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easy eights

Battleground
World War II

Created By:
Brad Sanders Devin Cooley Bob Brodeur
Jim Bland & Kurt Coyle

COPYRIGHT 1997 EASY EIGHT ENTERPRISES, INC.


10036 CAENEN LENEXA, KANSAS 66215
www. battlegroundwwii.com
18003352977

All rights reserved. No part of this publication unless otherwise marked may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted
in any form by means electrical, mechanical or otherwise, without written permission of the publisher.
Printed in the United States of America
forward
Ground combat is no place for wimps,
and Battleground is not for the weak at heart.
A bold statement? Well, perhaps. But, like these rules, it does capture the flavor of the
feeling and excitement generated by Easy Eights Battleground World War II.
For those who have dabbled in wargaming for any appreciable period of time, you
know that there are very few sets of rules out there that are able to bring to the wargame
table the spirit of individual, man against man, ground combat. At one extreme, the
gamer, and the game itself, quickly becomes mired in charts, rules, and procedures
designed to replicate every single detail of combat but instead, move along at a pace
akin to paint drying. Instead of watching his figures and vehicles sally forth into simu-
lated combat, the gamer finds himself an unwilling participant in the true Bore Wars. At
the other extreme, we find rule sets that are so superficial that any resemblance between
your actions on the gaming table and real combat appear to be totally accidental.
Of course, anyone who has been involved in combat, or even simulated combat,
appreciates the fact that it is impossible to reduce the fear, the terror, the exhilaration,
the sheer adrenaline rush that such an experience brings to each and every participant to
a set of game rules. The best rules can do is to capture the spirit of ground combat. The
following set of rules, Easy Eights Battleground World War II does just that. They
capture the feel and spirit of the ground combat in World War II. They provide you, the
hobbyist, with an opportunity to recreate, however vicariously, life at the sharp end of
the stick, where individual soldiers and tank commanders bring success to their com-
manders well laid plans, or utter ruin and defeat down upon themselves and their com-
rades.
Easy Eights Battleground World War II is a set of rules that nicely blends
technical details of weapons and machines with the elusive quality of playability. It pro-
vides the gamer with an opportunity to enjoy an evening of quick moving wargaming
while, at the same time, they give the historical purist an appreciation of small unit com-
bat in World War II. In over three decades of wargaming experience, I have found few
rule systems that have achieved this as well as these do.

So, don your steel pot, check the function of your weapon, give the order for your
troops to saddle up, and follow me onto the Battleground.

Harold Coyle -Author of Team Yankee

Easy eights Battleground World War II


introduction & designer notes
Introduction designers notes
As I leaned over the counter in Phills shop looking at a pack Things dont always turn out as we would like and we dont
of 20mm World War II figures, I asked if there were a good always respond in a manner we would hope to. Say you work
set of skirmish rules. I searched for a long time before com- at a fast food joint and you are the best burger flipper in the
ing to the conclusion that of all the rule sets on the market, place, just as they trained you to be. One lunch hour youre
none offered the level of detail I was looking for. None of the flippin away, youre a little tired and havin some trouble
rule sets offered any continuing support for the system. keeping up. This makes you nervous because the regional
Throughly discouraged I decided that I would put together manager is in the store and you want a raise, so you cant be
my own rules. Had I realized at that moment what a task it slow in front of her. You glance over to see if she is looking
would become, I believe that I would have swiched periods. and as you look away from the grill you drop a burger. Of
This is the same time I first met Harold Coyle. He and I start- course she sees you drop it, and now your more nervous and
ed to hammer out some basic rules for World War II. For more behind. Now the servers are calling for more burgers
some reason the game became popular in the surrounding and your sweating and your hands are shaking and there are
area and people started to encourage me to publish. Our just no burgers ready. So your regional manager is headed
Tuesday night game turned into quite a popular night on the your way and the store manager is coming and the customers
gaming circuit. Things were going well when Bob and Devin are waiting and all you can think is to leave. Do you buck up
came in on the scene. Both were excellent gamers and added and cook, or, do you walk?
a lot to the rule set and before long they became my partners Every one of us has had a day like that, maybe not in fast
in a new company dedicated to providing excellent games. food, but somewhere. For me it was as a theatre stage man-
Now, it had grown into a company with deadlines and actual ager. Now imagine that day while being shot at. And if you
work! What had I gotten myself into? Hours and hours of run you could be imprisoned or worse. And if you stay you
work, debate and playtesting later we are finally done. A lot could die.
of work has gone into this set of rules. They have grown out Ultimately, we want you to have that nervous feeling when
of a love for gaming and the period. I feel that this set of rules you play Easy Eights Battleground World War II. Because
offers the skirmish level gamer a comprehensive and work- that is as close as we can imagine to real combat, which is
able set of rules. Nor is this the end of the game. It is part of unimaginable to those of us who havent been there. And this
a system of games, not just a stand alone rule set. Our first also explains our approach to the rules. Because as hard core
follow-up Scenario Pack is Red Devils in the Night, focusing as your elite assault engineers may be, they are scared and
on the British Airborne on June 6th 1944. The level of detail they know they could die in some not fun ways.
in this Scenario Pack is worth its weight in gold. The What I am talking about is the human factor: totally intangi-
Scenario Packs are designed with Battleground in mind, but ble and totally unpredictable. But still we have to represent it
they will suppliment any set of skirmish level rules. I firmly on the game table. Because of this human factor we have
believe in the hobby and gaming and so have developed the dice. Die rolls can represent the human factor and the whims
supporting Scenario Packs to work with any skirmish level of chance very effectively. So, when you roll a result that
rule set. I hope you will enjoy this set of rules as much as I seems impossible at the time (there is no way he could miss
have. at that range!) please remember that just about anything is
Thanks, possible. Even if you come upon some variable we have
Brad Sanders missed, look at the charts and try to give us the benefit of the
doubt. Chances are the variable wasnt missed but we simply
built it into the basic die roll. We did this because the variable
was too obscure to include as a modifier or so encompassing
that it is the die roll itself.
You, however, are the final arbiter. If you disagree with our
take on a situation or see something missing, feel free to
change, add or delete to your hearts content. You bought it,
its your game. All we want is to provide you a vehicle to that
nervous excitement that comes from a great game. If you
have questions or comments call, write, or E-mail us. Wed
love to hear from you. Have nothing but fun.
Thanks,
Bob Brodeur

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Acknowledgements
Battleground World War II was developed over A Special Thanks go to the following people for
three years of constant gaming. Many people put inthere support and encouragement:
a lot of time and effort to make this an outstanding
Ron Vunovich
game. HAHMGS
Tabletop Game and Hobby
Easy Eight would like to thank the following peo- Muddy River Gamers
ple who helped in one way or another in complet- Lost Victories
ing this rule set. Sam Ory
Amy Ory
Playtestsers Jim Deppen
Rusty Marriott Kyle Jamison
Kurt A. Coyle Jim Soper
Shawn Coyle
Alan Lawrey
Robyn E. Linthicum Thanks to Guy Sager, The Forgotten Soldier, who
Edward J. Kelly put his experience on paper; we will never feel cold
Steven H. Ferrell again!
Kyle Jamison
Darrin Manna
Meredith Megadeath Hockenbury Thanks to Edward Kelly for use of his excellent
Shane Tiny Langford terrain featured in the pictures in the Terrain sec-
Brad Jenison tion.
Devon Jenison Thanks to Elle and Ringo for making it hard to con-
Andrew Jenison centrate on writing.
Dan Banks
Cooper Banks Thanks to our wives Tavish, Nancy and Tina for
T.G. Watkins putting up with our late nights and erratic behavior.
Alan Watkins We love you very much.
Scott Mcelheny
Ryan Rhino Flessing Thanks to Phill and Lynn Kilgore for thier contin-
Richard Wilson
Troy Larson uing support and advice.
Dave Yates
Redd Gary Claxon A very Special Thanks to Harold Coyle for every-
James Brandon thing. He believed in the Battleground dream and
Alan Miller encouraged it every step of the way. This game
Steve
Bill Kist contains a lot of concepts and ideas that were mold-
Louis Murphy ed by his keen eye and military experience. We
Mike Brodeur could not have accomplished any of this without
him. Thanks, Harry.
...and the countless others who have joined us at
Table Top, conventions, and demonstration games. Happy Gaming,
Brad Sanders, Devin Cooley & Bob Brodeur

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Core Rules

Table of Contents
Scales
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Miniatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Dice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Items Needed to play


Figures and Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Dice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Other Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Game Play
Turn Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Card Initiative System . . . . . . . . . . 3
Taking Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Sighting Checks
Sighting Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Sighting Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Sighting Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Easy eights Battleground World War II 1


core rules
Introduction
The Core Rules introduce players to the structure of DICE
Battleground World War II. The Core Rules cover the areas of We use a twenty sided die as our standard die throughout the
Scale, Turn Sequence, Initiative, and Sighting. game. In addition an eight sided, some six sided, and ten
sided dice are used. In the rules various types of dice are
SCALES abbreviated.
A three sided die is rolled by rolling a six sided die using the
Battleground World War II uses a number of gaming conven- results as follows: 1 or 2=1, 3 or 4=2 and 5 or 6=3.
tions or scales. These are intended to ease play and increase Note: All die rolls in Battleground World War II require a die
excitement and realism. roll result of equal to or less than the number necessary to be
TIME successful. All modifiers apply to the die roll. Negative mod-
The time scale for one turn is approximately the time it takes ifiers reduce the number rolled, therefore increasing chance
the average soldier to aim and fire a bolt-action rifle twice of success. Positive modifiers increase the number rolled,
while being shot at. The idea here is two-fold. First, this is a reducing the chance of success. All modifiers are cumulative.
short period of time which allows for heat of the moment
activities, such as crossing a street, throwing a grenade, etc. Dice Needed
Second, each turn focuses more on the order of events and
Type Abbreviation
less on the time they take to complete, therefore a strict time
scale is avoided. Twenty Sided Die d20

Eight Sided Die d8


GROUND
The ground scale is the following: 1 = the distance a man Six Sided Die d6
can crawl in one action. The focus of the ground scale is on Ten Sided Die d10
the spatial relationship between the opposing forces, not how
many meters in range any certain weapon had. This makes Three Sided d3 (d6 1,2=1 3,4=2 5,6=3)
for a very playable system that will fit on a 4x6 table. All Multiple Dice
measurements throughout these rules are given in Inches.
2d6 roll 2 six sided dice then add together
MINIATURES
28mm / 1/48 scale models. Smaller and larger scales could Items needed to play
also work with appropriate changes in ranges and movement
rates. Conversion Charts for 15mm and 20mm scales are World War II figures and vehicles
available by request. Throughout the rules the term Figure A wide range of World War II figures and models are avail-
represents an individual soldier and the term Model repre- able from a variety of manufacturers and dealers.
sents a vehicle. The term Piece refers to both figures and/or
models. Unit denotes several pieces organized together. It is Dice
recommended that figures be individually based to allow you You will need several d20, d6, d8, and a d10.
to take full advantage of the Unit Scale.
A table
UNIT Scale You will need at least a 4x4 table. A 4x6 table is a good
The game system is based on a one to one ratio. One figure size and a 6x10 is ideal if you have access to one. You will
represents one individual soldier on the battlefield, and one also need a selection of terrain to cover your table (there is a
model represents one vehicle. Battleground World War II is section on terrain making later in this book).
designed very specifically for a one to one unit scale. All
Rates of Fire, Ranges, and most importantly the Fire Effect Other Items
Charts, assume a one to one unit scale. The use of a one to You will need a deck of playing cards, tape measures, pencils
one unit scale allows players to focus on small unit action and paper. You may also want photocopies of the forms
with good detail and ease of play. It captures the feel of mov- included in these rules.
ing your squad from one hedgerow to the next!

2 Easy eights Battleground World War II


core rules
Battleground World War II is designed for at least two play- 2. Rally Phase: After all Special Fire modes are marked, roll
ers to play. In addition, an umpire or gamemaster (GM) can the Rally Check for all Broken individual figures using the
be used. A GM can give a fair and impartial interpretation of Rally rules listed in the Infantry and Armor sections.
the rules and of a particular scenario being played. The GM
can also keep track of various factors such as hidden move- 3. Squad morale: After rolling to Rally individual figures,
ment, spotting, and any special features of the scenario (hid- roll for any units of armor or infantry that have fallen below
den terrain features, reinforcement arrival, etc.). See the their Break Point. See the rules for Squad and Platoon
Scenario section for more information on gamemasters and Morale in the Infantry and Armor sections.
players.
4. Artillery Phase: After establishing Squad Morale,
artillery observers plot new fire missions for next turn and
resolve any missions scheduled for this turn. See the Artillery
section.

5. Actions: After establishing Special Fire modes, determin-


ing individual and squad Morale and resolving Artillery bar-
rages for the turn, begin the Action Phase. The heart of the
Battleground World War II turn is the Action Phase. During
this phase pieces move, fire and die. Each piece receives two
actions each turn, unless Broken or using Special Fire modes.
Actions are covered under the rules sections for Infantry,
Armor, and Artillery. We use a random initiative system to
determine the order of actions. Although each turn is a short
period of time, actions are not considered simultaneous.

The Random initiative system


Initiative during the course of a game turn is determined by a
random card draw. Each unit is assigned to a poker card and
a small deck is made of the cards from all units on both sides.
Then, the gamemaster (or one player) shuffles the deck. At
the beginning of the Action Phase, the gamemaster begins to
turn over the cards one at a time. The unit whose card is
drawn first takes two actions. Then, a second card is drawn
and this unit takes two actions. This continues until the deck
Game Play is empty and all cards have been drawn. Units which are
Broken or who have chosen a Special Fire mode for the turn,
TURN SEQUENCE do not take actions when their card is drawn; they are
Battleground World War II uses a simple turn sequence which skipped and the next card is drawn. If a unit has some pieces
is repeated until the game is over. on Special Fire and some not (for example: a squad where the
machine gun is on raking fire but the riflemen are not), then
1. Mark Special Fire modes: At the beginning of every turn, only those models which are not using a Special Fire mode
players of both sides should mark any of their pieces that will may take actions on their card.
be using Special Fire modes during the upcoming turn. This system best captures the randomness of combat and set-
Special Fire modes include Opportunity Fire, Ambush Fire tles all issues of which soldier is faster to run, which tank
and Pinning Fire. These Special Fire modes are covered gunner is faster to reload, etc. Most importantly it leads to
under the rules sections for Infantry and Armor. Pieces must real nail-biting excitement at the game table as all players,
meet all requirements for their Special Fire mode and be quietly or loudly, hope and pray their card is next.
clearly marked with counters. In single table games, it may be
preferable to mark Opportunity and Ambush Fire on a map or Card system notes
a piece of paper. Always mark Pinning Fire on the table. 1. It is convenient to use cards of the same color (or suite if

Easy eights Battleground World War II 3


core rules
you prefer) for each side. For example the Allied cards would ment with a piece not in immediate contact with the enemy).
be a red ace through a red 4 and the Axis cards a black ace Refer to the rules sections on Infantry, Armor, and Artillery to
through a black 3. This leads to a quick ID of whose turn it is see what types of actions may be performed.
to take actions.
2. Try to keep the size of the deck between 3-7 cards per side.
Split up units on their cards so that there are about this many sighting checks
cards. In a small game, each squad and vehicle will have their
own card, while in larger games it is prudent to logically form Tank commander Walther scanned the wood line as his Mk
small groups of vehicles into sections or platoons and place IV rounded a corner in the Normandy road. Something
them on one card. The same applies to infantry and support seemed wrong but he didnt see anything. Shrugging it off he
weapons. urged his driver forward...

Random Initiative System line of sight


Axis black cards Allies red cards Sighting requires a clear Line of Sight (LOS) between the
Ace - Panther Tank Ace - 2 Jeeps & 2 M8 Greyhounds viewer and the target. A Line of Sight is simply a straight
2 - Tiger I no. 1 2 - 2 M10 GMC path between the viewer and target that is not blocked by any
3 - Tiger I no.2 3 - 2 M4 Shermans No. 1 & 2 terrain, smoke, or other features. The Terrain rules cover
4 - Squad A 4 - 3 M4 Shermans No. 3 4 & 5 what specific items of terrain will block a Line of Sight. A
5 - PAK 40 5 - Squads A & B with Halftracks piece must have clear Line of Sight between itself and the tar-
6 - Heavy Weapons 6 - Squads C & D with Halftracks get in order to make a Sighting Check. Line of Sight is of
unlimited range, but effective sighting and fire will not be.
TAKING ACTIONS
Once it is determined that it is a units turn to take an action, Sighting Checks
the player may take two actions with each piece in the unit. It Sighting checks simulate a pieces ability to see the enemy.
is important that each piece complete the first action before Any piece may make a Sighting Check at the beginning of
any other piece takes a second action. Once any piece in a every action. To ease play and reduce die rolling, Sighting
unit has taken a second action, it is forbidden to go back and Checks are made by each unit. Therefore, one check is made
do a first action with a different piece in that unit (with the and is assumed to apply to an entire squad or vehicle crew. In
reasonable exception of someone taking two actions of move- games with a Gamemaster, the Gamemaster should make
Sighting Checks in secret and tell the player results in secret
as much as is possible. In two player games, checks can be
made in the open and the player being sighted against can
reveal any pieces seen based on maps or dummy counter
assignment. In totally open games, with all models on the
table at all times, sighting can still be used to determine
which models may fire on which targets.

To make a Sighting Check, follow this simple procedure:


1. Announce which unit is sighting, in which direction.

2. Measure the range to the area to be sighted.

3. Classify the target of the search as:


Infantry or Vehicle
Open or Concealed
Moving or Not
Firing or Not
Infantry or Vehicle - Tripod MGs and mortars are infantry,
towed guns are vehicles; all other cases should be self-
explanatory.
Open or Concealed - Depends largely on terrain. In the

4 Easy eights Battleground World War II


core rules
Terrain section each type of terrain is discussed including Tank commanders may not use the binocular modifier while
whether any piece is open or concealed in that terrain; how- buttoned up.
ever, common sense and consistency should resolve most Buttoned up Applies to any vehicle that is buttoned up. In
cases. addition, GMs can disallow any Sighting Check to a buttoned
Moving (or Not) - Depends on the last action of the target. up vehicle if the GM believes there is no way to see the tar-
If the target moved in its last action, the target counts as mov- get through a periscope (see the Armor section).
ing. Moving Vehicle Applies to any vehicle which moves in an
Firing (or Not) - Uses the same principle as moving. If the action that it makes a Sighting Check. When making a
target of the search fired in its last action, the target counts as Sighting Check at the beginning of an action, state if the vehi-
firing. cle will move or not in that action before rolling. If a vehicle
4. Next, locate one of the above classifications on the has no plans to move and then sees a new target that inspires
Sighting Chart by moving down the left hand column. Then, movement, allow the movement. If no target is sighted do not
moving to the right, locate the range always moving up to the allow the movement.
next longest range if between columns. The number cross ref- Elite This modifier applies to all Elite figures and vehicle
erenced between the two gives the base d20 chance or below crews and represents their vast battlefield experience.
to sight the target in question. Next, apply any of the Vehicle, Green This modifier applies to all Green figures and vehicle
Infantry or Viewer Modifiers on the bottom of the chart. crews and represents their inexperience in combat.
These modifiers shift the range band either to the left or right
and change the d20 chance to sight. Positive modifiers move
Sighting Example
the range to the right the number of bands indicated, while
negative modifiers move the range to the left. So a +1 modi-
fier would change the range from 24 to 30, while a -4 would
change the range from 20 to 4. The number indicated on the HEAT

OF
new range band is the actual d20 chance or below to see the
target. Roll a d20: if the number is equal or less than the PRONE

chance to sight then the target is sighted.

