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Delhi wednesday, february 1, 2017

Delhi wednesday, february 1, 2017 www.thehindu.in ● Regd. DL(ND)-11/6110/2006-07-08 ● RNI No. TNENG/2012/49940

www.thehindu.in Regd. DL(ND)-11/6110/2006-07-08 RNI No. TNENG/2012/49940 ISSN 0971 - 751X Vol. 7 No. 27 CITY EDITION 22 Pages Rs. 8.00

● No. 27 ● CITY EDITION ● 22 Pages ● Rs. 8.00 Printed at Chennai, Coimbatore,

Printed at Chennai, Coimbatore, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Madurai, Noida, Visakhapatnam, Thiruvananthapuram, Kochi, Vijayawada, Mangaluru, Tiruchirapalli, Kolkata, Hubballi, Mohali, Allahabad, Malappuram and Mumbai

E. Ahamed suffers cardiac arrest in Parliament

Page 12

E. Ahamed suffers cardiac arrest in Parliament Page 12

Trump fires top govt. lawyer Sally Yates for not backing travel ban

Page 14

Trump fires top govt. lawyer Sally Yates for not backing travel ban Page 14
lawyer Sally Yates for not backing travel ban Page 14 India gave befitting reply to cross-border

India gave befitting reply to cross-border terror: Mukherjee

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India gave befitting reply to cross-border terror: Mukherjee Page 12

India will go for the kill in T20 series decider against England today

Page 17

BRIEFLY

PM defends decision to advance Union Budget

NEW DELHI: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday defended his government’s decision to bring forward the presentation of the Union Budget by a month, in the middle of the Assembly polls in five States, saying it would facilitate execution of development works by giving more time for allotment of funds and their spending.

NEWS | PAGE 12
NEWS | PAGE 12

Three killed in car explosion

BATHINDA: Three persons were killed and 15 injured in an explosion in a car near the venue of the road show of a Congress candidate at Maur Mandi here.

NEWS PAGE 12

Austria to ban full-face veil in public places

VIENNA: Austria’s governing coalition has agreed to prohibit full-face veils in courts, schools and other “public places” as part of reforms drawn up after negotiations.

WORLD | PAGE 14

EMPOWER

Page 7

Note ban a radical measure: CEA

Economic Survey pegs growth at 7.1% based on pre-Nov. 8 data

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

NEW DELHI: The government’s Chief Economic Adviser Arvind Subramanian on Tuesday said there was a sense of anxiety about the economy’s prospects follow- ing demonetisation and

stressed the need to allay the fears of an overzealous tax regime in its aftermath, even as he proposed the headline “the Chief Economic Ad- viser finally speaks on de- monetisation” for breaking his silence on the issue after 85 days. Speaking soon after Union Finance Minister Arun Jait- ley tabled the Economic Sur- vey for 2016-17 in Parliament, Mr. Subramanian termed the move to cancel the legal tender nature of high-value currency notes a “radical

currency-cum-governance-

cum-social engineering measure to permanently and punitively raise the cost of il- licit and unaccounted trans-

actions or kala dhan (black money).”

Credit growth down

“Bank credit growth has come down, two-wheeler sales have come down.

growth has come down, two-wheeler sales have come down. There will be an impact on GDP.

There will be an impact on GDP. But the question is how much,” he said. Mr. Subramanian also stressed that it wouldn’t be appropriate to compare the Survey’s forecast of “a quarter to half percentage point decline in growth” to projections made by other agencies, including the In- ternational Monetary Fund, which has scaled down its India growth estimate to

6.6%.

The Survey pegs eco- nomic growth in 2016-17 at 7.1%, but this is based mainly on information for months before the November 8 de-

monetisation of ₨500 and ₨1,000 notes. This is half a percentage point lower than the 7.6% growth last year, but the CEA warned that com- parisons attributing the dif- ference in growth numbers to demonetisation alone would be foolhardy.

Costs to informal sector

Mr. Subramanian declined comment on the design and implementation of demonet- isation, but did speak on the costs, and long-term benefits of what was “an unusual and unique monetary experi- ment” aimed at a structural break. “It would be fair to say

‘Review of demonetisation impact by June’

TCA SHARAD RAGHAVAN VIKAS DHOOT

NEW DELHI: The Economic Survey for 2016-17 doesn’t include the traditional detailed review of the year gone by — thanks to the budget presentation being advanced to February 1 from the last working day of February. This review is expected to be completed by June and would take a fresh look at the impact of demonetisation , on the basis of more data that comes in over the next four-five months. “With the Budget and Survey dates being advanced, it makes less sense to review the year based on data for just two quarters. We will do this later and you will have a full-blown, backward looking review,” Chief Economic Adviser Arvind Subramanian told The Hindu on Tuesday. The Survey has projected growth of 7.1% in 2016-17 based on data for the first seven-eight months of the financial year.

that short-term costs include the hardships and inconveni- ence faced particularly by those in the informal sector.” After a temporary slow- down in GDP growth, the Survey expects the economy to return to normal, once the scrapped currency is re- placed by March. In the long run, tax revenues and GDP growth would be bolstered on account of greater tax compliance and a reduction in real estate prices.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

STATES’ FINANCES IMPROVED; TWIN BALANCE SHEET PROBLEM | PAGE 15

EXCERPTS ON PAGE 15

Changes in H-1B visa on the anvil, says White House

VARGHESE K. GEORGE

WASHINGTON: The White House said on Monday it was work- ing on changes in H-1B and other guest worker visa pro- grammes through legislative and executive actions as part of President Donald Trump’s immigration reform, even as a Bill introduced by a Demo- cratic lawmaker proposed new restrictions on H-1B visas. These visa programmes are mandated by the legislature and are widely used by Indian IT companies to place skilled workers in the U.S. A leaked draft of an executive order un- der consideration for presid- ential signature proposes re- strictions on the Optional Practical Training (OPT) work, a job training opportun- ity available for Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Masters from a U.S. university. It also pro- poses to roll back the permis- sion to work currently avail- able to spouses of H-1B visa holders and to replace the current lottery system that se- lects the 85,000 annual H-1B visa beneficiaries. This year’s selection process opens on April 1. According to the draft pub- lished by Vox.com, the Trump administration is also plan-

IT stocks drop 4% on visa fears

NEW DELHI: IT stocks plunged over 4% on Tuesday, knocking of more than ₨33,000 crore in market valuation of the top five companies, after a new H-1B Bill in the U.S. caused concerns that it would afect the hiring plans of Indian technology firms. TCS slumped by 4.47% to settle at ₨2,229.90 on the BSE. Infosys lost 2.01% to close at ₨905. Wipro came in at ₨457.10, 1.62% lower than its previous close. Tech Mahindra went down 4.23% to close at ₨451.75 and HCL Technologies declined 3.67% to ₨808.85. PAGE 16

ning to have federal inspect- ors regularly visit the sites where guest workers are employed. “I think with respect to

H-1Bs and other visas

[all] part of a larger immigra-

tion reform efort the Presid- ent will continue to take through executive order and through working with the Congress…,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said on Monday.

[it] is

NEW BILL SEEKS TO DOUBLE SALARY | PAGE 14

Shivpal threatens to form new party after polls

OMAR RASHID

LUCKNOW: Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Akhilesh Ya- dav was on Tuesday faced with a fresh challenge in the form of his rebellious uncle, Shivpal Yadav, who threatened to form a new party after the elections. After days of remaining in isolation, the uncle spoke out, hinting that the internal feud within the Samajwadi Party was far from over. Also, like his brother Mu- layam Singh, Shivpal Yadav too was critical of the SP’s alliance with the Congress. Mr. Shivpal has for the past few days been camping in the Yadavs’ home district, Etawah, and his remarks, made after he filed his nom- ination from Jaswant Nagar, on the Samajwadi Party symbol, has given a new twist to the family feud. After claiming he had even considered contesting the election as an independ- ent candidate, Mr. Shivpal

India awaits credible action on Saeed, LeT

SUHASINI HAIDAR

NEW DELHI: India reacted cau- tiously to the Pakistan gov- ernment’s move on Monday to place Mumbai attacks mastermind Hafiz Saeed and four other members of the Lashkar-e-Taiba front, Jamaat-ud-Dawa, under “preventive detention,” and putting their charity arm Fa- lah-e-Insaniyat on its terror watchlist. Oicials suggested that the moves were cos- metic and designed to pla- cate the U.S. government ahead of a major interna- tional meet on tackling ter- ror funding next month. “Exercises such as yester- day’s orders against Hafiz Saeed and others have been carried out by Pakistan in the past also,” MEA spokesper- son Vikas Swarup said on Tuesday.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

PAKISTAN MILITARY DEFENDS DETENTION | PAGE 14

Dalits flee village after attack by upper castes

STAFF REPORTER

GURUGRAM: More than two dozen Dalit families in Mirchpur village in Hisar were allegedly forced to flee their homes on Tuesday af- ternoon after nine persons from their community were beaten up, allegedly by upper caste members. Four of the accused have been arrested. The incident comes nearly seven years after caste-based violence in the village claimed the lives two Dalits -- Tara Chand (70) and his teenage polio-stricken daughter Suman. Several other persons from their community were injured when their houses were set afire by some mem- bers of the Jat community. A total of 15 accused in the case were convicted by the Rohini court, which completed the trial in just over nine months. The fresh spell of violence erupted on Monday evening over a minor altercation between two groups of teen- agers during a function in the

village. Of the nine injured Dalits, eight are being treated at Civil Hospital, Hisar, while one has been re- ferred to Maharaja Agrasen Medical College, Agroha. “A boy belonging to the Dalit community had re- cently won a 1600-metre bi- cycle race and was being har- assed by the members of the upper castes since. They taunted him again during the function on Monday and the matter escalated. The boy was brutally beaten up and others from the community were also thrashed when they came to his rescue,” ad- vocate Rajat Kalsan told The Hindu over the phone from Hisar. Mr. Kalsan had repres- ented the Dalit families in the previous case at Rohini court. Mr. Kalsan alleged that the State government was not serious about the security of Dalits and had withdrawn the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) troops de- ployed in the area a month ago.

Force (CRPF) troops de- ployed in the area a month ago. FRESH POSTURING : Shivpal Yadav

FRESH POSTURING: Shivpal Yadav filing his nomination papers from the Jaswantnagar seat in Etawah on Tuesday. PHOTO: PTI

said: “You wait for the result on March 11. And after that result, we will form a new party.” “Where will those people, who have been working hard for five years, go?” he asked. He took pot shots at his nephew: “Meherbani hai, ticket bhi de diya hai mujhe

(I am so grateful, he has given me ticket). Such bene- volence! Otherwise I would have to contest as an inde- pendent. I was prepared for that too. Many friends wanted me to fight inde-

pendently.” He said he had filed his nomination after facing “many obstacles” along the way, a reference to the fact that he had got ticket only on the insistence of Mr. Mu- layam Singh. Mr. Shivpal’s name was also not included in the list of SP’s star campaigners. Mr. Shivpal’s remarks come at a time when many members of the old guard close to him and Mr. Mu- layam have openly rebelled against Chief Minister Akhilesh.

Fake ₨2,000 notes have 50% of security features

Counterfeit currency seized on Bangladesh border is hard to detect

 

SHIV SAHAY SINGH

S HIV S AHAY S INGH visually impaired on fake notes are not usable. The agencies

visually impaired on fake notes are not usable. The agencies are apprehensive that more hard-to-spot fake currency may be smuggled in, since over half the features were copied in three months. “After demonetisation, FICN counterfeiters have focused on ₨2,000 notes. They have not been fully successful, but they are beginning to copy a few features,” P.S.R Anjaneyulu, IG, South Bengal Frontier, BSF, told The Hindu. BSF and NIA arrested Mohammad Ashraful and Ripon Sheikh from Malda district with the notes, earlier this month. Some ₨500 fake notes have also come, where the printing is inferior but paper quality and colour closely match the original. During 2013-2016 FICN with a face value of ₨6.6 crore was seized.

KOLKATA: Counterfeiters have expertly replicated half of the security features of the new ₨2000 notes, a consignment of Fake Indian Currency Notes seized on the Bangladesh border recently reveals. The Border Security Force (BSF) and the National Investigation Agency (NIA) intercepted four consignments of ₨2000 notes between December 2016 and January this year from areas near Malda district. With the quality of the fakes improving over time, the seizure has set alarm bells ringing for intelligence agencies and security forces. “The notes have copied the geometric patterns and the colour scheme both on obverse and the reverse side including watermark, and the exclusive number

FORGERS’ PROGRESS: A ₨2,000 note intercepted near Malda

district of West Bengal. — PHOTO: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

 

pattern of the ₨2000 currency. Unlike samples seized elsewhere which were scanned or colour photocopies, these have been printed using sophisticated dyes,” a senior security oicer said. More than half of the 17 RBI-listed security features have been replicated. In genuine currency, there are 13 features on the front (or obverse) side including two for visually impaired and four on the reverse. The samples show that the four features on the

reverse side, a motif of Chandrayaan, language panel, Swachh Bharat logo and year of printing, have been copied. On the obverse, the see-through area, denominational numeral in Devnagari, guarantee clause with RBI Governor’s signature, and watermark are replicated.

Paper quality

The fakes, however, do not match on paper quality, and the magenta dye used is a little darker, experts said. The features for

Delhi ragpicker sells waste to fund his children’s education

JAIDEEP DEO BHANJ

NEW DELHI: Mohammad Hamid Ali, a waste collector at Pandara Road, is done with his round of collection for the day and by noon, sits down to sip water leaning against the wall of the Raghubir Singh Junior Mod- ern School.

On Tuesday, he had a smile

on his face as he had just re-

ceived a call from his eldest daughter, Haleema, from As- sam, who told him that she had scored 100 % in her class

IX

Arabic exam. The results

in

other subjects are expec-

ted in a day or two and she hoped she would do as well.

For 39-year-old Ali, the

and she hoped she would do as well. For 39-year-old Ali, the Mohammad Hamid Ali news

Mohammad Hamid Ali

news gives him great satis- faction as all his hard work to get his children educated is

paying of. He hopes that one

day his children will get good jobs, just like the children who study at the school next to his workplace.

Not many of the residents at Pandara Road know that what they throw away as waste from their homes is funding the education of Mr Ali’s three children. Mr Ali reached Delhi in 1999 from his village in Bar- peta district of Assam. “When I was a kid, I saw my house and all the land my father owned submerged in floods. Overnight, it became part of the river and we moved away to stay with my grandmother. We were poor but found jobs to ensure that we were never hungry. Edu- cation, however, was a dis- tant dream,” he said.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

that we were never hungry. Edu- cation, however, was a dis- tant dream,” he said. CONTINUED

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that we were never hungry. Edu- cation, however, was a dis- tant dream,” he said. CONTINUED

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that we were never hungry. Edu- cation, however, was a dis- tant dream,” he said. CONTINUED

2 |

CITY

THE HINDU

2 | CITY THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 4 of 6 AAP Ministers campaigning

NOIDA/DELHI

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

2 | CITY THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 4 of 6 AAP Ministers campaigning
2 | CITY THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 4 of 6 AAP Ministers campaigning

4 of 6 AAP Ministers campaigning in Punjab

With Punjab going to polls on Feb 4, five of the six Cabinet Ministers of the AAP govt. are out of the city Page 4

Alcohometer not 100% accurate, says court

Raising doubts over the efficacy of the device, a court here acquitted a man in a drunken driving case Page 5

DELHI

CONNECT

Calling all readers to connect with us for all things Delhi at

all readers to connect with us for all things Delhi at twitter - @DelhiConnect www.facebook.com/NewDelhiConnect

twitter - @DelhiConnect www.facebook.com/NewDelhiConnect

Bigg Boss revelry spills onto streets

Traffic snarls witnessed on DND flyway as supporters come out to welcome show winner Manveer Gurjar

AIIMS director Misra retires

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: Dr. M. C. Misra re- tired as the director of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) here after serving a tenure of three years and three months. Dr. Balram Airan, Dean, AIIMS, and chief of the Cardio- Thorasic Centre has taken over the charge as acting dir- ector till the Appointments Committee of the Cabinet fi- nalises the name of the new head. During his tenure, Dr.

Misra contributed towards the advancement of the Apex Medical Sciences Uni- versity of India. He also initi- ated the expansion of the JPN Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC) and the construc- tion of the Surgical Block, a Health Ministry statement read.

New chief for JPNATC

Dr. Misra had also been heading the AIIMS Trauma Centre since June 2008, a charge which has now been handed over to HOD, Sur-

gery, Dr Anurag Srivastava. Deputy Director (Admin- istration), AIIMS, V. Srinivas, said: “During his tenure, Dr. Misra created a dynamic policy environ- ment with adequate re- source availability where meritocracy could thrive and achievers reached their potential.” “Today there is all-round recognition that AIIMS has the largest pool of medical talent that is capable of matching the best in the world,’’ Mr. Srinivas added.

PURUSHARTH ARADHAK

NOIDA: Traic snarls were wit- nessed on the DND flyway on Tuesday as supporters of Bigg Boss Season 10 winner Manveer Gurjar came out in large numbers to welcome him. The 29-year-old contest- ant was supposed to come via the flyway, but he took another route to reach his home in Agahpur village in Noida. As the news spread that he had taken another route, his supporters fol- lowed suit, triggering massive traic jams in the middle of the city.

Hooliganism on show

People could be seen sit- ting on the rooftops and bon- nets of cars, and raising slo- gans in support of Mr. Gurjar. Many others were seen speeding in front of police- men. Some were found drinking in cars, while others were seen using hooters. On many occasions, vehicles of the supporters and other commuters crashed. How- ever, not a single policeman present on duty stepped for- ward to control the menace.

Shoddy arrangements?

Ahead of Mr. Gurjar’s ar- rival, the Noida police had claimed to have made special arrangements to ensure hassle-free rides for com- muters. Heavy police force was deployed on the flyway to avoid congestion.

Though policeman were present, no one allegedly stepped forward to control the menace

no one allegedly stepped forward to control the menace CHAOS: Big Boss Season 10 winner Manveer

CHAOS: Big Boss Season 10 winner Manveer Gurjar (in blue) being welcomed at Agahpur village in Noida; (right) fans clog the DND flyway on Tuesday.

PHOTOS: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

Superintendent of Police (Traic) Prabal Pratap Singh, however, said action would be taken against those who indulged in hooliganism. “Our team has video- graphed the people who were violating rules. We will identify them and take action.” Meanwhile, Mr.Gurjar was welcomed by his family and fans at the community centre in Agahpur village. Here, too, people were found openly drinking.

village. Here, too, people were found openly drinking. Surajkund mela kicks of today, 20 countries to

Surajkund mela kicks of today, 20 countries to participate

ASHOK KUMAR

FARIDABAD: More than 20 countries from Europe, Africa and South Asia will take part in the Surajkund Crafts Mela-2017 that begins here on Wednesday. Five of the countries— Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Tunisia, Mongolia and South Africa— will be coming to the mela for the first time. Speaking to the media at the Surajkund mela ground on Tuesday, V.S. Kundu, Vice-Chairperson, Surajkund Mela Authority, said buses would be available at ISBT Delhi, Shivaji Stadium, Gurgaon and Faridabad to ferry visitors back and forth to the mela.

Bus services available

Buses will also be available at the Tughlakabad and

Badarpur metro stations. Mr. Kundu said keeping pace with the Digital India Initiative, entry tickets to the mela would be available on online portal ‘bookmyshow’. Oline ticket counters at the mela ground have also been increased to avoid queues. With a view to ensure cashless transactions, Dena Bank, the oicial banker, has been asked to provide 100 POS machines, a bank branch with two ATMs, and six mobile ATM vans at the event. Further, Mobikwik has been roped in as a cashless wallet partner. Mr. Kundu said Wi-Fi facility would be made available at the mela through Bharat Sanchar Nigam Limited. Girl students of government and government-aided schools and colleges of Haryana will be given free

entry on weekdays as part of the Beti Bachao-Beti Padhao campaign of the Haryana government. Folk artistes from Egypt, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Seychelles, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan will be performing at the event. Besides that, a variety of dance forms such as Bhangra, Gidda and Badhai, among others, will be presented by artistes of the North Zone Cultural Centre and other zonal cultural centres.

