actual establishment of the sanctuaries to
develop social acceptance by the community.
Systematic assessment and evaluation of appropriate fish sanctuary areas
should take into consideration ecological significance, rationalization of
protection areas in other existing uses and existence of institutional and
financial mechanisms for the establishment and management of these
areas.

Formulation and Legitimization of Management Plan

Creation of a local MPA body that will oversee Marine Sanctuary Plan
formulation and implementation;
Incorporation of buffer areas in proposed fish sanctuaries, for example,
o In Lasang, an additional extension of 100-200 meters around the
perimeter to include the reservation area for whale sharks will
considerably expand the no-take area and afford a buffer zone
which will make it manageable and yet ecologically meaningful.
o In Agdao Centro, the aggregate total area under protection can
be at least 20-30 hectares.
Specify prohibition of fishing activities within the designated area, fines
and penalties for violation of such prohibition and enforcement
mechanisms (e.g. patrolling of Community Based Fishery Law Enforcers,
community reporting system, community IEC activities)
Legitimize plan through City Ordinance declaring the establishment of the
fish sanctuaries, allocating budget and adopting the implementation
mechanisms and strategies indicated in the MPA plan

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


40
Coastal and Riverbank Rehabilitation and Management

Mangrove Rehabilitation

It is significant to note that Peoples Organizations (POs) from barangays Lasang, Bucana
and Matina Aplaya are actively rehabilitating mangrove areas by way of planting of
mangrove seedlings, such as Rhizopora, Sonneratia and Avicennia spp, along the coastal
areas of the said barangays. The Association of Fisherfolks of Davao City, Inc. (AFDCI),
an NGO funded by the European Commission has been instrumental in mobilizing the
coastal communities of Barangay Lasang. Together with the Barangay Council of Lasang,
they have established a mangrove nursery that supports the requirements for seedling
materials during tree planting activities and provide alternative livelihood to the
community. The activities also include regulation of fishing, gleaning and other fishery
related activities in the area.

There are also 3 other PO operating mangrove nurseries in Barangay Matina Aplaya.
These POs receive financial assistance from NGOs, Congressional Fund of
Congressman Prospero C. Nograles and supported with barangay and City funds.
Activities for the Mangrove Rehabilitation are also assisted by private schools
(University of Mindanao, Davao Doctors College and Holy Cross of Davao College) and
private organizations (Rotary Club of Davao).

Riverbank Rehabilitation

Barangays 8-A, 9-A and 10-A in Poblacion District have also initiated riverbank
rehabilitation activities. These barangays planted malubago species along the Davao
Riverbank with a regular quarterly maintenance and protection activities. Led by
Barangay officials, the activity is supported by private organizations like the University of
Mindanao Administrative Employees Association and the Protect the Davao River
Movement.

In addition, the city government of Davao through the office of the City Environment
and Natural Resources (CENRO) has initiated the Adopt a Mangrove and Riverbank
program which is strongly supported by the national and local government offices, non-
government organizations, barangay Council and the academe.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


41
Table 17. Status of Replanting Initiatives of Mangrove & Malubago spp. Along Coastal and Riverbank
Barangays of Davao City.
OFFICE/AGENCY/ NO. OF LOCATION REMARKS
OGANIZATION HECTARES

University of Mindanao 3.0 Sitio Tambungon, Brgy 2,050 seedlings of mangrove


Administrative Employees Lasang, Bunawan District planted
Association (UMAEA)
UMAEA 1.5 Purok 9, Brgy 9-A 750 hills malubago seedlings
Poblacion District planted along the riverbanks
of Davao River
Inter-agency tree planting 500 m. Purok 2 Gravahan, Brgy 500 hills malubago seedlings
Maa planted along the riverbanks
of Davao River during Earth
Day Celebration
Inter-school tree planting 2,000 sq. m. Brgy. Matina Aplaya 2,500 hills of mangrove
planted along the coastal
areas of Brgy Matina Aplaya
Inter-agency tree planting 5.0 Sitio Malambu-on, Brgy 6,650 hills of mangrove
Bucana planted along the mouth of
Davao River
Source: CENRO, 2005

The recommended potential areas for mangrove rehabilitation are Brgys. Lasang,
Bunawan, Bucana & Matina Aplaya. Species of mangroves to be planted are Rhizopora,
malubago, Sonneratia & Avicennia spp since these species are observed to be thriving in
the said areas.

The following are recommendations to further increase mangrove areas in the city:

Establishment / survey of potential areas for Mangrove Rehabilitation


Areas;
Establishment of a City Mangrove Nursery
Collaboration among the LGU, concerned NGAs, POs and academic
institutions, specially the secondary level, to increase level of awareness
on the importance of mangroves;
Forging of co-management arrangement between DENR and LGU for
mangrove area rehabilitation; and
Site species matching should be taken that appropriate species suitability
and extent of planting area are considered to assure higher survivorship.
In addition, the mangrove rehabilitation program will need to make sure
that capacity building of duly designated management are both technically
capable and equipped to manage the area and at the same time foster
community participation and stewardship.
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
42
General Recommendations

Below are general recommendations concerning the Citys biodiversity conservation:

The different existing and proposed protection/rehabilitation areas can be


part of the biodiversity conservation zone in the city CRM zoning
scheme. Coastal habitat and species protection/rehabilitation is also an
integral component of fisheries management and ecotourism
development. The implementation mechanisms, particularly institutional
and financial mechanisms at the city and barangay level for the proposed
protection/rehabilitation areas need to be worked out.
Systematic assessment of coastal habitats, capability and interest of
potential local management bodies in most of the proposed fish
sanctuaries are insufficient. Assessment can also involve the participation
of local communities so as the gauge the appropriate management
mechanisms that match the objectives of the particular zone.
Harmonization of uses and management intervention of adjacent zones
need to be further assessed so that these are consistent with
management objectives (e.g. proposed fish sanctuary that are adjacent to
pollution sources) and the likelihood of success of implementation.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


43
Chapter 5
Marine Transportation, Navigation and
Coastal Industries

A. Status of Marine Transportation in Davao City

The marine transportation of Davao City is an important sector contributing both to


local and national economic activities. The seaports in the City are considered one of
the largest in the country. They are considered major support facilities that have made
the City a leading regional center in Mindanao Region. They service inter-island
passenger traffic. This function is a significant linkage to the Citys tourism sector.
Primary routes include Iloilo, General Santos, Manila, Bacolod, and Cebu. The Citys
marine transportation also benefits inter-island travel within the Davao Region. The
Citys transport system to the Island Garden City of Samal is considered a major local
route directly related with tourism. Since Davao City is the jump-off point going to the
Samal Island, tourism related establishments, services, hotels and restaurants
economically gain from the existing set-up. There are 12 passenger boats and 3 barges
from the City to the said Island. There are two terminals for these boats going the
Island. One terminal is situated at Port of Sasa where barge and passenger boats are
available. In Sta. Ana Pier, passenger boats are the ones taking the route from the City
to the Island. These are operated by the vessel owners. Boat fare amounts to P25/head
for the barge boats and P7.50/head for passenger boats.

The Citys ports also handle inter-island and international shipments of locally produced
commodities. They are essential facilities and infrastructure supporting the Citys trade
economy, particularly for the agricultural sector. Major destinations of bananas,
pomelos, mangoes and vegetables are Manila and Cebu. The bulk of these products are
then transported to larger foreign-bound vessels for export. Major trade partners of the
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
44
City for bananas are China, Japan, Korea and Middle Eastern countries 1. Coconut oil is
also exported to Singapore and Japan. PPA-XI records that fruits and vegetables account
for 70% of Sasa Wharfs exports at an average of 2 million mt a year. To mention,
Philippine Fruits International Cooperation (PFIC), a subsidiary of Profood International
Corporation, is located within the City. It is a world-class producer of tropical fruit
purees/concentrates/ready-to-drink juices (mango, pineapple, papaya, guyabano, guava,
banana, clamansi, tamarind, Philippine orange and passion fruits). These products are
supplied to international supermarket chains 2. In 2004, total exports shipped out from
the Citys ports amounted to US$ 993.8 million (DCIPC). Port activities also contribute
to local employment through stevedoring activities.

At present, the City has two government ports - Port of Sasa and Sta.Ana Pier. (See
Map 5. Coastal land Development ). The Port of Sasa is the primary seaport for most
commodities produced in Davao Region (See Box 2. Port Facilities, Equipment and
Services, Port of Sasa) while the Sta. Ana Pier basically provides anchorage services to
small vessels. In 2004, a total of 956 and 53 vessels used the Port of Sasa and Sta. Ana
Pier, respectively. Tables 18 and 19, (through GRT and Total Cargo Throughput) show
that the 2 ports are significant trading points.

Box 2. Port Facilities, Equipment and Services, Port of Sasa.

Port Facilities
Berth length 980 meters
Draft 10.5 m. MLLW
Reefer facilities 204 outlets (with generator set)
Container yard 48,848 sq.m
Transit shed 6,250 sq.m
Open storage areas 3,400 sq.m (I) and 33,323 sq.m (II)
Passenger Terminal Bldg. 360 sq.m

Cargo Handling Equipment Port Services


4 units reach stacker Cargo handling
3 units forklift, 25T Pilotage
42 units forklift, 3T-6T Porterage
2 units crane Tug assistance
1 unit spreader Watering
2 units clam shell Shore reception
Prime movers Vessel Repair/Maintenance
Chassis trailers Bagging
Shipping Handling
Source: PPA, Davao City

1
http://www.gov.ph/cat_transportation/newscontent.asp?newsid=13343
2
http://www.mindanao.org/min_brochure/Mindanao%20Investment%20Brochure.pdf

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


45
Table 18. Shipping Statistics, Sta. Ana Pier, 2004
Port Performance Sta. Ana

Number of Vessels 53
Domestic 28
Foreign 25
Gross Registered Tonnage (m.t.) 207,141
Domestic 24,134
Foreign 183,007
Total Cargo Throughput (m.t.) 1,800
Domestic 1,200
Foreign 600
Source: PPA

Table 19. Shipping Statistics, Port of Sasa, 2004


Port Performance Sasa

No. of Vessels 956


Domestic 672
Foreign 284
Gross Registered Tonnage 6,620,654
Domestic 4,102,405
Foreign 2,518,249
Total Cargo Throughput (m.t.) 2,808,640
Domestic 1,731,894
Foreign 1,005,420
Transit Cargo 71,326
Foreign Transshipment 0
Total Passengers 137,203
Disembarking 70,410
Embarking 66,793
Source: PPA

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


46
The Citys Fish Port Complex in Daliao, on the other hand, serves as the center for
collection, processing, storage and packaging of fishery and marine products for local
and export distribution. (See Map 5. Coastal Land Development). Japan is a major
destination of these fishery and marine products. Commercial fishers, mostly from
Taiwan, use this port as transshipment facility.

In addition, there are also four anchorage ports in the City. These are in Panacan,
Bunawan, Ilang, and Lasang. These ports are basically used by cargo ships. (See Map
5.Coastal Land Development). The ports are managed by the Pilot Harbor Association.

B. Navigational Lane of Davao City

Vessels using the waters of Davao City follow designated waterways. Navigational lanes
used by boats occupy about 50 meters passing in between Davao City and the Island
Garden City of Samal where the shortest distance in between the two cities is about 1.5
kilometers (Map 5. Coastal Land Development).

Domestic and international vessels weighing not less than 100 gross registered tonnage
(GRT) entering the territorial waters of the city with the intent to call at a port are
required to give written notice to the Philippine Ports Authority (PPA) 24 hours before
arrival for vessels on scheduled runs and 36 hours for tramping (without regular
schedule) vessels (PPA Administrative Order 13-77).

In year 2004, PPA records show that about 956 vessels docked in the Port of Sasa.
Refer to Table 18 and 19 for anchorage and berthing details.

C. Coastal Industries
Related with the Citys marine transportation sectors operations are commercial
establishments and industries situated within the coastal barangays. There are 6,390
commercial establishments registered as of 2004. These commercial establishments have
high economic value to the Citys local economy. Total Gross Sales in 2004 amounted
to P30 Billion. These establishments also generate employment among the local people.
As of 2004, 20,117 employees were benefiting from the operations of these
establishments.

To mention, 95% of these establishments are classified micro in scale while 4% are
categorized as small commercial establishments with Total Capital ranging from P3M to
P15M. The rest falls under the medium and large operations. Most of these medium and
large commercial establishments are situated within Barangays 27, Bucana, Pampanga
and Sasa.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


47
Major coastal industries, on the other hand, are involved in processing/manufacturing of
food, copra, corrugated cartons, chemicals, cement/hollow blocks, lumber/plywood,
feeds/rice (mills), charcoal, metal/steel, plastics, fiber glass, rubber and oil. Majority of
these industries are located in Panacan, Sasa, Bunawan, Tibungco and Lasang. (See
Annex 7 for list of major coastal industries).