Sighting modifiers
Cover and Camouflage
Hasty Applies to pieces in a concealing terrain but not set up
in any way. UB
HE
Improved Applies to pieces that have taken some time to
conceal themselves and is determined by scenario. A U.S. bazooka team is on Op-Fire covering a road bend. A German MKIV H moves
around the bend on its first action. As soon as the tank moves around the bend, the
Constructed Applies to pieces that have had days to conceal bazooka team makes a sighting check. The tank on the road is an open moving medium
themselves and is determined by scenario. sized vehicle at 15 inch range. This places it on the 15 column of the sighting chart and
an AQ indicates that the target is automatically acquired. At the top of the tanks
Vehicle second action, the tank commander makes a sighting check for the woods. The bazooka
Target size Determined by the vehicle and is included on the team hidden there is judged to be hastily concealed and prone and at a 15 inch range.
This places the Americans on the 15 column to start. Being hasty shifts them to the 10
vehicle data charts. inch column, and prone shifts them to the 15 inch column. The tank is in motion
Infantry which shifts to the 20 column. The tank commander needs a 6 or less on d20 to see
them.
Full Automatic Applies to squads that are firing weapons
with a ROF (Rate of Fire) of 3 or more per action.
Single shot Applies to individual soldiers using an aimed
shot.
Prone Applies to figures that are marked prone on the game
board.
Viewer
Binoculars Apply even if only the squad leader or tank com-
mander has a pair. Generally, all squad leaders and tank com-
manders have a set. Binoculars may only be used by figures
that are not moving. You are not allowed to move in an action
that a figure uses the binoculars modifier.

Easy eights Battleground World War II 5


6
Sighting Chart
VEHICLES INCHES
4 8 15 23 30 45 53 60 68 75 83 90 105 120 135 150 165 180 195 210
Concealed 19 19 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - - - - - -
Concealed Moving AQ AQ AQ 19 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - - - -
Concealed Firing AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - -
Concealed Moving/Firing AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - -
Core rules

Open AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - -
Open Moving AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - -
Open Firing AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - -
Open Moving/Firing AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 -
INFANTRY INCHES
3 5 10 15 20 25 30 38 45 53 60 68 75 83 90 105 120 135 150 165
Concealed 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Concealed Moving 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Concealed Firing AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - - - - - -
Open AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - - -

Open Moving AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - - -
Open Firing AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ AQ 19 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 - - - - -

Modifiers

Viewer Infantry Target Vehicle Target Cover and Camouflage

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Binoculars -2 Single Shot fire +2 Very Small +2 Hasty -1
Green +1 Full Auto Fire -1 Small +1 Improved +1
Elite -1 Prone +1 Large -1 Constructed +2
Buttoned Up +2 Very Large -2
Moving Vehicle +1

Note: Modifiers are NOT applied to the die roll, instead Sighting Modifiers indicate the number of columns to shift. Negative
Modifiers shift to the left and positive Modifiers shift to the right.
Infantry

Table of Contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Machine Gun Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12


The Squad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Jamming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Morale and Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Troop Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Grenades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Morale Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 To Throw Grenade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Broken Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grenade To Hit Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Surrender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 To Fire Rifle Grenade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Fanatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Duds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Rally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hand To Hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Hand To Hand Combat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Squad Morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Hand To Hand Combat Modifiers . . . . . . . .15
Skill and Gut Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Assault Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Obstacles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Other Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Satchel Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Small Arms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Demolition Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Weapon Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Pole Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Shooting Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Line Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
To Hit Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Bangalore Torpedo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Effect Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Flamethrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Cover Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Mines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Jamming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Man Vs. Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Special Fire Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 AFV Effects On Infantry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Opportunity Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Movement into Close Combat with AFV . .19
Op-Fire Spotting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Close Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Ambush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Projectile Attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Pinning Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Snipers
Machine Guns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Snipers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Im Hit! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

Easy eights Battleground World War II 1


Infantry
INTRODUCTION Morale and leaders
Infantry was the heart of all combat operations during World Private Hammelton roared with anger as his squad mates
War II. The infantry rules are intended to give a good feel for ran. Grabbing the .30 cal off its tripod, he rose and opened
small unit combat. Each figure in the game represents an indi- fire!
vidual soldier. These rules allow players to use their figures
independently while still conveying the importance of the All figures have a morale rating between 1 & 20. This indi-
squad and teamwork. cates the experience, cool headedness and determination of a
figure in combat conditions.
the Squad
The typical squad in Battleground World War II consist of 10 Troop Quality
men. A squad contains a sergeant who functions as the squad During the fighting in World War II many different qualities
leader and a corporal who is his assistant. In addition the of men took part.
squad carrys a light machine gun of some type operated by a Green These troops are raw recruits with little training and
gunner and his assistant. The rest of a typical squad would be no combat experience.
riflemen. This is a generic squad and certainly there were Regular These troops have experienced some action at the
variations based on nationality and troop quality. World War front and have good combat knowledge. All troops are
II was a massive engagement and it is difficult to include the assumed to be Regular unless specifically stated otherwise.
squad makeup of every troop type and nationality. We will Veteran These troops have been in the front lines for months
use this generic squad as the basic element to game with. or even years. They are hardened, tough, and know that it is
safer to stay and fight than to run away.
The Squad Elite These troops are the best in training, morale and pure
fighting ability.
Command Range Each figure has a Command Range asso-
ciated with them. Any figures within this range and Line of
Sight are within the Command Range of that figure.

Troop Quality Soldier Typical Leader


Command Command
Quality Morale Range Morale Range
Squad Leader Ast. Squad Leader
Green 8 6 10 -0 8

Regular 10 8 12 -1 10

Veteran 12 10 14 -1 12

Elite 14 12 16 -2 14

Squad Weapon Ast. Gunner Morale Check


Light Machine Gun A Morale Check is a test of a man or a units resolve in com-
or PMG
bat. Throughout the game you will be required to roll Morale
Checks. The controlling player must roll a d20 equal to or
less than the figures morale to pass. If the die roll is higher
than the figures morale that figure is Broken.
Teams of One Whenever a figure is alone and not within
Command Range of a squad or team then he is a Team Of
One. A Team Of One always has a morale rating of half the
figures morale. Very few men were willing to fight the war
themselves. This does not apply to Heroes.
Squad Members

2 easy eights Battleground World War II


Infantry
Craven Coward Anytime a figure rolls an unmodified 20 on then one of the refusing players figures must spend two
a Morale Check (not a Rally) that figure becomes a Craven actions searching each prisoner. The surrendering figure is
Coward. The figure is Broken with no chance of Rally and is removed from play after having been searched. A figure
removed from play. whose surrender is refused may never be counted as captured.
Heroes Any time a figure rolls an unmodified 1 on a Morale No Quarter When a player decides to gun down a surrender-
Check that figure is driven to heroics. Roll a d20 and refer to ing figure, that player invokes the No Quarter rule. If the sur-
the Hero Creation Chart to determine the type of Hero. rendering figure was of the enemy then No Quarter is
invoked for them. If the figure is on your own side then No
Hero Creation Chart
Die Hero Type Special Abilities
Quarter is invoked for you. To invoke No Quarter the player
Medal of Honor Never Checks Morale. Never takes Gut Checks.
must make a Morale Check based on the No Quarter Chart.
1 Iron Cross Becomes Elite. 2 free actions immediately. Ignore first When No Quarter is in effect, any figure that would surrender
Hero of USSR LtW. Never Suppressed. Can operate crewed weapons
Never Checks Morale. Never takes Gut Checks. Becomes Elite. under normal circumstances will become Fanatic instead. No
2-3 Stud Hero 1 free action immediately. Can operate crewed weapons alone.
Never suppressed. +1 Morale Becomes Elite.
Quarter can be designated as a special rule during a scenario.
4-5 Hero 1 free action immediately. Fanatic
6-10 Normal Hero +1 Morale Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately.

11-20 Common Hero Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately. No Quarter Chart
Nationality Own Enemy Modifier
Note to become a Hero or a Craven Coward the die roll must American N/A 1/2 Morale
be a natural 1 or 20, must come from a Morale Check, not a Russian 1/2 Morale Morale +4 vs. Germans
Rally or Gut Check, and the Morale Check must be the direct Commissar Morale Morale
result of enemy fire.
German 1/2 Morale Morale +4 vs. Russian
German SS Morale Morale +4 vs. Russian
Broken figures
A figure that fails a Morale Check or a Squad Morale Check
becomes Broken. A Broken figure runs two actions of move- Any figure that is a Fanatic cannot be Broken or suppressed.
ment toward the nearest cover and away from the enemy Fanatics must charge any known enemy figure within two
immediately. This movement conforms to all normal move- actions of movement. Cases where a figure goes Fanatic are
ment rules. Once a Broken figure reaches cover he stops and covered under Surrender and Squad Morale rules. In addition
drops prone. If he cannot reach cover in 2 actions the figure the Fanatic rule can be designated as in effect as a special rule
will continue to move 2 actions in every Rally Phase until during a scenario.
cover is found. If a figure is in cover and fails a Morale
Check the controlling player can choose to have the figure Rally
drop prone and stay; however the figure is still Broken and All Broken figures attempt to rally during the Rally Phase of
will not rise up until Rallied. If a figure is prone and behind the game turn. There are two types of Rally: Self Rally and
cover when he fails a Morale Check he no longer has the Leader Rally.
choice to stay under that cover. The figure will break and run. Self Rally To be eligible for Self Rally the figure must start
Cover must offer a +3 modifier before the prone bonus to the turn in cover and prone. During the Rally phase of the
count as cover for Broken figures. game roll a d20 equal to or less then half of the figures
morale to become rallied. To determine the half Morale
Surrender Check, subtract or add any modifiers before halving. If the
When a surrounded figure breaks and has no cover within 2 figure passes the check then the figure is treated normally
actions the figure will surrender. The figure will automatical- when his card is pulled.
ly approach the closest enemy figure with his hands up. It Leader Rally To be eligible for Leader Rally a figure must
takes one figure to guard any surrendering figures. start the turn in the Command Range and Line of Sight of a
Surrounded means that there is not an open avenue of escape Leader. During the Rally Phase of the game roll a d20 equal
that is not covered by possible enemy fire. Because this is to or less than the figures morale. To determine the Morale
open to interpretation, disputes will be settled by the Check subtract or add any modifiers, including any
Gamemaster or by a die roll. Leadership Modifiers. If the figure passes the check then the
Refused Surrender Refusing surrender is when figures strip figure is Rallied and treated normally when his card is pulled.
the surrendering infantrymen of any weapons and then order Note: Leaders may Leader Rally themselves.
them to the rear. When a player decides to refuse surrender

Easy eights Battleground World War II 3


infantry
Leaders decide to head for a less intense area to the rear.
Leaders are in charge of squads and platoons. They fufill a Teams Any figures that are not in a squad are considered a
very important role of directing the fire and manuevering of team. Machine gun crews, bazooka men and artillery crews
the squad assigned to them. Leaders also bolster the fighting are all examples of Teams. Teams are subject to all Squad
spirit of the men they command. Leaders have morale like Morale rules. Infantry squads may be Broken up into smaller
any other figure on the board. Generally a leader will have a teams.
morale rating two points higher then the men he commands. Squad Morale During the Rally Phase look to see how many
Command Range Each leader has a Command Range. figures in each squad have been disabled (KIA, HW, Broken,
Command Range equals the Leaders morale minus two. Captured). If the number of disabled figures equals or
Any figures within this range and LOS of the leader are con- exceeds the squads Break Point then make a Squad Morale
sidered to be within the Command Range of that Leader. Check. This is a single roll using the morale of the highest
Leaders can add their Leadership Modifier to figures within surviving leader and taking all of that leaders personal mod-
Command Range. ifiers in to account. If the d20 roll is more than the Leaders
Note: Each figure may only be effected by one leader at a modified morale all surviving squad members will break, see
time. A figure will be effected by the Leader with the highest Broken Figures.
Modifier whenever two leaders can effect the same figures.
Each leader can only effect as many figures as the leader has Break Point Chart
points of morale. Troop Quality Break Point
Leadership Modifiers Each Leader has a Leadership Green 40%
Modifier they can apply to the figures within Command Regular 50%
Range. This modifier can be used to Rally figures that are
Veteran 60%
Broken. During Leader Rally the Leader that is Rallying fig-
ures may apply his Leadership Modifier to the die roll of the Elite 70%

Broken figure.
Directed Fire If a leader personally directs an action of Fanatic Squads If the surviving leader rolls an unmodified 1
infantry fire then the Leadership Modifier is applied to the die on any Squad Morale Check all surviving squad members
roll. For a figure to gain this bonus the Leader figure must be immediately become fanatics and all Fanatic rules apply.
in base to base contact with the figure he is effecting. Coward Squads If the surviving leader rolls an unmodified
Example: If a 16-2 leader is directing a machine gun team 20 on any Squad Morale Check all surviving squad members
then a -2 is applied to the To Hit dice rolled. immediately become Craven Cowards and are removed from
Directed Actions If a leader personally directs any action that play.
requires a Skill Check or Gut Check then the figure making Ripple Effect Whenever a squad has a number of friendly
the die roll will gain the Leadership Modifier for that roll. figures equal to or more than half of its own number break
Example: A 12-1 leader is directing movement through wire; and run within Command Range and Line of Sight it must
each figure that is in base to base contact with the leader at take a Squad Morale Check.
the time of making the Skill Check for crossing wire will
receive a -1 on their die roll. skill checks and gut Checks
Leader Loss The loss of a leader in combat adversely effects Situations will arise when a figures determination and abili-
the men under his command. Any time that a leader is ties are in question but life is not immediately in danger.
Broken, receives a Heavy Wound (HW) or gets Killed In These situations are covered by Skill Checks and Gut Checks.
Action (KIA) the figures under his command and in Line of Some actions will require both a Skill Check and a Gut
Sight must take a Morale Check with a modifier that is oppo- Check.
site the Leadership Modifier. Skill Checks Whenever there is a question as to whether a
Example: A 16-2 leader is KIAed, the figures in his unit must figure can complete an action, a Skill Check is used to deter-
take a +2 morale check. This Morale Check is taken immedi- mine success or failure. Skill Checks are made using the
atly and is treated as if a Morale Check was generated from a morale of the figure and takes all modifiers into account.
direct result of fire. However, failure of a Skill Check never leads to a Broken fig-
ure. Failure of a Skill Check results in the failure of the
Squad MORALE attempted action and that action being wasted. Success of a
Squads have a group personality not unlike that of ordinary Skill Check means the action was completed. The failure of
soldiers. After a certain amount of abuse the entire squad may some Skill Checks, can be fatal.

4 easy eights Battleground World War II


Infantry
Gut Checks Some actions do not seem safe and sane to the action at no cost.
average soldier. If a player wishes to have a figure attempt an Fire The figure may roll To Hit with the # of dice allowed by
insane action the figure must first pass a Gut Check. A Gut their weapon, see Small Arms, Machine Guns and Man vs
Check is made exactly like a Morale Check, taking all per- Tank.
sonal and leader modifiers into account. A figure will never Throw The figure may throw a grenade up to 6, see
become Broken as the result of a failed Gut Check. He will Grenades.
simply not attempt the action. In addition, a figure that fails a Mount The figure may mount or dismount a stopped vehicle,
Gut Check does not lose an action. Instead a figure that fails see Passengers and Riders.
a Gut Check can go on and take some other, more reasonable, Load The figure may load a crew weapon or a personal
action. weapon, examples: load a bazooka, affix a rifle grenade, etc.
Normal Check Unjam The figure may unjam a jammed weapon. This does
Walk along a narrow ledge under fire (Skill and Gut) not include reloading the new round on weapons that require
Jump an obstacle (Skill) an action to load, see Small Arms - Jamming.
Operate a foreign vehicle/ equipment (Skill) Setup It takes one action to set up an air cooled MG on a tri-
Half Check pod, two actions for a water cooled.
Ram a building with a half track (Gut) Breakdown It takes one action to breakdown a MG.
Ram a tank or gun with a tank (Gut)
Jump from a second story window (Skill and Gut) Action Example
Quarter Check
Ram a tank with a truck (Gut) First Action
Jump from a second story window into a moving jeep (Skill
and Gut) 5"
actions
Figure A
Seeing most of the Americans run, Dieter shouted at the
other men to move forward. Pressing on, Dieter advanced
toward enemy positions and then dove for cover. Spotting a Figure B
lone American manning a .30 cal, Dieter fired his MP-40.

Actions Each figure in the game is allowed two actions per


turn. These actions are taken when the figures card is drawn. Figure C
These actions can be any combination of actions: move-fire,
move-move, fire-fire. All the figures that are associated with In the first action Figure A is moving 5 to the front of figures B and C. Figure
the card must all perform their first action. All figures then B is taking the action to fire on the enemy. Figure C has started the action in
the prone position and will spend the action getting up.
perform their second action. Each figure can perform differ-
ent actions from other figures in its squad. Second Action
Man Actions Some tasks that are performed on the battlefield
are listed as man actions. Man actions are listed as a number
of actions that need to be taken to complete a given task. 5"
These actions can be performed by several figures combining Figure A
their actions.
Example: A task that takes 4 man actions can be completed
by 2 men in one turn (two actions). Figure B

Move The figure may move up to 5, as modified by terrain,


see Terrain section.
Crawl The figure may crawl up to 2 while prone.
5"
Rise The figure may rise from the prone position at the cost Figure C
of one action.
Prone A figure may drop prone at the beginning or end of any Figure A has now moved and and will continue to move for his second action.
Figure B is firing again for his second action. Figure C spent the last action
getting up from prone and will now move 5 inches to a new location.