States to portray culture

A family each from Haryana and Jharkhand will live in the specially- created ‘Apna Ghar’ to showcase the lifestyles of their States. To mark Haryana Swarna Jayanti celebrations, the ‘Apna Ghar’ of Haryana will display popular sports of the State, such as boxing and wrestling.

the ‘Apna Ghar’ of Haryana will display popular sports of the State, such as boxing and

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the ‘Apna Ghar’ of Haryana will display popular sports of the State, such as boxing and

NOIDA/DELHI

THE HINDU

NOIDA/DELHI THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 CITY | 3 DELHI Feb 01,Wed Feb 02,Thu Feb

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

CITY

| 3

DELHI Feb 01,Wed Feb 02,Thu Feb 03,Fri RISE 07 09 SET 18 01 RISE 07
DELHI
Feb 01,Wed
Feb 02,Thu
Feb 03,Fri
RISE
07 09
SET 18 01
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07 08
SET 18 02
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Six die in accidents due to fog
Tractor runs over girl
on her way to exam
Waiter charred to death
as fire breaks out in bar
Three died on Yamuna Expressway in a pile-up; at least 11 dead in two days
STAFF REPORTER
STAFF REPORTER
PURUSHARTH ARADHAK
GREATER NOIDA: Six persons lost
their lives and a dozen were
critically injured on Tuesday
in road accidents in Jewar
and Dankaur areas caused
due to dense fog. Three of the
six people died on the
Yamuna Expressway in a
vehicle pile-up. The incid-
ents come a day after five
men were killed in four dif-
ferent accidents in Dankaur
and Jewar, also due to dense
fog.
NEW DELHI: On her way to
school to attend practical ex-
aminations, a 17-year-old girl
was run over by a tractor
near her house in north-west
Delhi's Swaroop Nagar area
on Tuesday morning. After
hitting the girl, the driver of
the tractor, identified as
Praveen, fled the spot but
was later arrested.
According to the police,
the deceased, Khushboo, a
Class XI student in a govern-
ment school in Bhalswa
Dairy, was with friends when
the tractor carrying con-
struction material hit her.
NEW DELHI: A 24-year-old man
was charred to death and two
others, including a fireman,
sufered minor injuries after
gas pipeline, said the police,
adding that investigations are
on. A Delhi Fire Services oi-
cial said a call was made to
them around 2-30 p.m. from
Mirzaa hookah bar-cum-res-
a fire broke out in a hookah
bar-cum-restaurant situated
taurant located on the sixth
floor of Amba Tower in Ro-
in a multi-storey tower in Ro-
Khushboo
Gas leak suspected
Fatal pile-up
In the first incident, three
the driver allegedly dragged
the girl under the wheels of
the vehicle for a few metres
and abandoned the vehicle
before fleeing.
The victim’s friends told
the police that the vehicle
crushed her face and chest.
Bleeding profusely on the
road, one of the friends in-
formed the family who took
her to Babu Jag Jivan Ram
hospital. Her body was
handed over to her family
after post-mortem.
hini on Tuesday afternoon.
A senior police oicer said
that the deceased has been
identified as Kamal Kumar, a
resident of Rajapur area of
the city. He used to work as a
waiter in the restaurant.
The fire which sarted in
the kitchen is suspected to
have originated from an LPG
hini Sector 9 area following
which five fire tenders were
rushed to the spot.
“The entire building was
evacuated and the premises
cordoned of. There were
five LPG cylinders in the kit-
chen when the fire broke
out,” said M.N Tiwari,
Deputy Commissioner of Po-
lice (Rohini district). He ad-
ded that the owner is ab-
sconding after the incident.
persons died on Yamuna Ex-
pressway in a vehicle pile up
around 8 a.m near Jewar in-
terchange. One of the victims
was a cable operator, identi-
fied as Santosh Chaturvedi
(45), who was on his way
from Mathura to Ghaziabad
with his family.
Chaturvedi, his friend
Mukesh Babu Gupta (40) and
the Ibrahim (48), who was the
driver of the car they were
travelling in, were declared
after the police rushed them
to a nearby hospital.
Chaturvedi’s wife Rachna
Devi, daughter Yashavi and
son Yash have sufered severe
injuries. The family was
heading for passport renewal
Driver flees
CRUSHED: The truck that
collided with a tractor on
Sikandrabad Road; (right)
one of the vehicles that was
damaged in the pile-up.
The incident took place at
around 6:45am at the Burari
road outside D1 block, JJ
colony in Swaroop Nagar
area. After hitting Khushboo,
PHOTOS: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT
on Sikandrabad road, near
Sabota village, around 9 a.m.
The tractor driver Sazid,
helper Shakeel and other oc-
cupants Chetram, Jugender
and Santosh sufered severe
injuries. The accident led to a
massive traic jam.
Bus hits pedestrian
In another incident, 20-
year-old Rohtash died after
at the Ghaziabad passport of-
fice. The family hails from
Holi gate in Mathura.
In the second accident a
truck collided with a tractor
being hit by an unidentified
vehicle in Dankaur police sta-
tion area. He was returning
home when the incident took
place.
In a fourth accident on the
same day, a speeding bus hit a
45-year-old pedestrian iden-
tified as Munni Devi in
Dankaur area.
The victimdied on the
spot. Enraged locals damaged
the bus and thrashed the
driver and the conductor. In a
fifth accident, one Pradeep
and his friend Pramod were
heading home on a motor-
cycle in Rabupura in Greater
Noida when an unidentified
vehicle hit their bike. Pra-
deep died on the spot while
his friend is battling for his
life in a private hospital.
Audi accident: ‘driver’ surrenders, gets bail
PURUSHARTH ARADHAK
GHAZIABAD: A man appeared
before the Ghaziabad Chief
Judicial Magistrate court on
Tuesday, claiming to be the
driver of the Audi Q7 that
The police said they
will probe if the
doctor, who is the
car’s owner, was
behind the wheel
rammed an auto at In-
dirapuram, killing four. The
ing that he was driving the car,
accused is one Ishaq Ahmed
from Hafizganj, Bareilly and
he has received bail from the
court.
Ahmed, who hails from
Labhera village under the
Hafizganj police station in
Bareilly, submitted a sur-
render application through
his lawyer on Monday. In his
surrender application, he
claimed he was driving the
car in question and wished to
surrender, while also submit-
ting a bail application.
“As he has forwarded his
surrender application, claim-
he now becomes an accused.
Any suspicion on the car
owner Dr. Manish Rawat is
now over. We will, h owever,
carry out further investiga-
tion in the case,” said P.K Tri-
pathi, Indirapuram station
house oicer.
its investigation yet. We will
also investigate, either
Ahmed was driving the SUV
or some other person was
driving it.”
The family of the victims
lodged a police complaint and
an FIR was registered under
sections 279 (rash driving),
304a (causing death by negli-
gence) and 427 (causing dam-
ages) of the Indian Penal
Code at Indirapuram police
station. Unidentified persons
were named in the FIR.
Doctor unreachable
Protecting owner?
When asked if there was a
possibility that Ahmed has
been used as front to protect
the owner who, according to
reports, is a doctor at Safdar-
jung hospital, the oicer said:
“The police have not closed
In the incident, four people,
including a woman techie and
the autorickshaw driver, were
killed when the high-end SUV
rammed their auto at In-
dirapuram on a narrow road
that runs parallel to the
Hindon canal. Police identi-
fied the auto driver by his first
name, Sanjeev (25).
The others were identified
as Yajuvendra Singh Sengar
(40), his cousin Vishal Singh
(25), and their family friend
Rinku Yadav (38), who
worked with HCL in Noida.
All hail from Kanpur in Uttar
Pradesh. Vishal had come to
appear for a job interview, the
police said.
Following the incident, the
police had seized the SUV as
the occupants fled the spot.
After an investigation, the po-
lice claimed that the car was
registered in the name of one
Manish Rawat, a doctor with
Safdarjung Hospital’s neuro-
logy department in Delhi.
However, a couple of days
into the investigation, the po-
lice failed to reach Rawat,
who could have given clues
about the occupants of the car
on the night of the incident.
Woman ‘raped’
in Amar Colony
DELHI TODAY
STAFF REPORTER
Talk: `Writing Resistance: The rhet-
orical imagination of Hindi Dalit liter-
ature’ - a discussion on Laura R.
Brueck's book in the series South Asia
Across the Disciplines. Discussants:
NEW DELHI: A 21-year-old wo-
man has accused three per-
sons, including a friend of
hers, of raping her inside a
moving car in south-east
Delhi's Amar Colony on
Monday. All three accused
have been arrested, said the
police.
The accused are in their
20s and have been identified
as as Arif, Vijay and Mehar-
ban. “The incident came to
light late on Monday when
the woman made a call to the
police control room and in-
formed us that after she was
raped, they dumped her near
Garhi village,” the oicer
added.
Prof. Harish Trivedi, Formerly Pro-
fessor of English, University of Delhi;
Prof. Apoorvanand, Department of
Hindi, University of Delhi; and Prof.
Ajay Navaria, Department of Hindi,
Jamia Millia Islamia. Guest of Honour:
Job interview
Prof. Puroshottam Agrawal, Pro-
fessor of Eminence, ITM University,
Gwalior at Seminar Rooms II & III,
Kamaladevi Complex, India Interna-
tional Centre, 6 p.m.
Talk: Reminiscences of Bharat
Bhawan: `In the light of others’ Ashok
Vajpeyi will speak about his reminis-
cences. , India International Centre,
6:30 p.m.
Talk: "About Song of Surrender" lec-
ture by Dr. Gowri Ramnarayan, a trib-
ute to Bharat Ratna Dr. M. S.
Subbulakshmi at Lecture Hall, Indira
Gandhi National Centre for the Arts,
11, Mansingh Road, 4 p.m.
Music and Talk: The richness and
subtleties of the Gwalior Gharana
Lecture and Demonstration by
Hindustani Classical Vocalist Meeta
Pandit
(Mail your listings for this column
at cityeditordelhi@thehindu.co.in)
In her statement provided
to the police later, the victim
said that she is from
Jharkhand and had moved to
Delhi a month ago to look for
a job. She stayed in Tugh-
lakabad village in a rented
accommodation and met
Arif near her home. He later
got her into the car on the
pretext of a job interview and
raped her, while his friend
was driving, added the po-
lice.
Disclaimer: Readers are requested to verify &
make appropriate enquiries to satisfy
themselves about the veracity of an adver-
tisement before responding to any published in
this newspaper. Kasturi & Sons Limited, the
Publisher & Owner of this newspaper, does not
vouch for the authenticity of any advertisement
or advertiser or for any of the advertiser’s pro-
ducts and/or services. In no event can the
Owner, Publisher, Printer, Editor, Director/s,
Employees of this newspaper/company be held
responsible/liable in any manner whatsoever for
any claims and/or damages for advertisements
in this newspaper.

Published by N. Ram at Kasturi Buildings, 859 & 860, Anna Salai, Chennai-600002 and Printed by S. Ramanujam at HT Media Ltd. Plot No. 8, Udyog Vihar, Greater Noida Distt. Gautam Budh Nagar, U.P. 201306, on behalf of KASTURI & SONS LTD., Chennai-600002. Editor: Mukund Padmanabhan (Responsible for selection of news under the PRB Act).

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LTD., Chennai-600002. Editor: Mukund Padmanabhan (Responsible for selection of news under the PRB Act). C M

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CITY

THE HINDU

4 | CITY THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Delhi sufers as AAP Ministers busy

NOIDA/DELHI

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

4 | CITY THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Delhi sufers as AAP Ministers busy

Delhi sufers as AAP Ministers busy in Punjab

Officials say meetings have been re-scheduled and work has halted; situation may continue till elections end

MARIA AKRAM

NEW DELHI: With Punjab going to elections on February 4, five of the six Cabinet Minis- ters of the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government are out of the city. Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal has been in Punjab for most of January, while his deputy Manish Sisodia and other Ministers are also cam- paigning for the AAP in the State.

Focus on polls

Health and Home Minister Satyendar Jain is out of the country to attend a health conference, said his oice staf. Water and Tourism Minister Kapil Mishra was in the city on Monday, but was back in Punjab on Tuesday. Only the Environment Min- ister Imran Hussain is in the city. Many AAP MLAs are also campaigning in Punjab and Goa for the party in the upcoming elections.

‘No work being done’

As per the oicials in the Delhi government, the meet- ings are re-scheduled and work has come to a halt. “The Ministers are away. We cannot say if governance is hit, but work has come to a halt as most of them are out. And the situation will con- tinue till the elections are over. This week the ‘govern- ment’ is taking it easy,” said an oicial. Another oicial said that the governance in Delhi is af- fected for the past one month and the tussle between the Lieutenant-Governor and the CM proved to be a ‘con-

the Lieutenant-Governor and the CM proved to be a ‘con- PRIORITY SHIFT: Delhi Chief Minister Arvind

PRIORITY SHIFT: Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal rallying in Amritsar on Tuesday. He has been in Punjab for most of January. PHOTO: PTI

He has been in Punjab for most of January. PHOTO: PTI venient’ excuse and gave time

venient’ excuse and gave time to the Ministers to cam- paign in other States. “Work isn’t taking place. Only the education depart- ment has work. Setting up of

mohalla clinics has also stopped as the former L-G Najeeb Jung raised objec- tions. Overall, no work is tak- ing place in the government,” said the oicial.

The Opposition has also slammed the AAP govern- ment for leaving Delhi and campaigning in other States.

Civic elections next

The Leader of the Opposi- tion in the Delhi Assembly Vijender Gupta had said that while Delhi is in the midst of various “problems” related to school admission, public transport, pollution, hospit- als and ration cards, the whole Cabinet was busy campaigning for elections. With the Delhi civic polls slated in April this year, it is expected that the AAP will start campaigning across wards but the MLAs, accom- panied by volunteers, are spending time in Punjab. The Aam Aadmi Party is yet to finalise its candidates for the civic polls while other parties have already started surveying and campaigning in the city. “We cannot decide on can- didates right now till the Election Commission doesn’t declare, which seats are reserved,” said a senior party member.

Petition in HC against pre-election freebies

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: The Delhi High Court on Tuesday declined to grant urgent hearing on a petition seeking directions to restrain all political parties from making promises of freebies if they are voted to power. A Bench headed by Justice B. D. Ahmed refused to grant urgent hearing as it also sought to know from the peti- tioner how the issue was rel- evant for Delhi at this point in time when elections are go- ing to be held in Uttar Pra- desh, Punjab, Uttarakhand, Goa and Manipur. “Why don’t you go and file your petition in the Alla- habad High Court,” the court asked the petitioner.

The petitioner has sought direction to the Election Commission of India (ECI) to restrain all political parties from ofering or distributing freebies ahead of the As- sembly elections in the five States, scheduled to be held in February and March.

Common feature

The petition alleged that the ofering of freebies to people by political parties, if they are voted to power, has become a common feature during elections. The peti- tion has said that the ECI has not taken any necessary steps to stop political parties in the upcoming Assembly elec- tions from distributing such freebies at the expense of the government exchequer.

Jain in Bangkok for health conference

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: Health Minister Satyendar Jain will present the Delhi government’s health model, including its mohalla clinics concept, at a three-day international con- ference in Bangkok begin- ning on Wednesday. The conference is being jointly organised by the World Health Organization, the World Bank, and the

Rockefeller Foundation, in association with the Thail- and government. Nobel laureate and noted economist Amartya Sen will also be briefed during the conference about the initiat- ives taken by the Delhi gov- ernment for the improve- ment of the health sector, particularly its emphasis on afordable health care facilit- ies for disadvantaged and marginalised groups.

Will focus on digitisation, women’s safety: Patnaik

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: Amulya Patnaik formally took charge as Commissioner of the Delhi Police on Tuesday and said his focus will be on digitising the functioning of the force, ensuring women’s safety and “reaching out to people from all sections of the society”. In two separate but brief interactive sessions with the media, Mr. Patnaik steered clear of controversial topics such as Sunanda Pushkar murder and Najeeb Ahmed’s disappearance. Also his response to issue of the Delhi Police and the Aam Aadmi Party’s (AAP) frequent face-ofs over a host of issues and the future of this relationship was a con- cise: “It’s been fine all along”.

Cyber crime

Mr. Patnaik did not unveil any strategy relating to how he would pursue his priorit- ies, i.e. whether there would be more apps launched, a key feature of the round one of digitisation. “I won't be able to spell it out at the moment but we have many schemes that have been digitised and we will see what other schemes can be digitised for the people,” said Mr. Patnaik.

can be digitised for the people,” said Mr. Patnaik. CHANGE OF GUARD: Outgoing Delhi Police Commissioner
can be digitised for the people,” said Mr. Patnaik. CHANGE OF GUARD: Outgoing Delhi Police Commissioner

CHANGE OF GUARD: Outgoing Delhi Police Commissioner Alok Kumar Verma (right) welcomes the new top cop Amulya Patnaik; Katrina, the “Delhi Police cat” who has made the second-floor office of the Police Commissioner its home, in attendance at the ceremony on Tuesday.PHOTOS: SUSHIL KUMAR VERMA

He, however, complimen- ted the Cyber Cell of Delhi Police saying it was “already doing a great job” and that further training would be provided to cops in the post- demonetisation scenario where people were more vulnerable to cyber frauds. He said that steps have been taken to ensure there

are cyber units at district level and added that more people will be trained on how to tackle cyber crimes. “We are in the process of training a lot of people on cy- ber crime and cyber of- fences, how to investigate them and that process will continue,” said Mr. Patnaik. Digitisation of the Delhi

Police was boosted during the tenure of B.S. Bassi, but little progress was made dur- ing the tenure of the outgo- ing Alok Kumar Verma.

Women’s safety

Chalking out his other pri- orities for the force in the coming days, ensuring wo- men’s safety and “reaching

out to people from all sec- tions of the society", some- thing he said was continuing. Mr. Patnaik credited his predecessor by saying that street crimes in the Capital have come down in the re- cent past and said that they hoped to build on the same. In his farewell speech, Mr. Verma stressed on this as-

pect and reminded how the street crime had come down in the past year. “Women’s safety will al- ways remain a priority. Safety of children and senior citizens will remain an area of priority. We will do our best to further see how wo- men in the city can feel safer," said Mr. Patnaik.

Cong ‘chargesheet’ against Kejriwal govt

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: Gearing up its cam- paign ahead of the municipal polls, the Delhi Congress on Tuesday held a convention of block-level party oicials and released a ‘charge sheet’ against the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government. Speaking at the event, Delhi Pradesh Congress Committee president Ajay Maken said that Delhiites were tired of the “misrule” of the BJP in the municipal cor- porations during the past 10 years and of the AAP in the government for two years.

Allegations of corruption

According to the booklet, which is titled ‘Kejriwal Ka Brashtachar, Mauj Kare Rishtedar’, the Congress laid out several allegations of cor- ruption surrounding Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal. The booklet will be handed out in a door-to-door cam- paign, with another booklet on the performance of the BJP in the municipal corpora- tions to be released soon. While the election dates

corpora- tions to be released soon. While the election dates Booklet released by the Delhi Congress

Booklet released by the Delhi Congress on Tuesday.

PHOTO: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

have not been announced yet, the Delhi Congress is already getting ready for the three- way fight. The AAP will be contesting the civic polls for the first time, though the party had fielded candidates in the by- polls to 13 wards last year. Of the 13 wards, the AAP and the Congress won five each, with BJP taking just three seats.

Oppn blames BJP for not using civic funds

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: In the last budget session of the current term, the Opposition Congress on Tuesday hit out against the BJP-ruled South Delhi Muni- cipal Corporation (SDMC) for failing to spend money it allocated for basic amenities and development works. Accusing the SDMC of “misrepresenting its finan- cial position”, the Leader of the Opposition Farhad Suri told a special budget session of the House that the corpor- ation was depicting a “rosy picture” when in fact it still owed hundreds of crores of rupees in the form of loans and arrears. “The corporation claims it has a ₨1,500 crore surplus, but it also owes ₨516 crore to the Delhi government, ₨120 crore as pensions, ₨580 crore as arrears to sanitation work- ers and over ₨300 crore as per the Seventh Pay Com- mission,” said Mr. Suri. This would impact the fu- ture funding of the South

Delhi Municipal Corpora- tion since the Delhi govern- ment would take into ac- count the comparatively better financial situation of the corporation before alloc- ating resources, said Mr. Suri

Reduced share

As per the Fourth Delhi Finance Commission, the SDMC would get a reduced share of funds compared to the north and east Delhi civic bodies, which have publicly acknowledged their finan- cial crisis, since it claims to be in “surplus”, said Mr. Suri. Funds going unused in key sectors, including health, education and sanitation, proved the “incompetence of the BJP-ruled administra- tion”, said Mr. Suri On pending payments of arrears to safai karamcharis and pensions to social wel- fare scheme beneficiaries, Mr. Suri said that if the final budget presented later this month did not give a definite time frame for the payments, the Congress would protest.

time frame for the payments, the Congress would protest. Illegal structures near Birla Mandir demolished S

Illegal structures near Birla Mandir demolished

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: The Delhi govern- ment on Tuesday informed the National Green Tribunal (NGT) that it has demol- ished illegal structures in the Central Ridge area near the Birla temple. “In compliance with the direction of the NGT, de- molition was carried out in- side 7.5 acres of Ridge land on January 4. The structures demolished included a prac- hin mahamai temple along with two platforms and four jhuggis,” the report read.

Service road

The service road running parallel to Birla Mandir was spared as the representative of the Land and Develop- ment Oice contended that the street was part of the temple and should not be de- molished, it read. The Bench was hearing an execution petition filed by the petitioner seeking imple- mentation of the Tribunal’s March 3, 2015 order directing the demolition of the illegal

March 3, 2015 order directing the demolition of the illegal CLEARED AWAY: A small religious structure,

CLEARED AWAY: A small religious structure, two platforms and four

jhuggis were demolished. FILE PHOTO: SHIV KUMAR PUSHPAKAR

Service road parallel to Birla Mandir spared as it was contended that it’s a part of the temple

structures. The Delhi government also told the Bench that to prevent any re-encroach- ment of the area, a boundary

wall was essential but the work could not be started due to intervention by the temple management, which is claiming that the area was allotted to them for a service road. The NGT has directed the Delhi government to con- struct the boundary wall at the earliest and file a status report by March 6, the next date of hearing.