The coastal land areas covered by tenure and zoning are shown in Map 6 (Coastal Land
Tenure and Zoning). The inventory of foreshore areas with Foreshore Lease Contracts
(FLCs) within coastal barangays as of December 2004 (See Annex 1) indicates that Shell
Phils., Inc. and Legaspi Oil are the only ones with FLCs.

Moreover, the list of industries within coastal barangays with Environmental Compliance
Certificates (ECCs) as of December 2005 (See Annex 2) indicates that not all of these
industries have been issued ECCs.

In addition, the Citys industrial establishments situated along the coasts are directly
linked with the marine transportation sector of the City. There are twelve private ports
in the City which are used and owned by establishments engaged in manufacturing and
exporting activities. The concentration of these coastal industries is in Barangays Sasa
and Ilang. The products handled by these establishments include wheat, flour, corn,
grains, bananas petroleum products, coconut oil, copra, copra pellets, veneer, cement,
coal and containers (Map 5. Coastal Land Development and Table 20. Profile of Private
Ports, Davao City).

Table 20. Profile of Private Ports, Davao City


Port Location Berthing Facility Cargo Storage Cargo Handling Commodity
Equipment Handled
Sasa, Davao 14.6 m X 43 cm Silos for grains, Ship unloader/ Wheat
Universal Robina
City concrete deck warehouse conveyor Flour
Corporation
35m X 78m Portable Corn
unloader (suction Grains
and discharge
120 tons/hour
Sasa, Davao 38 m X 5 m RC pier Storage tanks Pipelines Petroleum
Shell Jetty
City 6.4 m X 4.6 m pier for petroleum products
Head, 2 b-dolphines products
Warehouses
Sasa, Davao 3.5 m X 66.28 m Storage tanks Pipelines Petroleum
Caltex Jetty 1
City concrete wharf Warehouses products
Sasa, Davao 16.7 m X 8.5 m
Caltex Jetty 2
City concrete deck
(non-operational)
81.5 m X 4 m
causeway
Sasa, Davao 200 m concrete deck Warehouse for Pipelines Coco-oil
Legaspi Oil
City copra and Conveyor Copra
copra pellets Copra pellets

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


48
Port Location Berthing Facility Cargo Storage Cargo Handling Commodity
Equipment Handled
Sasa, Davao 99 m concrete deck Warehouses Pipelines for coco Coco-oil
INTERCO-
City for copra, Copra
DAVAO
copra pellets Copra pellets
Storage tanks
Panacan, 15 m X 20 m loading Storage tanks Pipelines for coco Coco oil
New Davao Oil
Davao City deck for coco oil oil (9D X 320
Mill
4 breasting dolphins m)
Mooring bollards
Ilang, Davao 400 m X 13 m 3 cargo sheds 26 units forklifts General
TEFASCO Wharf
City concrete apron 1 cold storage Mobile cranes cargoes
15,000 sq m Payloader Containers
CY Backhoe and banana
Reachstacker for exports
Ilang, Davao 95.65 X 20 m 3,600 sq m 17 units forklifts Banana for
MTBS Wharf
City concrete deck shed (electric) exports
12 reefer plugs 13 units diesel Reefer
feed forklifts containers
Ilang, Davao Berth 1- 142 m 2 cargo sheds 3 tonner forklifts Cement
HOLCIM Wharf
City Berth 2 131 m 1 shed for coal Mobile cranes Coal
Open storage Conveyor Slags
for coal Payloader Gypsum
Pampanga, Loading platform Storage tanks Pipelines Petroleum
DOTSCO Jetty
Davao City 2 breasting dolphines for petroleum products
products
Agdao Logs
Mintrade
Centro (sawmill)
Source: PPA, 2006

Table 20 below presents performance of these private ports. Number of vessels which
used these ports and volume of cargoes shipped in and out through these ports are also
shown. It can be inferred from the table that these private ports are essential support
facilities to industries which contribute highly to the Citys trading economy.

Table 21. Port Statistics, At Berth Only, 2004


Interco- Shell U. R.
Port Performance Caltex Leg-Oil MTBS Petron Tefasco Unioil
Dav. Phil. C.

Number of Vessels 91 83 94 121 88 50 448 4 8


Domestic 91 57 69 0 78 32 206 2 8
Foreign 0 26 25 121 10 18 242 2 0
Gross Registered
Tonnage (m.t.) 258,170 483,578 455,993 916,096 220,241 95,974 2,562,027 51,643 6,339
Domestic 258,170 30,562 26,120 0 180,759 24,195 741,749 975 6,339
Foreign 0 453,016 429,873 916,096 39,482 71,779 1,820,278 50,668 0

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


49
Interco- Shell U. R.
Port Performance Caltex Leg-Oil MTBS Petron Tefasco Unioil
Dav. Phil. C.

Total Cargo
Throughput (m.t.) 303,904 151,714 180,608 287,030 212,386 29,481 1,698,754 31,080 10,214
Domestic 303,904 43,514 54,174 0 202,529 15,566 905,716 2,000 10,214
Foreign 0 108200 126434 287030 9857 13915 793038 29080 0
Source: PPA, 2004

D. Issues and Problems

Marine Transportation

Oil Spills

The most critical problem concerning the marine transportation sector of the City is
the water pollution brought about by oil spills from the ships and operations of
industrial establishments with private ports. These spillages are results of discharging
activities, worn-out equipment, ship accidents and broken pipes. Table 22 identifies oil
spillages recorded by the Philippine Coast Guard. It should be mentioned that this issue
was one of the major points raised during the Barangay cluster Consultation and Zoning
Workshops.

Table 22. Record of Oil Spillages, Davao City


Date of Spiller Place of Volume Spill Type of Oil Cause of Fine
Incident Incident Spillage

January 2000 DUCC DUCC 1,000 liters Light bunker Leaking P5,000
Wharf, Ilang discharge pipe
February MV Intra Bhum TEFASCO 10 liters Oily mixture Discharging P4,000
2000
March 2000 MV Oceanic Sasa Wharf 250 liters Oily mixture Discharging P4,000
March 2001 Undetermined Legaspi Oil 10 liters Oily slick Undetermined none
source
March 2001 Undetermined Sasa Wharf 20 liters Oily slick Washed away none
current
April 2001 MV Mega Dua TEFASCO, 5 liters Oily mixture Worn-out valve P7,000
Ilang gasket

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


50
Date of Spiller Place of Volume Spill Type of Oil Cause of Fine
Incident Incident Spillage

April 2001 MV Pula Bay Sasa Wharf 300 liters Oily mixture Discharging P4,000
May 2001 MV Terrier Sasa Wharf 70 liters Oily mixture Discharging P4,000
July 2001 MV Dingalan Sasa Wharf Major oil spill Light bunker Collision with P1,000,000
MV Pacific
Eagle
March 2005 MV Cala Piccola TEFASCO, 128,000 liters Bunker oil Crack on oil P20,000
Ilang mixed with tank
salt water
Source: 8th District Philippine Coast Guard

Notably, there is high incidence of oil spills in Sasa. The highest volume of oil spills,
however, happened in Ilang where 128,000 liters of bunker oil mixed salt water polluted
the Citys waters. Fines for oil spills are paid to Philippine Coast Guard. Analysis of the
above table reveals that externalities caused by oil spills are not sufficiently compensated
by the amounts of fines charged to firms owning the concerned vessels. This also results
from the regulation that fines are paid to Philippine Coast Guard without revenue-
sharing agreement with the City Government.

Solid Wastes

PPA Administrative Order 02-2003 provides implementing rules and regulations on


installation of shore reception facilities. It specifies garbage fee for each type of vessels
and states that additional fee shall be collected for collection of oily wastes, noxious
liquid substance and garbage in excess of 0.4 cu.m. Table 22 presents the schedule of
fees. Further, it mandates segregation of biodegradable wastes from non-biodegradable
wastes. As a response, in 2003, PPA awarded the contract for the establishment and
operation of reception and treatment facilities for wastes generated by ships to Golden
Dragon International Terminals, Inc. The latter offers waste collection and disposal
services. A Certificate of Service Rendered is signed by vessel in-charge.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


51
Table 23. Schedule of Fees, Shore Reception Facilities
Types and Classification of Vessel Fixed Fee Additional Fee
(Collection of
0.4 cu.m or Excess Oily Waste
less) Garbage and NLS

Domestic
Passenger ferry regardless of GRT that calls at base and P30/call P30/cu.m P1,300/cu.m
private port for more than once a day
Passenger/cargo vessel of 7 GRT to 400 GRT
P30/call P30/cu.m P1,300/cu.m
Passenger/cargo vessel of 401 GRT to 1,000 GRT
P150/call P150/cu.m P1,300/cu.m
Passenger/cargo vessel of 1001 GRT and above
P500/call P450/cu.m P1,500/cu.m
Foreign
1,000 GRT and below P1,700/call P550/cu.m P1,500/cu.m
1,001 GRT and above P5,000/call P550/cu.m P1,500/cu.m
Source: PPA

Resource Use Conflicts

The conflicts raised in relation to marine transport and coastal industries are as follows:
Water pollution arising from the Citys ports has negatively affected
other coastal economic activities. In Barangays Agdao Centro, Daliao and
Sasa, dock sites are adjacent to beach resorts and poor water quality
diminishes tourism and recreation values;
Wharfs located in Barangay Sasa and Tibungco and the associated boat
traffic have resulted in incidents of property damage for both seaweed
farmers or boat owners; and
Passage of ships through the fishing grounds is being contested by fisher
folks in the said areas. There is also a perception that there is
encroachment of unregistered foreign vessels plying along the Citys
waters.

Other Socio-Economic Concerns

The Davao City Fish Port Complex is the only fish port within the City. The insufficient
number of fish landings within the City that will accommodate increased trading of
fishery products has been a pressing concern especially in Barangays Binugao and Toril.
This is important in relation to providing support facilities for fishery development as
discussed in the Fisheries Section.

Finally, it has to be noted that prostitution has become a prevalent problem


within the port areas.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


52
Coastal Industries

Industrial Pollution

Though industries have high significance to the economic performance of Davao City,
several environmental issues need to be addressed. First, these establishments are
sources of solid and liquid wastes which have worsen the poor water quality of the City.
Used oil, sawdust, animal wastes, coconut meat and used water are dumped into the
City waters. (See Annex 7 for types of wastes generated by coastal industries). The
industrial pollution in coastal and marine waters in the City negatively impacts all other
resource users. In particular, the following issues were raised during the barangay
cluster consultation and zoning workshops:

These industrial wastes have affected tourism activities in beach resorts


situated adjacent to these establishments. (See Map 3. Fisheries and
Coastal Enforcement Issues).
The poor water quality has lessened the recreational value in coastal
resorts. This is the case in Barangays Hizon, Pampanga, and Lizada as
relayed during the barangay consultations.

Foreshore Lease Agreements and Environmental Compliance Certificates

Strict implementation of monitoring and evaluation of FLCs and ECC issuances have also
been weak. DENR records compared to inventory of existing coastal industries show
very low compliance to environmental requirements since only a few coastal
establishments have the required FLCs and ECCs.

E. Management Interventions and Recommendations

Marine Transportation Sector

At present, the City Government has no involvement in the local management of marine
transportation sector. The Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA)-XI is the
government agency that collects administrative, registration and licensing fees and
charges from shipping companies. Thus, the City Government has no hold on local and
international vessels. The only responsibility devolved to the City is the registration of
fishing vessels 3 gross tonnage below.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


53
On the other hand, the Philippine Ports Authority (PPA)-XI owns, develops, manages
and regulates the Port of Sasa and Sta. Ana Pier. The PPA derives its income from port
dues for the use of port facilities as a whole; and port tariffs charged on ship owners and
cargo owners. Port dues are charges on cargo and ships. Port tariffs include aids to
navigation, pilotage and towage fees, cargo handling, berthing fees, anchorage fees, usage
fees, wharfage fees and storage fees. PPA also earn from concessionaires' fees and fees
from private port operators. The PPA does not charge any fee for the negative impact
of ships and port operation on coastal resources. It receives 10% and 20% from cargo
handling revenues on domestic and foreign cargoes, respectively. To mention, 50% of
PPAs annual net income accrues to national government as dividends.

There is an on-going negotiation between the City Government of Davao and the
Philippine Ports Authority regarding payment of appropriate taxes.