Easy eights Battleground World War II 5


infantry
OTHER ACTIONS of rifles. They have the range and hitting power of a rifle
Anything a player can think of can be an action if the GM combined with the rate of fire of a SMG. Assault rifles were
allows or both sides agree. Using a radio, crossing a wall, available to Germans from early 1944 on. Assault rifles were
climbing a tree, boosting a buddy over an obstacle can all be rare, but more common on the Eastern Front. Assault Rifles
other actions. Some complex tasks may take more then one may take advantage of Spraying Fire; see Special Fire modes.
action. Some actions are complex and dangerous to perform, Gun Chart The Gun Chart beaks down the most common-
see the Skill Check and Gut Check rules for more rules that ly seen weapons of the war by nation. The chart includes all
cover these actions. small arms and crew served machine guns. Specific rules for
crew served machine guns can be found in the Machine Gun
SMall Arms subsection of the infantry rules.
Type This indicates the weapons general classification, such
Hammeltons .30 cal jams after a short burst on the advanc- as R for rifle, as described above.
ing Germans. Hammelton immediately pulls his Colt .45 and ROF This indicates the weapons Rate of Fire. The number
puts a man down. of dice To Hit per action of fire is equal to the weapons ROF.
Crew This indicates the number of figures required to oper-
In World War II it took a huge volume of fire to actually kill ate the weapon. Any weapon with less than the indicated crew
a man on the battlefield. Most fire was poorly aimed and takes an extra action to set up and breakdown and has its jam
served the purpose of forcing the enemys head down, thus number decreased by 1 per missing crew member.
limiting his fire and movement. The Small Arms fire rules Example: A 1917A1 HMG with one crew would take 5
take this fact of combat and represents it with a die roll To Hit actions to set up and jam on a 18 or higher.
and to Effect. Players will find that it takes a lot of fire to Range This indicates what row on the Effects Chart this
cause substantial damage to enemy troops. weapon uses to determine the chance To Hit. A weapon in the
SMG class would use the SMG row to determine chance to
Weapon Types hit at various ranges. Some weapons have a bonus range.
Battleground World War II divides the variety of small arms Example: The German MP-40 SMG has a +2 range. This
available in the war into several categories. Below are the makes its effective range 10 instead of 8. This bonus never
descriptions for most infantry-carried small arms. Crew applies to Point Blank Range.
served machine guns are covered in the Machine Gun sub- Effect This indicates what column on the Effects Chart a
section. weapon rolls to determine damage. A weapon in the SMG
class would roll on the SMG, or F, column. Some weapons
Pistols (P) Pistols are handguns designed for close fighting include a + or - modifier. This modifier is applied to all
and self defense. All nations issued pistols to officers, staff Effects rolls and indicates that the weapon in question fired a
and special troops like commandos. Pistols have minimal particularly effective or ineffective round.
range and have little stopping power. Pistols are also used in Jam This indicates a weapons chance of malfunctioning in
Hand to Hand combat; see Hand to Hand. combat. If the jam number or higher is rolled on any To Hit
Submachine Gun (SMG) Submachine Guns are full auto- roll (never an Effects roll) then the weapon has jammed; see
matic weapons that fire pistol-caliber ammunition. They have Jamming.
a high rate of fire and adequate range, but only marginal stop- Note: A Jam does not necessarily mean the weapon has had
ping power. All nations issued SMGs to squad leaders, tank a round mislodge in the chamber. Any weapon malfunction,
crews, gun crews and some special units. Submachine guns including some sort of difficulty in changing magazines, is
may take advantage of Spraying Fire, see Special Fire modes. covered by the Jamming rule.
Rifle (R) Rifles are bolt action, long barrelled, small arms. Set This indicates the number of actions required to set up
Rifles are the standard weapons issued to squad members and breakdown the weapon. This number will be effected by
(riflemen) in German and Russian forces. Rifles offer good the number of crew available, see Machine Guns.
range and hitting power, but at a low rate of fire.
Self Loading Rifle (SLR) Self loading rifles are semi-auto-
matic versions of rifles. They have all the advantages of a
rifle with the bonus of an improved rate of fire. SLRs are rare
for German and Russian forces. All American riflemen were
equipped with a SLR throughout the war in Europe.
Assault Rifle (AR) Assault rifles are fully automatic versions

6 easy eights Battleground World War II


infantry
Small Arms List
American Type ROF Crew Range Effect Jam Set Notes
S&W M1917 Revolver P 1 1 P P 20 NA

Colt M1917 Revolver P 1 1 P P 20 NA


Colt Automatic M1911A1 P 2 1 P P-1 20 NA

Springfield M1903A1 R 1 1 R R 20 NA
M1 Garand Rifle SLR 2 1 R R 20 NA

M2 Carbine SLR 2 1 R R+1 20 NA


Thompson M1 SMG 3 1 SMG SMG -1 20 NA

M3A1 Grease Gun SMG 3 1 SMG SMG -1 19 NA


Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) PMG 3 2 LMG LMG 20 0

M1919A4 Machine Gun MMG 4 3 MMG MMG 20 1


M1917A1MG .30 Water Cooled HMG 4 3 HMG HMG 20 2

M2HMG .50 cal. LCMG 3 3 HMG LCMG 20 2


Russian Type ROF Crew Range Effect Jam Set Notes
Nagant Revolver M1895 P 1 1 P P 20 NA

TT33 Tokarev P 2 1 P P 20 NA
Mosin-Nagant Carbine M1938 R 1 1 R R 20 NA

AVT-40 SLR 1 1 R R 20 NA
PPSh-41 SMG 3 1 SMG SMG 20 NA

PPS-43 SMG 3 1 SMG SMG 20 NA


DP LMG 4 2 LMG LMG 20 0

Maxim M1910 HMG 4 3 HMG HMG 20 2 -1 setup with wheel base


SG-43 HMG 4 3 HMG HMG 20 2 -1 setup with wheel base

DShK-38 LCMG 3 3 HMG LCMG 20 2 -1 setup with wheel base


German Type ROF Crew Range Effect Jam Set Notes
P-08 Luger P 2 1 P P 20 NA

P-38 Walther P 2 1 P P 20 NA
Kar 98k R 1 1 R R 20 NA

Gew-43 SLR 2 1 R R 20 NA
MP-43 AR 3 1 R R 20 NA

MP-44 AR 3 1 R R 20 NA
StG44 AR 3 1 R R 20 NA

MP-40 SMG 3 1 SMG +2" SMG 20 NA No range bonus for PB


EMP SMG 3 1 SMG SMG 20 NA

MP-35/1 SMG 3 1 SMG SMG 20 NA


MG-34 LMG 4 2 LMG LMG 20 0

MG-34 with tripod MMG 4 3 MMG MMG 20 1


MG-34 with tripod & heavy barrel HMG 4 3 HMG HMG 20 1

MG-42 LMG 4 2 LMG LMG 20 0


MG-42 with tripod MMG 4 3 MMG MMG 20 1

MG-42 with tripod & heavy barrel HMG 4 3 HMG HMG 20 1

Easy eights Battleground World War II 7


infantry
Shooting Sequence
The following sequence will allow any figure using an action 5. If you scored a hit, use the Results Chart to roll an Effect.
of fire to resolve fire quickly. Use the column according to the weapon and roll a d20.

1. Find the range between the figure firing and the target in 6. Add or subtract any Cover Modifiers from the die roll.
inches.
7. Look up the correct row with the final modified die roll to
2. Determine the type of weapon the figure is using. find the result.

3. Look up the weapon on the To Hit section of the Effects To Hit Modifiers
Chart located in the upper left hand corner. This chart deter- Lightly Wounded When a soldier has a Light Wound, the
mines what die roll is needed to score a hit acording to range. pain of the wound prevents him from firing effectively, so he
Apply any To Hit modifiers to the die roll. gains a +5 to any To Hit dice roll.
Example: A rifle needs an 8 or less at a range of 16 inches. Green Infantrymen that have not seen battle react poorly
An Elite figure would subtract 2 from the die roll. when in a fight. All Green infantrymen receive +2 to the To
Hit die.
4. Roll the number of d20s according to the ROF indicated Non Qualified Infantrymen that pick up a crew served
on the Effects Chart. Determine the total number of hits. weapon that they did not start the game with, or as part of that
weapons crew, are considered non qualified. +2 To Hit for

Point Blank Effective Long Extream Cover Modifyers Pistol SMG Rifle LMG MMG HMG LCMG
D20 To Hit: 16 12 8 4
Open Ground .....0 H G F E D C B A
Pistol 4" 5" 8" 15" Road .....-1 1 LtW KIA KIA KIA GD GD GD GD
SMG 4" 8" 15" 30" In Deep Water .....-2 2 MC HW HW KIA KIA GD GD GD
Aimed Shot .....-2 3 MC LtW HW KIA KIA KIA KIA GD
Rifle 5" 15" 40" 75" Point Blank .....-2 4 MC LtW LtW HW KIA KIA KIA KIA
LMG 5" 30" 45" 75" Sniper .....-5 5 MC MC LtW HW HW KIA KIA KIA
Brush .....+1 6 MC MC LtW LtW HW HW HW KIA
MMG 5" 40" 90" 188"
Hedge .....+2 7 SUP MC MC LtW LtW HW HW HW
HMG 6" 45" 102" 218" Prone .....+2
8 SUP MC MC LtW LtW LtW HW HW
ShellHoles .....+3
9 SUP MC MC MC LtW LtW HW HW
Bocage .....+3
ROF 10 SUP SUP MC MC MC LtW LtW HW
Light Woods .....+3
11 SUP SUP MC MC LtW LtW LtW
Pistol 1 To Hit Modifyers Graveyard .....+3
12 SUP SUP SUP MC MC LtW LtW
SMG 3 Lightly Wounded..... +5 Rubble .....+4
13 SUP SUP MC MC LtW LtW
Green..... +2 Roadblock .....+4
Rifle 1 Heavy Woods .....+4 14 SUP SUP MC MC LtW
Non Qualifyed.....+2
SLR 2 Captured Use.....+3 Partial Tank Cover .....+5 15 SUP MC MC LtW

Leadership Ability..... -x Gun Shield......+5 16 SUP MC MC MC


AR 3
Elite..... -2 Wall .....+5 17 MC MC MC
PMG 3 Aimed Shot..... -2 Wood Building .....+5 18 SUP MC MC
Sniper..... -3 Fox Hole .....+5 19 SUP MC MC
LMG 4
Fire on Move.... 1/2 Trench......+5 20 SUP SUP MC
MMG 4 Sand Bags .....+5
No Target.....1/2 21 SUP SUP MC
HMG 4 Stone Building .....+7 22 SUP SUP SUP
Pillbox .....+12 23 SUP SUP
LCMG 3
24 SUP SUP
AC 2 25 SUP SUP
26 SUP
27 SUP
HE Gun Caliber Modifiers 28
< 50......+2 29
> 75.......-2
>100......-4
>150......-6
> 200......-8
>250....-10

Effects Chart

8 easy eights Battleground World War II


infantry
being unfamiliar with the weapon. the figure to hit the dirt. The figure is immediately forced
Captured Use Infantrymen that pick up a weapon that prone. If already prone there is no further effect.
belonged to the enemy gain a +3 penalty for its use. Note: Figures in cover will still be effected by suppression.
Leadership Ability Weapons that are personally directed by They will duck down/button up and will require an action to
a leader were much more effective in combat. Any leader that get up again. Figures using a Special Fire mode will lose this
is in base to base contact with a figure can add/subtract their fire mode if not already prone.
Leadership Modifier to the To Hit die of the weapon.
Elite Elite men were highly trained and motivated. Their Cover Modifiers
superior fire discipline gains them a -2 to the To Hit die roll. Cover modifiers are applied to the effect die roll. These mod-
Aimed Shot When a hit was very important, an infantryman ifiers reflect the amount of cover a particular figure has. Any
took longer to line up his shot. The first action is spent aim- modifier based on terrain is covered in the Terrain section of
ing and the second to fire. To Hit rolls for Aimed Shots are the rules.
made at a -2. Aimed Shot Aimed fire is more likely to effect a figure and
Sniper Snipers are deadly accurate due to superior training receives a -2 to the Effect Chart.
and positioning. -3 to the To Hit die roll for any designated Point Blank Close gunfire tended to be extremely effective
sniper. in causing wounds. A -2 modifier applies to any Point Blank
Fire on the Move When a unit shoots their weapons while gunfire.
on a moving vehicle there is a half To Hit modifier on the To Sniper Snipers are particularly deadly in their attacks so they
Hit die roll. The half To Hit number is calculated by deter- gain a -5 to the effect die roll.
mining the chance To Hit including all modifiers and then
halving the total. This only applies to passengers in/on a vehi- Jamming
cle. Infantry may never shoot and walk/crawl in the same Any time an unmodified roll of 20 is made on a To Hit roll
action. the weapon has jammed. This does not necessarly mean that
No Target When a figure wants to shoot at a location that the weapon has actually jammed but it does mean that some
contains no visible target, although they suspect one, they can malfunction has occured and it needs to be rectified. It takes
fire at the location with a half To Hit modifier. Any hits are one action to clear a jam, see Actions. Any weapon which can
applied as normal to any figures in the location. fire every action (small arms, MGs, etc.) may fire normal the
action after being cleared. Weapons which must be loaded
Effect Results (bazookas, flare pistols etc.) must spend an additional action
Gory Death (GD) The figure has been blown away in a gris- loading a new round.
ly fashion - splattering his buddies with blood and bone.
Remove the figure from play. Any friendly figure within 5
Modifiers to Jamming Number
must make an immediate Morale Check just as if they were
shot at themselves. Green Troops -1
Killed in Action (KIA) The figure is dead. Remove from
Non-Qualified Personnel -2
play.
Heavy Wound (HW) The figure was hit hard and is either Captured Weapon -2
down and out, or down and screaming. Regardless, the figure
takes no further part in the battle. Remove from play unless
using Im Hit rules in the Sniper section. Special fire modes
Light Wound (LtW) The figure has been hit but is still in
action. The figure must make an immediate Morale Check at As Viktor scanned the room, he heard the skuff of a hob-
+5 or break. If the Morale Check is passed the figure is forced nailed boot on the street outside. Slowly he took a breath and
prone. The figure is at +5 on all fire and other die rolls includ- pulled his PPSh tight against his shoulder. Aiming out the
ing morale for the rest of the game. The figure now only has window, Viktor waited for his foe to appear...
1 action per turn for the rest of the game.
Morale Check (MC) The figure has taken a superficial hit or Opportunity Fire
had a near death experience. Make an immediate Morale Opportunity Fire allows figures to forego their normal turn in
Check as described in Morale and Leaders. If passed the fig- order to wait for the "opportunity" to fire the moment a target
ure is forced prone. See Supression. presents itself. This is intended to represent those figures who
Suppression (Sup) The sound of incoming rounds has forced know or suspect that an enemy, not presently in sight or

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infantry
range, is about to come into a position where the figure can
fire. The figure on Op-Fire may only take a shot while the
enemy piece is taking an action. Op-Fire Example
To set Opportunity Fire the figure must meet several condi- First Action
tions.
It must have a weapon to fire. Any gun may be used includ-
ing any rifles, machine guns, bazookas, panzerfausts,
flamethrowers and any other projectile weapon. Infantry may
set Op-Fire with grenades but no other types of explosives
such as demo-packs, mines and bangalore torpedoes.
OF
The figure may not have a valid target in LOS and effective
range. If you have a target in LOS and effective range you
must wait for your card to fire. A player may set Op-Fire even Viktor
if aware of enemy figures, as long as those figures are not in
Line of Sight or effective range.

The figure setting Op-Fire must be in good order. For


infantry this means that he must be unwounded and not Last turn the player running Viktor rolled a sighting check, and although he
Broken. Crew weapons must have a full crew, their weapon saw nothing the GM informed the player of noise in the street outside. This
turn during the Mark Special Fire Phase the player marked Viktor with Op-
must be set up and loaded. Fire. When the card for Viktors squad was pulled, Viktor did not move with
the rest of the squad. If the Germans in the street move into Viktors line of
sight Viktor may take a sighting check immediately. If Viktor sights the enemy,
The figure must forego its normal turn. Once Op-Fire is set he may take one action of fire immediately. This fire follows all fire rules, just
the figure loses its turn. A figure cannot give up its Op-Fire as fire within the normal action sequence. Viktor receives only one action of
fire. His first action was spent watching and waiting. If the Germans never
once it is set and the turn begun. An individual figure in a cross in front of the window, then Viktors turn is lost. Viktor may never move
squad may set Op-Fire while the rest of the unit is free to act or take actions with his squad, even if their card comes after the Germans
have moved to safety.
during the turn. Figures still on Op-Fire at the end of a turn
may voluntarily remove that Op-Fire in the Mark Special Fire
modes phase of the next turn. Op-Fire Spotting
When a figure is marked with an Opportunity Fire marker it
The figure loses one action. Once a target comes into sight will not make normal Sighting Checks. The figure will take a
only one action of fire is allowed. This is to represent the time Sighting Check whenever an enemy figure or figure takes an
spent waiting and the effect of firing on a target that sudden- action within its Line of Sight. Therefore, a figure on Op-Fire
ly moved into sight. may take as many spotting checks as enemy actions taken
within its Line of Sight.

Ambush
Ambush is a Special Fire mode that allows a figure to wait
until an enemy piece comes in close before firing. A figure
may not set Op-Fire if there are legal targets within Line of
Sight. In some circumstances it may be beneficial to wait
until the enemy comes within a lethal range. Ambush reflects
this by allowing a figure to go on a special Op-Fire mode that
will allow the enemy to get closer even though they have
been spotted. To be able to set Ambush a figure must fit the
following criteria:

Must never have been sighted in their present position

It must have a weapon to fire. Any gun may be used includ-

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ing any rifles, machineguns, bazookas, panzerfausts, Fire will force everyone within the effected zone whose cover
flamethrowers and any other projectile weapon. Infantry may modifier is less then a +7 prone. Figures are forced prone as
set ambush with grenades but not other types of explosives soon as the Raking Fire is laid down. Each figure wanting to
such as demo-packs, mines and bangalore torpedoes. perform an action within the effected zone, other then crawl-
ing, must pass a half Morale Check. If any figure takes an
The figure setting Ambush must be in good order. For action within this zone, other than crawling, then they are
infantry this means that he must be unwounded and not subject to a single roll To Hit by the firing weapon for each
Broken. Crew weapons must have a full crew, their weapon action taken. This roll To Hit takes all To Hit and cover mod-
must be set up and be loaded. ifiers into account. Imaginary lines are drawn from the edge
of the machine gun to the edge of the effect zone. This area is
Once Ambush is set the figure loses its turn. A figure cannot the cone of fire.
give up its Ambush once it is set and the turn begun. An indi-
vidual figure in a squad may set Ambush while the rest of the
Plunging Fire

,,
squad is free to act during the turn. A figure still on Ambush
at the end of a turn may voluntarily remove that Ambush in
the Mark Special Fire modes phase of the next turn.