Donation in banned notes stumps govt

BINDU SHAJAN PERAPPADAN

NEW DELHI: The Vigilance De- partment of the Delhi gov- ernment is facing a peculiar situation after it received ₨23,500 in demonetised notes from the dean of a top med- ical college, who got the money by post from an un- known donor who meant to give the cash to the Prime Minister’s National Relief Fund (PMNRF). A packet containing the banned notes had come to Deepak K. Tempe, dean of Maulana Azad Medical Col- lege (MAMC). It was clearly written on the packet that the money was meant for the PMNRF, Delhi government sources said.

Searching for next step

Mr. Tempe sent the packet to the Vigilance Department along with a letter saying there’s is something “fishy” about the packet, which con- tained two envelops, one of which had the scrapped notes. The department then apprised and consulted the

Officials say donor was likely unable to exchange the old notes and decided to give it to PM’s fund

Accounts Section of the Fin- ance Department on how to deal with the case. Oicial sources said that the department is likely to give its opinion in the next two to three days. Oicials suspect that the donor might not have been able to exchange the ₨23,500 and that’s why it was donated to the PMNRF.

Final call

“The Accounts Section will take a final call on whether the amount should be handed over to the police or donated to the PMNRF or deposited in the govern- ment’s bank accounts,” said sources, adding: “The amount of ₨23,500 received was in 11 scrapped ₨1,000 notes and the rest in ₨500 de- monetised notes.”

HC notice to govt on details of trees felled for projects

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: The High Court on Tuesday asked the Delhi gov- ernment as to why it has not complied with an order of the Central Information Com- mission (CIC) asking it to fur- nish details about the number of trees felled for each devel- opment project in the city. Justice Sanjeev Sachdeva issued a notice to the Delhi government while listing the matter for March 3. The court issued the no- tices on a plea seeking imple- mentation of the August 5, 2011 order of the CIC.

RTI application

The petitioner claimed that in 2013 he had sought to know the status of the imple- mentation of the CIC order by filing an application under the RTI Act and was told that the order could not be imple- mented as the same was not traceable following an incid- ent of fire in April 2012. The department, however, had said that all concerned di- visions have been asked to

had said that all concerned di- visions have been asked to GREEN COUNT: Departments were supposed

GREEN COUNT: Departments were supposed to publish on their websites the number of trees felled for various development

projects. FILE PHOTO: SUSHIL KUMAR VERMA

comply with the order of the CIC. Thereafter, in 2015 when the petitioner again sought to know the status, he was told that the divisional oice has not received the CIC order. The petitioner claimed that while the environment in the city is being destroyed, the authorities were main- taining a “lackadaisical atti- tude” by “wilfully disobey- ing” the order of the CIC.

In detail

The CIC, in its order, had directed each department to publish the environmental cost, including number of

trees felled, of their projects along with details of com- pensatory plantations on their respective websites. Details of permissions given for felling and pruning trees along with applicant de- tails, number of trees, reasons for approval and location, among others were also to be displayed. As per the petition, the de- partments also had to display the “number of complaints received on the tree helpline, number of trees cut, location of the tress, status of com- plaint and status of prosecu- tion undertaken, if any”.

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trees cut, location of the tress, status of com- plaint and status of prosecu- tion undertaken,

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trees cut, location of the tress, status of com- plaint and status of prosecu- tion undertaken,

NOIDA/DELHI

THE HINDU

NOIDA/DELHI THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 CITY/STATE | 5 Alcohometer not 100% accurate, says court

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

CITY/STATE

| 5

THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 CITY/STATE | 5 Alcohometer not 100% accurate, says court Acquits

Alcohometer not 100% accurate, says court

Acquits a man who was sentenced to six-day imprisonment in a drunken driving case, questions absence of certificates

NIRNIMESH KUMAR

NEW DELHI: Raising doubts over the eicacy of the alco- hometer and the ability of the police oicers to operate it, a Delhi court has set aside six-day simple imprison- ment of a man in a drunken driving case. The appellant, Ganga Singh, had challenged a Met- ropolitan Magistrate order holding him guilty of drunk driving. The breath analyser reading said that alcohol content in the appellant’s body was 199.2mg per 100 ml of blood. Challenging the order, the counsel for the appellant submitted, among other things, that no certificate re- garding accuracy and proper functioning of the alco- hometer in question was produced and proved on re- cord by the prosecution. Hence, it was not fair on the part of the trial court to rely on the reading of the breath analyser.

No certificate on training

Though the oicer who had put the alcohometer to the appellant’s mouth for test told in his cross-examin- ation that he was imparted training for its operation, he

ation that he was imparted training for its operation, he failed to place on record any

failed to place on record any certificate issued by any au- thority in this regard. The oicer also failed to state what was the outside limit of reading of an alco- hometer. Further, the court also noted that the police did not take the appellant to a hospital to ascertain the al- cohol content in his blood. “It is not the case of the prosecution at all that any certificate regarding the al- cohometer’s functionality was obtained or proved on record. It is also not the case

of the prosecuting agency that the alcohometer used in this case was ISI marked. This material fact raises the question mark on the au- thenticity and genuineness of the readings procured form the said alcohometer in the absence of production of any certificate of accuracy of reading carried out by it, par- ticularly when its functional- ity was not at all established by the investigating agency,” Additional Sessions Judge Lokesh Kumar Sharma said rejecting the reading of the

device.

Margin of error

It is a matter of common knowledge that every elec- tronic device, be it an alco- hometer or a glucometer, does not give 100% accurate reading/result. The margin of error varying from 10 to 20% is bound to occur and, hence 100% accuracy cannot be procured from such devices,’’ the Judge observed. “Accordingly, the judg- ment of conviction and con-

“Accordingly, the judg- ment of conviction and con- BENEFIT OF DOUBT: The court said that 10

BENEFIT OF DOUBT: The court said that 10 to 20% error is bound to occur in electronic devices like alcohometer and

glucometer. FILE PHOTO: SUSHIL KUMAR VERMA

sequent order on sentence are hereby set aside and the appellant is set at liberty,” the Judge said.

Matter of concern

The accuracy of the alco- hometer has been a matter of concern. Prince Singhal from Community Against Drunk Driving (CADD) said there is a need to get new and

portable devices as many of the devices used by traic police in Delhi and else- where do not provide the correct reading. He also said that during the anti-drunken driving drives that CADD had been a part of, it was observed that policemen were not well trained to deal with the device.

Not Statehood, want more powers: Delhi govt. to SC

NEW DELHI: The Delhi govern- ment on Tuesday told the Su- preme Court that it was not seeking full Statehood for Delhi but more administrat- ive powers, contending that a “democratically elected gov- ernment cannot be subservi- ent to the Lieutenant-Gov- ernor”. Making a case for more ad- ministrative powers without the shadow of the L-G hanging over it, the Arvind Kejriwal government told a Bench of Justice A.K. Sikri and Justice R.K. Agrawal, “it is inconceivable that in a Cabinet form of government, you have a titular head who is not accountable but inter- poses himself on every de- cision”. The observations were made by the Delhi govern- ment’s counsel during the hearing of its pleas, which challenged the Delhi High Court verdict upholding the primacy of the L-G in Delhi’s governance.

Nullification of decision

Telling the court that the L-G can always remand back a decision by Delhi’s Council of Ministers for reconsidera- tion, senior counsel Gopal Subramaniam said the ques- tion was “whether in the ex- ercise of his discretion, he can nullify a decision of the

Council of Ministers”. Referring to the constitu- tional provisions and that of the Government of the Na- tional Capital Territory of Delhi Act, 1991, Mr. Sub- ramaniam asked if the L-G could interpose himself on every decision and if a Coun- cil of Ministers of a demo- cratically elected govern- ment can only aid and advise him and that too was not binding. Pointing to the dichotomy of the situation, the counsel said that there was a legis- lature under the Representa- tion of People Act that came into being through direct elections and has a Chief Minister appointed by the President, but the decisions by this government can be eclipsed by the L-G“who is not answerable to anyone”. “Would there be a situ- ation where the Chief Minis- ter will tell the legislature that his government did take decisions but the same were vetoed by the L-G?” Referring to the constitu- tional provisions that the President or the Governors were bound by the aid and advice of the Council of Min- isters, Mr. Subramaniam wondered aloud: “Can the L-G have powers higher than those exercised by the Governors?”—IANS

JNUSU pulled up for ‘disrupting’ meeting

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: The Jawaharlal Nehru University Students’ Union was on Tuesday pulled up by the Registrar for allegedly disrupting a meeting related to an admission policy at the university. The union members were0 protesting outside a Standing Committee meeting as a part of the ongoing hunger strike being organised on the campus against a notification of the University Grants Commission that seeks to change the admission criteria for M.Phil and Ph.D courses.

‘Violent behaviour ‘

“By their violent behaviour, a group of about 50 JNU students are damaging the future of thousands of socially and economically poor students,” JNU Registrar Pramod Kumar said. Mr. Kumar added that

the students concerned had gone against the university’s ethos of free and frank discussion and resorted to violent means to push their demands. The students, however, said they had only shouted slogans and not resorted to any violent means. They said the meeting had to be adjourned after the protests as the detailed agenda had not been sent before to the members.

Students determined

Meanwhile, the general secretary of the union, Satarupa Chakraborty, congratulated the students for putting up the resistance. She added that the students had to ensure that the university’s admission policy was not tampered with and that the UGC gazette was rolled back.

Councillor blames PWD for clogged drains

STAFF REPORTER

Tenant to pay ₨1 lakh fine for ‘frivolous’ appeal

STAFF REPORTER

NEW DELHI: The Delhi High Court has slapped a fine of ₨1 lakh on a woman for filing a frivolous appeal against eviction to continue her stay in a rented premises. The cost will be paid to the landlord. The woman had sought injunction from forcible eviction from the tenanted premises and challenged the demands for payment of arrears of rent by claiming that though the rent receipt showed ₨11,500, the actual rent was just ₨3,500. “It is seen that the

appellant (tenant) deliberately filed this frivolous appeal and dragged the litigation just to continue to remain in possession. It is further seen that the present litigation is a clear case of abuse of the process of law. Despite the appellant not leading any oral or documentary evidence to prove the rate of rent to be below ₨3,500 per month, has chosen to file this second appeal,” Justice Pratibha Rani noted. “Therefore, in my opinion, the present is a fit case where while dismissing this second

appeal the appellant be also burdened with exemplary cost. The appeal is dismissed with costs of ₨1 lakh payable to the respondent [landlord],” the Bench ordered.

Notice to vacate property

The woman was inducted as tenant in the 2nd floor of the property at Tagore Park in July 2005 by one Mukesh, initially for a period of 11 months on a rent of ₨10,500 per month. The rent was subsequently increased to ₨11,500 per month from August 1, 2008. The landlord passed away in September 2009, leaving

behind a will in favour of his son (respondent) bequeathing the property to him. The son served a notice to the woman in December 2009, terminating her tenancy, but neither did she vacate the premises, nor cleared the arrears of rent.

No evidence

A suit was initiated against the woman for recovery of possession, rent and damages. She claimed that the respondent is not the owner of property, but never provided any

evidence substantiate her claim. The woman also filed a suit for permanent injunction in 2009 against forcible eviction wherein she claimed that she had put signatures on the rent agreement under compelling circumstances, but again gave no evidence. The court rejected her claim that the rent she was paying was much lower than the amount shown on the rent receipt. The court said since rent is taxable income, no landlord would show a higher amount in the receipt.

NEW DELHI: Drains maintained by the Delhi government’s Public Works Department along Rohtak Road till Tikri Kalan were found to be blocked, leading to insanit- ary conditions in the area, said Azad Singh, North Delhi Municipal Corporation’s former Mayor and Mundka councillor Azad Singh.

‘Unhygienic conditions’

Mr. Singh, along with top Engineering Department of- ficials, carried out an inspec- tion on Tuesday. He said the team found that the choked drains of the PWD were leading to unhygienic condi- tions as the drains of nearby colonies, including Swarn Park, Rajdhani Park, Hari Das Colony and Lekha Ram Park, spilled over on to the road. According to Mr. Singh, a part of the drain near Metro pillar number 569 was covered by the DMRC. He said the arrangements made were inadequate as water was not diverted properly.

Witness in murder case shot at STAFF REPORTER NEW DELHI: A 25-year-old man, witness in
Witness in murder
case shot at
STAFF REPORTER
NEW DELHI: A 25-year-old man,
witness in a murder case, is
critical after he was shot at in
outer Delhi’s Sultanpuri on
Monday night.
The victim, identified as
Sidhartha Sharma, had wit-
nessed the murder of a wo-
man in Mangolpuri in March
last year, said the police.
Victim threatened
His family members told
the police that Sharma was
being pressurised to with-
draw his statement.
He, however, had refused
to succumb to the threats
and had even gone to a court
in Rohini on Monday
morning.
A few hours later, he was
shot at four times outside his
home in Krishna Vihar.
The police said they had
identified the accused based
on CCTV footage, and were
conducting raids at their
possible hideouts.
The police also detained a
few suspects on Tuesday.

CM

YK

were conducting raids at their possible hideouts. The police also detained a few suspects on Tuesday.

ND-ND

were conducting raids at their possible hideouts. The police also detained a few suspects on Tuesday.

6

|

STATE

THE HINDU

6 | STATE THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik-

NOIDA/DELHI

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi
DEATH DEATH BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi

DEATH

DEATH

BRIMMHASRI A. Athvarapathi Dhik- shithar, 70, S/o. S. Anjaneya Dhik- shithar attained Sivalogaprapthi on 31.1.17. Cremation on 1.2.17 at Sengalipuram. Dasasthu on 10.2.17. Mob.9444006418 / 9443716175 V.N. SESHADRI (90), Retired Branch Manager, The Hindu, Madurai, passed away on 30−01−2017.Address:

14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.

away on 30−01−2017.Address: 14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.
away on 30−01−2017.Address: 14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.
   
   
 
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      
14/56, Vasanth Apts, First Main Road, R.A. Puram, Chennai−600028. Phone: 9840953950.      

400 schools in ‘Voice of Unity’

STAFF REPORTER

GURUGRAM: As many as 51,000 students from 400 schools in Gurugram and surrounding areas on Tuesday cre- ated history by singing the national song ‘Vande Matram’ in one voice at the ‘Voice of Unity’ programme or- ganised by Hindu Spiritual and Ser- vice Foundation at Tau Devi Lal Sta- dium here. Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar was the chief guest on the occasion. The ‘Voice of Unity’ program was a preface to the four

day Hindu Spiritual and Service Fair being held from Feb 2-5 at Leisure Valley grounds of Gurugram. The students danced to the tune of songs sung by noted Bollywood Singer Palash Sen with his Euphoria Band team. The program began with the chanting of ‘mantras’ and ended with singing of national song “Vande Matram”. Highlighting the history and im- portance of the National Song and the National Anthem, Mr. Khattar exhorted the people to always work for the welfare of the country.

the people to always work for the welfare of the country. Security concern as student walks

Security concern as student walks out of SDMC school

School inspector asks principal, guard to explain ‘negligence’

DAMINI NATH

clude instructions to principals to make “gate registers for visitors” and to ensure that no students were left on the premises after working hours.

NEW DELHI: On the morning of December 19, 2016, a Class V stu- dent of a South Delhi Municipal Corporation primary school in west Delhi entered her classroom, put down her bag, removed the uni- form she was wearing to reveal a layer of clothes underneath and simply walked out of the school. The class teacher discovered this while taking the morning attend- ance of students but the school ap- proached the police at about 3 p.m. as per a report of the school in- spector. According to the com- plaint filed by the school’s principal at the Khyala Police Station, the child had told a classmate that she was going to an aunt’s house. While she remained missing all day, her family was distressed and the po- lice were on their toes. After having been missing for al-

lice were on their toes. After having been missing for al- NO OVERSIGHT: SDMC has now

NO OVERSIGHT: SDMC has now issued guidelines to ensure safety of students. FILE PHOTO

to ensure safety of students. F I L E P H O T O This incident

This incident once again shows that the promises of deployment of female security staff and CCTV cameras have not been fulfilled

most a day, she was found late at night by the police near India Gate, roaming around seemingly un- harmed. Her parents told the school inspector the next day that she had left on her own and had been angry at her mother. The school inspector asked the prin- cipal, class teacher and the security guard of the school to explain their “negligence”. As per the December 20 letter, they were given two days to respond.

Guidelines for schools

Almost a month later, on January 17, SDMC Commissioner Puneet Kumar Goel issued a general guideline to school principals to ensure the safety of students. While the guideline focused on making school infrastructure safe, it did in-

Opposition takes up issue

“It should also be ensured that on the gates, duty at the time of recess and dispersal of students be as- signed to teachers,” said the guideline. However, the incident and its aftermath don’t seem to have changed much when it comes to the primary schools of the SDMC. Farhad Suri, the Leader of the Opposition in the SDMC, on Tuesday highlighted the issue dur- ing a meeting of the House, saying that the infrastructure of schools left a lot to be desired. “This incident once again shows that the promises of deployment of female security staf and CCTV cameras have not been fulfilled. It shows the general apathy of the staf,” said Mr. Suri. The Leader of the House, Subhash Arya, dis- missed the claims saying that though there were certain flaws, the education services provided by the SDMC had improved. “It’s not right for us to comment on the girl and this one incident. Yes, learning outcomes need to im- prove, but to say that our schools are bad is incorrect,” said Mr. Arya.

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HRD & ADMN

THE OOTACAMUND CLUB − Applications are invited for the post of SECRE- TARY of the club. The candidate must have an impressive track record in general administration,

a working knowledge of computers,

a flair for hospitality and excel-

lent interpersonal skills. A hus- band and wife team may add value

to the job. Please apply in confi-

dence, before 15/02/2017,with Pho- tograph and complete bio data of the applicant and spouse by email

to ootacamundclubooty@gmail.com

PERSONAL

LOST & FOUND

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no.6253630) issued by CBSE have been lost as of 29.01.17. Sama Haq, 2315 Hudson Lines, Kingsway

NOIDA/DELHI

THE HINDU

NOIDA/DELHI THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 | 7 F O R J O B L

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

|

7

NOIDA/DELHI THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 | 7 F O R J O B L

F O R

J O B

L I S T I N G S

&

A R T I C L E S ,

V I S I T

w w w . t h e h i n d u . c o m / j o b s

L E S , V I S I T w w w . t h e

Illustration: K.B. Jawaharr

between the professional and the personal cannot be avoided. Can waves be sep- arated from the sea? To a considerable degree, our ca- reers define where we live,

Be your child’s first career guide

Parents have to present a palette of career options and let their children make the choice

how healthy we are and they also largely define the con- tours of our social life. It’s for this reason that when we meet someone for the first time, we are asked first up, what we do. Given this, shouldn’t parents keep themselves abreast of the latest and emerging career options and share these with their children, and how each of these choices will impact their lives. “Parents should place a palette of career op- tions before the children, but have to be open to their suggestions being rejected. When this happens, they have to accept their child’s choice, even if they are aware that it’s likely to lead down a cul-de-sac. Why should we fear fail- ure? Isn’t failure a part of life too? Some people change four to five careers before finding their true calling. Going through the struggle of making diferent careers work and then finding what suits them absolutely can provide rich learning,” says Kesang Menezes, certified parent educator, Parenting Matters.

The lines between exist- ing specialisations have blurred too. While this may appear to be a stumbling block, it is actually a liberat- ing situation. It’s an invita- tion for youngsters, espe- cially millennials, to place purpose ahead of profes- sion. If they find a worthy purpose to work for, they can find the skills and ac- quire the specialisations that are necessary to drive this purpose. They are not focussed on specialisations, but on the purpose, and this will spare them the frustration of see- ing some of their acquired skills becoming redundant and also provide them with the motivation to keep up- dating their skill sets. Par- ents have to help their chil- dren find that larger purpose.

PRINCE FREDERICK

“I t’s up to my children

what they want to do.”

Doesn’t this sound

dull, on account of overuse. You have probably heard

it said many a time. At some point of your parenting jour- ney, you probably said it yourself, haven’t you? On the face of it, this posi- tion looks lofty. A non-inter- fering parent standing on

the sidelines and watching the children stride down a career path they hewed out themselves. But often, it’s a thin line that divides non-interfer- ence and irresponsibility.

Shoving career opinions down one’s children throats and guiding them to form opinions about career op- tions are two things. Parents have to play a guiding role, and not doing

of

responsibility.

Careers make a life

Choosing a career path has implications for one’s entire life. An interplay

so

is

abdication

People’s skills Being purpose-driven Parents want their chil- dren to find that dream pro- fession,
People’s skills
Being purpose-driven
Parents want their chil-
dren to find that dream pro-
fession, but a more sensible
approach would be wanting
and enabling them to find a
larger purpose, which will
define the course their ca-
reers would take. Career
choices were fewer in the
past. Professions came
clearly etched, and could be
easily diferentiated from
one another.
Not any more. A raft of
new specialisations have
entered the job market, and
newer ones are muscling
their way in every year. At
the same time, what was
new only yesterday is be-
coming redundant.
It’s being increasingly re-
cognised that some work-
place problems may have
their roots at home. These
problems have to do with
people’s skills — the lack of
them, actually. Though tech-
nology is redefining most
functions in the corporate
world, making it necessary
for employees to acquire
new skill sets many a time
during the course of their
careers, the emphasis on
people’s skills has never
been so pronounced. The
foundation for developing
people’s skills for the work-
place should be laid at home.
“Emotional intelligence
and communication are crit-
ical for whatever one does in
life. Parents have to provide
an atmosphere at home that
develops both. Polite speech
and a respectful attitude that
enables someone to listen to
other viewpoints with an
open mind, are best learnt at
home,” says Kesang.
CM
ND-ND
YK
someone to listen to other viewpoints with an open mind, are best learnt at home,” says

8 |

SOUTH

THE HINDU

8 | SOUTH THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Sudanese student killed by fellow national

NOIDA/DELHI

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

Sudanese student killed by fellow national in A.P.