The Citys private ports are managed by industry owners using the ports. They are
obliged to pay 50% of the port charges collected in PPA ports. These private ports are
regulated by PPA through: issuance of permit to construct and operate the port; and
approval of increases in cargo handling rates and port charges. There are no special fees
for coastal industries.

The only fish port of the City, the Davao Fish Port Complex situated in Daliao, is being
managed by Philippine Fisheries Development Authority (PFDA). PFDA is mandated to
pay realty tax to the City. At present, however, PFDAs delinquency has totaled to P85
million as of 2004. (City Treasurer letter to PFDA, dated 22 June 2004).

It is noteworthy to mention that marine pollution and safety standards are under the
supervision of the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG). Collection of fines and penalties from
violators accrue to PCGs Funds.

Given the above institutional and financial arrangements related to the Citys marine
transportation system,, the sectors increasing negative externalities on the Citys
waters, resource use conflicts and the devolution of CRM to LGUs as mandated in Local
Government Code and RA 8550, the following are recommended:

1. Zoning
a. Navigation Zone (Navigational Lanes) shall be established in
consultation with the concerned agencies (e.g. Philippine Ports
Authority; Philippine Coast Guard).
b. Coordination with MARINA on list of registered local and foreign
vessels.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


54
c. Regulate construction of additional private and fish ports shall be
limited to areas following the Comprehensive Land Use Plan.
Since PPA issues permits to construct private ports, the City
Government should collaborate with PPA.
d. Identification/designation of areas for fish landings

2. Valuation Study of the Citys Marine Transportation Sector. This study is


geared towards assessing and drafting recommendations on the following
areas:
a. Strengthened institutional arrangement and/or management
sharing scheme on the management of ports. This can specifically
be zeroed in on solid waste and wastewater management.
b. Revenue generation options. Revenue-sharing arrangements with
PPA and MARINA on the use of City waters by PPA Ports and
private ports as well as with PCG on fines and penalties collected
from oil spillers should be explored.
c. Levying of fees and charges from vessels plying along the Citys
waters/navigational lane
d. Feasibility study on devolution of Port of Sasa or Sta. Ana Pier to
City Government per Administrative Order No. 02-98. An
institutional arrangement between the City Government and PPA
may be forged.
3. Conduct of independent water quality monitoring by the City with
strengthened collaboration with PCG and DENR in PPA and private port
areas. Along with this, mechanisms that will mitigate externalities caused
by ships and port activities should be developed.

Coastal Industries

Davao Citys coastal industries follow the appropriate zoning and legislated business
requirements. There is no specific local government unit or office that has direct
jurisdiction over the special requirements of coastal industries. Available information
showed that the local government only gets revenue from these coastal industries
through their business permits and real estate taxes.

Based on the city land use plan, the industrial zones include the following coastal
barangays Sasa, Panacan, Ilang, Tibungco and Bunawan.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


55
Compliance to environmental regulations of FLCs and ECCs is very low. It is essential
that these are strictly enforced because these have direct bearing mitigating resource
use conflicts and negative environmental impacts.

DENR-EMB is the one responsible for ECC issuances for those industries which have
complied with their approved standards. The City has not developed standards for the
industries yet, especially for those situated within the coastal areas, to ensure that
industrial pollution is controlled.

Recommendations to improve environmental impacts of operations of coastal industries


include:

Strengthened collaboration with DENR-EMB on ECC and DENR-LMS for


FLC issuances and strict implementation of fines and penalties for non-
compliance. A regular review of these issuances is imperative; and
City Ordinance for industrial establishments specifying required SWM
and wastewater facilities and, corresponding fines and penalties for non-
compliance

D. Data Gaps

Data gaps for marine transportation, navigation and coastal industries are:

Number of boats routing from Davao City to Island Garden City of Samal and
operators of these boats;
Value of Citys exports transshipped through Citys ports;
Institution managing anchorage ports in Panacan, Bunawan, Ilang, Lasang and
Daliao;
Points of Citys navigational lane;
Number of registered shipping lines;
Type of wastes generated / collected from vessels
Types of wastes commonly found within the port area;
Taxes paid by PPA ports to City Government;
City Government office in-charge for the coastal industries and
PPA Revenues from Port of Sasa, Sta. Ana Pier and private ports;

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


56
Chapter 6
Tourism and Recreation

A. Profile of Coastal Tourism in Davao City


Davao City, the gateway to Mindanao and the East Asean Growth Area (EAGA) is a
destination hub offering various activities from highlands to the coast. It is also the
jump-off point for interesting sights in the Davao region, including the Island Garden of
Samal. Department of Tourism (DOT) records show that 80% (568,442 out of the total
691,974) of the visitors to Southern Mindanao during the period January to December
2004 arrived in Davao City en route to their destinations. This is attributed to the
positioning of Davao City as the Convention Center of the Souththe ideal convention
and leisure destination to both domestic and foreign visitors which comes mostly from
Japan, USA, Korea, China and Australia. Estimated tourists receipts of P7.09B were
generated in 2004.

In January 2006, Davao City as a major international tourist destination in Mindanao was
put to test when it hosted the 25th ASEAN Tourism Forum, a cooperative regional
initiative to promote the Southeast Asian region as one tourist destination. According
to a DOT press release, the ATF is already putting this emerging megacity in the world
tourism map and drawing global attention to its economic boom and bloom. Touted as
the biggest tourism event in Asia, the event drew about 3,000 foreign and local visitors.
Welcome to this city with adventures From Islands to Highlands.

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Tourist Attractions and Establishments

City Tourism Office records show that as of 8 December 2005, there are a total of 51
registered travel and tour operators in the City, providing inbound and outbound tour
services, including assistance to passport processing. Of these establishments, 18 are
DOT-accredited; 31 are non-DOT accredited (Davao Tourism Situationer 2006).

There are a total of 160 tourist spots and attractions (see Table 24) in the city (City
Socio-Economic Profile 2003). This includes a historical site along Talomo Beach which
is the landing site of the American Liberation Forces during World War II. This 10-km
stretch waterfront is site of the Second World War sunken warships that can be found
about 200 meters from the shore. (Davao Tourism Situationer 2006).

Table 24. Types and Number of Tourism Sites in Davao City


Type Number

Natural 34
Historical 32
Cultural 5
Religious 8
Agricultural 10
Festivals 19
Shopping 18
Recreational 34
Total 160
Source: Davao City Socio-Economic Indicators 2004, OCPDC June 2004

Davao City has 2,201 rooms available for visitors who stay at an average of 4 days.
(Davao City Socio-Economic Indicators 2004, CPDC June 2004). Despite the number of
available lodging facilities, there is only one hotel located along the city coast -- the
Waterfront Insular Hotel Davao, a first class hotel with 153 rooms; accredited with the
Department of Tourism as of December 1, 2005. The hotel has its own jetty which also
serves as port for guests of the Pearl Farm Beach Resort in IGACOS.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Coastal Tourism

Coastal tourism has proven to be a major contributor to the Citys economy. Its direct
linkages with the other business sectors marine transportation (local), restaurants,
accommodations (hotels), telecommunications and other service-related activities
have increased its economic and financial contributions to the City.

The Citys beach resorts have increasingly attracted local and foreign tourists. At
present, there are 17 private beach resorts listed with the Department of Tourism and
the Davao City Tourism Office (Table 25). Most of these resorts and seaside
restaurants are located along the shorelines of Matina Aplaya, Talomo and Toril. (Beach
Escapades, Madayaw Dabaw Travel Guide, CTO 2006). Public beaches can also be
found in Barangays Bucana, Pampanga, Ilang, Panacan, Lasang, Lizada, Agdao Centro,
Lapu-Lapu, Dumoy (Map 5. Coastal Land Development).

Table 25. Beach Resorts, Davao City


Establishment Location

Larous Beach Resort Talomo Proper


Larous II Beach Resort Talomo Proper
Kalayaan Beach Resort Brgy Daliao
Bonguyan Beach Resort Matina Aplaya
Felis Resort Complex Matina Aplaya
High Ponds Resort Binugao, Toril
Dumoy Garden Dumoy
Kadayawan Resort Matina Aplaya
Vales Beach Facilities Daliao
Ocean View Beach Daliao
Mergrande Ocean Resort Bago Aplaya
Mervillas Beach Resort Bago Aplaya
Jones Beach Resort Talomo Proper
Davao Seagull Resort Matina Aplaya
Seagull Beach Resort Matina Aplaya
Shrimric Beach Resort Bago Aplaya
Vales Beach Resort Toril
Source: City Tourism Office and DOT, 2005

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


59
There are many other beach resorts and restaurants in the various coastal barangays
(See Annex 3) not listed with the Department of Tourism and City Tourism Office .
Tourists and local residents also take gastronomic delight in the seaside restaurants that
dot along the entire coast line of the city.

Aside from swimming, coastal recreational activities include snorkeling, boating, fishing,
diving, cruising, and other underwater activities. Davao City is marketed as one of the
diving destinations and the gateway to other aqua sports in Mindanao. The large number
of diving enthusiasts in the city organized themselves into groups like the Scuba Divers
of Davao Association (SCUDDA). There are 6 shops registered with the DOT offering
aqua sports facilities (including equipment rental and air refilling) and 2 of these shops
offer basic and advance scuba diving lessons.

Davao City also links locals and tourists to the Island Garden City of Samal and this
contributes significantly to the Citys tourist and recreation establishments.

B. Issues and Challenges


Coastal Water Pollution

The negative effects of increasing economic activities on the Citys coastal areas for
tourism have been evident. Tourism and recreation establishment are waste generators
and also among the sectors also affected by coastal pollution. EMBs Annual Water
Quality Report in 2004 indicates that of the 12 stations assessed, only stations 2, 3, 4, 8,
9 and 10 are suitable for bathing and/or contact recreation. Stations , 9 and 10 falls
within Class A (Total Coliform MPN/100 ml = 70), stations 2, 3 and 4 fall within Class
SB (Total Coliform MPN/100 ml = 1,000) and stations 1, 5, 6, 7, 11 and 12 are under
Class SC (Total Coliform MPN/100 ml = 5,000). It is interesting to mention that these
stations are used as bathing beaches and fishing areas. Table 26 presents details of the
said Report.

Table 26. Total Coliform Level of Bathing Beaches, Davao City and Island Garden City of Samal, 2004
Total Coliform MPN/100ml

Station Identification 1st 2nd 3rd 4th Average


Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter

Stn. 1: Kalayaan Beach Resort, Daliao 1,615 3,273 3,632 677 2,299
Stn. 2: Mergrande Ocean Beach Resort, Bago Aplaya 550 114 169 33 217
Stn. 3: Seagull Beach Resort, Matina Aplaya 383 182 43 110 180
Stn. 4: Bonguyan Beach Resort, Matina Aplaya 924 773 1,217 81 749

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


60
Total Coliform MPN/100ml

Station Identification 1st 2nd 3rd 4th Average


Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter

Stn. 5: Liberty Beach Resort, Matina Aplaya 7,675 2,615 5,006 381 3,919
Stn. 6: Marina Azul I, Matina Aplaya 1,020 4,404 2,107 244 1,944
Stn. 8: Guino-o Beach Resort, Binugao 2,268 1,233 1,154 553 1,302
Stn. 9: Paradise Island Beach Resort, IGACOS 42 43 29 19 33
Stn. 10: Costa Marina Beach Resort, IGACOS 123 27 25 <20 49
Stn. 11: Samal Beach Resort, IGACOS 50 19 31 27 33
Stn. 12: Felis Beach Resort, Matina Aplaya 2,788 3,432 7,268 438 3,482
Stn. 13: Agdao Beach Resort, Agdao 9,366 8,547 14,537 342 8,198
Source: DENR- EMB IX

The majority of the resource use conflicts raised during the barangay cluster
consultation and zoning workshops are related to coastal pollution. These are the
following:
The presence of industries adjacent to beach resorts in Barangays
Sasa, Pampanga, Ilang, Hizon, Lizada and Bunawan have decreased
water quality in these beach areas due to dumping of industrial wastes
as discussed in the section of coastal industries. Specifically, oil
leakages and spills occur in Sasa. (Barangay Validation Workshop in
cluster 2.) The same situation is observed in Barangay Matina Aplaya
where beach resorts are adjacent to dock sites. (See Map 3. Fisheries
and Coastal Enforcement Issues).
Aquaculture activities, including seaweed farming and fish cages, in
Barangays Tibungco, Sasa, Panacan and Lizada have caused organic
pollution in beach resort waters. (Barangay Validation Workshop.
(See Map 3. Fisheries and Coastal Enforcement Issue Map).
Coastal settlements adjacent to beach resort are affected by domestic
solid waste and wastewater discharge. Overall, the coastal waters of
Davao City are not suitable for swimming.