,,
Max Range = Long Range

The figure loses one action. Once a target comes into sight Max Width

,,
only one action of fire is allowed. This is to represent the time LMG = 5 inches
MMG = 6 inches
spent waiting and the effect of firing on a target that sudden- HMG = 8 inches
LCMG = 8 inches
ly moved into sight.
Max Depth
The figure may never shoot at a target farther than 15 Gun Emplacement
LMG = 2 inches
MMG = 3 inches
HMG = 3 inches
LCMG = 3 inches
Pinning fire
Pinning fire is a special fire modes that assumes the weapon
is continuously shooting during the entire turn. Although this
volume of fire is inaccurate it is concentrated into a deadly Plunging Fire This type of Pinning Fire is used at longer
cone that will deny an area to the enemy. There are three ranges than the Raking Fire. Plunging fire can only take place
types of Pinning fire: Raking, Plunging and Spraying. at ranges longer then effective and shorter then extreme. The
machine gun is elevated up and the ammunition is arced into

,,,,
the target zone. If any figure takes an action within this zone
Raking Fire then they are subject to a single roll To Hit by the firing
weapon for each action taken. This roll To Hit takes all To Hit

,,,,
Max Range = Effective Range and cover modifiers, except prone, into account. Figures are
not forced prone by Plunging Fire, and because of the arch-
ing bullets, figures get no cover bonus for being prone.

,,,,
Plunging Fire can arch over terrain features of 1 level of
Max Width
LMG = 5 inches
height. Higher terrain will block Plunging Fire.

,,,,
MMG = 6 inches

,,,,
HMG = 8 inches
LCMG = 8 inches
Spraying Fire
Gun Emplacement

,,,,
Max Range = Effective Range

Max Width

,,,,
4 inches

Automatic Weapon
Raking Fire This type of Pinning Fire is the most common.
The machine gun sprays bullets approximately two feet off
the ground at a steady rate. This type of fire is designed to Spraying Fire Small Arms that are capable of full automat-
deny the enemy an avenue of approach. This form of Pinning ic fire are eligible for Spraying Fire. Spraying Fire is using

Easy eights Battleground World War II 11


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the weapon on full automatic mode to hose an area with bul-
lets. Any figure caught in Spraying Fire must pass a half
Morale Check. If that check is failed then the figure must go
prone. If the check is passed then the figure has the choice
whether to go prone or not. Every action spent within the
cone of Spraying Fire is subject to a single roll To Hit. This
roll To Hit takes all normal To Hit modifiers into account and
is then halved.
Stopping Pinning Fire At any time the gun crew is forced
off the gun or the gunner or crew takes casualties, then the
Pinning Fire is lifted. Furthermore, the gun is finished for the
turn. If the gun suffers a jam result when making an attack
then the Pinning Fire is lifted for the remainder of the turn.
Pinning Fire Jamming Because machine guns can roll an
excessive number of dice when laying a Raking or Plunging
fire, they are subject to special jam rules when using those
fire modes. Anytime a Raking/Plunging machine gun rolls a
jam, roll an immediate Skill Check, using the loaders
morale. If the check is passed, no jam occurs. If the check is
failed a jam occurs as normal and the Raking/Plunging fire is
lifted.

,,,,,
,,,,,
Note: This exception applies only to Raking and Plunging
fire not to Spraying fire.

,,,,,
,,,,,
Gun Duel Machine gun Types
There was a wide variety of automatic weapons in service
during World War II. These ranged from gigantic machine

,,,,,
,,,,,
guns to up-scaled automatic rifles. For gaming purposes these
have been broken down into 5 catagories. These catagories

,,,,,
,,,,,
help define the basic capabilities of the weapon in question.

Pre Machine Gun (PMG) The Pre Machine Gun is defined


as a weapon that is fed by a limited magazine and difficult to
load and change ammunition. It is essentially a fully auto-
Gun Duels When two machine guns lay pinning fire on one matic version of a rifle. The American Browning Automatic
another then a special Gun Duel rule must apply. This rule Rifle is an excellent example of this type of weapon. These
only applies when each gun is under the other guns cone of weapons are eligible for Spraying Fire only, and they may
fire. Roll To Hit dice for each crew member for both Pinning never use Raking or Plunging Fire.
machine guns. Resolve that roll as per normal Pinning Fire
rules. If during the result of that roll the machine gun crew is Light Machine Gun (LMG) The Light Machine Gun is
effected then their Pinning Fire template is lifted. This hap- defined as a full rate of fire machine gun with a bipod that is
pens immediately when the Pinning Fire is declared, before easily transported by infantrymen. To be considered setup the
any other actions are taken. It is possible for both Pinning Light Machine Gun must be deployed with the bipod in use
Fires to be removed, both to stay, or only one to stay. and the crew prone or otherwise braced, ie. wall, window,
trench, etc. It takes no actions to setup. A German MG34
machine guns bipod machine gun is a good example of this kind.

Dieter saw in the distance two Americans laying one of their Medum Machine Gun (MMG) The Medium Machine Gun
large .50 cals on its tripod. With no cover near at hand is defined as a full rate of fire air cooled machine gun. To be
Dieter watched with horror as a third American opened an considered setup the Medium Machine Gun must be
ammo can and loaded the weapon. deployed with the tripod in use. The gunner is considered to
be sitting behind the gun firing. This catagory of weapon may

12 easy eights Battleground World War II


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not be fired if it is not setup. 4. Apply modifiers for target and thrower.
Heavy Machine Gun (HMG) The Heavy Machine Gun is
defined as a full rate of fire water cooled machine gun. To be 5. Roll a d20 using all modifiers To Hit. If the modified
considered setup the Heavy Machine Gun must be deployed number rolled is equal or less than the chance To Hit the
with the tripod in use. The gunner sits behind the gun firing. grenade lands on target. Place a grenade template and pro-
This category of weapon may not be fired if it is not setup. ceed to roll damage. If a miss is rolled, use the deviation tem-
Large Caliber Machine Gun (LCMG) The Large Caliber plate to determine the actual location of the grenade. Place
Machine Gun is defined as a full rate of fire, typically air the template on the table with the center over the intended tar-
cooled, machine gun that fires a large caliber round such as a get with the arrow pointing away from the thrower. Roll a d8
.50 caliber or a 12.7 mm. To be considered set-up the LCMG and a d3. This shows the grenades direction (the D8) and
must be deployed with a tripod in use. The gunner is consid- deviation (the d3 in inches). Place the grenade template on
ered to be sitting behind the gun firing. This category of the actual landing point and proceed to roll damage.
weapon may not be fired if it is not setup.
Auto Cannon (AC) The Auto Cannon is defined as a fully 6. Place the grenade template over the landing point center-
automatic main gun. These are generally anti-aircraft guns ing the landing point with the dot in the A ring. Now deter-
deployed for ground use or automatic tank guns. This catego- mine which figures are in the area of effect, and in which ring
ry of weapon is always mounted in a vehicle or towed mount. (A, B, C, D). If there is a question as to which ring a figure is
in always chose the inner ring. Figures under the A ring will
Crews roll on the A column of the Effects Chart. Roll on the Effects
Each machine gun has a particular number of crew members Chart using all modifiers on the chart to determine injury to
associated with it. The gun may be operated with less crew effected figures. Apply injuries just as in Small Arms. Figures
members but it will affect the Jamming Number and may only count terrain cover if the terrain is between them
Breakdown Number. For every missing crew member there and the center point of the grenade.
will be a -1 to both factors. Enclosed Space Grenades could be especially brutal in a
Example: A MMG that requires 3 crew members to operate tight, enclosed space. Any grenade that goes off in a foxhole,
and normally jams on a 20 will jam on a 19 or 20 if it only halftrack crew area, or bunker (but not in a normal building)
has 2 crew members and a 18-20 if it only has one. will effect all occupants of the area as if they were in the A
ring.
Jamming Cluster Grenades During combat it was common for
If the controlling player rolls the Jam Number while rolling infantrymen to group grenades together in a sack or tie them
To Hit dice then the gun is Jammed. It takes one action to un- together. This was done to increase the effectiveness against
jam a machine gun. both infantry and vehicles. It takes 6 grenades to create a
Cluster Grenade. Cluster Grenades are thrown as normal
grenades with a +1 To Hit. On detonation they have the effect
Grenades
of a small HE template.
Holscher watched with cool detachment as a burst of fire
from the window killed Otto. Pressing his back to the wall he grenade To Hit modifiers
pulled the pin on an egg grenade and flipped it in the window. Window/ Door This modifier applies to grenades being
He was gratified by a loud KRUMP and a muffled cry. thrown through any window, door or similiar apperture such
as down a stairwell. This modifier does not apply at 0 range.
Grenades are small bombs carried by individual soldiers. In Foxhole This modifier applies to grenades being thrown into
World War II they were either shockingly effective or practi- a foxhole, trench or similar dug-in position such as behind
cally harmless. sandbags or in a gun pit. This modifier does not apply at 0
range.
To Throw a grenade Vehicle Top This modifier applies to grenades being thrown
1. Pick a target point within 6 inches. into the fighting compartment of an open top vehicle; such as
a halftrack, jeep or truck. This modifier does not apply at 0
2. Declare what type of grenade is to be thrown. range.
Vehicle Motion This modifier applies to grenades being
3. Using the range chart, determine the chance of the grenade thrown into moving vehicles. The modifier is +1 per 4 of
landing on target movement in the previous action, regardless of vehicle fac-

Easy eights Battleground World War II 13


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ing. This modifier will always be combined with vehicle top
and applies even at 0 range. Rifle Grenade To Hit Chart
Thrower Elite This modifier represents the skill and experi-
ence of Elite troops. This modifier always applies.
Range To Hit
Thrower Green This modifier represents the inexperience of 0 inches 18
Green troops. This modifier always applies.
Thrower Light Wounded This modifier represents the debil- up to 6 inches 12
itating effect of Light Wounds. This modifier always applies.
Bunker Slit Grenades can only be placed in a bunker slit at 6 to 12 inches 8
0 range. At this range no modifiers apply except those spe-
cific to the thrower such as Thrower Elite. Condition Modifier
Window / Door +3
Grenade To Hit Chart
Vehicle Motion +1 per 3"
Range To Hit
Shooter Elite -2
0 inches 18
Shooter Green +2
up to 3 inches 12
Shooter LtW +5
3 to 6 inches 8
Bunker Slit +10
Condition Modifier
To fire a rifle grenade
Window / Door +3 1. It takes one action to affix the grenade to the rifle.
Foxhole +4
2. Nominate a target point within 12 just like a regular
Vehicle Top +2 grenade. All modifiers to thrown grenades apply; deviation
works just as a thrown grenade in the event of a miss. Work
Vehicle Motion +1 per 3" out effects just as with a thrown grenade.
Note: It is not possible to direct fire a rifle grenade into a fox-
Thrower Elite -2 hole/ halftrack crew compartment because too much arcing is
required.
Thrower Green +2 Long Range Rifle Grenade Fire At ranges longer then 12
and out to a maximum of 30, the rifle is elevated and aimed
Thrower LtW +5
much like a mortar. If the target point is in sight , roll a d8 to
Bunker Slit only at 0" range determine direction of deviation, then a d6 to determine dis-
tance of deviation. Use the standard mortar deviation tem-
RIFLE GRENADES plate, with the arrow pointing at the enemy table edge. Work
Rifle grenades can give the grunt much needed extra range out effects just as for a thrown grenade.
and punch, but were inaccurate and no substitute for a mortar Blind Fire If the target point is out of sight, roll a d8 to
and a bazooka. determine direction of deviation, then a 2d6 to determine
distance of deviation. Use the standard mortar deviation
template, with the arrow pointing at the enemy table edge.

duds
Whenever an unmodified 20 is rolled To Hit with any type of
grenade a mishap occurs. This mishap is generally that the
grenade is a dud and has no effect. Gamemasters are encour-
aged to use more interesting mishaps, appropriate to the
activities of the thrower, whenever possible.

14 easy eights Battleground World War II


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Hand to hand
Josef heard the blast down the hall as he directed his
squads movement in the ruin. With a shout he ran down the
hall to see what happened. Viktor lay there dead as a German
entered through the window. In a rage he charged the Kraut
with his pistol...

When the going gets tough, sometimes the tough have to run
at the enemy and beat them to death with a rifle butt.

Hand to Hand Combat


Anytime an infantry figure ends an action in base to base con-
tact with an enemy figure, hand to hand combat ensues. Both
sides roll a d20, modified as below. The low die lives and the
high die is HW and out of play. A tie roll indicates that the
figures are locked in deadly combat until next turn when they
roll again with the first of their cards.
Continuing Combat Once locked in combat neither figure
may disengage until one of them goes down. If a figure enters
Hand To Hand on its first action and wins, it may take a sec-
ond action as normal that turn. If a figure enters Hand To
Hand on its second action the Hand To Hand is assumed to be
a free action. If a figure is engaged by an enemy in Hand To
tion. It represents the difficulty of figthing someone elevated
Hand before its card that turn, and wins, the figure gets two
above you. This modifier also applies to any figure who
actions as normal. These rules are expediencies to keep Hand
moved into Hand to Hand against a figure behind a wall, sand
To Hand from bogging down play with extra record keeping.
bags, or a similar elevated obstacle. This modifier is in favor
of the figure who started behind the wall because a figure
Hand To Hand Modifiers Chart behind a wall can use the wall as cover. The over obstacle
Condition Modifier penalty is +2.
Prone Any figure that engages in Hand to Hand combat while
Over Obstacle +2 prone receives a +3 penalty because of the difficulty of fight-
Prone +3 ing from the ground.
Manning Crew Weapon Any figure who is manning a crew
Crew Weapon +5 weapon as a gunner or assistant of any sort when engaged in
LtW +5 Hand to Hand combat is subject to the Manning Crew
Weapon penalty. This penalty applies to any crew weapon
Green +2 from the LMG or bazooka to the anti-tank gun. This penalty
Elite -2 represents the difficulty of the crew being burdened with
ammo, occupied with the gun, seated in the gun seat, etc. The
Surprise -2 Manning Crew Weapon Penalty is +5.
Leader -1 Per point of Leadership Modifier Light Wound Any figure engaging in Hand to Hand combat
with a Light Wound suffers the Light Wound penalty. This
Pistol -3 represents the pain and disability of the wound. The Light
Extra Attacker -2 Per extra attacker
Wound penalty is +5.
Green Green troopers arent well trained in Hand to Hand
higher morale -1 combat and not ready for the savage reality. Green troops
always receive the Green penalty of +2.
Hand to Hand Combat Modifiers
Elite Elite troops are trained in various techniques of Hand to
Over Obstacle This modifier applies to any figure who start-
Hand combat and are ready to practice them whenever possi-
ed Hand to Hand Combat in a foxhole or other dug-in pos-
ble. Elite troops always receive the Elite bonus of -2.

Easy eights Battleground World War II 15


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Surprise Figures who have surprise will be more likely to Assault Engineers are special troops trained in the use of
strike down their foe before he can respond. The surprise engineering equipment. Assault Engineers are ranked as
bonus should only apply to figures that never sighted until Green, Regular, Veteran, or Elite just as any other troops, but
actually in Hand to Hand with their foe. The Surprise bonus they will have a morale rating at least one point higher than
is -2. other troops of equal ranking. Assault Engineers are deployed
Leader Any Leader can use his Leadership Modifier as a in attacks to use their special equipment and skills to over-
bonus in Hand to Hand combat. This represents the Leaders come enemy obstacles such as anti-tank ditches and pillbox-
greater skill and determination. The Leader bonus is always es. In defense Assault Engineers can deploy wire, lay mine
the Leaders Leadership Modifier. fields, make road blocks and a variety of other obstacles.
Pistol Any figure carrying a pistol may use it in Hand to Hand Each of these tasks require specific tools, wire cutters, shov-
combat to deadly effect. The Pistol bonus is -3. els, picks, axes, etc. Engineers are assumed to have these
Extra Attacker For each additional attacker over one on one tools available unless a scenario indicates otherwise. Normal
the side with superior numbers receives a -2 bonus. Roll for troops are assumed to have an entrenching tool, but no other
each fight one on one, always applying the Extra Attacker special gear.
bonus to each figure on the larger side. Because Hand to
Hand combat is simultaneous, roll for every attacker, even if Obstacles
the outnumbered figure loses the first roll. The Extra Assault Engineers are trained and equipped to lay obstacles in
Attacker bonus is -2 per attacker over one. The attacker is not the game. They can spend actions to set up defensive obsta-
necessarily the figure who initiates the combat. If a single fig- cles on the table. Some obstacles, such as foxholes, can be set
ure runs into a group of several, the bonus applies to the larg- by any troops and are noted as such. The chart that governs
er group. the construction of obstacles is located in the Terrain section.
Higher Morale The figure with the higher morale receives a Engineers can also reduce and remove obstacles during the
bonus of -1 to represent his superior training and will. game. They do so using the special tools used below. Only
engineers can used the specialized equipment below, with the
exception of satchel charges. Any troops can use satchel
charges for close assaults vs vehicles or as large grenades.