STAFF REPORTER

IBRAHIMPATNAM

(KRISHNA

DIS-

TRICT): A Sudanese student, pursuing B. Tech in the Nova College of Engineering and Technology near Vijayawada in Andhra Pradesh, was fatally stabbed, allegedly by his junior and fellow na- tional, late on Monday. The incident followed a dispute over money. The deceased, Mohamed Elmgtaba Abdelgabar Hus- sein Osman, a second year student of Electronics and Communications Engineer- ing, celebrated his 25th birth- day on January 20. He was staying with fellow nationals in a rented house on Ferry Road. “Around 11.45 p.m. on Monday, the accused, Al- laeldeen Ibrahim Hamed Mahmoud, 22, who also stayed in the same house, al- legedly began demanding the money which he lent to Elmgtaba a couple of weeks ago. In a fit of rage, Al- laeldeen picked up a kitchen knife and allegedly stabbed Elmgtaba in the abdomen. “Soon after the incident, room-mates rushed the vic- tim to a nearby hospital run by a medical college, which reportedly denied him ad- mission. He was then rushed to the Andhra Hospitals, where doctors pronounced him brought dead,” said Ibrahimpatnam Inspector D. Chavan. Based on the complaint by Badreldin Abdulla Mo- hammad, room-mate of Mo- hammad Elmgtaba, the po- lice registered a case of murder under Section 302 of the Indian Penal Code and took the accused into cus- tody. It is said that the two had argued over money a couple of times earlier too. The incident came as a shock to the other room- mates and village residents. Police have informed the embassy about the incident.

Lekshmi Nair to be kept out of principal’s post for 5 years

BJP protest demanding her arrest turns violent; SFI calls off law college strike

STAFF REPORTER

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The im-

passe surrounding the Kerala Law Academy Law College developments took a curious turn on Tuesday with the management agreeing to keep Principal P. Lekshmi Nair out of the post for five years. The Students Federation of India’s pact with the man- agement, and the subsequent decision to call of the strike, have divided the agitators. All other student organisa- tions have said they will con- tinue with their agitation. They have also called for a State-wide education bandh on Wednesday. A demonstration under-

education bandh on Wednesday. A demonstration under- FORCIBLE EVICTION: Police lathi-charged BJP activists who

FORCIBLE EVICTION: Police lathi-charged BJP activists who were protesting at the Kerala Law Academy Law College on

Tuesday. — PHOTO: S MAHINSHA

taken by the Bharatiya Janata Party, demanding the Prin- cipal’s arrest, turned violent with the police resorting to lathi-charge to quell the

protest. The party has called for a dawn-to-dusk hartal in Thiruvananthapuram dis- trict to protest against the al- leged police excess.

The decision of the college authorities came close on the heels of talks they had with an SFI delegation led by State secretary M. Vijin and pres- ident Jaick C. Thomas. Emer- ging from the discussions, they claimed victory and said the management had ac- cepted all their demands. College director N. Naray- anan Nair told the media that Ms. Nair would not remain on the campus as a faculty member for the next five years. Vice-Principal M.M. Madhavan Potti would dis- charge the duties of the Prin- cipal. The management had promised not to pursue any action against students who took part in the agitation.

Students’ views sought on dress code for teachers

TANU KULKARNI

BENGALURU: Students of Karnataka colleges may soon have a say in what their teachers wear. Principals have been asked to collate and submit the opinion of students on whether teach- ing and non-teaching staf should adopt a dress code in the workplace. They will have to mail their answers to the Joint Director of the De- partment of Collegiate Edu- cation (DCE).

‘Bringing in discipline’

In a circular issued last week, the department said introducing a dress code would “bring in discipline” in colleges. It has proposed that the faculty members also display their names stat- ing their designations. The move has been severely criticised by faculty

The move has been severely criticised by faculty ILLUSTRATION: SEBASTIAN Lecturers are befuddled as they were

ILLUSTRATION: SEBASTIAN

Lecturers are befuddled as they were not consulted. “It’s

a pity that the department

did not even think of taking our opinions. Shouldn’t it be more concerned about what we are comfortable with rather than taking a decision based on the whims of our students? It has trivialised our self-esteem by sending the circular,” said a lecturer.

SFI criticises move

members, who are urging the government to withdraw the circular immediately. “If the department feels that there is a need to bring

The move has drawn sharp criticism from student organisations too, which have decided to support the teachers’ association. Stu-

discipline into colleges, it should speak to teachers and hold meetings with the asso- ciation rather than asking students for their opinion,” said H.C. Ramanna, secret- ary of the Karnataka Govern-

dents Federation of India State secretary Gururaj De- sai said the move would curb the freedom of teachers. “Whether it is dress code for students or faculty mem- bers, we oppose the move as

ment College Teachers’ As-

it

takes away the autonomy

sociation.

of

the individual,” he said.

BJP workers disrupt temple programme in Dakshina Kannada

RAGHAVA M.

MANGALURU: Activists of the Hindu Jagaran Vedike and workers of the Bharatiya Janata Party on Tuesday at- tempted to disrupt a pro- gramme at the popular Southadka Mahaganapathi temple near Belthangady in Dakshina Kannada district. Unhappy that the Kokkada gram panchayat president V.J. Sebastian had been in- vited to the function, about 20 people started singing bhajans loudly in the midst of the proceedings. The po- lice had to drive the protest- ers away before the function could go of smoothly. According to the Belthangady police, the temple, administered by the Muzrai Department, had or-

Along with Vedike activists, they sang loudly to protest a non-Hindu panchayat president’s presence

ganised a function to inaug-

urate a new dining hall and start a special seva. District in-charge Minister B. Ramanath Rai and MLC Srinivas Poojary, besides Mr. Sebastian, were present at the function. The Vedike activists and BJP partymen claimed that Mr. Sebastian’s presence vi- olated the Karnataka Hindu Religious Institutions and Charitable Endowments Act,

1997.

The act of protesters, Mr. Sebastian said, had hurt his

feelings. He said he was at- tending the public-cum-reli- gious function as per pro- tocol. Mr. Sebastian, a Congress worker, has been a gram panchayat member for over 11 years.

Not the first time

This is not the first time that Hindu outfits have pro- tested against non-Hindus attending temple functions. In April last, they pro- tested against the inclusion of the then Dakshina Kan- nada Deputy Commissioner A.B. Ibrahim’s name in the invitation of the annual fair of the Mahalingeshwara temple in Puttur. Following a petition before the High Court, the State government ordered new invitations without Mr. Ibrahim’s name.

British era documents found in Kerala

ABDUL LATHEEF NAHA

MALAPPURAM: A research team from Calicut University has stumbled upon a heap of rare documents that have the po- tential to redefine the his- tory of Malabar during the British era. The documents found at the Kidangazhi Mana at Porur, near Wandoor, in the district can help historians re-read Malabar’s history of the 19th and 20th centuries. P. Sivadasan, head of the history department who led the research team, said they had found many rare docu- ments and books during a search conducted at the Mana. The documents found with British stamps on them threw light on the shift of power from the Mysore re- gime to the British. Many palm leaves recovered from a temple at Karikkad, near

Many palm leaves recovered from a temple at Karikkad, near TREASURE TROVE: A research team from

TREASURE TROVE: A research team from Calicut University examining the documents found in Malappuram district.

Manjeri, about a year ago too had thrown light on this power shift. “We have found hundreds of documents. All of them have great significance from a history researcher’s point

of view,” Dr. Sivadasan said. The documents threw light on the domestic, social, agricultural, industrial, political and cultural lives that existed in the 19th and 20th centuries. A rare book

The rare find can help historians re-read Malabar’s history of the 19th and 20th centuries

of etiquette meant to be fol- lowed by educated women of landed families was among the finds. Rare books such as G. Sankara Kurup’s Tipu Sultan and a 1892 land survey hand- book are among the history team’s prized recovery. The famous Pattambi Pan- changam, published in 1900, was also found. “The documents refer to bicycle, agricultural imple- ments, domestic utensils, vehicles and foreign trips. All these are good enough to have a fresh look at the social history of Malabar in the 19th and 20th centuries,” said Dr. Sivadasan.

to have a fresh look at the social history of Malabar in the 19th and 20th

CM

YK

to have a fresh look at the social history of Malabar in the 19th and 20th

ND-ND

NOIDA/DELHI

THE HINDU

NOIDA/DELHI THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 NATION | 9 AI pilot faces probe for avoiding

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

NATION

| 9

AI pilot faces probe for avoiding alcohol test

NEW DELHI: Air India has ordered a probe against a senior executive pilot for al- legedly skipping the mandat- ory pre-flight alcohol test. The airline has set up a five-member committee to investigate the allegations, besides reporting the matter to the aviation regulator, Dir- ectorate General of Civil Avi- ation (DGCA), sources said. The executive pilot is cur- rently heading Air India’s operations department, they said, adding that the probe was necessitated after the airline’s pilots union ICPA brought it to the notice of the management. The action came after a complaint was received from the Indian Commercial Pi- lots Association ) that a senior executive pilot had evaded pre-flight medical test in the last 25 days at Delhi airport, the sources said. Air India has also in- formed the DGCA, they said. “The committee has been asked to complete its invest- igation at the earliest and file its report,” one of the sources said. — PTI

Vasundhara pips Kejriwal as most ‘liked’ CM

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

JAIPUR: Rajasthan Chief Min- ister Vasundhara Raje has become the “most liked Chief Minister” on social media platforms, leaving be- hind Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal and U.P. Chief Minister Akhilesh Ya- dav. Her oicial Facebook page has notched up more than 71 lakh ‘likes’ so far. The Chief Minister's Of- fice said in a statement here on Tuesday that Ms. Raje had efectively used social media channels to communicate with her supporters across the globe.

Techie murder: Infosys faces tough questions

Why was no other employee working with victim, ask police

SHOUMOJIT BANERJEE

PUNE: The swift police action in apprehending the prime suspect notwithstanding, a number of serious questions have been raised in the after- math of the ghastly murder of young software engineer Rasila Raju O.P. that has thrown the issue of women’s safety in workplace into sharp relief. Commissioner of Police Rashmi Shukla has said that she will write to IT major In- fosys seeking an explanation for the events that led to the tragedy. “The incident has once again brought to the fore the issue of workplace security arrangements in general, and for women in particular. There is this question why the girl was working alone on that floor on a Sunday. Why was no other employee asked to work with her,” Ms. Shukla said. “Companies seriously

to work with her,” Ms. Shukla said. “Companies seriously The Infosys campus at Hinjewadi, Pune, where

The Infosys campus at Hinjewadi, Pune, where software engineer Rasila Raju O.P. was murdered. — PHOTO: DATTATRAYA ADHALGE

need to conduct more aware- ness programmes on safety measures they have in place. Women could preferably be asked to work in pairs,” she said.

‘Common safety helpline’

Infosys issued a statement soon after the incident. It said the firm had a common safety helpline across its campuses in the country that was manned round-the- clock. The company also had an Infosys Emergency App.

The oice premises were al- ways monitored by security guards. The deceased, who hailed from Payimbra village in Kozhikode, Kerala, was

working with Infosys since

2015.

The prime suspect, a 26- year-old from Assam identi- fied as Bhaben Saikiya, worked as a security guard and was nabbed from Mum- bai’s Chhatrapati Shivaji Ter- minus (CST) in the early hours of Monday.

PDP, BJP face-of over Article 370

PEERZADA ASHIQ

SRINAGAR: Ruling coalition partners, the Peoples Demo- cratic Party (PDP) and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), on Tuesday witnessed a ma- jor face-of over Chief Minis- ter Mehbooba Mufti’s re- marks on Article 370. “Article 370 represents J&K’s pluralistic ethos and disturbing it would go not only against its interests, it is also linked to the political character of the State…noth- ing can be more anti-national than talking about abroga- tion of J&K’s special posi- tion,” Ms. Mufti told the As- sembly on Monday. The remarks invited a sharp reaction from BJP le- gislators, with Speaker Kavinder Gupta calling for “clarification from the Chief

Minister”, hinting at expun- ging the remarks. “It [abrogation of Article 370] is our party’s stand. Our elders gave their life for this cause. The remarks are in- sulting and should be ex- punged,” demanded BJP MLA Rajiv Jasrotia. Speaker Gupta said there was “a thought process that Article 370 should not be there” and he will go through the records. “Ms. Mufti can clarify things herself,” said Mr. Gupta.

Handle to Opposition

The BJP criticism of Ms. Mufti inside the Assembly has provided a handle to op- position parties too. Independent MLA Engin- eer Rasheed asked the PDP- BJP coalition to call of the al- liance “as these two parties

preaching inside the As- sembly are contradictory”. Opposition NC sought cla- rification from Ms. Mufti on her remarks while support- ing the PDP stand on Article 370. “There have been re- peated attempts to use the ju- dicial route to somehow weaken Article 370 and Art- icle 35A. We welcome her stand with a hope that the she stands by what she has said,” said NC spokesman Junaid Mattu. Without naming the BJP, Ms. Mufti had also con- demned “certain elements of moving judiciary to dilute Article 370”. For the first time ever since Ms. Mufti joined hands with the BJP to rule the State last year that the two coali- tion partners saw themselves on a collision course.

SC rejects plea to stay jallikattu law

KRISHNADAS RAJAGOPAL

NEW DELHI: A few hours after the President gave his assent on Tuesday to the Tamil Nadu amendments in the Prevention of Cruelty Act of 1960 to allow jallikattu, the Supreme Court refused to stay the new State law. Allowing the Central gov- ernment to withdraw its January 7, 2016 notification permitting jallikattu, a Bench of Justices Dipak Misra and Rohinton F. Nariman de- clined the plea of NGO Com- passion Unlimited Plus Ac- tion for an interim stay on the operation of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Tamil Nadu Amendment) Act, 2017. It asked the organisation and other animal rights activ- ists the ‘basis’ of their chal- lenge to the new State law. Referring to the amend- ments made by the Tamil Nadu Assembly to the 1960 Central Act, Justice Misra pointed out that the declared object of the new legislation is the preservation of a par- ticular breed of bulls. “They say that the new law is for the preservation of a

“They say that the new law is for the preservation of a variety of bulls… they

variety of bulls… they call it [jallikattu] a culture. This has to be debated,” he observed.

‘Act violated’

“The basis of our challenge is that the State has violated the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960,” senior advocate Siddharth Luthra said. Attorney-General Mukul Rohatgi told the Supreme Court that jallikattu was a matter of culture and that cit- izens had the right to take measures to “conserve their culture.” Mr. Rohatgi, appearing for the Centre, was countering

the allegation of animal rights activists that Tamil Nadu had violated the Pre- vention of Cruelty to Anim- als Act, 1960 and seeking an interim stay on the new State law. He referred to Article 29 (1) of the Constitution to back his submission. “Then we have to decide on whether jallikattu comes within the ambit of ‘culture’ meant in Article 29 (1) and whether this kind of a sport or event or activity is safe… Conservation of a culture should not involve inflicting unnecessary pain or sufer- ing to animals,” Justice Misra responded. Mr. Rohatgi then

referred to Section 11 (3) (e) of the 1960 Act which permits slaughtering of animals for food.“Mr. Rohatgi, slaughter- ing for food comes within the purview of doctrine of neces- sity. Section 11 (3) (e) permits slaughter for food but also mandates that the animal should be killed without in- flicting upon it unnecessary pain and sufering,” Justice Misra observed. The court’s permission for the Centre to withdraw its January 7 notification has now rendered infructuous the batch of writ petitions filed by several NGOs and other animal rights organisa- tions against the notification last year. The interlocutory applica- tions filed by the NGOs against the new Tamil Nadu law were part of their 2016 writ petitions. The Bench has given them two weeks to file fresh writ petitions challenging the Tamil Nadu amendments. The State government and others supporting jallikattu in the current litigation were given four weeks to file their counter-aidavits.

Supreme Court condemns defiance of ban

KRISHNADAS RAJAGOPAL

NEW DELHI: Noting that “law and order has primacy in a civilised society,” the Su- preme Court on Tuesday made scathing observations about the way the Tamil Nadu government handled days of violence that rocked the State amid massive public protests favouring jallikattu. A Bench of Justices Dipak Misra and Rohinton F. Nar- iman said the violence and holding of jallikattu events across Tamil Nadu indicated sheer defiance of the Su- preme Court’s A. Nagaraja judgment of 2014 banning jallikattu. The judgment had termed the sport an act of ‘in- herent cruelty’. State government lawyers, led by senior advocate K. Parasaran, maintained that

the protests were peaceful and an evocation of the pub- lic’s wish for a new jallikattu law. “But what was the neces- sity to hold road marches,” Justice Misra asked. “Don’t people have a fun- damental right under Article 19 of the Constitution to protest,” senior advocate C.S. Vaidyanathan intervened. “To say you want to protest peacefully is one thing, but to come out in defiance of a Su- preme Court judgment is quite another,” Justice Nar- iman reacted sharply. “The whole thing was peaceful, suddenly some- ”

thing happened

Mr. Para-

saran reasoned. To this, Justice Misra retor- ted: “Mr. Parasaran, we are now governed by the concept of rule of law. Something like this does not happen sud-

should not happen.

Mr. Parasaran, please tell your State Executive, law and order has primacy in a civil- ised society. When the Su- preme Court, the final arbiter of the Constitution, is seized of the matter, there should be complete obeisance and compliance. We have said this in the Cauvery water dis- pute matter.” Senior advocate Rakesh Dwivedi, also for Tamil Nadu, pitched in that there was no breach of the Nagaraja judgment. He sub- mitted that jallikattu events were not held till the ordin- ance was promulgated in this regard recently.

denly

‘No ifs and buts’

“We are only concerned

about preserving the honour

and

there are no ‘ifs’ and ‘buts’

of the Supreme Court

about that,” Justice Nariman responded. Justice Misra pointed out

how four people had died in jallikattu events. “People die in every game. A cricketer

died in Delhi

we stop the game,” Mr. Ro- hatgi submitted. At this point, parliament- arian Dr. Subramanian Swamy, who sought to inter- vene in the jallikattu litiga- tion, objected to submissions made by the T.N. government to downplay the violence. “They are wrong to say there was no violence. A police sta- tion was burnt. In Pudukot- tai, jallikattu events were held in defiance of the Su- preme Court ban,” Dr. Swamy submitted. “Yes. That is exactly what we are saying here,” Justice Nariman responded.

does not mean

submitted. “Yes. That is exactly what we are saying here,” Justice Nariman responded. does not mean

CM

YK

submitted. “Yes. That is exactly what we are saying here,” Justice Nariman responded. does not mean

ND-ND

10 |

EDITORIAL

THE HINDU

10 | EDITORIAL THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Cricket’s new

NOIDA/DELHI

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

EDITORIAL THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Cricket’s new order T
EDITORIAL THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Cricket’s new order T

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

Cricket’s new order

T he Supreme Court has named a four-

member Committee of Administrators to

run the afairs of the Board of Control for

Cricket in India as part of a continuing ju-

dicial exercise to reform the way the body is admin- istering the game. While few will sympathise with the BCCI oice-bearers who were removed for de- fying the court’s well-intended reforms, there is no escaping the feeling that it should have found a way of reforming the body without appointing its own administrators. Only one of the four appointees has played representative cricket, and it is arguable whether a public auditor, a cricket chronicler or a financial sector executive are the most suitable candidates to administer a body that oversees a competitive sport. In a country where there is no shortage of cricket experts and where many have the experience of having put bat to ball at some point in their lives, it is a glib assumption that a combination of eminence in some field and a pas- sion for the game are suicient to run a national sports body. The court could have asked the Board to come up with suggestions to draw up a commit- tee of interim administrators from among former players and administrators with an established con- nect with the game. Also, by appointing a panel of its own, the court has rendered itself vulnerable to the charge of massive judicial overreach. There is an undoubted element of public interest in the manner in which the highest court has en- gaged itself with the game’s administration in re- cent years. The objectives were laudable: cleansing the administration; bridging the credibility deficit built by reform-resistant administrators; and re- vamping a system fraught with conflicts of interest and unchecked commercialisation. Last year, the court declared that running cricket in India is a public function. Many felt the intervention was needed to keep the exploitation of cricket’s com- mercial potential honest, and run the game in ac- cordance with its tradition and values. Then came the panel headed by former Chief Justice of India R.M. Lodha and its sweeping recommendations for reform. The Supreme Court accepted most of the recommendations and made them binding on the BCCI. Thereafter, the reluctance shown by the BCCI to accept the Lodha panel reforms led to its president Anurag Thakur being held prima facie guilty of contempt of court.The situation is ripe for a new set of administrators and the next election, which will be overseen by the four-member com- mittee, will throw them up. The big question, of course, is whether this will amount to a mere re- placement of one set of oice-bearers with another, or bring about a real and systemic change in the way cricket in this country is run.