Conversely, solid wastes generated in beach resorts have also threatened the Citys
water quality. At present, no City Ordinance has been passed yet to ensure that proper
SWM practices are observed by beach resort owners.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


61
Expired Foreshore Lease Contracts (FLCs)

Another critical issue besetting coastal tourism areas are expired Foreshore Lease
Agreements (FLAs) of some existing tourism facilities and establishments in the Citys
coastal areas. The inventory of Lands Management Sector of DENR as of December
2004 shows that there are only 3 beach resorts which has been awarded a Foreshore
Lease Contract. The lack of strict monitoring of FLA issuances results in increasing
operations of tourism facilities and establishments without tenure. This is also related
with the issuance of Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) by EMB. EMBs ECC
list (as of December 2005) shows that only Davao Seagull Resort Development, Inc. and
Kisan Lu Beach Resort in Matina Aplaya and Bago Aplaya, respectively, have been issued
ECCs.

Other Resource-Use Conflicts

Conflict on the use of the coastal area was also one of the issues raised during the
celebrated King David Statue issue during the 3rd quarter of year 2005. Some local
legislators took offense on the nude statue that was erected by reclaiming around 3,300
square meter of the coastline. The issue reached a stalemate when Davao City Mayor
Rodrigo R. Duterte cited that the subject in question is part of the MR 20, along with
other smaller establishments/developments in the area. Local media reports said that
the Mayor will act on the King David issue if he can implement the same fate to the
other illegal structures within the proclaimed area. The issue did not progress. The city
government through the Office of the City Planning and Development Coordinator is
coordinating with the DENR Land Management Sector regarding the legality of the
occupants in order to recommend proper management of the reservation.

C. Management Interventions and Recommendations


Tourism Programs

To meet its tourism needs, the Davao City Tourism Office is mandated to implement
the city tourism plans, programs and activities, which include the licensing of all tourism
related establishments/services in the city. The tourism industry in the city has also
organized themselves into several organizations. There are 26 tourism-oriented
associations/organizations in Davao City listed with the Department of Tourism XI,
including an association of scuba divers. (p 66-67 Davao Tourism Situationer 2006).
There are also several web sites available in the internet providing information on
Davao City and its tourism attractions and facilities. Official website of the Davao City
Tourism Office is http://www.davaotourism.davaoguide.com/

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


62
An attempt to institutionalize the tourism industry in the city was marked by the
passage of Ordinance No. 0121-03 series of 2003 creating the Barangay Tourism, Arts
and Culture Council. It strengthens government and private sector cooperation in
implementing a good tourism environment for the city. Under its provisions, these
barangay councils will be composed of 40% government and 60% private sector
proportion, to be headed by the Barangay Chairman and assisted by the Chairperson of
the Barangay Committee on Tourism. Funds for the operation of the Council shall be
covered by its own funds which may be sourced from private foundations, NGOs and
other similar organizations.

Presidential Proclamation 20

Presidential Proclamation 20 (MR 1050) provides that Times Beach, situated at Cabacan-
Punta Dumalag be reserved as recreation center. The said area measures 24.29 hectares
where 1.52 hectares are covered by validated titles. On the other hand, area occupied
with structures subject to validation account to 1.45 hectares. Remaining area on land is
3.56 hectares while remaining area under water is 17.76 hectares. Indicative survey of
the Times Beach area reveals that there are 22 tourism-related business establishments
constructed within the indicated reserved area. Structures/properties within the MR
1050 as surveyed are the following: private building owned by Arthuro Pamilar; Malibago
Beach Resort; Aqua Marina; Baywalk; JJs Beach Resort; Coves Resort; Tuna-to-Go
Seafoods; Lisas Seafoods; Ivy Jane Ihaw-Ihaw; Dondi and Elizabeth Carenderia; Mariets
Restaurant; Dwenzyls Seafoods; Miggys Grill; Resthouse Brown; Hannahs; Tabing
Dagat; Chinos; Babes Ihaw-Ihaw; Kanaway; Emar Beach Resort; Adarna/Queensland
Property; and Bonguyan Beach Resort. The Adarna/Queensland Property is composed
of: Baywalk where Davids Status is located (reclaimed area); Davids statue (reclaimed
area); Queensland Development Property (titled property); and Queensland Hotel
(private property). It should be mentioned, however, that 29 housing units/structures
are situated within the MR 1050.

Ecotourism

The City plans to establish an ecotourism area in Matina Aplaya where there have been
nesting sites of marine turtles. A primary recommendation related with this is the
identification of specific institutional and revenue-sharing arrangements between the
City and Barangay Matina Aplaya. Basic areas that also need to be looked into are
prohibited activities within the area and corresponding fines and penalties.

Supporting recommendations for the Citys present initiatives on coastal tourism include
the following:
Tourism Zone shall be established in accordance with existing policies,
existing land uses and the Comprehensive Land Use Plan.
Consensus-building on conflict areas with industries, mangrove areas and
settlements.
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
63
Organization of association of beach resort and other coastal tourism business-
related owners. A Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) can be forged
among these stakeholders on strategies on how to maintain good water
quality.
Strengthen collaboration between proposed CRM Office and EMB of
DENR for strict implementation of FLA and ECC issuances. Regular
review of the said permits should be conducted.
Conduct of independent water quality monitoring in beach resort areas.
Development and implementation of Monitoring and Evaluation (M& E)
Program for coastal tourism facilities, establishments, services and
industries. Indicators should target analysis of impacts of coastal tourism
activities on water quality and affected coastal habitats.
City Ordinance specifically addressed to beach resort owners and other
related stakeholders such as restaurants, hotels etc. These should specify
provisions for required SWM facilities/equipment, sewerage and
sanitation facilities, source reduction mandates and, fines and penalties for
improper dumping of wastes. City Ordinance specifically addressed to
industry owners with provisions on waste disposal and, fines and
penalties for non-compliance to ECC standards and said Ordinance.
Reconcile records of establishments (beach resorts and seaside
restaurants) of the City Tourism Office, Business Bureau and the
Department of Tourism. There are several establishments already
operating but are not reflected either in the lists of CTO and DOT.

D. Data Gaps
Data gaps include the following:

Number of boats registered per establishment providing passenger transport


service
Number of seaside restaurants (small, medium, large scale operation)
Income specifically generated from coastal tourism; labor generated
Number of establishments located along the coast

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


64
Chapter 7
Synthesis and General Recommendations

A. Resource Use Issues and Impacts

Based on the barangay cluster consultation and zoning workshops, the most common
issues raised (Annex 4) were:
improper waste management, primarily human and solid waste, followed
by industrial waste, oil spills and waste water
illegal fishing activities
informal coastal settlements
various resource use conflicts in each sector

The interaction of the major coastal land and city water resource uses are illustrated in
Fig. 5. Notably, majority of the interactions of resource uses are negative, resulting in
conflicts. For land-based uses, conflicts arise from incompatible nature of adjacent
establishments (e.g. heavy industry and critical habitats for biodiversity conservation;
beach resorts and informal settlements). All of the private establishments along the
coast directly limit public access to shorelines and coastal areas for recreational and
other livelihood activities. For water-based uses, navigation has a negative impact on
fixed aquaculture and fishing gear structures. All types of coastal industries on land and
water (e.g. aquaculture) if unregulated have adverse negative impacts on critical areas
for biodiversity conservation and municipal fisheries due to degradation of coastal water
quality.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


65
Protection of critical coastal habitats (i.e. turtle nesting grounds, whale shark and dugong
conservation areas, mangroves, seagrass and corals) on the other hand has potential
positive impacts on fishing and tourism. On the other hand, marine transport facilities
complement coastal industries and navigation.

The environmental and socio-economic impacts of current coastal resource uses are
summarized in Annex 5. Despite the prospective positive socio-economic benefits the
different coastal development activities ( i.e. marine transport, heavy industries, tourism,
settlements), the costs of the negative environmental impacts outweigh the positive
socio-economic impacts considering that only a few benefit directly from most of these
activities.

Figure 7. Interaction Matrix of the Major Coastal and Marine Resource Uses.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


66
B. General recommendations
1. Development objectives should ensure that coastal and marine resources can
renew themselves and provide opportunities for wealth and security for future
generations. Coastal land areas (particularly foreshore areas) and city waters are
state owned and should be managed for public good. Environmental services to
safeguard the diverse socio-economic benefits from these resources, such as
water quality monitoring, biodiversity conservation, fishery and coastal law
enforcement should be allocated proportionate subsidy by the government.
2. Polluter pay principle should be applied to mitigate coastal pollution. Fishery
productivity, coastal tourism potential and biodiversity conservation are
compromised by degradation of water quality, regulation and mitigation costs
should be borne by the major waste generators such as coastal and marine
transport industries.
3. Mechanisms to ensure equitable and long-term socio-economic betterment of
marginalized members of the community should be established. Of the coastal
uses, well managed fisheries have high direct long-term socio-economic benefits
as a source of food and livelihood to the very poor sectors of the community.
Improved fisheries management should be coupled with livelihood development.
Informal coastal settlements are significant waste generators. Priority for housing
and sanitation programs will bring about very high socio-economic and ecological
benefits.
4. Adoption of a coastal and marine zonation scheme which is harmonized with the
Citys land use and watershed plans, as a framework for integrated coastal zone
management will be strategic. Given the diverse and complex coastal and marine
resource use concerns, policy and institutional support for the creation of a
CRM body to coordinate the formulation and implementation of management
programs and strategies for the different priority use zones is imperative.

C. Proposed Coastal and Marine Management Zones

Coastal and city water zoning is a development planning tool to identify development
opportunities, rationalize and harmonize priority use areas and manage current and
prospective resource use conflicts towards integrated coastal zone management. The
zoning scheme can be used as framework for the management of coastal and marine
resources within the jurisdiction of the local government unit. Decisions to
designate management zones and the supporting policies and guidelines
should be anchored on the principles of sustainable development, equitable
use and allocation of benefits, and good environmental governance.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


67
During each barangay cluster consultation and zoning workshop, the participants were
divided into 4 to 5 groups for the zoning workshop where they discussed and plotted
on the base map current coastal and marine uses (i.e. both land-based and activities
within city waters), priority issues, management recommendations and the proposed
zonation scheme. To optimize sharing of information and discussions, each workshop
group was comprised of representatives from different barangays. The issues and
recommendations made were tallied (Annex 4) and results of the zone mapping activity
of each workshop group were integrated into a proposed zoning map. After all the
barangay cluster consultations, the zoning recommendations (Annex 6) were integrated
and the major zoning proposals were integrated into a city-wide zoning map (Map 7.
Proposed Zoning based on barangay cluster zoning workshops). The proposed zones
were grouped into five marine and coastal management zones, with the other proposed
zones subsumed as sub-zones. The different maps (Maps 1-6) were overlain to identify
critical conflicting uses and considerations for each of the zones.

The specific objectives of the proposed coastal and marine management zones were:

to identify biodiversity conservation areas to rehabilitate critical


habitats and protect endangered species;
to designate priority use areas for the different major socio-economic
activities in the coastal and marine areas of the City;
to identify specific resource use conflicts that need to be addressed

The location of different management zones and specific considerations for each zone is
described below.

Biodiversity Conservation Zone

The biodiversity conservation zone will be comprised of mangrove rehabilitation areas,


fish sanctuaries and endangered species (sea turtle, whale shark) conservation areas.

Mangrove Rehabilitation Areas

The proposed Mangrove Rehabilitation Areas are:

District I District II District III

Bucana Lasang Lizada


Matina Aplaya Bunawan Sirawan
Talomo Panacan

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Of these areas, Brgy. Lasang was the most frequently suggested Mangrove Rehabilitation
Area because of the suitability of the area for rehabilitation and the barangay council and
people's organization are actively involved in the protection and conservation of their
mangrove areas. It was suggested that mangrove areas in Bunawan which is adjacent to
Brgy. Lasang be part of the mangrove rehabilitation zone. Based on the resource
assessment study, Brgys. Lasang and Bunawan have the most diverse and largest area of
mangrove forest (Map 4) remaining in Davao City. In addition, as discussed below the
waters off Lasang have been proposed for the establishment of a fish sanctuary as well
as a whale shark conservation area.

Moreover, the mouth of the Davao River and Lipadas River as well as the shoreline
from Matina Aplaya down to Lizada is also potential areas for mangrove rehabilitation.

Considerations:

Based on the Comprehensive Land Use Plan of Davao City (1996-2021), Barangay
Panacan and Bunawan are identified as part of the industrial zone. Barangay Lasang is
adjacent to Barangay Bunawan. As seen in the coastal habitat map, the greatest area
cover of mangrove, coral reefs and seagrass beds in the city waters are found in Lasang.
This area has the highest potential ecological values. Further development of the
industrial zone must be limited and environmental standards and regulations must be
strictly enforced to conserve biodiversity of these critical coastal habitats as well as the
fishery productivity in the area.