Satchel charge
A satchel charge is a bag of explosives that can be used for
small demolitions. An engineer can spend two actions to set
a satchel charge against an object and destroy it. A set satchel
charge can knock down a tree, open a locked wooden door or
other small demolition projects. Only engineers can use a
satchel charge as a demolition. Satchel charges can also be
thrown exactly like a grenade with a +2 To Hit penalty. A
satchel charge will detonate 2 actions after the action it is
thrown or set. These actions are based off the figure who set
or threw the charge. Thus the charge will explode on the first
or second action of the throwing figures next turn. Satchel
charges explode using the small HE template, with the center
point on the charge.
Throwing back When a satchel charge is thrown near enemy
figures, it behooves those figures to return the favor. It takes
one action to throw back a satchel charge. To do so the fig-
Assault Engineers
ure must be in base contact with the charge and must pass a
Wisch approached the building using rubble as cover, the half Gut Check. Only one figure can be in base contact with
weight of his weapon forcing him to use extra caution. a satchel charge at any one time. Figures stuck in an enclosed
Raising his flamethrower he let out a long burst and saw sev- space, such as a pillbox, will have a -5 on this check. This
eral of the Russians expire horribly. The ruin was now defi- check represents both the willingness of a figure to throw the
nitely in German hands. charge and whether the figure can complete the task both in
one roll. A thrown back satchel charge is thrown exactly like

16 easy eights Battleground World War II


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any other satchel charge. Line charges are used to destroy linear obstacles such as a
small road block or a section of wire. Line charges only take
demolition pack one action to set against a linear obstacle and are 3 long.
Demolition pack is a package of explosives that engineers Line charges explode as two small HE templates 3 apart.
can use to destroy enemy defenses, such as pillbox doors.
Engineers can also use several demo packs to destroy large Bangalore torpedo
structures such as bridges and buildings. Some demo packs A bangalore torpedo is a pipe filled with explosives. They are
are merely large satchel charges others are purpose designed 3 long and can be set and detonated exactly like line charges.
quantities of explosives. Demo packs are assumed to be the In addition bangalore torpedos can be electrically linked and
large satchel type unless specified in the scenario. Generally detonated exactly like demo packs. This allows bangalore tor-
the purpose designed explosives are used to destroy large pedoes to create gaps longer then 3 long. Or, the torpedos
fixed objects and not under direct fire. Single demo packs can can be set under a 3 wide obstacle, such as a mass of wire,
be thrown like a satchel charge, but only out to 3. Thrown and then blow open a gap. Bangalore torpedos explode with
demo packs may be Thrown Back exactly as satchel charges. the HE effect of one small HE template every 3.
Demo packs can be triggered to explode by a two action fuse,
exactly like a satchel charge. Demo packs can also be set flamethrower
against an object, by spending two or more actions. A single A flamethrower is a portable fuel tank that squirts flaming
demo pack will explode using the medium HE template. liquid out over a short distance. Engineers are equipped with
Electrical Detonation Demo packs can also be triggered flamethrowers to clear out stubborn, dug-in defenders.
electrically. To trigger a demo pack electrically an engineer Flamethrowers can also be used to start fires, see the Terrain
must spend one action attaching the cables. Any number of rules. Primarily, flamethrowers are used in an anti-personnel
charges may be linked to the cable provided an engineer or anti-tank capacity. Man-carried flamethrowers have
spends one action with each charge linking them together. enough fuel for 6 actions of fire.
Then the engineer must move at normal rate to wherever he Activation Flamethrowers must be activated before use by
chooses to detonate from. It then takes one action to detonate. rolling a 17 or less. A flamethrower may activate and fire in
An engineer may wait as long as he likes before setting off the same action. Once activated a flamethrower can fire every
the charge. The cable between the detonator and the charge action without checking again. As soon as an activated
will be cut if any tracked or halftracked vehicle moves across flamethrower holds its fire for one or more actions, that
the cable. The cable will also be cut by the A ring of any HE flamethrower is considered inactive and must be activated to
blast. Finally, the cable can be cut by any enemy figures who fire again.
spend one action at the cable. Anti-Personnel Effect Flamethrowers use the special tear-
drop template to determine effect. Any figure within the cen-
Pole charge ter red zone is considered Gory Death, regardless of any
A pole charge is a single demo pack set at the end of 8-10 cover but taking LOS into account. Any figure within the
pole. They are used in close assaults to attack pillbox gun slits outer yellow zone receives an A column hit with all cover
and second story windows. Pole charges are subject to a two bonuses applied. Any figure in the yellow zone who receives
action delay fuse exactly like satchel charges. Pole charges a LtW or worse is considered a Gory Death.
cannot be electrically detonated. Pole charges can be forced Anti-Tank Effect Flamethrowers can effect an armored vehi-
into a gun slit at 3 range on a roll of 18 or less. If this roll is cle only if that vehicle is in the center red zone. Any effected
failed the charge detonates just outside the slit. Pole charges armored vehicle is effected exactly like a molotov cocktail
can also be set in a second story window if the setting figure but with a -5 on the Effects Chart, taking all other modifiers
is in base contact with the wall below. The setting figure must into account.
roll a 15 or less to successfully set the charge. If a figure fails Detonation Whenever a figure carrying a flamethrower
to set the pole charge in the window, the charge will land 2 receives a Light Wound or worse result from a hit on the
from the target point in a randomly determined direction. A Effects Chart, there is a possibility of the flamethrower deto-
pole charge explodes using a medium HE template. nating. Roll immediately on the same chart that effected the
figure, using all the same modifiers. If a Light Wound or
line charge worse results, the flamethrower explodes. The figure holding
A line charge is a board or pole with a series of small charges an exploding flamethrower is Gory Death and any figure
attached. Line charges are set with a two action fuse, just as within 3 is hit as if in the yellow zone of the flamethrower.
satchel charges. Line charges cannot be electrically activated.

Easy eights Battleground World War II 17


infantry
mines Tricky minefields Tricky minefields are a real terror. The
Mines are deadly bombs buried or laid on the ground to hin- mines are practically packed in edge to edge. Fake mines and
der the movement of troops and vehicles. Mines can be of trip wires are included for unwary engineers. All the mines
three types; Anti-Personnel, Anti-Tank and Booby-Trap. are well buried and camouflaged and all the tracks are care-
Minefields can be either individual mines or an area, maybe fully brushed away.
4x4, marked on the map or table. Laying mines Mine fields can only be laid by engineers. The
Anti-Personnel Mines Anti-Personnel mines are designed to amount of time taken is included on the Obstacles chart in the
cause casualties among troops. Whenever a figure crosses a Terrain section. Generally minefields are laid before the start
single mine or enters a mined area there is a chance that that of a game. If a player has minefields in a scenario, the size
figure will detonate a mine. Use the following procedure: and type of field should be included in with that players
forces. The location of the field or fields can be predeter-
1. Determine the type of minefield. mined by scenario or left to the player to decide. The player
should mark the field on the table, or on a map in non double-
2. Determine the figures movement rate in inches. Always blind games. Single mines can be marked with a counter,
let the figure finish his action before intiating a mine attack areas defined with a counter on each corner.
so the figures actual movement can be determined.
Anti Personnel Mines Chance to Hit Chart
3. Determine whether the figure was looking or not. A figure Rate of Movement Hasty Improved Tricky
will only be looking if warned by an earlier detonation or the 5 Not Looking 14 16 18
player specifically says the figure is looking. A looking fig-
4 Not Looking 12 14 16
ure can never move more then 3 per action.
3 Not Looking 10 12 14
4. Now refer to the mine Detonation Chart. Look down the 2 Not Looking 8 10 12
column to the figures movement and looking status, then Prone Not Looking 10 12 14
across to the right to the minefield column. This number is
3 Looking 6 10 12
the figures chance of detonating a mine. Roll a d20.
2 Looking 4 8 10
5. If the figure detonates a mine immediately roll for results Prone Looking 2 6 8
just as if the figure was in the A ring of a grenade. Then place
the grenade template over the detonating figure to determine Clearing Anti-Personnel mines Although any figure can
if any other figures are affected by the mine. Roll for any move through a minefield, only engineers can clear one. To
other affected figures exactly as for a grenade using the clear a minefield the engineer moves into the field on an
appropriate ring of the template. action, rolling as normal for a detonation. On the engineers
Anti-Tank Mines Anti-tank mines are covered in the Armor next action the figure does not move, but still rolls for a det-
section. Anti-tank mines are laid and discovered exactly like onation with the same chance as last action. In this action the
other mines. engineer is assumed to be removing mines and marking the
Booby-Traps Booby-Traps are specialized mines placed in lane. The engineer continues to alternate actions of moving
doorways, windows, medical supplies, knocked out tanks and and actions of marking until the lane is marked or the engi-
other nasty places. Booby-Traps follow all the normal rules neer is killed.
for anti-personel mines and can be of any of the types typical Marked Lanes Once a lane is marked any figure may move
to standard minefields. Booby-Traps never cover an area, but through with only a 1 chance of detonation, this chance rep-
instead can be several individual traps. resenting the possible missed mine. An engineer can remove
Hasty Mine Fields Hasty mine fields are laid down quickly this 1 chance of detonation by spending one action of moving
in expected lines of enemy advance. Hasty fields are not as and two actions of marking for the entire lane.
closely mined as other types and the mines are merely laid on Mine Detectors Engineers equipped with magnetic mine
the surface, with only a modicum of camouflage. detectors clear minefields as normal. But because of the
Improved minefield Improved minefields are laid whenever detection power of the tool, engineers receive a -4 on all det-
time allows. In an improved minefield the mines are closely onation rolls, both for moving and for marking.
spaced and buried below the surface. However, to save some Clearing Booby-Traps Engineers can remove booby-traps
time they tend to be laid in predictable patterns which are by following a procedure similar to clearing anti-personnel
known to experienced enemy engineers. mines. First the engineer must pass a Gut Check because

18 easy eights Battleground World War II


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Booby-Traps tended to be much more difficult then mine- passed the figure may remain in the location occupied. If the
fields. A half Skill Check must then be rolled. If the half Skill figure fails the a Gut Check then the figure must expend 5"
Check is passed, the trap is disarmed. If the check is not and up to 10" of movement toward cover to escape. The fig-
passed, but the number roll is equal or less then the figures ure is not Broken, he is only moving away from the vehicle.
morale, then the trap is still in place but did not detonate. If If the figure passes the Gut Check he has the option of stay-
the half Skill Check is not passed and the number rolled is ing in place or moving 5- 10 toward cover. If the figure has
higher then the figures morale then the trap has detonated, not moved during the current turn then this movement is con-
resolve as for a normal mine detonation. sidered his movement, otherwise treat it as a free movement.
Clearing Anti-Tank Minefields Engineers clear anti-tank
minefields exactly like they clear anti-personnel minefields. Movement Into Close Combat with AFV
However, the engineer only risks detonation on the action of Whenever a figure advances into contact with a Tank or
marking, not the action of moving, because the mines are not Assault Gun there is a half Gut Check when that figure moves
triggered to detonate against a man. within 5 inches of the vehicle. Whenever a figure advances
into contact with an AFV there is a Gut Check when that fig-
ure moves within 5 inches of the AFV. If this check is passed
then the unit may continue forward toward the Tank or AFV,
otherwise the figure must follow the same rules as AFV
Effects on Infantry. The following chart is used to modify the
dice roll for advancing on AFVs and Tanks.

Advancing into AFV Modifiers


Condition Modifier
Elite -2

Green +2

Entrenched / Cover -5

Front of vehicle +3
Man Vs. Tank
Vehicle unbuttoned +3
Corpral Hicks could not help but grin as the Mk IV moved
by, seemingly oblivious to the danger. Keeping cool, he wait- Engineer -4
ed for the tank to show its rear. Hicks fired the bazooka. He
saw the rocket strike the rear hull and then ducked shrapnel Vehicle in Smoke -3
as the tank brewed up with multiple secondaries.
Immobilized -3
During World War II the tank dominated the battlefield. In an
effort to provide infantry with a way to destroy these mon-
sters they were given specialized equipment and training. For Close Assault
game purposes a Tank is defined as any fully tracked armored Infantry close assault vs. AFV or Tank takes an action to com-
vehicle with an enclosed fighing compartment, including a plete. The infantry must be in base to base contact with the
top and a main gun. An AFV (armored fighting vehicle) is vehicle at the start of this action. Infantry can never close
defined as any armored vehicle that is not a tank. See the assault from Op-Fire or Ambush.
Armor section for specific vehicle classifications. Grenade Attack It is possible that a grenade placed in the
AFV Effects on Infantry correct spot on the rear deck or tracks of an AFV or Tank may
At any time a AFV or Tank comes within 5 inches of an cause damage. To make such an attack the figure attacking
infantry figure, that figure must pass a Gut Check using the must be in base contact with the vehicle and possess a
modifications provided in the chart. If the Gut Check is grenade. The controlling player must state whether a rear

Easy eights Battleground World War II 19


infantry
deck attack or a track attack will be tried. If trying to place a attempt fails the charge is still "set" and is placed on the
grenade in the fighting compartment of an open topped AFV ground next to the vehicle.
then you must consult the grenade rules. 3. Roll for Placement location on the Hit Location Chart.
1. Use the above rules to move the figure into close combat 4. The charge will detonate two actions from the time it was
with the AFV or Tank. placed, timed to the placers actions.
2. Determine the AFV or Tank size. 5. Subtract the targets armor from the Penetration Number.
3. Have the attacking player declare whether they are target- 6. If the d20 roll is less than or equal to the final Penetatraion
ing the tracks or the engine deck. Number roll on the Penetration Effects Chart. If no penetra-
4. Check the Placement Chart and roll a d20. Modify the tion apply Non-Penetration Effect from the Hit Location
result with the appropriate table modifiers. Chart.
5. A low roll on the die indicates a successful attempt. Now Thrown
roll a d20 on the Grenade Effect chart. 1. Using the rules for throwing satchel charges, roll To Hit,
6. Apply the result to the target. using all applicable modifiers.
Molitov Cocktail On several fronts in the war infantry were 2. If a hit is scored, then roll to see if the charge has hooked
forced into using gas filled bottles as anti-tank weapons. on to the vehicle. To do this, roll on the chart for placing
These were known as molitov cocktails and could be affec- satchel charges using all modifiers, including thrown. If a
tive against AFVs and Tanks when the fiery liquid found a miss is scored or the charge fails to hook, the Charge is set
way inside the vehicle. The cocktail is thrown exactly like a and placed beside the target vehicle.
hand grenade. If the cocktail landed on the Tank or AFV then 3. If a hit is scored and the charge hooks then roll on the Hit
roll a d20 and check the Molitov Effects chart. If the target Location Chart.
was an open topped vehicle and the molitov cocktail landed 4. The charge will detonate two actions from the time it was
inside, use the Open Top Chart instead. placed, timed to the placers actions.
Magnetic Mine These lethal weapons were developed in 5. Using the charges Penetration, subtract the vehicles
order to give a very effective anti-tank weapon to the armor and roll to penetrate. If a penetration occurs roll on the
infantryman. The only problem is that the soldier using the Penetration Effects Chart and apply damage. If there is no
weapon had to be close enough to touch the tank to place the penetration check the Hit Location Chart for Non-Penetrating
mine. Effect.
1. Move the figure into close combat with the AFV or Tank.
2. Using the Placement Chart, roll to place the mine. Close Assault Placement Chart
3. Roll on the Hit Location chart to see where the mine is Attack VS S M L VL
placed. Grenade vs.
14 10 7 5 3
Engine / Rear Deck
4. The mine will detonate in two actions after it has been Grenade vs.
14 11 9 7 5
placed, based on the placers actions. Tracks / Wheels

5. Upon detonation roll for penetration using the mines Magnetic Mine 12 12 14 16 16
Penetration number. Satchel Charge 14 12 10 8 8
6. Subtract the targets armor from the Penetration number,
this is the final Penetration number. Modifiers
7. If the d20 roll is less than or equal than the final Elite -2
Penetatration number, roll on the Penetration Effects Chart. If Green +2
no penetration apply any Non-Penetration effect from the Hit
Light Wound +5
Location Chart.
Satchel Charge Satchel charges were sometimes used as Engineers -2
expedient anti-tank weapons. In order for a satchel charge to Thrown Satchel Charge +5
be effective it must be "placed" on the tank. Satchel charges
Anti Magnetic Paste (Magnetic Mines Only) +10
may also be thrown at an AFV and may Hook on the vehicle
and cause damage. Demo packs may be placed like satchel
charges. A thrown demo pack will never Hook on an AFV. Projectile Attack
Placed During World War II several weapons were developed to
1. Use the rules to move the figure into close combat with the allow the infantryman to attack tanks at a distance. These
AFV or Tank. weapons are allowed to take advantage of Op-Fire and
2. Roll for an attempt to place the Sachel Charge. If the Ambush.

20 easy eights Battleground World War II


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Mine & Explosives Penetration Chart Molitov Open Top Effects Chart
Die Effect
Weapon Penetration Flame explodes through the fighting compartment. The vehicle is caught on fire.

1-4 Anyone failing a morale check is considered KIA everyone else must bail out. Any
heavy weapons must be left behind and are destroyed along with the vehicle.

Magnetic Mine 30 The cocktail has burst inside the vehicle causing panic and damage. The driving

5-8 compartment is completely knocked out killing the driver. All radios and inherent
vehicle weapons are destroyed. All crew members must bail-out, vehicle is on fire.

Satchel Charge 20 Flame and gas burst inside the vehicle. Wide spread panic hits the crew as the flames
inch closer to the ammunition and fuel supply. All crew members failing a morale check
9-12 must bail-out, vehicle is on fire. The vehicle is out for 2 turns while the fire is
extinguished.
Demo Pack 25 Flame and Gas cover the vehicle and cause concern to the crew. Any crew member not
passing their morale check will be unable to take any action for their next turn.
13-16
The cocktail has burst inside the vehicle causing more panic then damage. While most
Grenade Vs Tracks / Wheels Effects Chart 17-20 of the supplies and packs in the vehicle are caught on fire no real damage is caused

Die Effect
Grenade explodes within the tracks. Track pieces and links are
Modifiers
1-4 blown apart. The track is permanently destroyed.

Grenade explodes within the tracks. Track pieces and links are
Unbuttoned -4
5-8 twisted off the rollers. The tank is immobilized until 8 man actions
are spent on the tracks by the crew members for repairs.
Shrapnel and concussion rock the side of the tank . The effects are
Flamethrower -5
9-12 sufficient to slow the vehicle to half speed until the crew spends 6
man actions on the tracks to repair them.
The explosion has caused slight track damage. The vehicle will lose
Rain / Snow +4
13-16 2 inches from its speed until the crew spends 4 man actions on the
tracks to repair them.
The shrapnel and explosion have been directed away from the tank.
17-20 No damage has resulted from the attack. Molitov Effects Chart
Modifiers Die Effect
Flame seeps into the fighting compartment of the vehicle. Wide spread panic hits the

1-4 crew as the flames inch closer to the ammunition and fuel supply. All crew members
passing a morale check must bail-out, otherwise they are KIA. Vehicle is on fire.
Cluster Grenade -5 As Flame and gas spread across the vehicle, some finds its way inside the fighting
compartment and causes havoc. Any crew member failing his morale check must
5-8 bail-out. The vehicle will lose a turn while the crew is dealing with the damage and
Vehicle In Motion +4 fire.
As the fireball covers the target vehicle it flashes past the vision ports. This makes it
very hard to see out of the vehicle and fight effectively. Panic sets in the crew from the
9-12 attack. Any crew member not passing their morale check will be unable to take any
action for their next turn. Any actions taken by the crew will receive a +2 modifier as well
Grenade Vs Engine Deck Effects Chart Flame and gas cover the vehicle and cause concern to the crew. Any crew member not
passing their morale check will be unable to take any action for their next turn.
13-16
Die Effect The Cocktail hits the vehicle and erupts in a ball of flame. Although hitting the vehicle
Grenade explodes and catches the fuel within the engine. This
17-20 and igniting, most of the gas splashes off the target into the surrounding terrain. Check
for fire.
1-4 causes an explosion as the engine is destroyed vehicle is
immobilized. Vehicles engine is on fire.
The explosion's concussion rips through the engine decking
5-8 causing engine damage. The vehicle is immobilized until the crew Modifiers
spends 8 man actions on the engine to repair damage.
The explosion's concussion rips through the engine decking causing
Unbuttoned -4
9-12 engine damage. The vehicle is immobilized until the crew spends 4
man actions on the engine to repair damage.
The shrapnel from the grenade is lodged itself in the engine
Flamethrower -5
13-16 compartment. The engine is prevented from gaining full throttle. Half
speed until the crew spends 4 man actions on the engine to repair it.
The shrapnel and explosion have been directed away from the tank. Rain / Snow +4
17-20 No damage has resulted from the attack.