Demonetisation’s long shadow

T he Economic Survey presented on the

eve of the Union Budget has been domin-

ated by a singular action of the govern-

ment. As Chief Economic Adviser

Arvind Subramanian stated, “To deify or demonise demonetisation that is the diicult question the world is asking, to which the survey tries to re- spond.” Describing the November 8 decision to withdraw high-value currency notes as a “radical governance-cum-social engineering measure” aimed at punitively raising the cost of illicit activit-

ies, Mr. Subramanian and his team acknowledge the complexities in assessing its potential impact as well as the lack of historical precedent to make reli- able predictions. The Survey, however, emphatic- ally asserts that while there have been short-term costs to the economy, which would need to be ex- peditiously addressed, there will be long-term be- nefits. Real GDP growth in the current fiscal, the Survey projects, will see a likely reduction by one quarter to half a percentage point relative to the baseline of about 7% as a result of the demand shock triggered by demonetisation. The Survey ar- gues that any comparison with last fiscal’s 7.6% pace would be “inappropriate” as among the other factors that influenced growth this year was that global oil prices stopped declining, lessening the updraught that soft energy prices lend to the eco- nomy. It contends that the latest growth estimates of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund — the bank trimmed its forecast to 7% from 7.6% and the IMF by 1 percentage point to 6.6%, both citing demonetisation as reason — reflect a higher baseline assumption and ought to be com- pared only on the extent of change in estimate. Devoting a whole chapter to demonetisation, the Survey recommends fast, demand-driven remonet- isation, further tax reforms, including bringing land and real estate under the ambit of the Goods and Services Tax, and reducing tax rates and stamp du- ties. It cautions against tax authorities turning overzealous. It flags the risks that Brexit and the U.S. election result pose to the world economic or- der, and to India’s economy. The prospect of “shifts in the direction of isolationism and nativism” could threaten the global market for goods, services and labour. The Survey conservatively projects growth for the coming fiscal at 6.75%-7.5%, with a caveat that lingering efects from demonetisation, oil prices and the possible rise of trade protectionism could jeopardise the forecast.

American carnage: Trump’s road to ruin

The Trump presidency in the U.S. is less than two weeks old, but it is already clear that it represents an unusually fierce assault on civic, political, and moral values

S HASHANK J OSHI
S HASHANK J OSHI
S HASHANK J OSHI
S HASHANK J OSHI

SHASHANK JOSHI

S HASHANK J OSHI

As a student of international politics, I can certainly suggest various ways in which U.S. President Donald J. Trump may be good for one country or another. From the vantage point of New Delhi, his focus on terrorism, his business interests in India, and his rad- ical indiference to non-proliferation all present strategic opportunities. From my perch in London, I also understand why Theresa May, Prime Minister of the U.K., is aggressively courting the Trump adminis- tration. A trade deal with Washington would bolster the government’s hand in departure negotiations with the European Union, and American support for the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation remains crucial to Bri- tain’s interests. This is all legitimate dip- lomacy, of course. If we work with those who imprison journalists (Turkey), shoot demonstrators (Iran) or ban political parties (Saudi Arabia) — feting their leaders, wel- coming their capital, and cooperating with their soldiers and spies — then it’s diicult to make a strong case against engagement with a man who earned the votes of nearly 63 million Americans in a free and, barring Russian involvement, largely fair election.

Not about geopolitics alone

But as citizens, as lower-case ‘d’ demo- crats, as those with myriad ties of culture, kinship, and intellect with the United States and its institutions, the geopolitical dimen- sion is not the only relevant one. The Trump presidency is less than two weeks old, but it is already clear that it represents an unusu- ally fierce assault on civic, political, and moral values, far in excess of that which might have occurred under the most ex- treme alternatives, from Bernie Sanders on the hard left to Ted Cruz on the hard right. To call Mr. Trump a fascist is to trivialise the term and insult those who have lived under truly oppressive systems; but to insist that the President’s critics are hysterical, motiv-

CARTOONSCAPE

President’s critics are hysterical, motiv- CARTOONSCAPE ILLUSTRATION: DEEPAK HARICHANDAN If a President lies on

ILLUSTRATION: DEEPAK HARICHANDAN

If a President lies on matters that can be fact-checked in seconds, is he likely to tell the truth on less visible matters of state?

ated by partisan animus, or crying wolf is to blind oneself to the evidence that is rapidly mounting. Most striking of all is the President’s ex- traordinary narcissistic personality dis- order. Its most recent manifestation is his protracted obsession with the size of crowds at his inauguration. Mr. Trump des- patched his press secretary to disseminate outright and easily disproved lies (“largest audience to witness an inauguration, period”), in the manner of the Iraqi informa- tion minister who famously insisted that American tanks, audible in the background, were nowhere near Baghdad in 2003. He then spent much of his speech to the Central

Intelligence Agency (CIA) boasting of this, and went on to shut down the Twitter ac- count of the National Park Service after it circulated dissenting photographs. Beha- viour like this is better subject to psychiatry than political analysis. Then we come to the pathological fib- bing. Mr. Trump, who began his political ca- reer by insisting that the U.S.’s first black President was a Kenyan-born Muslim, lies habitually and with disturbing ease, about matters both trivial and serious. He lied dozens of times in the past few weeks alone, claiming falsely that mass voter fraud ex- plains Hillary Clinton’s higher number of votes, that the U.S. did not accept Christian refugees, and that his ‘Muslim ban’ was com- parable to the Obama administration’s sus- pension of visa waivers. These “alternative facts”, to use the Orwellian term coined by the President’s adviser Kellyanne Conway, are demonstrably untrue. If a President lies on matters that can be fact-checked in seconds, is he likely to tell the truth on less visible matters of state? Moreover, when re- porters call out these lies, they are re- peatedly attacked as “fake news”, blacklisted and silenced at press conferences, and warned — in Mr. Trump’s own words — that they will “pay a big price”. A democracy can- not subsist on a diet of dishonesty.

Militarisation and politicisation

No less concerning is the damage being done to American institutions. Last week, the entire senior management of the State Department resigned en masse, in an unpre- cedented move. Hundreds of other diplo- mats are writing a dissent memo — like the so-called Blood Telegram from Dhaka in 1971 — on the Muslim ban. “This ban,” they write, “stands in opposition to the core American and constitutional values.” No surprise, then, that Mr. Trump has filled only 33 of 700 critical positions across the federal government. Meanwhile, National Security Advisor General Michael Flynn, who routinely tweets conspiracy theories and led campaign chants of “lock her up” targeting Ms. Clinton, is building up the most military-dominated National Security

is building up the most military-dominated National Security LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Council (NSC) staf of

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Council (NSC) staf of recent times. Eliot Cohen, a prominent neoconservative scholar who wrote a landmark book on the relationship between politicians and gener- als and served in the George W. Bush admin- istration, warned: “A serious civil-military issue is emerging.” And atop this militarisation, there comes

a remarkable act of politicisation. On Sat-

urday, Mr. Trump issued another executive order that removed the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staf and the Director of Na- tional Intelligence as permanent members of the NSC’s apex Principals Committee. In their place came Stephen Bannon, his Senior Counselor — and co-author of the President’s dystopian inaugural address — as a permanent member of the committee, alongside the Secretaries of State and De- fence. This move shocked former Defence Secretary Leon Panetta (“I’ve never seen it happen, and it shouldn’t happen”) and George W. Bush’s Chief of Staf Josh Bolten, who had barred Mr. Bush’s own political ad- viser Karl Rove from NSC meetings. More disturbing still is that Mr. Bannon is no or- dinary political flack. He was head of the far- right, white nationalist website Breitbart

News. He has complained about the number

of Asians in Silicon Valley, cheered on a “his-

toric struggle against Islam”, and published

misogynistic and anti-Semitic headlines. It was surely Mr. Bannon who deliberately ex- cluded mention of Jews from the White House statement on Holocaust Remem- brance Day on Friday — like much else, en- tirely without precedent.

Dealing without the dealmaker

Finally, we come to the pivotal role of Mr. Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner. It is Mr. Kushner, the President assures us, who will bring peace between Israelis and Palestini- ans. When British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson sought clarity on the scope of the Muslim ban, it was Mr. Kushner, rather than the State Department, that he called. If Mr. Trump’s adult sons feel slighted, they can take consolation from the fact that they have been given control of a trust controlling their father’s vast business empire which the President refuses to divest from. As he still profits from it, this creates permanent con- flicts of interest in foreign and domestic policy. Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and Kuwait have all booked rooms at the Trump Inter- national Hotel in Washington, D.C., efect- ively funnelling money to the President. Is this the government of the world’s largest democracy, or the Corleone family? None of this is normal. Not the sweeping cruelty of the Muslim ban, not the failed ex- tortion of Mexico, not the press secretary printing out hostile tweets and flaunting them at a press conference, not the Attorney General being fired for upholding the law. By all means, haggle with the self-pro- fessed dealmaker. Perhaps he’ll stick to the agreement. Perhaps, as in his business deal- ings, he won’t. Either way, do not delude yourself that everything is fine. President Trump is not an authoritarian leader. But the wall between populist demagogue and bud- ding autocrat is less firm than we would like to imagine. It has been knocked down by countless leaders, such as Hugo Chavez, Vladimir Putin, and Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Like all populists, they have brought eco- nomic ruin and political turmoil. To quote President Trump’s inaugural: “American carnage”.

Shashank Joshi is a Senior Research Fellow of the Royal United Services Institute in London.

Letters emailed to letters@thehindu.co.in must carry the full postal address and the full name or the name with initials.

Trump’s executive order

U.S. President Donald Trump’s executive order severely restricting immigration from seven Muslim- majority countries smacks of racism and fascism (“My priority is to protect U.S.: Trump”, Jan.31). Painting an entire community with the same brush of suspicion and hate is tantamount to a kind of international ‘apartheid’. Americans have taken to the streets to protest against the order and it is admirable that some other countries have also denounced the step, but I think all countries should rally around to get the order withdrawn. It is a wrong notion that firewalling the U.S. alone will help root out terrorism. It will only isolate the country.

R. Sampath,

Chennai

I don’t understand what the fuss is about. Every country is free to decide who to allow and who not to allow into its territory. To not allow outsiders also helps the local market grow. People who oppose this ban must be aware that many countries do not allow people with Israeli passports to cross their borders. People who speak about how the ban afects refugees fleeing war zones should also speak about why Gulf Cooperation Council states boycotting Israel do not open their doors to Israeli refugees.

Sarangan Ramaswamy,

Bengaluru

President Trump tweeted how his sudden measure has stopped all those “dudes” from terrorising the U.S. In a month, as this move gains more of a stranglehold, you can expect him to claim that he has

freed the U.S. from terrorism. His drumbeating would in all probability obscure reality. Our Prime Minister too claimed that his demonetisation move would completely wipe out black money. A lot of that black money is now back in the banks. No one knows how much of it is black money or how to trace it back to its owner. But incessant drumbeating about the move has completely obscured this reality too. Terrorism, like black money, cannot be wished away with the stroke of a pen, but all this logic seems to be lost on many people.

M. Balakrishnan,

Bengaluru

While many leaders of major democracies have expressed their concern over Mr. Trump’s executive order, India has chosen to remain silent, perhaps for its own strategic reasons. It is also watching what could be the next possible step by the U.S., which may be to include Pakistan in the list. But the Modi government’s silence

could also stem from the fact that the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill introduced by it is under scrutiny by

a Parliamentary Committee. The

Bill states that “illegal migrants who

are Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis and Christians from Afghanistan, Bangladesh and

Pakistan are eligible for citizenship”.

It leaves out, for instance, Muslims

and Jews. There are reportedly divergent views amongst lawmakers about the constitutionality of such an amendment. Critics have rightly viewed this Bill in its present form as being highly discriminatory and aimed at polarising society along religious lines. For the sake of

preserving the plurality of our

nation, such discriminatory provisions must be removed lest we become like the U.S. of today.

S.K. Choudhury,

Bengaluru

This radical approach is strange given that no major terrorist incidents have taken place on U.S. soil in the last eight years. The best brains of the world are working in the U.S. for its development, so if anything, this decision will only hamper the country’s growth, not stop terrorism.

N. Vijai,

Coimbatore

Universal basic income

Cash transfers as a substitute for anti-poverty schemes could relieve the government of its management and logistical problems (“The hidden agenda of benevolence”, Jan. 31). But unintended consequences, such as a spike in food prices, could make the lives of the poor miserable. At the same time, in a participatory democracy, innovative policies cannot be introduced or avoided only on the basis of what experts

think. There is nothing wrong in the government testing the waters through pilot projects. This will help the government gauge the preferences of the people for whom these schemes are being launched.

Infusing eiciency into the delivery of social sector schemes like the Public Distribution System is good as long as there are no cuts in entitlements, such as allocation of foodgrains. The entire ecosystem of food and fertilizer subsidies needs a review. For instance, price support for wheat and paddy has distorted cropping patterns. There is no

incentive for farmers to grow millets which are drought-resistant and more nutritious than wheat and rice. Soil health has been afected by overuse of nitrogenous fertilizers because of the incentives promoted by subsidies. The leakages in PDS and other schemes, if plugged, could release a huge sum for the government for distribution to targeted families as add-on basic income.

V.N. Mukundarajan,

Thiruvananthapuram

The Padmavati controversy

It is painful to see how fringe groups are using violence and threats to disrupt the shooting of a film which supposedly contains scenes that hurt them (“Clamour to rename Padmavati”, Jan.31). Earlier, such groups were active during the time of a film’s release; now they have started to disrupt the shooting itself. This undermines art and creativity. The silence of state authorities and the deference of the director to the demands of these fringe elements only legitimise such actions and further embolden these groups.

Amritpal Singh,

Amritsar

Land and climate change

Across the globe, agricultural land is being rapidly converted for infrastructural and economic activities (“How land use afects climate change”, Jan.31). This may sound good from a developmental perspective, but it is inimical to our environment. Waste-dumping practices in urban areas have made land barren and toxic. For instance, land near the Ganga and Doab

region has lost fertility and is unfit for agricultural purposes. The most recent example of severe land degradation is near the Yamuna river in Delhi where authorities have banned crop cultivation due to extremely high levels of heavy elements seeping into the land from polluted river water.

Gagan Pratap Singh,

Noida

Preparedness for oil spills

The disaster-preparedness of the Port Trust Board in case of an environmental disaster is really poor (“Blot on the beach”, Jan.31). In Chennai, appropriate booms should have been installed in the vicinity of the oil slick, but what we see is some ten people collecting oil using plastic tanks. No dispersants are being sprayed. The afected will be the fishermen, the fish-eating public, and marine life.

J. Ranjit,

Chennai

Print is not dead

There is little doubt that the newspaper industry will continue to prosper despite the invasion of online editions (“Is past the key to future?”, Jan.30). Ardent readers will always prefer a printed edition of a newspaper, for it is easier on the eye, easily portable, and provides for more leisurely reading than online articles do. The feeling of a warm newspaper right of the press is lovely, and an online edition cannot provide that. Print is everlasting and unchanging unlike the online world in which articles seem to disappear.

R. Sivakumar,

Chennai

CM

YK

and unchanging unlike the online world in which articles seem to disappear. R. Sivakumar, Chennai C

ND-ND

and unchanging unlike the online world in which articles seem to disappear. R. Sivakumar, Chennai C

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THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 PERSPECTIVE | 11 HOMELAND Violations in India, penalties elsewhere J

HOMELAND

Violations in India, penalties elsewhere

HOMELAND Violations in India, penalties elsewhere J OSY J OSEPH British engineering giant Rolls-Royce recently agreed

JOSY

JOSEPH

British engineering giant Rolls-Royce recently agreed to pay a $809-million fine (over ₨5,500 crore) for its corrupt prac- tices in India, Russia, China, Thailand, Nigeria and Malaysia. In the U.S., on January 6, Mondelez International, formerly known as Kraft Foods and of which Cadbury is now a part, agreed to pay $13 million to the U.S. authorities for paying an Indian agent, who in turn may have bribed government oi-

cials, for obtaining 30 diferent licences for phase II of its chocolate factory in Baddi, Himachal Pradesh. In October 2016, Cognizant

admitted to possible violations governing anti-bribery laws of the U.S. in its operations in India. In September 2016, Anheuser-Busch InBev paid $6 mil- lion to settle corruption charges against one of its Indian companies where

it had only a minority stake — the Indian company in question allegedly

tried to buy of an employee who had turned whistle-blower and was in- forming U.S. authorities about its practice of using third-party sales pro-

moters to pay bribes to Indian government oicials. In 2012, Oracle paid a

$2

million civil penalty in the U.S. to settle charges arising from a slush fund

in

India used to pay bribes.

It is almost an annual feature in the U.S. to see an American corporation

admitting to have violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) in its Indian operations, and agreeing to pay huge penalties. These could range from bribing government oicials to misleading accounting practices in or- der to hide slush funds. A similar parallel can also be occasionally seen in

the U.K., as the Rolls-Royce case illustrates.

Paying for others’ sins

A scan of global anti-corruption jurisprudence and its impact on ordin-

ary Indians inevitably throws up

a ‘robbing Peter to pay Paul’

scenario. An aggressive global firm enters the Indian market, realises that it is deeply corrupt, engages middlemen to pay bribes to bureaucrats and politi- cians, secures huge businesses

and swells its balance sheet. If caught, it apologises for the ‘mistake’, and of- fers to pay financial penalties to ofset possible criminal trial and long jail terms for its oicials — all in the home country, not India. An average Indian pays either by way of taxes into government cofers

that go into oicial purchases made from that company, or from his per- sonal finances to buy its product. In those purchases, the ordinary Indian pays more than the legitimate market price because of corruption, contrib- uting a part of the kickback paid to the middlemen who facilitate the com- pany’s business in the Indian market. Worse, when the company ofers to pay a fine to ofset criminal proceed- ings, that average Indian consumer would also partially contribute to it, be- cause it is from markets like India that such foreign companies make their profits, part of which would be used to pay of their governments that up- hold law. To be fair, it is the efective implementation of anti-corruption laws in the U.S., the U.K. and most other developed economies that are forcing global business giants to pay huge fines for their questionable practices. It is a demonstration of the efective implementation of laws of their homelands, and caution to anyone from those economies against bribing someone in countries like India.

Unless parliamentary oversight is extended to them, our anti-corruption agencies would continue to face issues of competence and accountability

The troubling questions

What is worrying is the attitude of the Indian government and its anti- corruption bodies to this by-now-well-established global phenomenon. It

is not known if India gets a share of the fine imposed under FCPA or other

anti-corruption laws in developed economies. There is nothing on record to show that in the long history of FCPA in the U.S., which came into being in the post-Watergate period in the 1970s, the Indian government has evolved any mechanism to regularly follow FCPA filings, and seek domestic remedy here in India. Nor is there any assurance that agencies such as the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) and En- forcement Directorate (ED) would take evidence from those filings to pur- sue cases here against those involved. Despite landmark judgments of the Supreme Court to improve our anti- corruption architecture, at least one loud nationwide movement against corruption, and the issue of graft finding a regular appearance in political rhetoric, it is a fact that India does not have an efective anti-corruption

mechanism yet in place. The CBI, ED and other agencies are only as good, or as bad, as those polit- ical leaders in power. Successive governments have deployed them for political score-settling than for fighting big corruption. At the highest levels, there is also a clear link between the corrupt big sharks and political funding. The last significant reforms in the administration of CBI and ED were ordered by the Supreme Court in the Vineet Narain case of 1997, by which it tried to bring some amount of autonomy to the agencies, especially bring- ing in supervision by the Central Vigilance Commission. However, the agencies have remained caged parrots, as the Supreme Court observed dur- ing the last government’s tenure.

It is no more just about autonomy of anti-corruption agencies or enact-

ment of the long-pending Lokpal act. It is now troublingly also about com- petence and accountability. Anecdotes emerging from those investigated in recent times, closure of cases and chargesheets, and the apex court order ordering the CBI to probe its former chief Ranjit Sinha, all point towards mounting incompetence in Indian agencies, especially in exploiting the di- gital databases across the world, celebrating whistle-blowers and enforcing the law with impartiality. Unless urgent parliamentary oversight — not perfect, but the best among the available options — is brought on to federal investigation agencies, nothing may change.

josy.joseph@thehindu.co.in

FROM THE ARCHIVES

FROM THE ARCHIVES (dated February 1, 1967) One killed in space cabin fire A flash fire

(dated February 1, 1967)

One killed in space cabin fire

A flash fire similar to the one that killed the three Apollo I astronauts on Friday [Jan. 27] raced through a space cabin simulator to-day [January 31] at the School of Aero-space Medicine, killing one airman and critically burning another. Initial reports said the inside of the pressure chamber was “completely charred”', as was the Apollo craft at Cape Kennedy. A Brooks Air Force spokesman said the airmen were performing maintenance in a cent per cent oxygen and pressurised environment in an experiment designed to study, the efects of pure oxygen on the blood of rabbits. Ten of the 12 rabbits in the chamber also were charred. An engineer at Cape Kennedy launching base heard the doomed men’s last words yesterday [January 30] when he played a recording made aboard the space capsule. Astronaut Robert Chafee

said “we are on fire-Get us out of here” before he and two others died in the Apollo spacecraft disaster last Sunday the New York Times reported to-day.

Puri Swami ends fast on cow issue

His Holiness Jagadguru Sankaracharya of Puri Govardhan Peeth to-day [Jan. 31] ended his 73-day-old anti-cow slaughter fast after a round of discussions with a group of leaders of the all-party cow protection committee. The Prime Minister, Mrs. Indira Gandhi, expressed the hope in New Delhi that the termination of the fast by the Sankaracharya would clear the way for a calm and dispassionate consideration of matter connected with the agitation. In a message of congratulation to the Swamiji, Mrs. Indira Gandhi said that as already assured, a high-level committee would be set up to go into the matter. She was glad that the Swamiji had ended his self- imposed ordeal.