The proposed mangrove rehabilitation areas from Matina Aplaya down to Lizada will
complement and enhance the proposed recreation and tourism zone discussed below.

Fish Sanctuaries

The establishment of fish sanctuaries were suggested in a number of barangays to


increase fishery productivity and/or prevent illegal fishing:

District I District II District III

Dumoy Lasang Lizada


Bunawan Daliao
Sasa
Agdao Centro

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Of these barangays, Agdao Centro passed a resolution to establish a fish sanctuary
since 2000. Resource assessment surveys conducted in 2002 (IMA 2000) reported coral
reef areas to be in relatively good condition. However, manta tow surveys conducted in
2005 indicate coral cover to be poor. In Lasang, a recent survey indicated that the coral
reef area was fair and the adjacent extensive seagrass areas have been reported for
sightings of whale sharks.

Some also suggested declaring fish sanctuary at barangays Lasang, Bunawan, Sasa,
Dumoy, Lizada and Daliao.

Considerations

Given that the condition of coral reefs within Davao City waters is generally poor, areas
with fair to good condition, and with committed local management groups should be
given priority in establishing fish sanctuaries.

To increase recovery rates and local improvement of fishery productivity, protected


areas should be at least 20 hectares (i.e. core no take and buffer sub zones).

The location of the fish sanctuary in relation to other resource uses should also be
considered to minimize resource use conflicts since fish sanctuaries are solely
protection areas and no other uses are allowed. For example the Agdao Centro fish
sanctuary is located adjacent to a heavily populated area. Thus consensus among
stakeholders should be met prior to declaration of fish sanctuaries and other types of
marine protected areas.

After careful assessment of ecological, socio-cultural and socio-economic consideration


to determine if a site is appropriate, a management plan must be formulated with the
participation of the local community. This plan should include the identification of the
management bodies, specific roles and responsibilities at the barangay and city level, and
financing mechanisms to sustain management activities.

Endangered Species Conservation Areas

Critical habitats for marine turtles and whale sharks are found in Davao City waters.
Protection of these areas and species within Davao City is imperative for the
maintenance of viable populations of these species in the Gulf and the Celebes Sea area.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


70
Pawikan Reservation Areas

District I District II

Matina Aplaya Lasang


Bunawan

Almost all of the workshop groups suggested the establishment of Punta Dumalag,
Matina Aplaya as Pawikan Reservation Area or Critical Habitat for Sea Turtle. The
coastal communities were aware of the creation of "Task Force Pawikan Dabaw" upon
the issuance of the City Mayor under the Executive Order No. 29, series of 2003, for
the protection and conservation of the nesting grounds of marine turtles in Punta
Dumalag, Matina Aplaya.

They have also proposed to establish marine turtle reservation areas in Lasang,
Bunawan,Tibungco and Ilang because of sightings of marine turtles in these areas.

Whaleshark Reservation Area

Sightings of whale sharks have been observed in the barangays of Lasang and Bunawan.
In order to protect and conserve the endangered species, local communities have
suggested to the declaration of the waters off these barangays as Whale Shark
Reservation Areas. As mentioned earlier, the coastal areas in Lasang and Bunawan have
the highest total areas of critical habitats. The productive coastal waters may serve as
good feeding grounds for whale sharks.

Both biodiversity conservation areas were also identified as ecotourism and research
areas.

Considerations

Turtle nesting areas have been reported in Punta Dumalag and Lawis in Barangay Lizada.
Thus, if conservation of endangered species will be pursued all other activities in and
adjacent to this area should be regulated so that the nesting grounds and survivorship of
hatchlings are given priority consideration. Research on how to conserve/rehabilitate
the nesting areas (e.g. inundation of nesting beach) and optimize hatchling survivorship
should be a component of the area management plan.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


71
Overall, Lasang and Matina Aplaya are the primary areas for biodiversity conservation
because of the relative good condition of coastal habitats and the occurrence of
endangered species. All other uses should be regulated strictly particularly activities that
degrade coastal water quality. With proper management, these protected areas may
become the Citys ecotourism attractions. City level efforts should be integrated with
the Davao Gulf wide biodiversity conservation activities (e.g. biodiversity conservation
IEC training and campaign conducted by WWF) to ensure long-term positive impacts.

Fishery Management Zones

The city waters cover an area of 19,827 hectares, about 10 % of the total area of Davao
Gulf which is a major fishing area in the Celebes Sea region. Fishing activities in the city
waters are intensive as seen in Map 1. The most productive fishing grounds within city
waters identified during the community consultation are indicated in the proposed
zoning map for reference in Map 7. Many fishermen from Davao also regularly fish
around the islands of Samal.

Capture Fisheries/Fishing Areas

It was proposed that the use of any form of fishnets one half kilometer from the
shoreline along the entire coastline of Davao City be prohibited, and this area be
reserved exclusively for small scale fishermen using hook and line. In the case of Davao
River, it was suggested that two (2) km. from the mouth of the river be reserved
exclusively for hook and line fishermen, and gill nets be allowed only beyond 2 kms.
These were suggested to facilitate monitoring of the illegal fishers and prevent further
degradation of coastal habitats, and improve the catch of small fishers.

No commercial special fishing permits can be issued given that the citys municipal
waters do not extend beyond 10 kms. from shore.

Considerations

Providing preferential use rights to small fishermen is provided for by RA 8550. This
proposed fishery reserves should exclude the proposed biodiversity protection areas
and mariculture areas discussed below. These fishery reserves are doable with full
cooperation from the coastal barangays particularly in implementing the fishery
registration and licensing alongside strict enforcement of fishery regulations. This could
be a form of incentive for small fishermen in the City.

The near shore waters are the most impacted by different types of pollution. Mitigation
measures to improve water quality will contribute in improving fisheries productivity
together with the effect of limiting fishing effort in the reserve areas.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


72
Agreements on municipal water boundaries with adjacent municipalities should be
finalized. Likewise inter-LGU agreements on fisheries management and enforcement
(e.g. complementation or reciprocity agreements on fishing permits) should be explored
particularly with Island Garden City of Samal which is a common fishing area of
fishermen from Davao.

Aquaculture

The marine aquaculture activities, particularly seaweed farming within Davao waters is
rapidly expanding. Mariculture activities were commonly proposed as a means to
provide alternative sources of livelihood to coastal communities.

District I District II District III

Matina Aplaya Lasang Lizada


Talomo Bunawan Daliao
Tibungco
Ilang
Panacan
Sasa
Leon Garcia

Barangay Tibungco was frequently identified as a priority area for seaweeds farming
because it has been found to be suitable for seaweed farming, being far from freshwater
river discharges. Majority of the existing seaweed farms are located in this area (Map 2).
Seaweed farming activities are also expanding to adjacent coastal barangays, Bunawan,
Ilang, Panacan and Sasa.

Designation of seaweed farms in barangays Dumoy, Lizada and Daliao and shellfish
culture in barangays Matina Aplaya and Talomo.

Significant expansion of fish cage culture will also require designation of specific areas.

Considerations

Expansion of the seaweed areas towards Sasa where most of the private ports are
located should not be allowed. Likewise, expansion of seaweed farms within the
proposed areas should be rationalized with respect to boat navigation lanes or passages.
Moreover, the seaweed farms are situated within 1 km from shore and will have to be
harmonized with the proposed fishery reserve for small fishers using hook and like.
Seaweed farms being fixed structures will effectively exclude all other water uses
including fishing. A permit system including subzoning of the seaweed farm areas
specifying sizes of lots, distances between lots, the requirements and responsibilities of
licensed seaweed farmers should be immediately formulated.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


73
Similar considerations are true for fish cage culture. However, in addition to these
concerns, the density of fish cages in designated areas should be regulated to minimize
organic pollution due to feed inputs.

In the case of shellfish culture, source of spats or seed should be certified to be from
non- red tide affected areas.

Pollution from brackish culture ponds should be mitigated and compliance to


environmental standards strictly enforced particularly in the Lasang and Bunawan area
which are adjacent to high priority biodiversity conservation and fishing areas.
Abandoned fishponds maybe reverted into mangrove areas which can be part of the
mangrove rehabilitation program.

Coastal Settlements

No specific areas have been proposed for coastal settlements. A clearly identified
recommendation is allocation of an area for settlement purposes and relocation of
existing coastal settlements. However, the Citys Comprehensive Land Use Plan
indicates that settlement areas along the coasts shall be from Lasang to Panacan,
Barangay 27-C to Matina, and Talomo Proper to Dumoy. At present, coastal
settlements are concentrated in Bunawan, Bucana, Talomo Proper, Sasa and Pampanga.

Considerations

Coastal Settlement Zone Management Program should consider several major issues.
First, the Citys CLUP major designated areas for settlements (from Lasang to Panacan,
Barangay 27-C to 31-D, and Bucana to Dumoy) against designated areas for medium and
heavy industrial district (from Lasang to Panacan) need careful examination. This also
applies to allocated areas for light industries from Panacan to Ilang. Along this line, it
should be noted that there are also several private ports in Barangay Ilang. Thus,
management of these designated areas should prioritize ensuring that industrial and ship
operations do not affect the environmental condition of the designated settlement areas.
Thus, there is a need for a buffer zone that will clearly identify boundaries and allowable
spaces for these two major areas settlements and industrial zones. Giving premium to
public health, measures mitigating wastewater, solid wastes and air pollution should be a
major strategy in the management of the coastal settlement zones.

Also, concentration of coastal settlements in Sasa and Pampanga which have been
designated as industrial zone should be a primary consideration in the settlement
relocation programs of the City. The presence of the Citys major seaport and intense
use of the waters in these areas by shipping vessels highlight the need for immediate
relocation programs.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


74
Marine Transport and Coastal Industrial Zone

The marine transport sector supports ancillary fishery related industries as well as a
diversity of industries in the City. Specific proposals for this zone are related to
infrastructure development and mitigation of pollution generated by these coastal
industries.

Ports/Fish Landing Development Areas

District I District II

27-C Sasa
Pampanga
Hizon Sr.
Lapu-lapu
Agdao Centro
Gov. Duterte
Leon Garcia

Additional development areas for ports and fish landings were proposed in barangays
Sasa, Pampanga, Hizon Sr., Lapu-lapu, Agdao Centro, Gov. Duterte, Leon Garcia and 27-
C. Most of the existing private ports and wharfs are already located here (refer to ports
and wharfs map).

Considerations

Concentration of additional development activities in Sasa and Pampanga supports the


recommended Industrial Zone area. On the other hand, the proposal for port and fish
landing development in Agdao Centro may result in negative impacts on the proposed
fish sanctuary in this area.

It should also be considered that the other areas being proposed for additional port and
fish landing activities are north of the suggested Recreation and Tourism Zone. The
probability of shipping and port activities leading to water pollution is relatively high.
Stricter ship and port waste management should also be implemented to prevent water
pollution.

Navigation safety measures (e.g. buffer zones to clearly identify shipping routes) for
fishing, passenger boat and commercial shipping operations should be given priority in
coordination with the national agencies to avoid marine accidents and ensure public
safety.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


75
Coastal Industries

The barangay validation workshop group outputs have suggested to identify Barangays
Ilang, Panacan, Sasa, Pampanga and Hizon Sr. as industrial zone because the existing
industries were presently situated here (refer to industrial map). They have also
proposed that there will be no construction of establishments/industries without
Foreshore Lease Agreements, and that construction of new establishments will be
concentrated in barangays Ilang, Panacan and Sasa.

Considerations

A major aspect that should be considered in relation to the proposed Industrial Zone
areas is directly related with coastal settlements as discussed above. However, it should
be brought to the fore that the proposed concentration of new establishments in Ilang,
Panacan and Sasa is expected to be economically beneficial to the Citys trading activities
due to the presence of Sasa Port and majority of the private ports in Ilang.

It should be noted that the City Zoning Map shows that there are rivers within the
designated industrial zones. Set environmental standards should prevent industrial
wastes from being dumped into these rivers whose waters are connected with the
Citys waters.

To reiterate, the City should develop and implement environmental standards that will
mitigate effects of industrial and shipping operations within the said area.

Recreation and Tourism Zones

Based on the results of workshop groups, it was observed that recreation and tourism
areas were commonly suggested and to be located at the southern part of Davao City
(Map 5) and some isolated cases in the north portion, namely:

District I District II District III

Matina Aplaya Panacan Daliao


Talomo Agdao Centro Lizada
Bago Aplaya Gov. Duterte Sirawan
Dumoy Binugao

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


76
Barangays Daliao, Talomo, Bago Aplaya and Dumoy were frequently suggested as
recreation areas, followed by barangays Matina Aplaya, Lizada, Sirawan and Binugao,
because sandy beaches were found in these barangays and these areas are far from the
heavy coastal industrial areas in the city.