Modifiers
Cluster Grenade -5

Easy eights Battleground World War II 21


infantry
Panzerfaust A panzerfaust is a single shot disposable 1. Determine the range to the target.
weapon. It takes an action to fire a panzerfaust, after which 2. Look right on the chart for the approprate range then check
the weapon is removed from play. The effective range is very the top of the chart for the To Hit number.
short but they have incredible penetrating power. The panzer- 4. Roll a d20. Modify this roll with all gun To Hit modifiers.
faust is a missle weapon and allowed to be on Op-Fire and 5. If the roll is less than or equal to the To Hit number than it
Ambush. is a hit.
1. Determine the range to the target. 6. Roll for location with a d20 on the Hit Location Chart
2. Determine the type of panzerfaust on the chart. 7. Subtract the targets armor from the Penetration Number,
3. Look right on the chart for the approprate range then check this is the final Penetration Number.
the top of the chart for the To Hit number. 8. Roll a d20. If the roll is less than or equal to the final
4. Roll a d20. Modify this roll with all the modifiers on the Penetration Number, then roll on the Penetration Effects
Gun To Hit chart except for HEAT round. Chart. If no penetration then there is no further effect to the
5. If the roll is less than or equal to the To Hit number, a hit vehicle. Anti-tank rifles fired such a small, light shell that
is scored. they never cause damage unless the shell first penetrates the
6. Roll for location with a d20 on the Hit Location Chart targets armour and thus never cause a Non-Penetrating
7. Subtract the targets armor from the Penetration Number, Effect. In addition ATRs always have a +3 modifier on the
this is the final Penetration Number. Penetration Effects Chart.
8. Roll a d20. If the roll is less or equal to the final Machine Guns vs AFVs and Tanks Truly desperate infantry
Penetatration Number, then roll on the Penetration Effects can fire their machine guns at enemy armor and potentially
Chart. If there is no penetration ,check the Hit Location chart cause damage to light vehicles. Machine guns must be
for Non-Penetrating Effect. specifically targeting the enemy vehicle to cause damage.
Bazooka / Panzerschreck A bazooka is a rocket propelled Armored vehicles moving through any type of Pinning Fire
anti-tank weapon. It has a short range and decent penetration will never be effected, although exposed crew may be. To use
capabilites. The Penetration and To Hit charts are given a machine gun against armour, follow the procedure below.
below. Use the modifiers of the Gun To Hit Chart. The 1. Roll To Hit as normal for the machine gun at the present
bazooka and panzerschreck are missile weapons and are range, using all To Hit modifiers and full Rate of Fire.
allowed to be on Op-Fire and Ambush. Both the bazooka and Machine guns will never be able to penetrate armor at longer
panzerschreck are crew served weapons and require both a then effective range.
gunner and a loader. It takes one action load a bazooka or 2. If a majority of hits is scored then there is the potential to
panzerschreck and one action to fire. Penetrate armor. A majority is 3 hits for a 4 ROF weopon, 2
1. Determine the range to the target. hits for a 3 ROF weapon. If less than a majority of hits is
2. Determine the type of bazooka or panzerschreck on the scored, the attack will have no effect even vs exposed crew.
chart. In an attempt to concentrate fire the machine gunner has
3. Look right on the chart for the approprate range then check given up the guns ability to spray an area.
the top of the chart for the To Hit number. 3. If a majority of hits is scored then roll for a Hit Location as
4. Roll a d20. Modify this number with all normal gun To Hit normal. All hits will be to the same location. This is to repre-
modifiers except for HEAT round. sent that the machine gun penetrated by beating on one small
5. If the roll is less than or equal to the hit number, then it is area of the targets armor.
a hit. 4. Subtract the targets armor from the Penetration Number,
6. Roll for location with a d20 on the Hit Location Chart. this is the final Penetration Number. Only roll to Penetrate
7. Subtract the targets Armor from the Penetration Number, once for the entire attack. Any penetration is for all of the hits.
this is the final Penetration Number. 5. Roll a d20. If the roll is less or equal to the final Penetration
8. Roll a d20. If the roll is less or equal to the final Penetration Number, then roll on the Penetration Effects Chart. Only roll
Number, then roll on the Penetration Effects Chart. If no pen- once on the Penetration Effects Chart. This one result is the
etration then check the Hit Location Chart for Non- total damage caused by the entire attack. If no penetration
Penetrating Effect. then there is no further effect to the vehicle. Machine gun fire
Anti-Tank Rifle (ATR) Early in the war various countries will be too light and spread out to cause any damage unless it
developed anti-tank rifles. These rifles were large caliber first penetrates the targets armor and thus never causes a
rifles designed to penetrate lightly armored vehicles. As the Non-Penetrating Effect. If penetrated, however, machine
war progressed and armor became more effective the ATR guns will have a +3 modifier on the Penetration Effects Chart.
was phased out. ATRs have one shot per action.

22 easy eights Battleground World War II


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Regular, Veteran or Elite just like any other troops, but will
Bazooka and Panzerschreck to hit Chart
generally have a Morale rating at least two points higher.
PB Short Effective Long Sniper teams use a number of special rules to represent their
Weapon 16 11 7 3 Penetration unique abilities.
Panzerschreck 8" 15" 23" 30" 46 Ambush Snipers are an exception to the normal Ambush
Bazooka 43 8" 15" 23" 30" 23 rules. Snipers can aim while on Ambush and can shoot out
beyond 15. Snipers may never set Op-Fire or Ambush if
Bazooka 44 9" 16" 24" 32" 28
Light Wounded.
Aim Because of Snipers high skill they are able to use an
Panzerfaust to hit Chart Aimed shot while on Ambush or Op-Fire. This is an excep-
PB Short Effective Long
tion that applies only to snipers and represents both the
Weapon 16 12 8 4 Penetration
snipers skill and the coordination between the sniper and the
Panzerfaust Klein 4" 6" 10" 16" 31 observer. Thus a regular sniper will be -5 To Hit and -7 To
Panzerfaust 30 4" 8" 12" 18" 39 Effect while using Ambush or Op-Fire.
Panzerfaust 60 5" 10" 14" 20" 46 Extended Range Ambush Because Snipers can be so effective
with their fire they may take Ambush shots at targets up to
Panzerfaust 100 6" 11" 15" 22" 46
40 away. This is an exception to the standard Ambush rules
Panzerfaust 150 6" 12" 16" 25" 52 and allows snipers to set Ambush with targets within LOS
and effective range and still shoot at them outside of 15.
ATR & Machinegun Penetration Chart Sighted in Location Unlike other troops Snipers may still set
5" 15" 30" 45" Ambush if their location is known to the enemy.
ATR to Hit 16 12 12 8
Sighting The observer is always issued a pair of binoculars
which they use for all Sighting Checks.
ATR Penetration 13 10 7 3
Concealment Any Sniper who starts the game in a fixed
MMG to Hit 16 12 12 12 position will automatically count as Constructed Concealed
MMG Penetration 5 4 - - because of the snipers training in camouflage and conceal-
ment.
HMG to Hit 16 12 12 12
Sighting Chart Because Snipers carefully choose the moment
HMG Penetration 7 6 3 - when they fire, snipers always count as Concealed Infantry,
LCMG to Hit 16 12 12 12 not as Concealed Firing Infantry.
LCMG Penetration 13 10 7 3
Target Selection Generally hits are randomized amongst a
squad and no firer can pick to shoot a squad leader or other
special squad member. Snipers are the exception to this rule.
snipers Snipers can select the Squad Leader, Machine Gunner, or any
other specialist within a sighted squad.
Holman had hit the ground, blood geysering from his chest,
even before the shot rang out. The rest of the squad dove for im hit!
cover in a panic. The silence that followed was broken by In basic game play figures with Heavy Wounds are removed
the sound of Holman weakly calling out for help. Each man as casualties. In games with snipers the Im Hit! rule can add
looked at the man next to him. Who would help Holman?... to the excitement. Im Hit! can also be used in any small scale
infantry game if the participants so choose.
Snipers are specially trained riflemen who are experts not Man Down Whenever a figure takes a Heavy Wound there is
only as marksmen but also as patient hunters. Not every lone a possibility that one of the other squad members may stop
rifleman is a sniper. Only special training, practice, and nat- fighting to help his wounded fellow. Therefore, any time a
ural talent make a figure a sniper. figure receives a Heavy Wound determine which friendly fig-
ure is closest to the wounded man, out to a maximum of 6,
that figure will have to pass a Gut Check. Only one figure
snipers will have to check. If two figures are equal distance away
Snipers are expert riflemen who are trained to lay in ambush randomly determine who will check.
and use precise rifle fire to slow an enemy advance and break Gut Check The figure closest to the wounded man makes an
enemy morale. Snipers are deployed in two man teams, one immediate Gut Check. If the check is passed the figure con-
sniper and one observer. Sniper teams are rated as Green,

Easy eights Battleground World War II 23


infantry
tinues on as normal, ignoring his wounded brother. If the Heavy Wound Figures that receive a Heavy Wound are
check is failed the figure must now Help His Buddy. always removed from play at some point. Even if treated by
Help His Buddy A figure that has failed his Gut Check will a fellow squad member or a Medic, a figure with a Heavy
stop fighting and Help His Buddy. On that figures next card Wound will never recover in the course of the game.
he will spend his first action moving to his wounded buddy.
On his second action he will drag his wounded buddy at full
5 movement rate towards the nearest cover of at least +3
protection. The figure will continue to spend every action
dragging his wounded buddy to cover until both he and the
wounded man are behind cover. Once behind cover the figure
will spend two actions applying a field dressing to the
wounded figure. Once this is done the wounded figure is
removed from play and the other figure may return to the bat-
tle as normal on his next action.
Medics The presence of a Medic on the field will allow other
figures to ignore their wounded buddies, secure in the knowl-
edge that the Medic will care for them. Any figures within
15 and LOS of a Medic will be immune to Gut Checks
caused by wounded fellows. In addition any figure failing a
Gut Check will automatically stop dragging his wounded
buddy as soon as he moves to within 15 of a friendly Medic.
Players are encouraged to move their Medics about, helping
any Heavy Wounded figures.
No Quarter If at any time a Medic is Heavy Wounded or
KIAd by enemy fire then all figures on that Medics side are
immediately subject to No Quarter.

24 easy eights Battleground World War II


infantry quick play charts
Hero Creation Chart
Die Hero Type Special Abilities
Medal of Honor Never Checks Morale. Never takes Gut Checks.
1 Iron Cross Becomes Elite. 2 free actions immediately. Ignore first
Hero of USSR LtW. Never Suppressed. Can operate crewed weapons
Never Checks Morale. Never takes Gut Checks. Becomes Elite.
2-3 Stud Hero 1 free action immediately. Can operate crewed weapons alone.
Never suppressed. +1 Morale Becomes Elite.
4-5 Hero 1 free action immediately.

6-10 Normal Hero +1 Morale Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately.

11-20 Common Hero Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately.

Troop Quality Soldier Typical Leader Break Point Chart


Command Command
Quality Morale Range Morale Range Troop Quality Break Point
Green 8 6 10 -0 8 Green 40%

Regular 10 8 12 -1 10 Regular 50%

Veteran 60%
Veteran 12 10 14 -1 12
Elite 70%
Elite 14 12 16 -2 14
Hand To Hand Modifiers Chart Grenade To Hit Chart
Condition Modifier Range To Hit
Over Obstacle +2 0 inches 18
Prone +3
up to 3 inches 12
Crew Weapon +5
3 to 6 inches 8
LtW +5
Condition Modifier
Green +2
Window / Door +3
Elite -2

Surprise -2 Foxhole +4

Leader -1 Per point of Leadership Modifier Vehicle Top +2


Pistol -3 Vehicle Motion +1 per 3"
Extra Attacker -2 Per extra attacker Thrower Elite -2
higher morale -1
Thrower Green +2

Thrower LtW +5

Bunker Slit only at 0" range


infantry quick play charts
Close Assault Placement Chart
Grenade Vs Tracks / Wheels Effects Chart Attack
Grenade vs.
VS
14
S
10
M
7
L
5
VL
3
Engine / Rear Deck

Die Effect Grenade vs.


Tracks / Wheels

Magnetic Mine
14
12
11
12
9
14
7
16
5
16
Grenade explodes within the tracks. Track pieces and links are Satchel Charge 14 12 10 8 8
1-4 blown apart. The track is permanently destroyed.
Modifiers
Elite -2
Grenade explodes within the tracks. Track pieces and links are
Green +2
5-8 twisted off the rollers. The tank is immobilized until 8 man actions
are spent on the tracks by the crew members for repairs. Light Wound +5

Shrapnel and concussion rock the side of the tank . The effects are Engineers -2

9-12 sufficient to slow the vehicle to half speed until the crew spends 6
man actions on the tracks to repair them.
Thrown Satchel Charge

Anti Magnetic Paste (Magnetic Mines Only)


+5

+10
The explosion has caused slight track damage. The vehicle will lose
13-16 2 inches from its speed until the crew spends 4 man actions on the
tracks to repair them.
Advancing into AFV Modifiers
The shrapnel and explosion have been directed away from the tank.
17-20 No damage has resulted from the attack. Condition Modifier
Elite -2

Modifiers Green +2

Entrenched / Cover -5
Cluster Grenade -5 Front of vehicle +3
Vehicle unbuttoned +3
Vehicle In Motion +4 Engineer -4
Vehicle in Smoke -3
Grenade Vs Engine Deck Effects Chart Immobilized -3

Die Effect Mine & Explosives Penetration Chart


Grenade explodes and catches the fuel within the engine. This
Weapon Penetration
1-4 causes an explosion as the engine is destroyed vehicle is
immobilized. Vehicles engine is on fire. Magnetic Mine 30
The explosion's concussion rips through the engine decking
20
5-8 causing engine damage. The vehicle is immobilized until the crew
spends 8 man actions on the engine to repair damage.
Satchel Charge
Demo Pack 25
The explosion's concussion rips through the engine decking causing
9-12 engine damage. The vehicle is immobilized until the crew spends 4
man actions on the engine to repair damage.
The shrapnel from the grenade is lodged itself in the engine
13-16 compartment. The engine is prevented from gaining full throttle. Half
speed until the crew spends 4 man actions on the engine to repair it.
The shrapnel and explosion have been directed away from the tank.
17-20 No damage has resulted from the attack.

Modifiers
Cluster Grenade -5
Infantry quick play charts
Special fire modes
Molitov Effects Chart
Opportunity Fire
Die Effect Ambush Fire
Flame seeps into the fighting compartment of the vehicle. Wide spread panic hits the

1-4 crew as the flames inch closer to the ammunition and fuel supply. All crew members
passing a morale check must bail-out, otherwise they are KIA. Vehicle is on fire.
Pinning Fire
Max Width
As Flame and gas spread across the vehicle, some finds its way inside the fighting
compartment and causes havoc. Any crew member failing his morale check must LMG = 5 inches
5-8 bail-out. The vehicle will lose a turn while the crew is dealing with the damage and
fire. MMG = 6 inches
As the fireball covers the target vehicle it flashes past the vision ports. This makes it
very hard to see out of the vehicle and fight effectively. Panic sets in the crew from the HMG = 8 inches
9-12 attack. Any crew member not passing their morale check will be unable to take any
action for their next turn. Any actions taken by the crew will receive a +2 modifier as well LCMG = 8 inches
Flame and gas cover the vehicle and cause concern to the crew. Any crew member not

13-16
passing their morale check will be unable to take any action for their next turn.
Plunging Fire
The Cocktail hits the vehicle and erupts in a ball of flame. Although hitting the vehicle
Max Width
17-20 and igniting, most of the gas splashes off the target into the surrounding terrain. Check
for fire.
LMG = 5 inches
MMG = 6 inches
Modifiers HMG = 8 inches
LCMG = 8 inches
Unbuttoned -4 Max Depth
LMG = 2 inches
Flamethrower -5 MMG = 3 inches
HMG = 3 inches
Rain / Snow +4 LCMG = 3 inches
Spraying Fire
Max Range
Molitov Open Top Effects Chart Effective Range
Die Effect Max Width
Flame explodes through the fighting compartment. The vehicle is caught on fire.
4 inches
1-4 Anyone failing a morale check is considered KIA everyone else must bail out. Any
heavy weapons must be left behind and are destroyed along with the vehicle.

The cocktail has burst inside the vehicle causing panic and damage. The driving

5-8 compartment is completely knocked out killing the driver. All radios and inherent
vehicle weapons are destroyed. All crew members must bail-out, vehicle is on fire.