Drawing up a diet plan

The welfare challenge lies in providing assistance to needy households to ensure adequate diets without creating conditions in which they opt for inferior diets that are too heavy on cereals

S ONALDE D ESAI
S ONALDE D ESAI
S ONALDE D ESAI
S ONALDE D ESAI

SONALDE DESAI

S ONALDE D ESAI

With the Kerala government’s decision to implement the National Food Secur- ity Act (NFSA) from April, the whole country will be covered by the legisla- tion. However, if we expect the NFSA to improve India’s malnutrition statistics, we may well be disappointed. Accord- ing to a study by Himanshu and Abhijit Sen, even before the NFSA is fully im- plemented, use of the public distribu- tion system (PDS) expanded sharply with proportion of households getting PDS subsidy rising from about 25% in 2004-05 to 50% in 2011-12. However, de- cline in child malnutrition has been far more modest.

A patchy record

While we still do not have nationwide data on malnutrition, State-wise data from Annual Health Survey/District Level Health Surveys of 2012-14 as well as National Family Health Survey IV of 2015-16 suggest only modest improve- ment in child malnutrition since the Na- tional Family Health Survey III of 2005- 06. Proportion of households receiving PDS subsidies in Rajasthan increased by about 15 percentage points, under- weight declined by 3 percentage points; neighbouring Madhya Pradesh experi- enced similar increase in the PDS but a sharper decline underweight (17 per- centage points); another neighbour Gu- jarat shows a drop in PDS use but re- cords a modest improvement in underweight statistics (5 percentage points). The strangest case is that of Andhra Pradesh where 59% of the pop- ulation received PDS subsidy in 2004- 05 rising to 76 % in 2011-12 but under- weight rate seems to be stuck around 32% with hardly any improvement. Why do we see this disconnect? Cri- tiques of the PDS may point to leakages and suggest that perhaps these sub- sidies are not reaching the target bene- ficiaries. However, a large number of studies have recorded improving per- formance of the PDS and suggest this may be an overly cynical assumption. Other critiques may argue that with rising incomes, poverty has fallen in In- dia and regardless of the PDS, individu- als may get suicient calories, making changes in PDS use irrelevant to caloric intake. This also seems somewhat of an overreach, given the entrenched

also seems somewhat of an overreach, given the entrenched BUDGET NUDGE: “Access to PDS subsidies changes

BUDGET NUDGE: “Access to PDS subsidies changes the way people allocate their ”

household resources

Waiting for PDS supplies in Adilabad. PHOTO: S. HARPAL SINGH

poverty in some sections of the country and society. A recently released report based on India Human Development Survey of 2004-05 and 2011-12 suggests that the re- lationship between the PDS and nutri- tion may be more complex. Jointly or- ganised by researchers from National Council of Applied Economic Research and University of Maryland, this is the first nationwide survey to interview the same households at two points in time. By matching households with similar income, family size, land ownership and place of residence, but one group with Below Poverty Line (BPL) or Antyo- daya Anna Yojana (AAY) card and the other without these cards, this study is able to compare apples to apples and ex- amine the role of the PDS in a quasi-ex- perimental design. The results suggest that access to PDS subsidies changes the way people allocate their household resources. When rice, wheat and other cereals are available cheaply, households try to get more of their required calories from cereals and less from milk, fruits and ve- getables. Results show that households with BPL/AAY cards consume a monthly per capita average of 11.87 kg of cereals, but only 2.77 litres of milk. In contrast, households without BPL/AAY

If the mechanisms for effective administration of the UBI are in place, it is possible to make a case for replacing PDS by cash transfers on nutritional grounds

cards but at the same income level, con- sume somewhat less cereals (11.22 kg) but more milk (3.21 litres). One would normally expect that the savings from cereal purchase due to price subsidies would be used to buy milk, fruit and nuts, but in an era where school and medical costs are rising and households face many other demands on their purse, these savings seem to be spent on non-food items. Food consumption forms 56% of household budget in BPL/ AAY households compared to a slightly higher level (58%) in matched house- holds without access to PDS subsidies. A prior study using the same data and

a similar matching procedure, pub- lished in a joint NCAER/Brookings journal, India Policy Forum, found that households with a BPL/AAY card were

no better than households without PDS

subsidies when it came to child nutri- tion. This may well be because access to

cheap calories reduces consumption of diferent foods and dietary diversity is

very important for balanced nutrition. This does not mean that we should do away with food subsidies. The NCAER report mentioned earlier also found that for very poor households or house- holds that experience income declines of 20% or more between the two sur-

veys, access to the PDS is very import- ant for preserving food intake and diet- ary diversity. When faced with a sharp income decline, households with BPL/ AAY cards reduce their cereal intake by

770 g per capita per month, and main-

tain their milk intake. In contrast, households who can’t avail of food sub- sidies reduced their monthly per capita

cereal intake by 930 g and milk intake by

280 milliliters.

Nudged towards better choices

The challenge lies in providing assist- ance to needy households to ensure ad- equate diets without creating condi- tions in which they opt for inferior diets that are heavy on cereals. This is a par- ticular challenge for modern India where rates of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart conditions are on the rise. Indian immigrants in the U.S. and U.K. also sufer from higher preval- ence of these conditions than the nat- ive-born. So it may be that Indians have greater genetic predisposition for these so-called “lifestyle” diseases, but it is also well recognised that these diseases are exacerbated by excessive consump- tion of carbohydrates, amply available in cereals. Cash transfers may be one way of dealing with this challenge. They would allow households to invest in better di- ets without circumscribing what they consume. However, their success would depend on the ability to efectively ad- minister transfers and reduce leakages. Moreover, how this may afect grain markets remains unknown. Interna- tional research on cash versus in-kind food subsidies presents mixed results, with the efectiveness of cash transfers depending on the institutional frame- work. Current debates on Universal Ba- sic Income tend to see it as an additional component of social safety nets. But if the mechanisms for efective adminis-

tration of the UBI are in place, it is pos- sible to make a case for replacing PDS by cash transfers on nutritional grounds and this is well within the framework

laid down by the NFSA.

Sonalde Desai is Professor of Sociology at University of Maryland and Senior Fellow at National Council of Applied Economic Research. Views are personal.

This land is their land

Despite the new land acquisition law, questions of resettlement and rehabilitation persist

P REETI S AMPAT
P REETI S AMPAT
P REETI S AMPAT
P REETI S AMPAT

PREETI SAMPAT

P REETI S AMPAT

The Bhangar violence in West Bengal recalls yet again the intensity of con- flicts over the acquisition of land for in- frastructure projects. These conflicts continue despite the new and ostensibly improved land acquisition law, with its higher terms of compensation, social impact assessments, and prior informed consent for projects involving the private sector. But if the 2013 law was en- acted to comprehensively address op- position to land acquisition, why do gov- ernments still get land acquisition wrong? Infrastructure projects are initiated for the “greater common good”, but the people dispossessed by them of their land, livelihood, and environment rarely benefit from all their goodness. The scale of the projects keeps growing. The information regarding them is little or often not accessible at all, and those af- fected discover the project’s full implic- ations either by accident or by doggedly exercising their right to information. Prior informed consent remains a farce. There are no clear procedures for estab- lishing consent in the case of private sector involvement and there is com- plete exemption for state-led projects. Compensation is often the proverbial fish bone — the inadequateness of com- pensating security of land, livelihoods, socio-cultural lifeworlds, not to men- tion the loss of environment and biod- iversity, have been discussed ad nauseam. The impoverishment of large numbers of small and marginal farmers and the landless is inevitable, but the in- security faced by large farmers once compensation money dries up in con- spicuous consumption has also been documented widely.

The insider and the outsider

Agitators are portrayed by ruling gov- ernments as being under the influence of “outsiders” when, in fact, infrastruc- ture paradigms, investors and benefi- ciaries are always the outsiders. The state asserts its sovereignty as the sole authentic “insider” and moves in police troops to protect its sovereign right from agitating locals. The outsider trope is particularly irrelevant when it applies to citizens of this country, but remains salient in state attempts to delegitimise agitations against land acquisition.

to delegitimise agitations against land acquisition. A FATAL FIGHT: “The Bhangar unrest has left two dead,

A FATAL FIGHT: “The Bhangar unrest has left two dead, several arrested and many injured since November 2016.” The wife of Mofijul Khan who died of bullet injuries in Bhangar, West Bengal. PHOTO: AFP

Dating from the struggles of the Nar- mada Bachao Andolan (NBA) in the 1980s against the Sardar Sarovar Project (SSP), the quality of state intervention and discourse outlined above remains uncannily familiar. This is despite the 2013 land acquisition law, and extends across parties. Thousands afected by the SSP were in fact on dharna during the monsoon of 2016, marking 31 years of the NBA’s struggle for justice for those dispos- sessed by the project. At a height of 138.68 m now, only the reservoir gates of the SSP dam remain pending before full submergence of the upstream areas. The 2016 agitations saw relay fasts by those already dispossessed and woe- fully short of promised rehabilitation, and satyagraha by thousands more fa- cing submergence — some without promised resettlement and others not even recognised as adversely afected. The year passed with yet another assur- ance of just rehabilitation, and the 2017 monsoon already looms ahead. In bitter irony further downstream, residents from 22 villages afected by the Dholera Smart City project pro- tested against the ‘denotification’ of agrarian lands from the SSP’s promised irrigation canals in Ahmedabad district, Gujarat. The water that was promised to peasants in Gujarat by the construction of the SSP is now to be oicially diverted to supply real estate and infrastructure projects for a city that, if developed, will

Eminent domain is a colonial doctrine imported by the colonial government to India and retained by the independent Indian state

destroy the existing agrarian infrastruc- ture and socio-cultural and ecological lifeworld of the area. The oicial endorsement of what con- stitutes ‘infrastructure’ is rooted in ideas of infrastructure aiding capitalist cir- cuits, increasingly created in direct part- nership with capitalist investors. Exist- ing agrarian and local infrastructure is devalued, rendered backward, and con- sidered in need of improvement for greater economic growth to accrue. Who benefits from these projects? The thousands agitating in the Narmada val- ley at the end of three decades bear wit- ness to this trajectory of economic growth and development. So do the res- idents of the Dholera villages who stand to lose not just the promise of irrigation, but the very land they survive on. The agitations over Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are other recent remind- ers. POSCO’s inability to set up a plant in Jagatsinghpur, Odisha, as it had not yet obtained forest and other clearances is a case in point. This came after 11 years of tenacious struggle by local residents against the project. Similar agitations have unfolded in Nandigram,

Mangaluru, Maharashtra and Goa, stalling projects or eventually pushing out SEZS developed by corporate giants and backed by state forces.

The Bhangar story

In the violence in Bhangar, the Trin- amool Congress that agitated against the high-handedness of the Communist Party of India (Marxist) in Nandigram and Singur claims the people first agreed to part with 14 acres of land and then outsiders created unrest. The local residents, reportedly organised under the Jomi, Jibika, Paribesh O Bastutantra Raksha Committee, claim that they had no knowledge of the full extent of the project. In negotiations with the govern- ment and the Power Grid Corporation of India Limited, they were informed only of a power sub-station that would improve the power supply of the area. They discovered belatedly that on com- pletion, the Bhangar sub-station would receive power from the Sagardighi thermal power plant and the Farakka unit that would then be transmitted via high-tension wires to Kolkata, the northeastern States and Purnea in Bihar. They demand an environmental impact assessment to ascertain the adverse im- pacts of the high-transmission lines on the local population, agriculture and ecology. Agitations have left two dead, several arrested and many injured since November 2016. The story unfolds in painfully familiar tedium as state repres- entatives claim that land was acquired with consent, compensation was negoti- ated with the residents, and outsiders are instigating violent agitations. Who pays for the losses of life, liveli- hood, peace and well-being of the local residents during months and years, sometimes decades, of agitation? What of the loss to the exchequer, and ulti- mately the Indian public, for all the ef- fort made to suppress agitations and democratic principles by the state’s sov- ereign assertions over the greater com- mon good? Where does the state source its sovereign power over citizens in a democracy? Eminent domain is a colo- nial doctrine imported by the colonial government to India and retained by the independent Indian state to institute capitalist development — the sine qua non of pre- and post-Independence de- velopment in India. Who is the ‘insider’ occupying the sovereign powers of the state over citizens?

Preeti

University, Delhi.

Sampat

teaches

Sociology

at

Ambedkar

CM

YK

sovereign powers of the state over citizens? Preeti University, Delhi. Sampat teaches Sociology at Ambedkar C

ND-ND

sovereign powers of the state over citizens? Preeti University, Delhi. Sampat teaches Sociology at Ambedkar C

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NEWS

THE HINDU

12 | NEWS THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 FROM PAGE ONE Debate simultaneous polls:

NOIDA/DELHI

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

12 | NEWS THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 FROM PAGE ONE Debate simultaneous polls:

FROM PAGE ONE

Debate simultaneous polls: Pranab

Lauds Centre’s decisions on note ban and strikes across the LoC

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

NEW DELHI: President Pranab Mukherjee, on Tuesday, called for a constructive de- bate on simultaneous elec- tions to the Lok Sabha and the Assemblies and state funding of polls to eradicate money power. During his customary ad- dress to the joint session of Parliament at the beginning of the Budget session, Mr. Mukherjee spoke about the need to debate these issues, which are pet themes of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. “Frequent elections put on hold development pro- grammes, disrupt normal public life and impact essen- tial services and burden hu- man resource with pro- longed period of election duty,” he said. “My government wel- comes a constructive debate on simultaneous conduct of elections to the Lok Sabha and State Legislative Assem- blies. Funding of elections to eradicate misuse of money power also needs to be de- bated,” he said.

‘Bold decisions’

In a speech liberally peppered with Hindi and Sanskrit, including a refer-

E. Ahamed sufers cardiac arrest in Parliament

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

point decline in growth’ to projections made by other agencies, including the IMF, which has scaled down its India growth es- timate to 6.6%. The Survey pegs eco- nomic growth in 2016-17 at 7.1%, but this is based mainly on information for months before the Novem- ber 8 demonetisation of ₨500 and ₨1,000 notes. This is half a percentage point lower than the 7.6% growth last year, but the CEA warned that comparisons attributing the diference in growth numbers to demon- etisation alone would be foolhardy.

diplomat told The Hindu.

Terror financing report

On Monday morning, hours before the crack- down on the JuD, Pakistan’s The News had also carried a report describing a meet- ing on January 11 in Wash- ington where Pakistani Ambassador Jalil Jilani was warned by a U.S. Assistant Secretary of State that Pakistan was in danger of being put back on a black- list of the U.S.-led Financial Action Task Force, after a very negative report on the JuD access to terror finan- cing was presented by the Asia-Pacific Group (APG) on Money Laundering. While Indian oicials could not confirm the meeting, they pointed to the upcoming Plenary Ses- sion of the FATF from Feb- ruary 19-24, where Pakistan, who was taken of the list of “high-risk coun- tries of concern” in 2015, could face being put on the blacklist again for “non-co- operation”.

cludes money for private tuition. Mr Ali’s wife shuttles between Assam and Delhi. “When the family is run- ning out of funds, my wife comes to Delhi to find work. But when we find that the children are slip- ping, she returns home to ensure that they are back on track. My mother is there in Assam to look after the children when we are both here in Delhi working.” He said he would work till his children graduate as it was not easy coordinat- ing their education. “I am in constant touch with their teachers over the phone to ensure all is going fine. My daughters have told be that they will de- cide soon if they want to become an engineer or doctor. My second daugh- ter is a bit weak in studies but she has promised me that she will work harder,” he said.

Note ban a radical measure: CEA

Terming job creation as In- dia’s central challenge, the CEA expects growth in the range of 6.75% to 7.5% in 2017-18 — an outlook that hinges on how demonetisa- tion and its lingering efects play out domestically.

Questions IMF forecast

“Bank credit growth has come down, two-wheeler sales have come down. There will be an impact on GDP. But the question is how much,” Mr. Sub- ramanian said, who also stressed that it wouldn’t be appropriate to compare the Survey’s forecast of ‘a quarter to half percentage

the Survey’s forecast of ‘a quarter to half percentage CEREMONIAL GRANDEUR: President Pranab Mukherjee leaves

CEREMONIAL GRANDEUR: President Pranab Mukherjee leaves after addressing the joint session of Parliament, ahead of the Union Budget, in New Delhi on Tuesday. PHOTO: V. SUDERSHAN

Fire in Parliament House

strikes, he said the govern- ment had taken decisive steps to give a fitting reply to the repeated incursions. “On September 29, 2016, our defence forces success- fully conducted surgical strikes at several launchpads along the Line of Control to prevent infiltration by ter- rorists. We are proud of the exemplary courage and valour displayed by our de- fence personnel and owe a debt of gratitude to them,” he said.

the people, especially the poor, in the fight against black money and corruption were “remarkable”. “My government’s very first Cabinet decision [in 2014] was to set up an SIT on black money,” he said. He emphasised that “fin- ancial inclusion is key to poverty alleviation”. An unprecedented 26- crore-plus Jan Dhan ac- counts had been opened for the un-banked”. He also said that the gov- ernment was taking special initiatives to develop North- east India, including opening new road and rail routes to neighbouring countries.

NEW DELHI: A fire broke out in a room in Parliament House on Tuesday night. It was doused within 15 minutes, officials said. A UPS unit in Room No. 50 on the first floor caught fire, sending plumes of smoke, which alerted those present there, said Atul Garg, Chief Fire Officer, Delhi Fire Services. The UPS was in the server room,

from where feeds of Parliament proceedings are sent to Lok Sabha TV, Mr. Garg said. After a call was received around 9.30 p.m., five fire tenders rushed to the spot with senior officials of the fire department. The fire was doused within 15 minutes and no casualties or injuries were reported. — PTI

NEW DELHI: The former Union Minister E. Ahamed sufered cardiac arrest in Parliament when President Pranab Mukherjee was delivering his address to the joint ses- sion at the start of the Budget session on Tuesday. He was immediately taken to hospital, and his condition is critical. Mr. Ahamed, 78, president of the Indian Union Muslim League, complained of breathlessness and uneasi- ness. The staf at Parliament tried to administer first aid, but it did not help. He was rushed to Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, where he has been under in- tensive care and on life support. Mr. Ahamed, MP for Mal- appuram in Kerala, was Min- ister of State for External Af- fairs in the United Progressive Alliance government.

On ventilator support

He underwent a proced- ure to revive his heartbeat and was put on ventilator support in the hospital. Prime Minister Narendra Modi enquired about his condition. Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi and Union Minister of State for the Prime Minister’s Oice Jitendra Singh visited the hospital.