Times Beach, a portion of barangay Matina Aplaya, adjacent to barangay Bucana, was
declared as a recreation center under the Presidential Proclamation No. 20, issued on
May 3, 1954 by Pres. Ramon Magsaysay.

In addition, the sandy public beaches in Gov. Duterte and Agdao Centro are local
recreation areas.

Considerations

The Times Beach area has been declared as a reservation for recreation purposes. If
Presidential Proclamation No. 20 will be strictly implemented, this would mean that no
industrial activities should be allowed in the area.

The Comprehensive Land Use Plan of the City (1996-2021) allocates land areas in
Binugao, Sirawan and Panacan as light industrial zones (for non-pollutive/non-hazardous
and non-pollutive/hazardous activities). Furthermore, industrial areas for pollutive/non-
hazardous and pollutive hazardous are also planned to be located at coastal barangays of
Binugao, Sirawan and Lizada for food based industries. It should be noted that EMBs
Water Quality Monitoring Report in 2004 concludes that station 7, Guinoo-o Beach
Resort, is unsuitable for recreation purposes. Panacan, on the other hand, has also been
designated for light manufacturing industries. In addition to this, there are already
existing private ports along the coast of this barangay. Given these, the City has to
develop and implement safety measures to ensure that operations and facilities of these
industries comply with prescribed environmental standards.

The Davao City Fish Port Complex in Daliao, is adjacent to other proposed Recreation
and Tourism areas. Since the Port serves as the Citys center for collection, storage and
packaging of fishery and marine products for local and export distribution, incidence of
water pollution from oil spills and solid wastes from shipping vessels should be regularly
monitored. Notably, EMBs Water Quality Monitoring Report in 2004 indicates that
station 1, Kalayaan Beach Resort in Daliao, is also unfit for bathing and/or contact
recreation due to high presence of coliform.

The same is expected in Talomo where the high concentration of coastal settlements
and attendant pollution from domestic wastes is not compatible with recreation values.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


77
For all areas, the major trade off in recreation and tourism potential is that the citys
coastal waters are not suitable for swimming. An unhealthy environment is radically
incompatible with recreation/aesthetic values. Until measures are undertaken to
mitigate coastal water pollution to improve water condition, disclosure and
dissemination of information that may affect public health (e.g. advisory on unsuitability
of coastal waters for swimming) should be given high priority. The consequence of this
will be a negative impact on coastal tourist establishment (i.e. beach resorts and
restaurants).

The condition of coastal waters is ironic given that Davao claims to have the
best water in the world. The City should invest in seriously addressing coastal
pollution. Regular water quality monitoring and SWM is imperative.

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


78
Annex 1. Establishments/Individuals in Davao City with FLCs as of December 2004.
Barangay Establishments/Individuals

Agdao Proper Lourdes Aportadera


Mindanao Land Foundation
Willie tan
Ilang Bacnotan Consolidated Industries, Inc.
Davao Union Cement Corporation
TEFASCO
Mindanao Terminal and Brokerage Services
Matina Aplaya Claudio Estrera, Sr.
Davao Light and Power Corporation
Elizabeth Dureza
Nicolas Santos
Panacan Victor Jayson
Compania Maritima
L.S. Sarmiento
Vicbros Group, Inc.
Sasa Davao Insular Hotel Co., Inc.
Getty Oil (Phil.) Inc.
Legaspi Oil Company
Mobil Oil Phil., Inc.
Compania Maritima
Petron Corporation
Shell Phil., Inc.
Talomo Proper Felix Victorio
Ligaya Victorio
Tibungco Davao Fruits Corporation
Gregorio Teo
Hudson Sawmill, Inc.
Source: DENR XI-Lands Management Sector

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

i
Annex 2. Establishments in coastal barangays of Davao City with ECCs as of December 2005.
Barangay Industries

Agdao Proper ACY Lumber and Construction Supply


Algon Engineering Construction Corp.
Blanted Trees Lumber Yard
Digital Telecommunications Phils.
Forever Richsons Trading Corp.
Makiling Technology
Marcotech Enterprises
WH Petron Service Station
Bago Aplaya Davao Sunshine Plastic, Inc.
Digitel Mobile Phils., Inc.
El Compania de Julio, Inc.
Globe Telecom, Inc.
Southern Plastics
Binugao Agri-Davao, Inc.
AMCO Foods Corp.
Eco-Exotic Lumber Jem Enterprises
JEWM Agro-Industrial Corp.
Marko Wood Products
Tri-Star Plastic, Inc.
Vicente Guinoo III
Bunawan Proper Bunawan Wood Treatment Services and Sales
Cecilia Stock Farm 2
Chaverson Wood Industry
Davao International Mega Gas Corporation
Digitel Mobile Phils., Inc.
Globe Telecom,. Inc.
Greenwoods Treatment Plant
Mindanao Fibertech Board Corp.
Petronas Energy Phils., Inc.
Pilners Plastic Products
P.O.P.I. Manufacturing Corp.
Steniel Mindanao Packaging Corporation
Tagum Mining and Development Corp.
Tropical Synergy Industries
Daliao Claudio C. Donal Farm
Davao Fishport Complex*
Globe Telecom, Inc.
Mabini Industrial Tree Plantation
Pacific Oil Farmers, Inc.*
Polar Bear Freezer and Storage Corp.
San Manuel Wood Products, Inc.*
Dumoy Julu Enterprises, Inc.
Julu Cornstarch Corp.
Price Gases, Inc.
Smart Communications, Inc.
TWA Incorporated

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

ii
Barangay Industries

Ilang Davao Rotrade Corp


Globe Telecom, Inc.
HOLCIM Phils., Inc.
Joseph Bosque Antoque
National Power Corporation
Lasang Caraga Filching Corp.
F.A. Oil and Soap Maker
Hi-Provite Industry, Inc.
Metro Lead Product Corp.
Lizada Globe Telecom, Inc.
Lizada Box Factory Stanrico
Martsons Food Corp.
Nopa Foods Corp.
Philippine Fruit International, Corp.
Standard Rice and Corn Mill
Vicon Flyng V Gasoline Station
Matina Aplaya Digital Telecommunications Phils.
Globe Telecom, Inc.
Pampanga Davao Morin I/E Trading Corp.
Denso Plastic, Inc.
GCF Tropical Nature Food Corp.
Southern Philippines Coco Charcoal Briquettes Plant
Western Feedmill Corp.
Panacan Caltex Filling/Service Station
8 Horses Clatex Station
Consolidated Plywood Industries, Inc.
Davao Panels Enterprises, Inc.
Digitel Mobile Phils., Inc.
Farma Plastic Product, Inc.
Fil-Nihon Kanyou Plantation, Inc.
Globe Telecom, Inc.
Greenvale Enterprises
Macondray Plastics, Inc.
Mindanao Coco Development Corporation
Nakashin Davao International, Inc.
New Davao Oil Mill, Inc.
Panacan Lumber Company (mini-sawmill)
Petron Corporation, Inc.
Philippine Lauan Industries Corp.
Southern Industrial Gases Phils., Inc.
Vicente Lao Construction
Sasa Asia Pacific Oil Mfg. Corp.
Caltex Phils., Inc.
Davao Mill Complex
Digital Telecommunications Phils.
First Oriental Packaging, Inc.
Geom Wood Products and Iron Works
Globe Telecom, Inc.*

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

iii
Barangay Industries
International Copra Export Corp.
Petron Corporation
Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp.
Southern Agro-Export Corp.
Syngent A Philippines, Inc.
Sirawan Davao Cresta Farm, Inc.
Davao Susana Farms 2
Judith Agri-Farm Corp.
San Miguel Foods Corp.
Smart Communications, Inc.

Tibungco Chemwood, Inc.*


Davao Enterprises Corp.
De Luxe Sawmill, Inc.
DFC Agro Plastics Corp.
Falwan Furnitures and Lumber Dealer
Globe Telecom, Inc.
GT Processing
Ibayaw Enterprises (Banana Mill)
MC Builders
New Olayta Enterprises
New Petron Service Station
Quatrolube Phils.
*CNC Issued

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

iv
Annex 3. Beach resorts and Recreation Establishments in the Coastal Barangays of Davao City
Coastal Barangays Beach Resorts

Bago Aplaya Gulf View Beach Resort


Jones Beach Resort Co.
Lu Beach Resort
Mergrande Ocean Resort
Mervilla Beach Resort
Paraiso Beach Resort
Shimric Beach Farm and Resort
Villa Victoria Beach Resort

Binugao Villa Villasin Beach Resort


Ayala High Ponds
Guinoo Beach Resort
Maeda Beach Resort
Abear Beach Resort
Bucana Silvosa Beach Resort
Times Beach
Bunawan Maddie Beach Resort
Daliao Public Beach (not identified)
Reyes Beach Resort
Fernandez Beach Resort
Kalayaan Beach Resort
Noriega Beach Resort
Redondo Beach Resort
Vales Beach Resort Complex
Villanueva Beach Resort
Dumoy Tanawan Beach Resort
Mer Grande Beach Resort
Paraiso Beach Resort
Water World Beach Resort
Maervillas Beach Resort
Dumoy Garden Beach Resort
Vales Beach Resort
Redondo Calulot Beach Resort (Villanueva Beach)
Ocean View Beach Resort
Badak Beach Resort
Governor Vicente Duterte Ipil Beach Resort
Lasang Paraiso Beach Resort
Lizada Martson Food, Inc. (seaweed processing)
Matina Aplaya AJ Beach Resort
Angels Hide Away Beach Resort
Bonguyan Beach Resort
Caro Beach Resort
City Gulf Beach Resort
Cloud Eagle Beach Resort
Davao Seagull Resorts Development, Inc.
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
ANNEX

v
Coastal Barangays Beach Resorts
Estrera Beach Resort
Felis Resort Complex
Garcia Beach Resort
Habagat Grills
Kanaway Beach Resort & Sea Food Restaurant
Liberty Beach Resort
Liosa Food Corporation
Lope Beach Resort
Marina Azul Resort Hotel, Inc.
Monteza Beach Resort
Moreno Beach Resort
Queensland
Seagull Beach Resort
Tropical Times Beach Park
Twin-H Beach Resort
Valdez Beach Resort
Pampanga Beach Club
Beachside Resort
Coaco Beach Resort
Dagat Diri Beach Resort
Dagat Fiesta Resort
Davao Beach Club, Inc.
Helen Espina Beach Resort
Hizon Beachside Resort
Maryknoll Beach Resort
Reyes Beach Resort
Waterfront Insular Hotel
Talomo Proper Amies Beach Resort
Lagpan Beach Resort
La Rous Beach Resort
Jones Beach Resort
Shimrick Beach Resort
Talomo Beach Resort
Victorious Beach Resort
27-C Magsaysay Park
Source: CPDO, 2005

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

vi
Annex 4. Tally of issues and recommendations in relation to the current major marine and coastal
uses raised during the barangay cluster consultation and zoning workshops.

BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total
Settlements
Issues
Improper solid waste management 3 4 5 2 3 5 7 29
Illegal settlements 5 3 5 2 1 4 3 23
Wastewater 1 2 1 1 5
Resource use conflict between settlements 2 1 1 1 5
and beach resorts
Human wastes 2 2
Resource use conflict between settlements 1 1
and seaweed production
Resource use conflict between settlements 1 1
and fishing activities
Resource use conflict between settlements 1 1
and mangrove areas

Recommendations
Relocation of coastal settlers 2 3 4 1 3 4 1 18
Strict implementation of SWM 3 5 4 1 1 1 15
IEC on SWM 2 1 1 4
Inter-Barangay collaboration on SWM 1 1 2
Installation of sewerage facilities 1 1 2
Proper coordination with the City 1 1 2
Government on resettlement and advocacy
program

Tourism and Recreation BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total

Issues
Resource use conflict between beach resorts 2 1 1 1 5
and settlements
Resource use conflict between resorts and 1 1 2
industries
Resource use conflict between beach resorts 1 1 2
and dock sites
Resource use conflict between beach resorts 1 1
and oil depots
Resource use conflict between beach resorts 1 1
and fish cages
Resource use conflict between beach resorts 1 1
and seaweed production
Resource use conflict between beach resorts 1 1
and public use of shorelines
Construction of fences by beach resort 1 1
owners

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

vii
BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total
Expired Foreshore Lease Agreement 1 1 2 4

Recommendations
Strict implementation of SWM 5 4 1 1 1 12
Zoning of area for tourism/recreation 1 1 3 1 1 2 2 11
Construction of baywalk for recreational 1 3 4
purposes
Strict implementation of policy against 2 2
dumping of industrial wastes in the sea
Installation of sewerage facilities 1 1 2
Resort owners should come-up with "Basura 1 1
Patrol" for the collection of garbage
Zoning of area for eco-tourism 1 1

Marine Transportation BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total

Issues
Oil spills 3 1 1 1 6
Resource use conflict between aquaculture 2 1 3
production and navigation
Resource use conflict between MPA 1 1 2
establishment and navigational use
Resource use conflict between seaweed 2 2
production and wharf uses
Resource use conflict between beach resorts 1 1 2
and dock sites
Resource use conflict between navigation and 1 1 2
fishing

Recommendations
Zoning of area for navigation 1 3 2 1 7
Strict implementation of policy against 2 2
dumping of industrial wastes in the sea
Impose penalties on parties responsible for 2 2
oil spillage
Improve water quality and check water 1 1 2
treatment facilities
Installation of sewerage facilities 1 1 2
Zoning of area for fish landing 2 2
Establishment of barangay fish landing 1 1 2
Zoning of area for ports 1 1 2

Industries BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total

Issues
Improper discharge of industrial wastes 2 2 3 7
Oil spills 3 1 1 1 6
Wastewater 1 2 1 1 5

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

viii
BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total
Resource use conflict between 1 2 1 4
industrial/commercial activities and livelihood
activities
Resource use conflict between resorts and 1 1
industries
Resource use conflict between industries and 1 1
MPAs
Illegal industrial establishments along the 1 1
shoreline

Recommendations
Strict implementation of SWM 5 4 1 1 1 12
Zoning of area for industrial zone 1 1 2
Strict implementation of policy against 2 2
dumping of industrial wastes in the sea
Impose penalties on parties responsible for 2 2
oil spillage
Improve water quality and check water 1 1 2
treatment facilities
Installation of sewerage facilities 1 1 2
Establishment of barangay fish landing 1 1 2
No additional industrial 1 1
structures/commercial establishments

Biodiversity Conservation BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total

Issues
Cutting of mangroves 2 2 1 5
Siltation due to tree cutting 1 1 2
Resource use conflict between MPA 1 1 2
establishment and navigational use
Resistance to the establishment of fish 1 1 2
sanctuary since this might result in fish catch
Resource use conflict between fishing and 1 1
coral reef preservation
Resource use conflict between seaweed 1 1
production and fish sanctuary
Resource use conflict between settlements 1 1
and mangrove areas
Resource use conflict between industries and 1 1
MPAs
Resistance of home owners to establishment 1 1
of mangrove plantation
Habitat management 1 1
Management of the proposed fish sanctuary 1 1

Recommendations
Zoning of area for MPAs 2 1 2 1 3 5 7 21

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

ix
BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total
Strengthen mangrove planting activities 1 3 1 5
Zoning of area for mangrove plantation 1 2 3
Organization of Bantay-Dagat 2 1 3
Establishment of whale shark reservation area 2 2
Regular monthly Coastal Clean-Up 2 2
Habitat conservation 1 1
Establishment of fish sanctuary 1 1
Construction of watch towers 1 1
Provision of livelihood and/or honorarium for 1 1
the volunteers
Obliging coastal settlers to plant and protect 1 1
mangroves
Establishment of pawikan reservation area 1 1
Establishment of mangrove sanctuary 1 1
Budget allocation for habitat protection 1 1

Fisheries BC C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Total

Issues
Illegal fishing 6 7 6 1 7 3 5 35
Encroachment of commercial fishing vessels 1 1
in the municipal waters
No definite fish landings 1 1
Weak support from PNP 1

Recommendations
Zoning of area for fishing 1 1 2 1 4 2 1 12
Strict implementation of Fishery Code 2 1 2 1 2 8
Initiation of potential livelihood activities 1 2 1 1 5
Strict law enforcement 2 2 4
Zoning of area for aquaculture production 1 2 1 4
Provision of livelihood and/or honorarium for 1 1 2
the volunteers
Zoning of area for fish landing 2 2
Establishment of barangay fish landing 1 1 2
Construction of fish cages 1 1
Construction of watch towers 1 1
Establishment of fish sanctuary 1 1
Organization of FLET 1 1
Budget allocation for Bantay-Dagat 1 1
BC: Barangay Council Validation

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

x
Annex 5. Relative Environmental and Socio-economic Impacts of Coastal and Marine Resource
Uses/Major Activities (i.e. land-based and sea-based)

Uses Environmental Impacts Socio-Economic Impacts

LAND-BASED
Settlements (-) Decreased water quality (+) Provision of shelters for landless
Dumping of solid wastes (-) Adverse effects on public health:
Wastewater due to lack of prevalence of water-borne and
sewerage and sanitation facilities respiratory diseases
Private beach resorts (-) Decreased water quality (-) Limited access to recreation by the
Dumping of solid wastes public
(+) Local economic development
Additional revenues for the City
Government through taxes
Increased local employment
Industries (characterized (-) Decreased water quality (+) Local economic development
as heavy, e.g. oil depots) Improper discharge of industrial Additional revenues for the City
wastes Government through taxes
Increased investments
Increased local employment
Marine Transportation
Wharfs and ports (-) Decreased water quality (+) Local economic development
Oil spills Increased trading activities
Wastewater Increased local employment
Increased tourist arrivals
Increased investments
Docking area for small (-) Decrease water quality (-) Obstruction along shoreline
ports Oil spills (+) Available livelihood support
Public access and use of (-) Decrease water quality (+) Increased recreational value
shoreline Improper solid waste management
Recreation
(swimming)
Habitat and species (+) Biodiversity conservation (-) Exclusion of other uses which have
protection higher revenue-generation potential for
Mangrove the City Government and the public
rehabilitation
Turtle nesting area
Inland aquaculture (-) Decreased water quality (+) Increased source of income
Fish ponds Chemical/pesticide discharge Increased aquaculture production
(-) Destruction of mangrove areas Additional revenues for the City
Conversion of mangrove areas into Government through taxes
fishponds Increased local
employment/livelihood
opportunities
Upland/agriculture (-) Decreased water quality (+) Increased agriculture production
Banana plantations Chemical/pesticide/fertilizer (+) Increased local employment/livelihood
discharge opportunities

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


ANNEX

xi
Uses Environmental Impacts Socio-Economic Impacts

SEA-BASED
Habitat and species (+) Biodiversity conservation (-) Exclusion of other uses which have
protection Increased fishery stocks higher revenue-generation potential for
Fish sanctuaries the City Government and the public
Whale shark and (+) Additional tourism potential
turtle sighting areas

Navigation (-) Decreased water quality (+) Local economic development


Oil spills Increased trading activities
Wastewater Increased local employment
Increased tourist arrivals
Increased investments
(-) Destruction of aquaculture structures

Fishing
Municipal Fishing (-) Reduced fish stocks (if unregulated) (+) Source of food
(+) Source of income
(-) Obstruction to navigation ( fixed gears)
Commercial and (-) Reduced fish stocks (-) Reduced income of municipal fishers
foreign fishing
Marine aquaculture
Seaweed farming (+) Protection of benthos (+) Increased local employment
(-) Decreased water quality
Discard of seaweed farming
materials like nylon, ropes, ties,
Fish cages plastics and Styrofoam
(-) Decreased water quality (+) Increased local employment
Organic pollution

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Annex 6. Summary of proposed zones and locations during the barangay council validation and 6 barangay cluster (c1-c6) consultation and zoning
workshops. Composition of workshop clusters, date, venue and number of participants are summarized in Table 1, Introduction Chapter.

Proposed Zone Bgy. Council No C1 No C2 No C3 No C4 No C5 No C6 No


Validation
Settlement Zone
Settlements No specified area 1 No specified area 1
Tourism and
Recreation Zone
Recreational zone Bago Aplaya to 1 Seagull to Daliao 1 Matina Aplaya, 1 Matina Aplaya 1 Binugao & 1
Lizada Toril Toril to Talomo Sirawan
Panacan 1 Duterte & Centro 1 Lizada & 1
Daliao
Baywalk Hizon Sr. 1 Bucana 1
No specified area 1
Improve of Pampanga 1
regulation of
recreational zone
Beach Talomo to 1
Binugao
Eco-tourism Agdao Centro 1 Punta Dumalag 1
Industrial Zone
Industrial zone Sasa to Ilang 1 Ilang to 1 Ilang to 1
Hizon Pampanga
No additional Panacan to 1
indusrial Agdao
structures/commer Centro
cial establishments
Cease regulation of Pampanga 1
industrial zonal
system

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Proposed Zone Bgy. Council No C1 No C2 No C3 No C4 No C5 No C6 No
Validation
Non-construction No specified area 1
of establishments
without FLAs
Barangay Agdao Centro 1
development site
Port Zone
Validation of wharf No specified area 1
structures without
FLA
Docking zone Daliao 1
Port Sasa to 27C 1
Fishport No specified area 1

Fish landing Panacan 1 No specified area 1

Trade and No specified area 1


Navigation Zone
Navigational lane Between Samal & 1 Between Davao 1 No specified area 2 Between Davao 2 Between 1
Davao & Samal & Samal Davao &
Samal,
from
Daliao to
Dvo Gulf
Marine
Protection Zone
Mangrove Matina Aplaya to 1 All coastal brgys. 2 Panacan 1 No specified 1 Matina 1
rehabilitation zone Bucana area Aplaya &
Talomo,
Sirawan &
Lizada

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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xiv
Proposed Zone Bgy. Council No C1 No C2 No C3 No C4 No C5 No C6 No
Validation
Marine sanctuary Bunawan and 1 Sasa and Agdao 1 Agdao 1
Lasang Centro Centro
Lizada, 1
Daliao,
Dumoy
Pawikan Matina Aplaya to 1 Ilang, Tibungco, 1 Matina Aplaya 1 Matina 1
reservation area Bucana Bunawan and Aplaya
Lasang
Whale shark Bunawan and 1
reservation area Lasang
Marine Protected Lizada 1 Lasang & Matina 1 Tibungco to 1 Lasang, Punta 1 Fish 1 Matina Aplaya 2 Sirawan 1
Area Aplaya Lasang Dumalag, Leon sanctuary,
Garcia coral reefs,
seawweds,
mangrove
Matina Aplaya 1 Matina Aplaya to 1 Lizada 1
Dumoy
Coastal habitat No specified area 1

Coral rehabilitation No 1
specified
area
Fishing Zone

Fishing zone Bucana to 1 Panacan to 1 Leon Garcia to 1 500 meters from 1 Bucana to 1
Binugao Buanwan Ilang the shoreline Binugao
Matina Aplaya to 1 Lasang to 1 No specified area 1
Binugao Tibungco, Matina
Aplaya to
Binugao, Bucana
to 27-C
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
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xv
Proposed Zone Bgy. Council No C1 No C2 No C3 No C4 No C5 No C6 No
Validation
Hook and line 2 kms 1
from
lapyahan-
Bucana
Gillnet no net fishing 1 3 kms 1
1/2 km from from
shoreline-all lapyahan-
coastal brgys. Bucana
Aquaculture Zone

Aquaculture Binugao 1 Tibungco to Sasa 1 Lasang, 1 Talomo & 1


Bunawan, Matina Aplaya
Tibungco
Leon Garcia 2

Seaweed Tibungco 1 Panacan & Sasa 1 Lizada & 1


production zone Daliao
Others

Multiple-use zone Duterte, Leon 1 Ilang to 1


Garcia Hizon Sr.
& Leon
Garcia to
Bucana
Multiple-use zone Hizon Sr. 1 Duterte to 31D 1
(residential,
commercial,
recreational)
Seawall 21, 22, 23, 31 1

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Proposed Zone Bgy. Council No C1 No C2 No C3 No C4 No C5 No C6 No
Validation
Coastal road Poblacion Areas 1

Bantay Dagat Pampanga & 1 Lizada & 1


Outpost Lapu-lapu Bucana
Research Matina Aplaya 1

Mangrove Bucana 1
Expansion Area

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Annex 7. List of Major Coastal Industries and type of waste generated

Nature of Business Companies Barangay Specific Activities Types of Waste Generated