Flame and gas burst inside the vehicle. Wide spread panic hits the crew as the flames
inch closer to the ammunition and fuel supply. All crew members failing a morale check
9-12 must bail-out, vehicle is on fire. The vehicle is out for 2 turns while the fire is
extinguished.
Flame and Gas cover the vehicle and cause concern to the crew. Any crew member not
passing their morale check will be unable to take any action for their next turn.
13-16
The cocktail has burst inside the vehicle causing more panic then damage. While most

17-20 of the supplies and packs in the vehicle are caught on fire no real damage is caused

Modifiers
Unbuttoned -4

Flamethrower -5
Rain / Snow +4
infantry qucik play charts

Bazooka and Panzerschreck to hit Chart


PB Short Effective Long
Weapon 16 11 7 3 Penetration
Panzerschreck 8" 15" 23" 30" 46

Bazooka 43 8" 15" 23" 30" 23


Bazooka 44 9" 16" 24" 32" 28

Panzerfaust to hit Chart


PB Short Effective Long
Weapon 16 12 8 4 Penetration
Panzerfaust Klein 4" 6" 10" 16" 31

Panzerfaust 30 4" 8" 12" 18" 39

Panzerfaust 60 5" 10" 14" 20" 46

Panzerfaust 100 6" 11" 15" 22" 46

Panzerfaust 150 6" 12" 16" 25" 52

ATR & Machinegun Penetration Chart


5" 15" 30" 45"
ATR to Hit 16 12 12 8

ATR Penetration 13 10 7 3
MMG to Hit 16 12 12 12

MMG Penetration 5 4 - -
HMG to Hit 16 12 12 12

HMG Penetration 7 6 3 -
LCMG to Hit 16 12 12 12

LCMG Penetration 13 10 7 3
Armored Combat

Table of Contents

Vehicle Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle Smoke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15


Tank crews and morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Abandoned Tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Typical Armor Crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Tank Crews in Battle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Crew Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Anti-Tank Mines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Tank Morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 tank vs. man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Morale Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 AFV effects on Infantry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Bail-Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 HE vs. Infantry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Tank Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle Mounted Machine Guns . . . . . . . . .16
Tank Platoon Integrity Check . . . . . . . . . . .3 Limitations of Vehicle MGs . . . . . . . . . . . .17
actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Crew Gun Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Simultaneous Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Crushing Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Anti-Tank Guns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Turning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Rate of Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Reverse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Manhandleing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Bogging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
buttoned-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Halftracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Buttoned-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Crew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Unbuttoned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Halftrack Machine Guns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Commander Exposed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Fighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Crew Exposed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Halftracks and Halftrack Trucks . . . . . . . . .19
Crew Covered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Trucks Jeeps and Motorcycles . . . . . . .20
gun rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Carrying capacity and drivers . . . . . . . . . . .20
Gun Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Fighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Gun Mounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Shooting Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Ammunition Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Passengers and Riders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Gun Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Dismounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Shooting Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Bailing Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
To Hit Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Crew Exposed / Buttoned-Up . . . . . . . . . . .21
Hit Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Protection for Riders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Penetration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Crew Served Weapons and Dismounting . . .21
special fire modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Crew Served Weapons and Bailing Out . . . .21
Opportunity Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Riding Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Op-Fire Spotting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Fighting Riders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Ambush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Vehicle Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
vehicle combat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Hit Location Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Ramming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

easy eights Battleground World War II 1


Armored Combat
Vehicle Types Typical Armor Crew
Commander Occupies the most prominent place on the tank,
Kilroy marvelled at the requisition forms. Presently there
in the cupola on top of the tank. His role is to direct the
were seven models of the Sherman tank in operation, all with
actions of the other crew members, to select targets and to
sightly different parts requirments. Now they were adding two
watch out for attacks on the tank.
new classes of Tank Destroyers and a new light tank! His
Gunner He occupies the space right next to the gun forward
head swam.
in the turret. His job is to aim and fire the gun. It is important
that he keep in good contact with his loader and the com-
World War II was the first war to be dominated by vehicles.
mander.
The advent of the internal combustion engine, combined with
Loader The loader selects the next round that will be loaded
modern manufacturing techniques, enabled all nations to
into the breach of the main gun and loads it after the main gun
field a wide variety of vehicles. During this time experimen-
has fired.
tation with vehicle configurations was common, resulting in
Driver The driver is responsible for driving the tank.
a variety of vehicle classifications. For game play each vehi-
Radio Operator The radio operator keeps the other tanks in
cle is categorized into a type of vehicle. The classifications
the group informed as to what is going on and informs his
Battleground World War II uses are for game purposes and
own crew about other actions on the battlefield. He can also
not what each nation actually called their type of vehicle. Any
use of the hull machine gun.
armored vehicle that is not a Tank is refered to as an AFV.
Tank (T) Fully tracked, turreted armored vehicle with an
enclosed top and a main gun. Tank Crew Positions
Assault Gun (AG) Fully tracked, enclosed top, armored Radio Operator / Hull Gunner Loader
vehicle with no turret and a main gun mounted in the hull .
Self Propelled Gun (SP) Fully tracked, open-topped
armored vehicle with no turret and a main gun mounted in the
hull.
Tank Destroyer (TD) Fully tracked, armored vehicle with an
open-topped turret and a main gun.
Armored Car (AC) Wheeled armored vehicle.
Halftrack (HT) Any armored vehicle with a front set of
wheels and a rear set of tracks that support an armored fight-
ing compartment. Driver Commander
Truck (TR) Any unarmored vehicle whose main purpose is Gunner
to transport men or material. Most trucks are wheeled but
some are tracked and halftracked trucks.
crew quality
Jeeps and Motorcycles (J or M) Small wheeled vehicles
Vehicle crews have a quality rating just as infantry squads do.
designed to cary a few men and a small cargo.
This rating represents each members individual skill and their
ability to work as a team.
Tank crews and morale Green These crews have received only elementary training,
only just received their vehicle, and have never seen combat
Wittmann looked proudly at his men. Surely the Tiger was
before. Green crews suffer a number of penalties in combat.
an awesome machine, superior to any other tank. But,
Regular Regular crews have had some training together in
Wittmann knew that it was the cool professionalism and com-
their vehicle. They have also tasted combat before and are
raderie of his crew that had made him famous. His job in this
somewhat prepared to face it again, provided all goes well.
war was to guide those boys through safely.
All vehicle crews are assumed to be Regular unless specifi-
cally stated otherwise in a scenario.
Tanks are fascinating masters of the battlefield: tons of metal
Veteran Veteran crews know each other and their vehicle
that protect a crew who focus their energy on aiming their
well. Theyve seen the worst and know that their vehicle and
main gun on a target and destroying it. For all of their sup-
crew mates will carry them through.
posed protection these monsters could easily become steel
Elite Elite vehicle crews are the best of the best. They shoot
coffins when the crews luck changed. The men in these
straighter, maneuver better, and keep their heads no matter
machines were very aware of the danger that fate could hold
how deep it gets. Elite crews receive benefits in combat.
in store for them.

2 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
Crew Typical Leader Craven Cowards If a tank crew rolls an unmodified 20 on a
Crew Quality Command Command Morale Check they become Craven Cowards, abandon their
Quality Morale Range Morale Range tank, and will leave the board with no chance of Rallying.
Heroes If a tank crew rolls an unmodified 1 on their Morale
Green 10 8 12 -0 10 Check they are driven to heroics, roll on the chart below to
Regular 12 10 14 -1 12 see what type of hero they become.

Veteran 14 12 16 -1 14 Die Hero Type Special Abilities


Medal of Honor Never Checks Morale. +1 Morale. Becomes Elite 1 free action
1 Iron Cross immediately. Ignore any penetrations results that are 16 or higher.
Elite 16 14 17 -2 16 Hero of USSR Never forced to button-up.

Never Checks Morale. +1 Morale. Becomes Elite.


Tank Morale 2-3 Stud Hero 1 free action immediately. Never forced to button-up.

These morale rules apply only to fully Armored Fighting 4-5 Hero
+1 Morale. Becomes Elite.
1 free action immediately. Never forced to button-up.
Vehicles: Tanks, Assault Guns, Tank Destroyers, Armored
6-10 Normal Hero +1 Morale. Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately.
Cars and Self Propelled Guns. Armored vehicles that are
infantry oriented, halftracks, jeeps and trucks, do not follow 11-20 Common Hero Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately.

these rules. The drivers of such vehicles are considered part


of the squad that is attached to them and follow all morale Note: Craven Cowards and Heroes are only created by
rules associated with infantry. The crew of the tank fight and unmodified die rolls of 1 or 20 and only on a morale check,
maneuver together, therefore they have a collective morale never a Skill Check, Gut Check or Rally.
rating. This rating is a single number between one and twen-
ty indicating the experience and devotion of the crew. If there Small Arms Morale Checks Anytime a vehicle crew is
is a Tank Leader present then the crew always tests their forced to take a Morale Check because of enemy small arms
morale on his number; otherwise the Tank Morale number is fire the crew will always button up but suffer no other ill
always used. effects. If an exposed crew member is KIA or wounded by
small arms fire no Vehicle Morale Check is required. The
Morale Checks vehicle is forced to button-up, but the crew will not abandon
A Morale Check for a tank crew is similar to the Morale their vehicle because of the loss.
Check for infantry. There are combat results that can force the
crew to take a Morale Check. A Tank Morale Check is made Bail-out
with one roll applying to the entire crew using the Tank If at any time a crew member fails a Morale Check made
Leaders morale if one is present, otherwise using the morale caused by a combat result (other than small arms) then the
of the crew. To make a Morale Check, roll a d20. If the die crew must abandon their vehicle immediately. This abandon-
roll result is higher then the morale rating the check is failed. ment is refered to as a bail-out. Each crew member is Broken
The crew must Bail-Out. exactly like a Broken infantry figure. The crew will now be
Immobilization At any time a tank gets an immobilization subject to all infantry rules including Morale and Rally rules
result then they must pass a Morale Check. This check is until they re-enter their tank. Vehicle crews who Rally may
caused because the crew of an immobilized tank are far more choose to re-enter their vehicle unless it is brewed up. Crews
vulnerable to enemy fire and may decide not to wait around may voluntarily bail-out of any vehicle at any time.
for the shot that kills them.
Crew Loss If one of the crew members of the tank die as a Tank Leaders
result of a penetrating round then a Morale Check is made for Tank Leaders are exceptional tankers that typically lead a pla-
that tank. The loss of a crew member to a penetrating shot dis- toon of tanks or AFVs. They are rated just like infantry lead-
pels the illusion of safety for the rest of the crew who may ers, having a morale rating and a modifier. Any crew led by
decide to seek cover elsewhere. a tank leader always checks on his morale. In addition the
Main Gun Loss If the tanks main gun is knocked out the Leadership Modifier of the leader can be applied to any To
crew is subject to a special Morale Check. This check is made Hit die or Hit Location die.
exactly like a standard Morale Check. If it is passed then the
vehicle may fight on with its secondary armament. If it is Tank Platoon Integrity Check
failed the crew will not abandon their vehicle but instead will Every turn each side must check the willingness of their
drive it off the field by the most expedient route, exposing armored forces to fight on. At the start of each turn count the
themselves to a minimum of risk. number of tanks and AFVs that are remaining on each side.

easy eights Battleground World War II 3


Armored Combat
75% Check If 75% or more of your tanks are destroyed or many tasks at once. For example, the loader could be loading
are out of action each of the remaining tanks must take a a new round in the main gun while the gunner fires the co-ax
Morale Check. Broken crews and abandoned tanks count gun. At the same time the driver navigates the tank while the
toward the 75% for this rule. radio operatior fires the hull machine gun. All of this is going
50% Check If 50% or more of your tanks are brewed up on while the commander is looking for a new target. Each
then each of the remaining tanks must take a Morale Check. crew member is allowed two actions per turn exactly like
Results of the Tank Platoon Integrity Check infantry. Vehicles move on a card draw just like infantry, as
If a tank has failed the Morale Check, roll a d20 to determine described in the Core Rules.
the behavior of the vehicle. Refer to the Results of the Tank Unbutton Takes one action for the crew to open all of the
Platoon Integrity Check chart. vehicle hatches and vision ports.
Button-up A vehicle may button-up at the beginning or end
Tank Platoon Integrity Check Modifiers of any action for no cost.
Fire main gun It consumes one action to fire the main gun.
Condition Modifier This is performed by the gunner.
Tank in Defensive Position -1 Aim main gun The gunner may spend extra time lining up a
shot for extra accuracy. This action may not be the action the
Tank Immobilized +1 gun is being loaded or an action in which the vehicle moves.
The gunner may not spend an action of Aim Main Gun with-
Taking fire from side +1 out the direction of the commander.
Direct Fire A commander may spend an action directing the
Taking fire from rear +2 fire or aiming of the main gun. Any Fire Main Gun action
taken without the direction of the commander suffers the No
Main Gun knocked out +2 Commander penalty. A tank leader may only use his leader-
ship modifier on a main gun shot if he is directing fire in that
Results of Tank Platoon Integrity Check action.
Die Result Fire Anti-Aircraft Machine Gun An exposed figure in the
commanders cupola may fire the AAMG if there is a gun
1 Crew rolls on Tank Hero Chart
present.
Fire Hull Macine Gun The radio operator can take an action
2-4 No Effect
to fire the hull mounted machine gun
The tank must seek cover away from the enemy. On next turn
5-9 the tank returns to normal. If tank is immobile then crew will Fire Co-ax Macine Gun The gunner may fire the co-ax
abandon the tank instead. The crew is not considered broken.
The tank will withdraw from enemy fire, facing the enemy, until it
mounted machine gun if he is not taking an action to fire or
10-14 is rallied at normal morale. No other actions are allowed. If tank aim the main gun.
is immobile then crew will abandon the tank instead.
The tank will retreat from the enemy seeking any available cover. Launch Smoke It takes one action for the commander or the
15-19 The crew is considered broken. If tank is immobile then crew will
abandon the tank instead.
loader to launch vehicle mounted smoke.
The tank crew immediately abandons the tank with no chance to
Load main gun It takes at least one action to load the main
20 rally. They will flee of the board. gun of a vehicle. See the Vehicle Chart and the Gun Rules for
more detail.
Exit Vehicle It takes an action to exit any vehicle. The vehi-
ACtions cle may not move during this action.
Enter Vehicle It takes an action to enter any vehicle. The
Sweat poured off Ferrell as he loaded yet another 75mm vehicle may not move during this action.
round. The commander called a target and Ferrel heard Other Actions Anything a player can think of can be an
BANG as the round sped away. Loader-AP, Driver - action for his crew, if the GM allows or both sides agree.
Forward came through his headphones. As Ferrell pushed Repairing a track, firing a pistol or digging out a bogged tank
another round home he called AP and prayed for a break. are all examples. For actions that may be difficult or danger-
ous, see the Gut and Skill Check rules of the Infantry section.
The typical Armored Fighting Vehicle crew consisted of sev-
eral men, each with a different task, all working together to Simultaneous Action
achieve the common goal of destroying the enemy. Because Each crew member is allowed to perform two actions per
there are several men in each tank, one tank may perform turn. All crew members must complete a first action before

4 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
any member may begin a second action. All terrain has effect exactly as in forward movement. No
Example: A driver may do nothing on first action while the vehicle may ever move in reverse and in forward in the same
gunner aims because the driver knows the movement will action.
ruin the aiming. Bogging A vehicle that is forced to take a Bog Check while
in reverse always recieves a +2 penalty on the check to rep-
Movement resenent reduced visibility.

Schmidt pushed confidently forward, up over the bocage. Bogging


He could feel the Tiger sticking as commander Wittmann Certain types of terrain and obstacles can cause a vehicle to
warned him of a tree to the right. He compensated and become stuck. This is known as bogging. Whenever a vehicle
pushed over into the road. crosses terrain that requires a Bog Check roll a d20 to deter-
mine if the vehicle becomes bogged. If the number rolled is
All vehicles have 2 actions to spend during their turn, both equal or greater than the bog number of that terrain type then
these actions may be movement. All terrain specific move- the vehicle is considered bogged. The bog happens immedi-
ment is covered in the Terrain section. ately when the terrain is crossed and the vehicle is not
allowed to finish any movement.
Turning Unbogging Whenever a vehicle is bogged that vehicle can try
Any turns that are less than 90 are part of normal movement. to free itself. Unbogging takes an action of movement to per-
These turns are assumed to follow a logical path between the form. Roll a d20 to determine if the vehicle has become
start and finish of the action. Only fully tracked vehicles may unbogged. If a 10 or less has been rolled then the vehicle has
pivot in place in order to make a 90 or 180 turn. become unbogged. If on unbogging a number is rolled that is
90 Turn When a fully tracked vehicle must make a 90 turn equal to or greater than the bog number for that terrain then
in place, half of the vehicles movement factor is spent for the vehicle is bogged worse than before. If the vehicle is
that action. The vehicle may not do anything except move, or bogged for a second time it is considered immobilized for the
remain motionless, with the remaining part action. A tank can rest of game play.
turn in place 90 and then move half its movement in the
same action. Buttoned-up
180 Turn It takes a fully tracked vehicle a full action to com-
plete a 180 turn. Commander Coyle sat high in his cupola watching the
Dead Tracks When a fully tracked vehicle loses the use of German platoon roll by. He could see that infantry fire had
one of its tracks it is considered a Dead Track. A fully tracked forced his foe to button-up. There was no way they could see
vehicle may still pivot in place with one good track. It takes him maneuvering around their flank.
one action to pivot up to 90 with a Dead Track.

Reverse Buttoned-Up
Any vehicle may move in reverse at half of forward speed. A vehicle is considered Buttoned-Up when all of the hatches
on the tank are closed. If there are no markers on a tank that
indicate otherwise, this is the state the tank is in. Because of
the limitations of being Buttoned-Up there are several restric-
tions. Buttoning-Up may be done as part of any action for
free. Buttoned-Up crews are immune to small arms fire and
non-penetrating artillery.
Sighting A Buttoned-Up vehicle will have a number of blind
spots. A spotting modifier is always used in this mode.
Movement Vehicle cannot use road bonus. Vehicle receives
+2 on all Bog Checks.
Shooting The vehicle will receive a penalty on all main gun
shots.

Unbuttoned
The state of being Unbuttoned is when all of the hatches are

easy eights Battleground World War II 5


Armored Combat
open so as to allow the crew the maximum benefits for sight- Crew Exposed
ing and ventilation. The practice of opening hatches when the The Crew Exposed designation is reserved for vehicles that
vehicle was not in combat was very common for all armies in have open tops like halftracks or trucks. These vehicles do
the war. For all of the advantages being Unbuttoned gives the not have the capability to Button-Up but can have the men
tank crew, it does invite attack from the simplest of defend- duck below the sides of the vehicle. When the crew of these
ers. Crew members become vulnerable to attack from small vehicles are standing up and looking over the sides of the
arms fire and grenades may be thrown into open hatches. vehicle a CE marker is placed on the tank. In order for figures
When an armored vehicle is Unbuttoned in play then an UB to fire small arms and machine guns from a vehicle they must
marker is placed on top of the vehicle. Unbuttoning always be Crew Exposed. It is possible for a single person to be
cost an action to perform. The driver can move the vehicle placed on Crew Exposed status while the rest of the crew is
but no other actions may take place during the action of down behind cover.
Unbuttoning.
Crew Covered
This is only for armored open-top vehicles like halftracks.
This designation cannot be taken advantage of by trucks or
jeeps. This is the normal state of open-topped vehicles that
are not specifically marked as Crew Exposed. When an open-
topped armored vehicle is Crew Covered it suffers the fol-
lowing penalties:
Sighting Only the driver and radio operator if present is
allowed to spot. In addition they may only sight out of the
front 30 of the vehicle. A spotting modifier is always used
in this mode. Figures within 1 of the vehicle may not be
seen.
Movement Vehicle cannot use road bonus. Vehicle receives
+2 on all Bog Checks.
Shooting The vehicle will receive a penalty on all main gun
shots.

GuN Rules
It had taken Woll a few shots to get used to how little he had
to lead his targets. But he certainly appreciated the accuracy.
Commander Exposed He appreciated even more the thick black smoke and flying
In this state the only hatch that is open is for the commander turret his new 88 brought out of every target.
of the tank. Typically in combat the rest of the crew would
remain Buttoned-Up while the commander would have his Gun Types
head exposed, looking for targets. The advantage is that the Throughout the war there many types of guns. Continual
commander could gain the advantage of spotting and direct- improvement in technology and design led to the develop-
ing the tank while the rest of the crew is protected. An ment of several guns even for the same vehicle. In game
armored vehicle in play that is in this mode must place a COE terms there are 4 types of guns, based on the length of the bar-
marker on the tank. A vehicle may become Commander rel. The barrel length greatly effects the performance of the
Exposed at the beginning or end of any action at no cost. round being fired.
Note: A vehicle where the commander always exposes him- Short (S) This stubby looking barrel size appeared quite fre-
self at the beginning of first action and always Buttons-Up at quently in the beginning of the war, but was found through-
the end of second action is allowable but there is a cost. The out. The disadvantage to the short barreled gun was its inabil-
gamemaster should consider that the commanders hatch is ity to produce sufficient amount of velocity for the round
left open while the commander is down waiting for his next being fired. Velocity directly relates to accuracy, especially
action. An astute enemy could take advantage of this. If a over distance. There is a modifier for penetration for short
player wants to specifically close the hatch he may. However barrel guns. These modifiers reflect the performance of the
it will take an entire action to expose the commander. short barreled gun. The advantage of a short gun is that it was

6 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
able to fit into small vehicles and it was all that was needed Hull Mounted The gun is mounted in the hull of the tank.
to deliver HE to a target. The only way to move the gun is to move the entire tank.
There is a 15 arc off center in which the gun may traverse
before the tank is required to move. When a tank moves to
obtain a new target all rules covering moving tanks are in
effect.