India awaits credible action on Saeed

Mr Swarup said only a cred- ible crackdown on the mas- termind of the Mumbai ter- rorist attack and terrorist organisations involved in cross- border terrorism would be proof of Pakistan’s sincerity Pakistan’s military, the government and the Punjab State law minister have is- sued statements claiming the action was prompted by “policy” considerations and “national security.” However, government oicials watching Is- lamabad closely say fears of U.S. strictures over terror financing may have more to do with it, which were heightened by the Trump administration’s threat to add Pakistan to its immig- ration ban applied to seven countries so far. “They (Pakistani oi- cials) are rattled by the travel ban. That would be a big setback for them….So the action is a message to the U.S. that they are ready to cooperate in their fight against terrorism,” a senior

ence to the northeastern States as “Ashtalakshmi”, Mr. Mukherjee referred to the government’s demonetisa- tion
ence to the northeastern
States as “Ashtalakshmi”, Mr.
Mukherjee referred to the
government’s demonetisa-
tion decision to fight black
money and corruption, and
also the surgical strikes
across the Line of Control as
bold decisions. Many mem-
bers thumped the desks in
approval.
Referring to the surgical
Praises people’s grit
On demonetisation, he
said the resilience and for-
bearance demonstrated by
PM defends decision to
advance Union Budget
lined that the attack was not
on the President but on the
government. He said the
number of farmers’ suicides
had gone up in the last one
year, with no farm loan
waiver, unlike under the UPA
regime, there was much
lower job creation than
promised, and allocations
for Dalits had gone down,
apart from the unease of the
minorities under the govern-
ment.
Referring to the railways,
Mr. Azad said the frequency
of serious accidents in recent
times was unprecedented.
He sought to know why there
were more ceasefire viola-
tions even after the surgical
strikes along the LoC, even
as he said that the Congress
had supported the strikes.
“The Prime Minister had
said (during the UPA govern-
ment) that our government
was weak,” Mr. Azad said, go-
ing on to say that the number
of ceasefire violations and
soldiers killed in the last two
years was higher than the fig-
ures for the past 10 years.
He said the Congress
wanted a debate in Parlia-
ment on the killing of sol-
diers in Kashmir.
He said that while the
President’s address men-
tioned demonetisation and
cited concerns over black
money, counterfeit currency
and militancy, almost all the
money had returned to
banks, meaning hardly any
black money was unearthed.
SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
NEW DELHI: Prime Minister
Narendra Modi on Tuesday
defended his government’s
decision to bring forward the
presentation of the Union
Budget by a month, in the
middle of Assembly polls in
five States, saying it would
facilitate execution of devel-
opment works by giving
more time for allotment of
funds and their spending.
He also pointed out that
the Atal Bihari Vajpayee gov-
ernment had changed the
time at which the presenta-
tion of the Budget starts from
5 p.m. to 11 a.m. to align it
with the country’s clock.
Mr. Modi was meeting Na-
tional Democratic Alliance
partners on the first day of
the Budget session, after dis-
cussions with the parlia-
mentary executive commit-
tee of the BJP, which includes
party president Amit Shah
and general secretary
Kailash Vijaywargiya, senior
Ministers and the party’s
chief whips in both Houses
of Parliament. “The Opposi-
tion has no other issue to
raise against us except this
[bringing forward the tabling
of the Budget],” sources
quoted Mr. Modi as saying.
The sources also said that
the Prime Minister termed
the President’s address to
both Houses a “reflection of
our work as a government”
and asked allies to “unitedly
take credit and take the word
to the people”.
He emphasised that the
decision to demonetise cur-
rency notes of ₨500 and
₨1,000 taken on November 8
had been a well-thought-out
one and the people had wel-
comed it.
He spoke of the desirabil-
ity of a quick rollout of the
Goods and Services Tax
(GST) regime.
At the NDA meeting, the
Telugu Desam Party (TDP)
expressed its support for de-
monetisation, while Shiv
Sena leader Anandrao Adsul
said the government should
be more supportive of co-
operative banks, sources
said.
Padma awards
Three killed in blast in car near
Cong. candidate’s road show
E. Sreedharan
Sreedharan told The Hindu
here on Tuesday.
The
decision
not
to
present a separate rail
budget was not in the in-
terest of the Railways and the
country, Mr. Sreedharan said
and pointed out that the util-
ity had become a department
similar to those of shipping,
posts and aviation.
“One should not forget the
vast assets of the Railways
and they [the government]
could have mobilised the
funds by utilising the assets
as surety,” he said.
Stating that Railways had
lost its sheen and the budget
would be a big disappoint-
ment, he said “all is lost” as
the decision taken by Rail-
way Minister Suresh Prabhu
was irreversible. If consulted
on the decision, he would
have warned the Minister
against the merger of the rail-
way budget with the Union
Budget.
BATHINDA: Three persons were
killed and 15 injured in an ex-
plosion in a car near the venue
of the road show of a Congress
candidate at Maur Mandi here.
“Three persons, two adults
and a boy, were killed in a blast
in a Maruti car. Their identity
has not been ascertained yet,”
Bathinda Deputy Commis-
sioner Ghanshyam Thori said.
It is not known what led to
the incident.
The car has been badly dam-
aged, he said.
The blast occurred shortly
Denied visa under new U.S.
policy, say Kashmir athletes
ISIS posters appear in
Subathu cantonment
STAFF CORRESPONDENT
PEERZADA ASHIQ
SRINAGAR: Two Kashmiri ath-
letes on Tuesday said that
they were denied visa to
travel to the U.S. for a sports
event because of the coun-
try’s “new policy” on
immigrants.
President Donald Trump
on Friday ordered extensive
vetting of Muslim travellers.
“All my documents were in
order, but the interviewer
told me, ‘Sorry, we cannot
give you a visa because of our
current policy’,” said Tan-
veer Hussain, 24, a snow-
shoe champion.
He was scheduled to parti-
cipate in a championship in
New York on February 25. He
had an invitation from the
World Snow-Shoe Federa-
tion for the event being held
at Saranac Lake.
“I was interviewed by U.S.
Embassy oicials for over six
minutes before they turned
Order won’t
afect India: U.S.
NEW DELHI: Indian citizens are
unaffected by the latest
executive order which bans
American visas to tourists from
seven countries, the U.S.
embassy said on Wednesday.
Speaking to The Hindu, an
embassy spokesperson described
the denial of visa to a Kashmiri
sportsperson as a “specific case”
which is not reflective of U.S. visa
policy toward Indian citizens.
“For privacy reasons, we
cannot discuss specific cases.
However, we note that Indian
citizens are not affected by the
order,” said a spokesman of the
U.S. embassy in New Delhi. —
Special Correspondent
“Indian Snowshoers
Denied Visas, due to ‘current
(US) policy’ This from our
good friend Abid Khan, from
Kashmir, minutes ago in our
Facebook Messaging,” Clyde
Rabideau, Mayor of the Vil-
lage of Saranac Lake in New
York, wrote on another ath-
lete’s Facebook page.
Abid Khan was also
denied a visa.
SHIMLA: The residents of
Subathu, an Army canton-
ment area in the Solan district
of Himachal Pradesh, on
Tuesday morning saw hand-
written posters threatening
bomb attacks over the next
few days by extremist outfit
ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and
the Levant).
Anxiety in Kashmir
down my application,” he
said. “The oicials did not
elaborate on the “current
policy.”
Mr. Trump’s new policy
towards immigrants and
Muslims has caused anxiety
in Kashmir. CPI(M) legis-
lator M.Y. Tarigami on
Monday staged a walkout in
the J&K Assembly protest-
ing against the new policies.
“Trump’s decision is cow-
ardly and self-defeating. It’s
dangerous for world peace
and is bound to polarise the
world and endanger the lives
of innocents,” said Mr.
Tarigami.

Maximum participation

Only RSS happy with Modi government, says Congress

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

NEW DELHI: The Congress on Tuesday sought to pick holes in the President's address to Parliament to mark the start of the Budget session, claim- ing that no section of society, apart from the RSS and BJP, was happy under the Naren- dra Modi government. “President has said ‘sabka saath, sabka vikas’. But they are keeping the company of only the RSS and working only for the BJP’s progress. Neither farmer, nor worker, nor youth nor any other sec- tion is happy,” Leader of the Opposition in the Rajya Sabha Ghulam Nabi Azad said here. Mr. Azad, however, under-

The Prime Minister urged maximum participation from MPs of NDA partners and the BJP in Parliament, except those who needed to travel for campaigning in the Assembly polls in five States.

Earlier at the BJP’s parlia- mentary executive commit- tee meet, Mr. Modi reiterated the change in the way Padma awardees were selected. “Pure desh ko Padma Shri mila hai, sirf Dilli ko nahin [the whole country has been covered in the Padma award selection, and not just fa- vourites of Delhi],” he said. He singled out the case of Dr. Yadav, a nonagenarian doctor in Indore, who has been ofering free treatment to poor patients for nearly six decades, as one of ex- amples of the change in the way Padma awards had been decided this year.

Delhi ragpicker sells waste to fund his kid’s education

To find a job, he moved to Delhi and was taught by his uncle how to rummage through garbage bins and find waste worth selling. He was then guided by Chintan, an NGO, and be- came a part of an organisa- tion called Safai Sena that guided him on the import- ance of educating his children. “For me, life is going on alright but I don’t want my children to join this profes- sion. I want to educate them and hope that they find a job,” he said. Mr Ali admits that he of- ten has sleepless nights thinking about how to con- tinue funding the educa- tion of his children. His son, Monirul Islam, is in Class V and is studying in a private school. His daughters, Sumeram and Haleema, both in Class IX, are in a government school. He sends Rs. 3000- 4000 home every month for their education that in-

Metro Man rues end of rail budget

S. ANIL RADHAKRISHNAN

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The de-

cision to do away with the 92-year-old practice of presenting the Railway Budget and merge it with the Union Budget is a wrong policy that will clip the wings of Railways, Principal Adviser to the Delhi Metro Railway Corporation E. Sreedharan has said.

‘A foolish decision’

“It is a foolish decision on the part of the Union Rail- way Minister and the Rail- ways will have to knock at the doors of the Finance Ministry for funds,” Mr.

after the road show of Har- minder Singh Jassi, who is con- testing from Maur assembly seat, the police said. Jassi is a relative of Sirsa- based Dera Sacha Sauda head Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh. - PTI

Kathmandu meet to finalise SAARC budget, agenda

KALLOL BHATTACHERJEE

NEW DELHI: Indian and Pakistani oicials will meet to finalise the budget and agenda of the SAARC during the February 1-2 meeting in Kathmandu. The meeting will mark the beginning of the annual calendar of events of the organisation which failed to meet in Is- lamabad for a summit and is in focus as it is the first time high oicials of member- countries will meet since the cancellation of the summit. “Joint Secretaries in charge of SAARC afairs from member-states will hold the annual program- ming committee meeting in Kathmandu to finalise budget for the SAARC sec- retariat and the regional centres. The meeting is likely to take stock of the present agenda and develop- ment projects,” said Pavan

Diplomats say the meeting is critical as it will require consensus among members

Kumar Dubey, oicial at the SAARC Secretariat. Mr. Dubey said SAARC had been performing its routine administrative and developmental tasks after members withdrew from the November 2016 summit ob- jecting to cross-border ter- ror from Pakistan.

Nepal’s role

The Planning Committee meeting also indicates the continuing role of Nepal as the Chair of SAARC which was to have passed on to Pakistan last November. However, diplomats indic- ated that the meeting in Kathmandu will be critical as

The posters were glued by unknown people in the mar- ket, a boys’ school, some parks and on the toll tax barrier. The posters claimed ISIS will plant bombs with the help of TVs, computers and washing machines from Subathu to Nepal. The blasts would occur around the com- ing Vidhan Sabha elections in the hill State, they said.

it will require consensus among members for final- ising budget of the organisa- tion. “We will have to build consensus among all mem- bers for the agenda of the or- ganisation,” said Mani Bhat- tarai, Joint Secretary in charge of SAARC afairs in Nepal’s Ministry of Foreign Afairs, indicating that both India and Pakistan will play a crucial role in meeting. A senior Bhutan diplomat, however, told The Hindu that the meeting of Kath- mandu would have to be fol- lowed by other meetings where more coordination among SAARC members would be needed. “India was also expected to hold a meeting but it has declined to hold it for the time being,” said the diplo- mat, indicating that India- Pakistan diferences con- tinue to be a major factor in the organisation.

diplo- mat, indicating that India- Pakistan diferences con- tinue to be a major factor in the

CM

YK

diplo- mat, indicating that India- Pakistan diferences con- tinue to be a major factor in the

ND-ND

diplo- mat, indicating that India- Pakistan diferences con- tinue to be a major factor in the

NOIDA/DELHI

THE HINDU

NOIDA/DELHI THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 ELECTION WATCH UTTAR PRADESH, UTTARAKHAND, PUNJAB, MANIPUR, GOA |

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

ELECTIONWATCH

UTTAR PRADESH, UTTARAKHAND, PUNJAB, MANIPUR, GOA

| 13

BJP will win 26 seats on its own: Parrikar

‘I have gone around all constituencies; I understand the pulse of the people.’

In the middle of his busy schedule, Defence Minister and former Goa Chief Min- ister Manohar Parrikar spoke to Prakash Kamat on the election scene in the State and related issues. Spending the campaign days huddled with senior party leaders at the BJP headquar- ters in the city when not at- tending party meetings or visiting houses in Panaji, Mr. Parrikar considers bringing the BJP back to power in the State a prestige issue.

Goa seems to be heading for a hung Assembly?

Not at all. This is usual talk. I have covered all the 40 constituencies extensively doing over 200 corner meet- ings till now. As of today, we will get 22 seats and

gress [the Dhavlikar broth- ers of the Maharashtrwadi Gomantak Party] previously. I am also aware that on our side also, a couple of big names may fall; I don’t deny that.

If you are so confident of victory, why did the Central leadership of the party indicate mid-election that a Central Goan leader (obviously you) could be sent to Goa to take over as Chief Minister?

You saw, even at the de- tailed press conference earlier [on Tuesday], I re- fused to comment on that beyond saying that “you yourself say what Amit Shahji has said. When the party’s national president has said what has to be said on the issue, I do not want to comment anything further.” I am a disciplined soldier of the party and has so far done, and always will do, what the party wants me to do.

Still, does it mean that you will take over as Chief Minister if the BJP comes to power?

as things settle down, we will get 26 out of the 36 seats we contest in the 40-member House. Take it from me. I have gone around all con- stituencies, I understand the pulse of the people. We have an anti-incumbency feeling

INFOCUS

in a few constituencies, I don’t disagree, but out of that, we have replaced the candidates. We will form a government on our own.

How different is this election from the Parrikar-led “Parivartan” election of

2012?

Mark my words [hinting at an election over 20 years ago in which three stalwarts of Goan politics, includ- ing a former Chief Minister, were defeated], this election too will be a wa- tershed elec- tion for many big fellows in the Opposi- tion, including Congress lead- ers and two of the fellows who were in al- liance not only with us but also with the

Con-
Con-

You journalists are polit- ical analysts. You can analyse what such a statement made by senior party leaders like Nitin Gadkari and the party’s national president means. Having said that, let me tell you, this was a strategic statement. Ahead of election, people expect delivery. When you go to people, they want to know who will de- liver the goods. They have confidence in me. They have trust in me that I deliver. Not that our other leaders did not deliver. The party found that people wanted that kind of reassurance that I will deliver for them. Whether I am in Delhi or

here, people now know that I will deliver.

festo only to invite the same endless controversies?

Why has the BJP manifesto skirted issues such as action against illegal mining, which led to a ₨25,000-crore revenue loss to the State, the fight against casinos, the regional plan and the medium of instruction?

Rebel RSS leader Subhash Velingkar has spoken about you in strong language as a betrayer…

I

will not comment on

what Mr. Velingkar says…

But his Goa Suraksha Manch, in alliance with the Maharashtrawadi Gomantak Party and the Shiv Sena, has vowed to defeat the BJP… As the RSS is away, is the BJP suffering damage in this election?

See, the RSS you are talk- ing about is led by Velingkar, who has formed a political party that is contest- ing against the BJP. We fight them in the election. But take it from me. I don’t believe in this RSS, but only in the Nagpur-led RSS and that is very much with us in Goa and the results will be there for you to see. Let him fight with his issue and we will fight with our issues. People will decide. Because you insist, let me tell you. Some individuals fall prey to media-hype. Me- dia likes to create them and tom-tom them. Election will show you that in terms of electoral politics some people would be no where. As for the vote cutting, you will know whose vote who is cutting in their strong areas [refers to the AAP cutting Congress votes in Catholic- majority south Goa]. Our vote nobody can cut. It is not only intact but will also go up. Last time, in alliance, we contested 26 seats and won

21 with a 34.86% vote share.

This time, we are contesting

36 seats and take it from me,

As far as casinos are con- cerned, what is needed is an administrative decision to locate them elsewhere from the Mandovi river. The BJP government has said time and again that it will do once a suitable alternative place is found. We will not increase the number of licenses. As for illegal mining, a special investigation team has been working. Law will take its course. We have suc- ceeded in resolving the issue of medium of instruction saying that while we will promote regional language schools in a big way, there is no question of stopping grants to primary schools in English medium run by the Arch- diocese. As for illegal min- ing, my Public Accounts Committee report said it led to a loss of ₨4,000-5,000 crore. Revenue loss is royalty loss. The Justice (retd.) M.B. Shah report estimated illegal extraction of ore to be ₨35,000 crore. On ground after an actual assessment, it was found to be around ₨3,500-4,000 crore. We have been recovering that. Mining has been resumed based on guidelines of the Supreme Court, which has put 20 mil- lion tonnes as the annual cap. We feel that the cap should be raised by 5-10 millions and done strictly under a mech- anism to monitor. So why re- peat these things in the mani-

anism to monitor. So why re- peat these things in the mani- we will cross 44%

we will cross 44% votes.

On the industrial front, the government has promised an investment of ₨25,000 crore and 25,000 jobs?

Industrial development

could not take place because

of the Congress scam on spe-

cial economic zones, in which huge government land

of 36 lakh sq. m got locked in

a Supreme Court case. We

are trying to see how that can be unlocked so that we can

give land for industrial de- velopment, which is a very crucial factor in this tiny State with land being a scarce resource.

In a multi-cornered election, who is your main rival? Is it the Congress?

The Congress this time also will not cross double-di- gits. May go down from the nine seats they won last time. Why Congress, of the 36 constituencies we are con- testing, virtually in 32-33 constituencies, we are the main contestant pitted against the Congress or even Independents.

There is an allegation that for a Defence Minister, you come down to Goa too often instead of being in Delhi?

Just ask anybody in Delhi that because I come down to Goa, have any files or pro- jects of the Defence Ministry been pending? Is there any such complaint from the De- fence Ministry that any pa- per, any file, any policy or other decision is pending be- cause I am in Goa … except, of course, for these eight days when I am stuck here still important matters I dis-

pose of on phone. Why only Goa, I travel all across the

country.

With spy cams, AAP to frame vote-buyers

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

stituencies. This job should have been done by the Elec- tion Commission, but we will keep an eye on malprac- tices and lodge a complaint as and when someone is caught on camera,” AAP na- tional spokesperson Ashutosh told presspersons here on Tuesday. Mr. Ashutosh said that in the St. Andre constituency, over ₨1 crore in cash had been seized from a rival can- didate on Monday night in a search by the flying squad formed by the Chief Elect- oral Oicer. He alleged that despite repeated alerts by the AAP about money being distrib- uted to solicit votes, the Election Commission had failed to tackle the menace and instead filed an FIR against Mr. Kejriwal. South Goa Magistrate Swapnil Naik said ₨17 lakh was seized during the raid in St. Andre, and eforts were on to locate its source.

raid in St. Andre, and eforts were on to locate its source. P A N A

PANAJI: Accusing the election authorities of not doing enough to check “liberal money distribution by rival candidates” all across Goa during the run-up to the As- sembly polls, the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) on Tues- day said it had hired 1,000 spy cameras for distribution in the 40 constituencies to catch cash and liquor distrib- utors in the act. “Spy cams are being dis- tributed in all the 40 con-

act. “Spy cams are being dis- tributed in all the 40 con- ILLUSTRATIONS: SATHEESH VELLINEZHI Big

ILLUSTRATIONS: SATHEESH VELLINEZHI

Big test before the big day

Big test before the big day THE RUN OF HIS LIFE: Mahendra Rawat, an Independent candidate

THE RUN OF HIS LIFE: Mahendra Rawat, an Independent candidate in the Malihabad constituency of Uttar Pradesh, makes a dash for the Collectorate in Lucknow to file his nomination papers on Tuesday after he lost precious time stuck in a

traffic jam. — PHOTO: RAJEEV BHATT

POLLDIARY

Money, mandate and Manipur

IMPHAL: After the many lunches and dinners clandestinely hosted by some candidates, there are now reports of barely concealed distribution of money to voters. During the by-election in the Hiyanglam constituency, local media said that each voter was bribed with as much as ₨5,000 — the amount increased as the voting hour

drew to a close. While she was the Trinamool Congress State president, Kim Gangte

urged people to cast their

votes according to their conscience, although some of them might have taken money. The demonetisation had hamstrung most politicians, but with phenomenal resilience, they are back in the election battlefield and some candidates are doling out edible oil, sugar, rice and other consumer items to poor villagers. There has been no report of officials of the Election Commission of India (EC) making their presence felt. — A Correspondent

India (EC) making their presence felt. — A Correspondent Ibobi confident of win despite hiccups IMPHAL:

Ibobi confident of win despite hiccups

IMPHAL: Manipur Chief Minister Okram Ibobi Singh and State Congress president T.N. Haokip are leaving for Delhi on Wednesday to finalise the list of party’s candidates. Out of the 60 constituencies, candidates in 41 constituencies have almost been finalised since they are the lone applicants for the Congress tickets in their respective constituencies. However, there are significant problems in the remaining seats since some fringe organisations have branded the Congress government as ‘anti-tribal’ and asked the politicians in their respective areas to not join the Congress. Some Congress MLAs have resigned and joined other parties. Congress MLAs Nemcha Kipgen and V. Valte resigned recently and joined the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). Sources said there may not be any takers for the Congress tickets in some of the remaining constituencies. Mr. Ibobi, who has been CM for three consecutive terms, told IMPHAL: The Hindu that his party will stage a comeback in view of a slew of The Hindu that his party will stage a comeback in view of a slew of the developmental works undertaken by it in the last 15 years. However, the BJP, which has a lone MLA in the 60 member House, says that it will wrest power this time as there is rampant corruption and non- governance. — A Correspondent

Akhilesh Das returns to Congress fold

NEW DELHI: Former Union Minister Akhilesh Das rejoined the Congress here on Tuesday in the presence of senior party leader Ghulam Nabi Azad. Mr. Das, a leader from Uttar Pradesh, had left the party to join the BSP. Mr. Das called the occasion a homecoming for him, saying it was a mistake on his part to leave the “temple of purity.” Reposing faith in Congress president Sonia Gandhi, he said he would work to ensure that the party did well in U.P. Welcoming Mr. Das back, Mr. Azad said there was anger in the business community — in which the former has some support —against the Modi government. Saying that he hoped Rahul Gandhi would be Prime Minister in 2019, Mr. Das said traders were unhappy as an impression had been deliberately created after demonetisation that they are dishonest. — Special Correspondent

that they are dishonest. — Special Correspondent Priyanka to stay put in Amethi, Rae Bareli PANAJI:

Priyanka to stay put in Amethi, Rae Bareli

PANAJI: Clearing the air on the future role of Priyanka Gandhi Vadra, especially when she has played an important part in sewing the alliance with the Samajwadi Party in Uttar Pradesh, the Congress on Tuesday said she has, for the “time being,” restricted her role to Rae Bareli and Amethi of her “own volition.” “Priyankaji has always defined her own political role and of her own volition, has restricted it to the two constituencies represented by her mother and brother, that is Rae Bareli and Amethi respectively,” Congress spokesperson Randeep Surjewala said. Mr. Surjewala was in Goa for campaigning. — PTI

said. Mr. Surjewala was in Goa for campaigning. — PTI Angry, pained and determined to stem

Angry, pained and determined to stem the tide of sacrilege

VIKAS VASUDEVA

pointing out that it was right in front of this Gurdwara that the torn pages of the holy book were found on October 12, 2015.