Daily Bread Bago Aplaya Food processing Wastewater, food waste


Davao Sunstar Corporation Panacan Snack food manufacturing Solid waste, plastic
Davao Agromarine Inc* Sasa Tuna processing
Eagle Muli-Purpose Cooperative Bago Aplaya Bihon processing Wastewater, food waste
Earth Grains Inc Buhangin Bread making Food waste
First Westlake Food Inc Panacan Bihon Food waste
Interco Sasa Manufacturer of edible oil Used oil, coco meat, wastewater
Legaspi Sasa Manufacturer of edible oil Used oil, coco meat, wastewater
Food Processing Magnolia Dressing Plant Sirawan Chicken processing Food waste, wastewater
Mindanao Oil Company Panacan Edible oil Coco meat, wastewater
MLD Foodlines Talomo Food products Wastewater
Pepsi Dumoy Soft drink processing Solid waste, wastewater
Phil Fruits Processing Lizada Fruit processing (puree) Liquid, solid
Philixson Intl Inc. Bago Aplaya Banana chips Agricultural waste, wastewater
Wilfredo S. Cal Bunawan Production of agri-banana Agricultural waste
Vicon Ice Plant Daliao Ice processing Wastewater
UFC Dumoy Ketchup Cullets, plastics, wastewater
Copra Mindanao Coconut Devl Corp Panacan Copra Coco meat, wastewater
DANS PENTA Gen. Services Sasa Slicing of cartons Carton trimmings
Cartons Steneil Mindanao Packing Corp Bunawan Corrugated cartons Miscuts, trims, wastewater
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
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xiii
Nature of Business Companies Barangay Specific Activities Types of Waste Generated

Mincor Sasa Corrugated cartons Ink/glue sludge, wastewater


MINDOACO Tibungco Acetylene Oxygen Carbide
Reynaldo Sadava Daliao Chemical Plants Waste water
Chemical Southern Industrial Gases Panacan Acetylene Carbide
Davao Oxygen Corp Panacan Oxygen Plants Lime sludge
Phil. Nihon Kanyon Panacan Granulated carbon Fine charcoal, fly ash
Union Cement Corp Ilang Lime stone Dust
Cement / Hollow U-mix concrete Tibungco Rock crusher Wastewater, noise, dust
Blocks
Pontalinao Agro-Industrial Bunawan Limestone Pulverized limestone, wastewater
Darwin Concrete Mix Corp Panacan Ready mix concrete Wastewater, plastic, paper bag
Caraga Filchin Lasang Wood treatment plant Wood trims, sawdust
Chen Woods Tibungco Wood treatment plant Wood trims, waste water
CPII Panacan Lumber Sawdust
Davao Fancy Panels Ent. Inc. Panacan Plywood Wood chips
Davao Panel Industries Panacan Plyboard manufacturing Sawdust, trimmings, miscuts
Davencor Tibungco Lumber Sawdust
Deluxe Sawmill Tibungco Lumber Sawdust
Earnsun Plywood* Panacan Plywood
Greenvale Mini Sawmill Panacan Lumber Sawdust
Mindanao Fiber Tech Board Bunawan Lawanit Wood trimming, waste waster
Wood
Mongcal, Coco lumber Matina Coco lumber Sawdust, miscut

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Nature of Business Companies Barangay Specific Activities Types of Waste Generated

Panacan Lumber Sawmill Panacan Lumber Sawdust, trimmings, miscut


RJ Coco Lumber Matina Coco lumber Sawdust, miscut
RJL Wood & Iron Works Panacan Furniture Sawdust, trimmings, miscut
Rolex Corp Lasang Lawanit Wood trimmings, waste water
Triple A Matina Coco lumber Sawdust, miscut
Construction O.G. Santos Construction Buhangin Construction Empty can / scrap
URC Sasa Feedmill Dust, feeds, empty bags
Vitarich Panacan Feedmill Dust, feeds
Standard Rice Corn Mill Lizada Ricemill Rice hulls
Industrial Carbon Technology Panacan Charcoal Carbon ash
Charcoal Phil. Japan Active Carbon Panacan Charcoal Carbon ash
Davao Central Chemical Corp Panacan Foam, charcoal Carbon ash
Southern Phil Coco Charcoal** Pampanga brickets Carbon ash
Metal / Fabrication Bacnotan Steel Corporation Ilang Fabrication Metal, scrap iron
/ Steel
Kobe Metal Craft Lasang Metal Craft Aluminum waste, dust
RJS Tibungco Fabrication Metal dust
Metro Lead Product Lasang Water sinker Battery casing, plates, waste water
Tagum Mining Development* Bunawan Processing of gold
DN Steel Corporation Panacan Roll forming G.I. sheets, trimmings
Albino Plastic Mfg Lasang Plastic pellets Wastewater, plastics
Davao Dynamic Industries Pampanga Plastic containers HDPE, LDPE, PP, wastewater, plastics

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Nature of Business Companies Barangay Specific Activities Types of Waste Generated

Duratex Industrial Corp Panacan Foam, furniture Scrap iron, foam trimmings
Isip Plastic Tray Factory Matina Aplaya Plastic tray factory Scrap iron
Plastics Macondry Pastic Panacan Packaging plastic Plastic, butt rolls
MFR / Davao Ever Win Panacan kitchenwares Plastic, miscuts
Minplas Panacan Housewares Plastic, miscuts
Tamaraw Plastic Twines Corp Lasang Plastic twine Plastics, wastewater
Ultimate Plastic, Co. Bunawan Plastic pellets Plastics, wastewater
Songfa Plastic Marketing Panacan Pellets (making) Plastics, wastewater
Fiberglass Sikra Engineering Services Matina Fiberglass product Fiber glass debris
Bandag Tire Recapping Panacan Tire recapping Rubber trimmings, tins
Rubber Electro Buhangin Tire recapping Rubber chips, tins
Pico Bonding Shop Lasang Bonding Rubber trimmings
Caltex Sasa Depot
Filipinas Shell Sasa Retailing of fuel
Oil Flying V Sasa Fuel retailing Plastic containers
JEND Ventures Lasang Oil refinery Used oil, wastewater
Petron Sasa Depot
Petronas Energy (Phil) Inc. Bunawan Liquefied Petroleum (LPG)
Davao Toplas Corp Centro Agdao Sack making Plastics, wastewater
Julu Cornstarch Corp. Dumoy Cornstarch production Wastewater
Others Mindanao Waste Recycling Sasa Recycling industry Crushed sacks, wastewater

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Nature of Business Companies Barangay Specific Activities Types of Waste Generated

Mylene Soap Processing Bago Aplaya Soap processing Fly ash, emission of fumes
RDL Buhangin Lotion, astringent Wastewater
Regwill Ind Inc. Ilang Repacking Oil, lubricants
Taroja Backyard Pig Pen* Bago Aplaya Pig fattening Manure, wastewater
Source: CENRO, 2006

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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Annex 8. Summary of Davao Citys Coastal Zone Issues and Recommendations for Specific LGU offices

Coastal Zone Issues Recommendations Responsible LGU Office/s

Coastal Settlements 1) Improper solid waste and wastewater Designation of coastal settlement and/or Sangguniang Panglungsod
management resulting from relocation areas
City Planning and Development
Lack of SWM activities and necessary Passage of City Ordinance defining uses Office
supporting policies and mechanisms for coastal settlements
- Research and Statistics
Lack of sewerage and sanitation Development and legitimization if ISWM Division
facilities Plan
- Zoning Enforcement Division
2) Negative impacts of improper solid Review, updating and enforcement of
- Housing and Homesite
waste and wastewater management to existing City Ordinance on ISWM
Development Division
public health
Strengthening of IEC activities
City Health Office
3) Negative impacts of water pollution to
Conduct of regular quality monitoring
tourism and recreation facilities - Health Program
Conduct of study on wastewater Development Division
4) Destruction of mangrove areas due to
problems in coastal settlements
expansion of settlements City Social Services and
Budget allocation and/or joint venture Development Office
with private sector for installation of
City Environmental and Natural
sewerage and sanitation facilities
Resources Office
- Environmental and Waste
Management Office
City Tourism Office
DENR
Potential private sector partners
Fisheries 1) Illegal fishing practices Strengthening of fisheries law City Agriculturist Office
enforcement
2) Overfishing Sangguniang Panglungsod
Zoning of city waters with specified Committee
3) Coastal habitat degradation
areas for fishery activities
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
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xviii
Coastal Zone Issues Recommendations Responsible LGU Office/s

Mangrove denudation due to illegal Drafting, legitimization and City Environment and Natural
cutting of mangroves and conversion implementation of Fisheries Resources Office
of mangrove areas into fishponds and Management Plan
- Natural Resources
illegal settlements
Implementation of registration and Operation Division
Water pollution caused by domestic licensing system for fishers, boats and
Barangay Captains
wastes from coastal settlements gears
Philippine National Police
Strengthening of IEC and advocacy
programs Philippine Coast Guard
Provision of assistance to fisherfolks Potential private sector partners
NGOs, POs
Community ( through
reporting system)

Coastal Habitats and 1) Insufficient coastal law enforcement Species conservation, specifically marine City Agriculturist Office
Species Protection turtles and whale sharks
2) Threatened endangered species Sangguniang Panglungsod
- Formulation and legitimization of
3) Destruction of coral and seagrass area by City Agriculturist Office
management plan for turtle sanctuary
structures and reclamation activities,
City Environment and Natural
particularly in Tibungco - Establishment and management of
Resources Office
conservation areas for whale sharks
4) Mangrove denudation due to informal
and butandings - Natural Resources
settlements
Operation Division
Establishment and management of fish
sanctuaries Barangay Captains
- Creation of local MPA body Philippine National Police
- Formulation and legitimization of Philippine Coast Guard
MPA Plan
Potential private sector partners
Mangrove rehabilitation
NGOs, POs
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
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Coastal Zone Issues Recommendations Responsible LGU Office/s

- Establishment/survey of potential Academic and research


areas for mangrove rehabilitation institutions ( e.g. UP Min)
areas
save Davao Gulf
- Establishment of City mangrove Foundation
nursery
- Conduct of IEC activities on
mangrove rehabilitation
- Forging of co-management
arrangement between DENR and
LGU
Riverbank rehabilitation

Marine Marine Transportation and Zoning Sangguniang Panglungsod


Transportation, Navigation
- Restriction of navigation zone to City Planning and Development
Navigation and
1) Water pollution caused by oil spills and specific areas Office
Coastal Industries
solid wastes from shipping vessels
- Coordination with MARINA on list of - Research and Statistics
2) Negative impacts of oil spills and solid registered local and foreign vessels Division
wastes from shipping vessels to beach
- Regulation of construction of - Zoning Enforcement Division
resorts
additional private and fish ports
City Health Office
3) Insufficient fish landings
- Identification/designation of areas for
- Health Program
fish landings
Development Division
Valuation study of Citys marine
City Environmental and Natural
transportation sector
Resources Office
Conduct of water quality monitoring
- Environmental and Waste
Management Office
Strict implementation of issuances of City Tourism Office
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
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Coastal Zone Issues Recommendations Responsible LGU Office/s
FLC and charging of fines and penalties
Coastal Industries City Treasurers Office
for non-compliance
1) Industrial pollution - Business Tax Amusement
City Ordinance for industrial
2) Weak implementation of issuance of establishment specifying required SWM And License Division
Foreshore Lease Agreements and and wastewater facilities and,
City Engineers Office
Environmental Compliance Certificates corresponding fines and penalties for
non-compliance - Planning and Programming
Division
- Building Permits Division
- Industrial Safety Division
Philippine Coast Guard
DENR-EMB
DENR-LMS

Tourism Water pollution from coastal industries, Restriction of Tourism Zone to specific Sangguniang Panglungsod
aquaculture activities and coastal areas
City Planning and Development
settlements
Consensus-building on conflict areas Office
Expired Foreshore Lease Agreements with industries, mangrove areas and
- Research and Statistics
(FLAs) settlements.
Division
Organization of association of beach
- Zoning Enforcement Division
resort and other coastal tourism
business-related owners City Environmental and Natural
Resources Office
Strengthening of collaboration between
proposed CRM Office and EMB of - Environmental and Waste
DENR for strict implementation of FLA Management Office
and ECC issuances.
City Tourism Office
Conduct of independent water quality
City Treasurers Office
Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations
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xxi
Coastal Zone Issues Recommendations Responsible LGU Office/s
monitoring in beach resort areas.
- Business Tax Amusement
Development and implementation of
And License Division
Monitoring and Evaluation (M& E)
Program for coastal tourism facilities, City Engineers Office
establishments, services and industries.
- Planning and Programming
Drafting and implementation of City Division
Ordinance specifically addressed to
beach resort owners and other related - Building Permits Division
stakeholders such as restaurants, hotels - Industrial Safety Division
etc.
Reconciliation of records of
establishments (beach resorts and Potential private sector partners:
seaside restaurants) of the City Tourism Association of resort
Office, Business Bureau and the owners
Department of Tourism.
NGOs

Davao City Coastal Zone Management Situation and Recommendations


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