‘All faiths targeted’

“It’s not only Sikh holy books; there have been sac- rilege of Hindu and Islamic holy books as well in parts of the State, which is unaccept- able. The government is the custodian of people’s faith and if it fails in its duty, then naturally, people will get angry,” he said. After the outrage at Bar- gari that protests erupted here and in surrounding vil- lages. After two pro- testers were killed in police firing at the nearby Behbal Kalan village, ten- sions spread across the State and anger against the govern- ment snowballed.

BARGARI (FARIDKOT): At a recent

election rally in Kotkapura, Prime Minister Narendra Modi tried to soothe Sikh sentiments hurt by wanton acts of desecration of Sri Guru Granth Sahib in the State, but barely 10 kilo- metres away at Bargari, the village where the outrage first took place over a year ago, many believe that the political damage is irreparable. Soaking in the winter sun outside Gurdwara Sahib Pat- shahi Dashmi in the village, Balwinder Singh, a former carpenter, who is here to attend a re- ligious ceremony, feels the State gov- ernment should have made more eforts to find the culprits and pun- ish them. “It’s been more than a year, but those responsible for the de- secration of Sri Guru Granth Sahib have not been caught I’m angry, I’m pained and so are many others in the vil- lage with the Akali govern- ment,” he told The Hindu,

lage with the Akali govern- ment,” he told The Hindu , ‘Govt. responsible’ “The Guru Granth

‘Govt. responsible’

“The Guru Granth Sahib

is treated as a living guru by us [Sikhs] and such incid- ents have to be curbed as

It’s the re-

soon as possible

sponsibility of the govern- ment to stop such incidents,

CM

YK

of the govern- ment to stop such incidents, C M Y K A protest in Amritsar

A protest in Amritsar against the desecration ofthe Guru Granth Sahib. People are still angry with the ruling party over inaction in cases of vandalism of the holy book. FILE PHOTO

but they (SAD-BJP com- bine) have failed,” said Prit- pal Singh, a local farmer, who had come to pay obeis- ance at the Gurdwara. The ruling Akali government,

meanwhile, has blamed the Aam Aadmi Party for the series of desecrations. “In- cidents of sacrilege started in Punjab after the entry of the AAP into the State. The

Punjab government had solved around 30 cases of sacrilege and only the incid- ent at Behbal Kalan re- mained unsolved,” Deputy Chief Minister Sukhbir Singh Badal said at the Kotkapura rally, requesting the Prime Minister to direct the CBI to conduct a speedy inquiry. Mr. Modi was quick to assure the crowd that the culprits would be punished.

Pre-poll damage control

Political analysts in Pun- jab see the latest attempt of the Prime Minster and the Akali leadership to heal the hurt feelings as a last-ditch efort to consolidate the sup- port of Sikh voters that could be a make-or-break factor in the upcoming polls. “They [SAD-BJP] have realised and recognised the fact that “sacrilege incid- ents” are a key issue in these elections, and Mr. Modi’s as- surance from the election stage at Kotkapura seems to be a damage-control exer- cise,” Ashutosh Kumar, Pro- fessor of Political Science at Panjab University, said. Professor Kumar said the Shiromani Akali Dal had been facing the wrath on the

sacrilege issue as it claims to be a “Panthic” party, but the BJP cannot absolve itself of responsibility as it is a part- ner in the government. “Sacrilege incidents happened during the SAD- BJP combine regime, which were related to law and or- der. In a secular polity, the government has to respect sentiments of all religions and it is its constitutional duty to protect all religions.

It was their [SAD-BJP] re-

sponsibility to find out the culprits and punish them,” he said. The Aam Aadmi Party has squarely blamed the ruling Akali government for the de- secrations. AAP State con- vener Gurpreet Singh Waraich said on Tuesday that during the tenure of Sukhbir Singh Badal as Home Minister, 95 cases of sacrilege took place, one be- ing the theft of the Guru Granth Sahib from the gurd- wara at Burj Jawahar Singh Wala village in June 2015. “What could be more shameful that even a year- and-a-half later, Sukhbir Badal was unable to trace the Holy Guru Granth Sahib,” he said.

POLLSTAT
POLLSTAT
even a year- and-a-half later, Sukhbir Badal was unable to trace the Holy Guru Granth Sahib,”
even a year- and-a-half later, Sukhbir Badal was unable to trace the Holy Guru Granth Sahib,”

ND-ND

even a year- and-a-half later, Sukhbir Badal was unable to trace the Holy Guru Granth Sahib,”
even a year- and-a-half later, Sukhbir Badal was unable to trace the Holy Guru Granth Sahib,”

14

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WORLD

THE HINDU

14 | WORLD THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Trump fires defiant acting Attorney-General Pak.

NOIDA/DELHI

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017

14 | WORLD THE HINDU NOIDA/DELHI WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Trump fires defiant acting Attorney-General Pak.

Trump fires defiant acting Attorney-General

Pak. military defends Hafiz Saeed’s detention

Obama-appointee betrayed the Department of Justice by refusing to enforce the travel curbs, says White House

VARGHESE K. GEORGE

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump on Monday sacked acting Attorney-General Sally Yates, an Obama ap- pointee, after she instructed government law oicers not to defend the presidential or- der that put restrictions on people from seven Muslim- majority countries travelling

to the U.S. “Now have an Obama A.G,” Mr. Trump tweeted before he sacked Ms. Yates. “The Democrats are delaying my Cabinet picks for purely political reasons. They have nothing going but to ob- struct,” he said after Ms. Yates sent out her instructions to government lawyers. “For as long as I am the act- ing Attorney-General, the Department of Justice will not present arguments in de- fence of the executive order,” she wrote. She “has betrayed the Department of Justice by refusing to enforce a legal or- der designed to protect the citizens of the United States”,

a White House statement is-

sued on Monday night said. “Ms. Yates is an Obama ad- ministration appointee who

is weak on borders and very

weak on illegal immigration,” the statement said hours after Mr. Obama waded into the controversy, supporting pro- testers and questioning his successor.

Values at stake

Mr. Obama’s spokesperson said the former President is “heartened” by the popular mobilisation, which is “ex- actly what we expect to see when American values are at stake”. In the opening salvo on Tuesday morning — at 6.22 am — the President tweeted:

“Nancy Pelosi and Fake Tears Chuck Schumer held a rally at the steps of The Supreme Court and mic did not work (a mess)-just like Dem party!” The mike had mal- functioned at the Democratic

Austria to ban full-face veil in

protest meet on Monday night and Mr. Schumer had broken down on Sunday, talk- ing about the travel ban. Mr. Trump had character- ised his sweeping travel ban as continuation of Mr. Oba-

ma’s policy. The former Pres- ident’s spokesperson refuted this suggestion. “With regard to comparis- ons to President Obama’s for-

eign policy decisions

President fundamentally dis- agrees with the notion of dis- criminating against individu- als because of their faith or

religion.”

Dissent note

Meanwhile, the White House challenged career for- eign service oicers to quit if they did not agree with the President’s travel ban and other policies, even as dozens of them are gathering signa- tures for a dissent note. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said: “They should either get with the programme or they can go.” Sparking of another con-

frontation with the Obama team, the White House claimed there was nothing unprecedented in chief

strategist Steve Bannon at- tending the Principals Com- mittee meeting of the Na- tional Security Council, as an adviser to the former Presid- ent too used to do it. David Axelrod, the adviser to President Obama, however

refuted the claim. “As a senior adviser, I had the opportunity to witness the fateful deliber- ations of his NSC Principals Committee over the strategy the U.S. would pursue in the

war with al-Qaeda

ever] I was not a member of the committee. I did not speak or participate. I sat on the sidelines as a silent ob- server. In elevating Bannon to sit with the Secretaries of De-

fense and State and other key national security figures on the NSC Principals Commit- tee, President Trump has blazed new ground.”

the

[How-

tee, President Trump has blazed new ground.” the [How- VOCAL OUTRAGE: Acting Attorney-General Sally Yates, who

VOCAL OUTRAGE: Acting Attorney-General Sally Yates, who was sacked by President Donald Trump on Monday; (right) two immigrants, born in the U.S. to Syrian parents, demonstrate against the ban at the Los Angeles International Airport on

Monday. — PHOTOS: REUTERS, AFP

MUBASHIR ZAIDI

KARACHI: As India cautiously watches developments in Pakistan over the house ar- rest of Jamaat-ud-Dawa chief Hafiz Saeed and four others, Pakistan’s military on Tues- day defended the decision saying it was taken jointly by the civilian and military leadership. “This is a policy decision that the state took in national interest,” Asif Ghafoor, Dir- ector General of the Inter- Services Public Relations, told reporters in Rawalpindi. On Monday, the Pakistani government put Saeed under arrest and his organisation JuD and charity arm Falah-e- Insaniyat on a watch-list. Ma- jor Gen. Ghafoor denied me- dia reports that the action was taken on pressure from the U.S. A senior government oi- cial told The Hindu that a meeting was held in Prime Minister’s House over the weekend in which both civil- ian and military leadership decided to take action against JuD. “A decision was con- sciously taken to put JuD’s charity branch Falah-e-Insan- iyat also on the terror watch list so that the massive fund- ing JuD gets in the name of charity can be choked,” he

ing JuD gets in the name of charity can be choked,” he Supporters of Hafiz Saeed

Supporters of Hafiz Saeed protest against his arrest in Lahore on Tuesday. PHOTO: AP

said requesting anonymity. On Monday, Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar indicated ac- tion against JuD in a press conference when he said the government has been delib- erating on taking action since it was banned by the UN. Ma- jor Gen. Ghafoor also came out soft on India saying Pakistan does not want war with India. “We don’t want war with anyone. War is not a solution,” he said. Meanwhile, Hafiz Saeed remained under house arrest at his Johar Town residence in Lahore as his guards were deployed in the inner cordon while the police outside the main gate. JuD has indicated that it would file a petition in Lahore High Court against the house arrest.

a petition in Lahore High Court against the house arrest. from Muslim majority countries. The standard

from Muslim majority countries. The standard duration of Optional Practical Training (OPT) jobs is one year, but with extensions allowed by consecutive administrations it can now extend up to three years for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) masters.

The Obama administration allowed the last extension in May

2016.

“STEM OPT extension is especially appealing to Indian students, who are concentrated in master’s programmes in engineering and computer science. “Data from SEVP (Student and Exchange Visitor Program) indicates that in 2016, 83% of Indian students, 43% of Saudi Arabian students, 78% of Iranian students, and 40% of Chinese students were enrolled in STEM programmes,” said Rahul Choudaha, co-founder of InterEdge, a U.S.-based provider of support services for international students.

New bill seeks to double H-1B salary

VARGHESE K. GEORGE

WASHINGTON: A new bill

introduced by Democratic Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren proposing changes in the H-1B visa programme seeks to raise the minimum salary under the scheme to $1,30,000 from the current $60,000. The legislation, if passed, could hit Indian and American IT companies which use H-1B visas to hire foreign skilled workers, including Indians.

Long-pending issue

A comprehensive immigration reform through legislation, however, is a long-pending issue in the U.S. and thrashing out a law that accommodates all domestic constituencies in the country is not an easy task. On H-1B alone, there are at least four bills now, including the one introduced by Ms. Lofgren. She argues that while the proposed change will allow companies to hire foreign talent when it is locally unavailable, it

plugs the loophole that allows them to undercut local employees by bringing cheaper replacements from abroad. “My legislation refocuses the H-1B programme to its original intent — to seek out and find the best and brightest from around the world, and to supplement the U.S. workforce with talented, highly-paid, and highly-skilled workers who help create jobs here in America, not replace them.” She represents parts of Silicon Valley in the U.S. House, as does Indian-American Congressman Ro Khanna, who also supports such restructuring of the H-1B programme. While the legislative route to immigration reforms is fraught, an executive action could immediately roll back presidential decisions that expanded the scope of the original legislation, under George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Vox.com published the draft of an executive order on immigration reform that awaits

Quebec attack:

Suspect charged with murder

QUEBEC CITY: A Canadian polit- ical science student known to have nationalist sympath- ies was charged on Monday with six counts of murder over a shooting spree at a Quebec mosque. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau condemned as a “terrorist attack” Sunday night’s assault on the Islamic Cultural Center in a busy dis- trict of Quebec City. Eight people were also wounded in the crossfire, and five of them remained in critical condition in hospital on Monday. Alexandre Bis- sonnette , the attacker, was charged with six counts of premeditated murder and five of attempted murder, police said. So far, authorities have shed no light on what may have prompted the attack. Local media said Bisson- nette is a Quebec nationalist and anti-feminist who re- cently “liked” U.S. President Donald Trump's page on Facebook. He also has reportedly ex- pressed support for French far-right politician Marine Le Pen. — AFP

President Donald Trump’s signature. The proposed order requires Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to carry out “site visits” at places where guest workers with L-1 visas are employed immediately. Within a period of two years, the DHS will expand such inspections to all sites where guest workers are employed. L-1 visas are used for intra-company transfers. It also requires the DHS to “improve monitoring of foreign students” in the U.S.

STEM programmes

The document titled “Protecting American Jobs and Workers by Strengthening the Integrity of Foreign Worker Visa Programs” was one of the six documents that Vox received from a source. The outlet did not publish the documents until two them turned out to be authentic. Since publication last week, a third one also turned out to be authentic — the one on restricting travel

‘Jihadist groups’ hail Trump’s travel ban

WASHINGTON: Jihadist groups, including Islamic State (IS) sympathisers, have hailed the Trump administration’s ban on travel to the U.S. from seven Muslim-majority na- tions. They said it would per- suade American Muslims to side with the extremists, ac- cording to a report in Wash- ington Post. One post on a pro-IS social media account hailed Mr. Trump as “the best caller to Islam,” while some posts pre- dicted that he will soon

launch a new war in West Asia. Some posts suggested that Mr. Trump was fulfilling the predictions of Anwar al- Awlaki, the U.S.-born preacher, who famously said that the “West would eventu- ally turn against its Muslim citizens,” it said. Another post on a pro-IS channel on Tele- gram. “Abu Magrebi”, said Mr. Trump’s actions “clearly re- vealed the truth and harsh reality behind the American government’s hatred toward Muslims”. — PTI

Rohingya refugees to be relocated on remote island

Hatiya island is situated on the estuary of River Meghna and is prone to flooding

entering the country last October. Most of those who fled to Bangladesh live in squalid conditions in refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar district, which borders Rakhine State and is home to the country’s biggest tourist resort. Bangladesh has also asked its oicials in the border dis- tricts to identify the Myan- mar nationals who “illegally infiltrated” the country. The island push came as members of Myanmar’s state-appointed body headed by Kofi Annan, tasked with finding long- term solutions for Rakhine state, visited refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar. The team also met with Bangladeshi oicials at Cox’s Bazar, and was due to hold talks with Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP

Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c
Hasina be- fore their departure on Wed- nesday. — AFP p u b l i c

public places DHAKA: Bangladesh will push ahead with a controversial

plan to relocate tens of thou- sands of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar to a remote island despite warnings it is uninhabitable and prone to flooding. The government has set up a committee com- prising state oicials in the coastal districts, ordering au- thorities to help identify and relocate undocumented My- anmar nationals to Thengar Char in the Bay of Bengal. “The committee will assist transferring both registered and unregistered refugees from Myanmar to Thengar Char near Hatiya island in Noakhali district,” according to an order issued by the Cabinet Division last week and posted online. Hatiya is situated on the estuary of the River Meghna and is a nine- hour journey away from the camps where the Rohingya have taken shelter. Some 232,000 Rohingya Muslims — both registered and unregistered — were already living in Bangladesh before more than 65,000 stateless Rohingya fleeing vi- olence in Myanmar’s west- ern state of Rakhine began

VIENNA: Austria’s governing coalition has agreed to pro- hibit full-face veils in courts, schools and other “public places” as part of a package of reforms drawn up after more than a week of negoti- ations. The coalition of So- cial Democrats and the cent- rist People’s party also agreed on Monday to ban po- lice oicers, judges and ma- gistrates and public prosec- utors from wearing head scarves in the interest of ap- pearing “ideologically and religiously neutral”. Austria’s Chancellor Christian Kern had said on Monday that the ban was part of a wide-ranging pro- gramme aimed at fending of the challenge of the far-right. The 35-page programme also includes beefing up sur- veillance and obliging mi- grants granted the right to stay to sign an “integration contract” and a “statement of values”. “Those who are not pre- pared to accept Enlighten- ment values will have to leave our country and soci- ety,” says the text. — AP, AFP

Russia makes big military push in Arctic

Nearly

three decades after nuclear icebreaker Lenin was taken out of service to be turned into a visitor attraction, Rus- sia is again on the march in the Arctic and building new nuclear icebreakers. It is part of a push to firm Moscow’s hand in the High North as it vies for domin- ance with traditional rivals Canada, the United States, and Norway as well as new- comer China.

MURMANSK

(RUSSIA):

Biggest since Soviet fall

Interviews with oicials and military analysts and re- views of government docu- ments show Russia’s build- up is the biggest since the 1991 Soviet fall and will, in some areas, give Moscow more military capabilities than the Soviet Union once had. The expansion has far- reaching financial and geo-

once had. The expansion has far- reaching financial and geo- BEEFING UP PRESENCE: Atomic icebreakers Russia

BEEFING UP PRESENCE: Atomic icebreakers Russia and Yamal moored at Atomflo base in the Arctic port of Murmansk,

Russia. — FILE PHOTO: REUTERS

political ramifications. The Arctic is estimated to hold more hydrocarbon reserves than Saudi Arabia and Mo- scow is putting down a seri- ous military marker. Under President Vladimir Putin, Moscow is rushing to re-open abandoned Soviet

military, air and radar bases on remote Arctic islands and to build new ones, as it pushes ahead with a claim to almost half a million square miles of the Arctic. Russia is building three nuclear icebreakers, includ- ing the world’s largest, to

bolster its fleet of around 40 breakers, six of which are nuclear. No other country has a nuclear breaker fleet, used to clear channels for military and civilian ships. Russia’s Northern Fleet, based near Murmansk in the Kola Bay’s icy waters, is also due to get its own icebreaker, its first, and two ice-capable corvettes armed with cruise missiles. The build-up is causing jit- ters elsewhere. Some 300 U.S. Marines landed in Nor- way this month for a six- month deployment, the first time since World War Two that foreign troops have been allowed to be stationed there. And with memories of Russia’s 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea still fresh, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is watching closely. Six of its members held an exercise in the region in 2015. — Reuters

CM

YK

(NATO) is watching closely. Six of its members held an exercise in the region in 2015.

ND-ND

(NATO) is watching closely. Six of its members held an exercise in the region in 2015.

NOIDA/DELHI

THE ECONOMIC SURVEY

| 15

THE HINDU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017 Demonetisation, structural reforms and GST will propel retail sector
THE HINDU
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2017
Demonetisation, structural reforms and GST
will propel retail sector into modern economy
SENSEX
GOLD
RUPEE
BRENT OIL
31-01-2017
27,656
31-01-2017 29,550
31-01-2017 67.87
31-01-2017 55.63
194
150
0.08
0.57
Krish Iyer, CEO, Walmart India
30-01-2017 27,850
points
30-01-2017 29,400
₨/10gms
30-01-2017 67.95
₨/$
30-01-2017 55.06
$/bbl

‘Gandhiji said poverty is about dignity and self-respect’

In the government, counterfactuals are a luxury one can’t afford: CEA

TCA SHARAD RAGHAVAN VIKAS DHOOT

Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian, who expects a transitional adverse impact on the eco- nomy due to the demonetisa- tion of high-value currency notes, spoke on the Eco- nomic Survey 2016-17.

sectors is to be seen. Then there is the question of what is measured and what is not. Remember, my estimate is very clearly for recorded headline GDP measurements. The impact

on the informal sector is not going to be captured fully be- cause we don’t measure that in the way we measure the economy. So, our reduction

You expect a slow-

is

probably kind of middle of

down of 0.25-0.5 percent-

the pack in terms of the oth-

age points in the growth rate in 2016-17, due to de-

ers, maybe a little less. But let’s see how it pans out.

monetisation, which seems a bit conservative in comparison to other forecasts. We have spelt out how…We have looked care- fully into the cash implica- tions because it is a liquidity shock to the system. But it’s a very unusual thing because cash in terms of liquidity has come down, but deposits

You have called de- monetisation an unusual and unique monetary ex- periment, for which there is no model to measure its eicacy. But, before its announce- ment, how would you have analysed its pros and cons? I would have analysed it as

have grown enormously. So a

I

have analysed it now. As

lot is going to depend upon how much cash and other

they say, counterfactuals are for historians. In the govern-

forms of money are substi- tutable. Interest rates have

ment, counterfactuals are a luxury one can’t aford.

come down, the price of cash has gone up and the price of

You have expressed

other money has come down. How it is all going to

concern about the fears of tax terrorism in the af-

play out and how much of it

termath

of

is in the informal and formal

demonetisation.