Ammunition Types
There were several ammunition types developed for guns
Standard This is the typical length gun that appeared during World War II. The most common of these was Armor
throughout the war. The Shermans 75mm gun is a perfect Piercing (AP) and High Explosive (HE). As the war pro-
example of this gun. This is considered the base line for all of gressed there became a high demand to develop rounds that
the gun rules. could effectively deal with heavy armor. A whole range of
Long (L) In order to produce a higher muzzle velocity, gun shells were available to the average tanker by the wars end.
designers produced long versions of guns. These long ver- The type of round can effect both the To Hit process and
sions produced better muzzle velocities then normal length Penetration ability.
guns and therefore increased accuracy and penetration. Armor Piercing (AP) The Armor Piercing round is the aver-
age anti-tank round found in World War II. The round was
hard tipped and the idea was that the round was forced
through the armor of the target. Armor Piercing Capped
(APC) Armor Piercing Capped Ballistic Capped (APCBC)
were developed to take adavantage of a smaller penetrator
that was buried inside the tip of the Armor Piercing round.
Extra-Long (XL) A few guns in World War II were These rounds could better defeat the targets armor. These
designed to be extra-long. These guns were rare and power- rounds were soon developed and distributed in the field. The
ful. Extra-long guns increased hitting power and accuracy AP Penetration number refects the use of these types of
even more than the long barreled guns of the time. rounds.
High Explosive (HE) High Explosive was developed to be a
gun mounts soft target round. It was very effective in attacking men and
There where two basic kinds of gun mounts in tanks during material, but only slightly useful against armored targets.
World War II: turret mounted guns and hull mounted guns. This particular round is resolved against soft targets like
Turret Mounted The gun is mounted in a revolving turret artillery. See Tank vs Man and Artillery.
that is mechanically or manually rotated. Turrets can be nor- High Explosive Anti Tank (HEAT) This round was discov-
mal speed or slow depending on the tank and how the turret ered early in the war. It used a shaped-charge warhead to
is manned and powered. When the turret is turned and fired shoot hot gas when it hit the target. This hot gas penetrated
in the same action the tank receives a penalty To Hit based on the armor like a shot. The advantage was that, because the
the chart below. Turrets can be turned and fired in the same penetration was based on chemical energy and not kinetic
action as long as they are not turned more than 90 for a stan- energy, it could be delivered by a low velocity weapon. The
dard turret or 45 for a slow turret. disadvantage was that HEAT rounds had a slower muzzle
Slow Turret Turrets that are slow in revolving due to lack of velocity and were therefore less accurate.
power or the weight of the turret. High Velocity Armor Piercing (HVAP & APCR) This
One and Two Man Turrets Several early war tanks had one round was developed to give even better penetration capabil-
or two man turrets. These severly effected the ability of the ity than ordinary AP rounds. The American army called this
crew to perform the several functions required of them. round the Silver Bullet. This type of ammunition was typi-
Whenever the commander is required to operate the main gun cally produced in limited numbers and therefore was scarce
that action of fire suffers the No Commander penalty. In addi- on the battlefield. Not every gun that shot this type of ammu-
tion when the commander is down operating the gun for an nition should be played as if it had an unlimited supply. The
action of fire he also receives the Buttoned Up modifier. penetration value of this round is listed separately on the tank
Furthermore, when the gunner is the only person in the turret chart.
he must reload the gun for himself. All reloading times are Smoke (SM) This round was developed to allow vehicles to
doubled. mark targets and obscure lines of sight. Smoke has no effect

easy eights Battleground World War II 7


Armored Combat
on targets but produces a smoke cloud out to the range of the additional action.
HE impact of the weapon type. Smoke rounds are typically in Traversing Each gun can be rotated the amount See Gun
limited supply. Mounts.
Ammunition Supply Not all Tanks and AFVs always carried
all the rounds available to them. In order to determine which
special ammunition types are carried by a particular Tank or
AFV roll a d6 for the number of rounds in the vehicle. This Elevation Each gun is able to move up and down a certain
rule is typically reserved for very special tank rounds like degree. This limits how low and how high a gun can shoot. A
HVAP and APCR but the rule can be used at any time to indi- vehicle may not shoot any targets that require elevation or
cate a shortage of ammunition. Certain Tanks and AFVs depression that are within 2 tank lengths. Targets will require
where assigned to particular rolls like tank destruction or elevation or depression if they are one or more levels above
infantry support and therefore would not carry many rounds or below the firing vehicle.
contrary to their mission.
For example: a Tank Destroyer may have a limited supply of Shooting Sequence
HE. The Gun To Hit chart is used to determine all hits for main
guns. The following sequence will allow any firing to be
Gun Actions resolved quickly.
In order to lay the gun onto the target, fire and reload it takes
several actions. These actions are performed by the crew of Determine Hit
the vehicle or gun. 1. Find the range between firer and target in inches.
Load Time Reload time is expressed in the number of actions
it takes to put a round in the chamber and make the gun ready 2. Determine all To Hit modifiers for the shooting model.
to fire. This action is performed by the loader of the weapon
system. The tank and gun chart give Load Times for all 3. Determine all To Hit modifiers for the target model.
weapons. All guns up to and including the 88L take one
action to load. Guns of 88XL or larger take two actions to 4. Roll a d20 and check the Gun To Hit chart according to
reload. Any gun that has a separate shell and charge take an range and barrel length. After modifying the resulting die
extra action to load. then examine the number needed To Hit the target. If the final
Veteran and Elite Crews Any tank crew that is Veteran or die roll is this number or less then a hit has been achieved.
Elite may reduce the load time one action up to a minimum Any roll of a 20 is a Jam, see Jamming.
load time of one action. A Veteran or Elite crew may only
reduce any load time by one action. If the gun takes one Determine Hit Location
action to load a Veteran or Elite crew will have no increase in 1. Determine what armor facing is toward the shooting unit.
the Rate of Fire. If there is a question, always choose front over side, and
Self Propelled Guns When a SP is not moving, and has not choose side over rear.
moved in the previous action, it may decrease its load time by
one action. When gaining this action bonus the crew must be 2. Roll a d20 and reference the Hit Location Chart to deter-
Crew Exposed and be a full crew. Therefore it is possible for min location.
a SP gun to fire and load in the same action if its original load
time was one action. This bonus may be combined with Determine Penetration
theVeteran and Elite crew bonus but will never obtain 2 shots 1. Look up the Armor value of the location of the target vehi-
in one action. cle.
Aiming Typically the gunner is trying to get off a shot before
the enemy can return fire. The gunner is always assumed to 2. Look up the Penetration value of the shooting weapon.
be lining up his next shot quickly while the gun is being
loaded, possibly letting out a quick burst from the co-ax as 3. Subtract the Armor value from the Penetration value of the
well. A gunner may take an additional action of aiming in shooting weapon. This becomes the number needed (or less)
order to better his chances To Hit. See To Hit Modifiers. to roll on a d20 to successfully penetrate the target.
Laying the Gun The gun must be pointed at, or layed on, its
target before firing. Laying the gun includes Traversing and 4. Roll a d20 to determine Penetration.
Elevating and occurs as part of an action of fire, not as an

8 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat

To Hit Modifyers Gun to Hit Chart PB Short Effective Long Extreme

Fire Based DRM Gun Size 16 14 12 8 4


Green..... +2 Short (S) 5" 23" 60" 75" 90"
Non Qualifyed.....+2
Captured Use.....+3 Standard 8" 30" 75" 103" +
Leadership Ability..... -x Long (L) 8" 45" 90" 113" +
Elite..... -2
Aimed Shot..... -2 Extra Long (XL) 10" 53" 113" 150" +
Fire on Move.... +12
No Target.....1/2
AP Penetration Over Range Chart
Moved in Previous Action.....+5
Gun Size PB Short Med Long Ext.
Buttoned Up.....+2
HEAT round.....+2 Short (S) - -10% -25% -50% -75%
No Commander.....+3
Standard +25% - -10% -25% -50%
Zeroed In.....-4
Acquired Target.....-1/-2 Long (L) +25% - - -10% -25%
Target Based DRM
Moving Front.....+1 Extra Long (XL) +25% - - - -10%
Moving Side.....+1 per 3"
Very Small Target.....+2
Small Target.....+1
Large Target.....-1
Very Large Target.....-2
Light Woods.....+3

Gun to hit
5. If there was no Penetration and the hit was from a 37mm time period. Most tankers had to come to a stop before shoot-
or larger shell, apply any Non-Penetrating Effects to the tar- ing their main gun. The rocking motion of the tank threw off
get. These effects are specific to the Hit Location and taken the shot. If a tank fires in the same action that it moves then
from the Hit Location chart. there is a +12 To Hit modifier. The US developed a gyro-sta-
bilizer that helped with this situation so US tanks that are fit-
Penetration Results ted with this device only receive a +6. See the special rules on
1. If Penetration is successful then roll a d20 on the the M4 Sherman sheet.
Penetration Effects chart to determine the extent of the dam- Moved in Previous Action Phase The rocking motion of a
age created. tank that has just stopped tends to throw off the shot of the
main gun. Therefore the shooting unit receives a +5 To Hit.
2. Apply any result to the target unit. Again the US gyro-stabilized tanks only gain a +3 To Hit.
Buttoned Up It is very hard to see and effectively engage a
3. Apply any location specific results obtained from the Hit target while the tank is Buttoned-Up. A +2 for vehicles that
Location chart to the target. are Buttoned-Up.
Non-Qualifyed When tank crew members rearrange them-
To Hit Modifiers selves to man the main gun there is a +2 die roll modifier.
Fire Based Modifiers HEAT Round The HEAT round was a low velocity ammu-
In Motion In World War II tanks had very primitive gun fire- nition and needed to be lobbed at the target. Therefore when
ing mechanisms compared to modern day equivalents. shooting a HEAT, HE, or Smoke round you gain a +2 Die
Hitting a target while in motion was very difficult during this Roll Modifier. This modifier only applies to main guns firing

easy eights Battleground World War II 9


Armored Combat
a HEAT round; never to bazookas, panzerschreks, panzer- Large -1 It is easier To Hit a large target and therefore there
faust or other infantry carried missile weapon with a HEAT is a -1 modifier for large targets.
warhead. Very Large -2 In the war there were several extremely large
No Commander Whenever the commander is not directing tanks and vehicles that where built. These are considered a
the fire of the Main Gun the gun receives the No Commander very large target and gain a -2 to the die roll.
penalty. Acquired Target When the gunner has been shooting at the
Zeroed In If units are in defended positions for very long same target several times he can adjust his fire. The shooter
they ususally zero in their guns on the enemys likely avenue may not move and the target may never have left the shoot-
of approach. They fire a round or two and tweak the target ers sight for this bonus to apply. For the first shot there is no
location in. When firing into a Zeroed In location the unit modifyer. The second shot gets a -1 in order To Hit, the third
gains a -4. After the tank moves or the crew abandons the a -2. A -2 modifier is the maximum Acquired Target modifier
vehicle this modifier is lost. Vehicles may be allowed to Zero allowed.
In as part of a scenario set up. Light Woods Vehicles in light woods are +3 to be hit. This
No Target This modifier is applied whenever a gun is fired at represents the chance of the incoming round striking a tree
an area and not a specific target, such as into a cloud of vehi- and thus missing. Light woods are the only type of terrain
cle launched smoke. that ever cause a To Hit penalty and are an exception to the
Elite Crew Elite crews receive a -2 To Hit because of their Hit Location and cover rules given below.
experience and skill in firing in combat.
Green Crew A Green crew recieve a +2 To Hit because of jamming
their lack of training and combat experience. Any time a To Hit roll is an unmodified 20 there is a Jam.
Leadership Modifier Vehicles with a tank leader as the com- When a Jam is rolled no round has been fired. Instead the
mander may use that leaders modifier on the To Hit die if the round was a dud, the round was misconnected, or some other
leader is spending his action directing the fire and if he choos- mishap has occurred in loading. It takes the loader one action
es to apply the modifier on the To Hit roll and not the loca- to clear the Jam. Once the jam has been cleared the gun must
tion roll. be reloaded, using the load time for the gun and crew in ques-
tion.

Hit Location
Once a hit has been scored it is necessary to establish where
the target tank has been hit. To determine Hit Location roll a
d20 and refer to the Hit Location Chart appropriate to the fac-
ing of the target. This chart will indicate any specific damage
Target Based DRM done by a Non-Penetrating round, and any additional effects
Motion When the target has moved in its last action phase it of a penetrating round. Note that Non-Penetration Effects
is considered still in motion. apply only to weapons of 37mm or larger caliber. Any size
Moving Front The target gains a +1 whenever the target is gun will receive Automatic Penetration when striking the 1
moving and the shot is to the front or rear. location from front or rear.
Moving Side The target gains a +1 for every 3 of movement. Automatic Penetration The round has struck the ground and
The faster a target is moving the harder it is To Hit. This only richocheted upward into the underbody of the tank or has
applies to targets that are not moving directly at the shooter. passed through a vision slit or similar aperture. Regardless
Target Size The size of the target makes it harder or easier To the round does not roll to penetrate but immediatly rolls on
Hit. There are 5 sizes and each has a modifier associated with the Penetration Effects chart, using all modifiers.
it. Each tank has a Target Size listed in the Tank Chart. Immobilized The round has destroyed the vehicles tracks/
Very Small +2 This is for small jeeps and motorcycles and the suspension or has knocked out the engine. Fully tracked vehi-
like. All anti-tank guns are considered very small targets. cles that are immobilized by a track hit may take advantage
Small +1 This category is for small tanks and cars and other of the Dead Tracks rule.
vehicles with very low silhouettes. They gain a +1 To Hit Crew -1 action This Non-Penetrating effect represents the
modifier. stunning effect of a round bouncing off the location of a crew
Medium The normal size for a target is the typical mid-war members seat. The effected crewman loses one action on his
tank like the German PzKw IV. There is no modifier for this next card. Any crew member who is Unbuttoned or exposed
target size. will be KIA /MC instead, but the round still does not pene-

10 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat

Penetration Effects Chart


Die Effects
The incoming round has scored a direct hit on the ammunition racks. The
vehicle violently explodes sending the turret in a random direction for 1d6
1 Catastrophic inches. All crew are instantly killed and any unprotected personnel next to
(1) the vehicle sustains a roll on the C column on the effects chart.

The incoming round has scored a hit on the ammunition racks. All crew is
2-4 Total Destruction instantly killed and any unprotected personnel next to (1) the vehicle
sustains a Morale Check.

The incoming round has destroyed the tank. All internal systems are
destroyed while a heavy fire is started from the punctured fuel system.
5-10 Fatal Internal Each man failing a 1/2 Morale Check will be KIA, otherwise all crew must
Damage bail out. The bailed out crew is considered Broken and must seek cover
in their next turn if not rallied.

The incoming round has easily penetrated the armor before it and
damaged the interior and crew. Each crew member must take a morale
Heavy Internal
11-15 check, failing the Morale Check will indicate a KIA on the member. The
Damage vehicle is out of play for 3 turns while the crew deals with the damage. All
further actions the vehicle takes are at +2 to any die roll.

The incoming round has slammed hard against the armor it just
penetrated, weakened but not yet finished the inside of the vehicle has
taken damage. Shrapnel is sprayed through the interior reeking havoc.
16-18 Internal Damage The vehicle is out of play for 2 turns while the crew deals with the
damage. Furthermore the vehicles radio is knocked out. To all further
actions the vehicle takes a +1 to its die rolls.

The armor of the vehicle absorbed most of the impact from the round.
19-20 Slight Internal The vehicle is out for 1 turn. The unit sustained no further damage.
Damage

Modifiers
Any gun smaller than 37mm +3

Add a -1 to the result die roll for every 10 points over the armor value you have penetrated. For
example, if the armor of the target vehicle is a 6 and the penetration of the round is a 30 then you
would subtract 2 from the dice roll for the above chart (30-6=24, and a -1 for each point over the
armor value=-2).

easy eights Battleground World War II 11


Armored Combat
trate and there is no additional effect.
Crew KIA The penetrating round has struck and killed the
indicated crew member.
Gun Destroyed Any time a location mounted with a main gun
or hull machine gun is struck that gun is out of action for the
remainder of the game. Even a Non-Penetrating round will
bend the barrel or other wise render the struck gun inoperable
if the round is a 37mm or larger.
/MC Morale Check This indicated that hits on this location
will cause the crew to take a Morale Check in addition to any
other effects, see Tank Morale.
Smoke This indicates that, in addition to other effects, the
tanks engine is smoking. Place smoke on the engine deck for
the rest of the game.
Half Move This Non-Penetrating Effect indicates that the
tanks engine has been damaged by the shock of the hit and the
tank can now only move at half normal rate, all terrain mod-
ifiers still apply.
No Effect The round has not penetrated and causes no dam- Penetration
age. Each round in the game has a Penetration value. This indi-
Normal Damage The penetrating round rolls on the cates how effective the round is versus armor. When the
Penetration Effect Chart, but there is no other effect. round hits the tank look up the tanks armor value at the loca-
Hit Location and Cover Tanks can take advantage of terrain tion hit then subtract it from the Penetration value of the gun
to protect themselves from enemy fire. Once a hit is scored shooting: this final number is the number or less needed to
and location determined look to see if any terrain covers the roll on a d20 to successfully penetrate the targets armor.
location where the target vehicle was struck. If the location is No Penetration Possible If the number is 0 or less there is no
open to the firer then proceed as normal with Penetration. If Penetration possible, the armour is to thick. However if the
the location is covered by any sort of terrain then the shot has gun was 37mm or larger there may still be a Non-Penetrating
been fouled and no hit has occured. Any sort of terrain will Effect for that Hit Location, refer to the Hit Location chart.
do because the terrain does not necessarily have to stop the Auto Penetration If the Penetration number is 20 or more
incoming round, only knock the round off course, blunt its still roll to penetrate. On a roll of a natural 20 the round was
shape or otherwise degrade the rounds performance so that it brittle or a dud or some other fortune of war has saved the tar-
will not be able to penetrate any armor. get from destruction. There is no automatic Penetration
Hull Down A tank in the defensive may have a custom dug except from a strike to the 1 location from the front or rear
pit that covers the entire hull and leaves only the turret and strikes to locations with No Armor.
exposed. Tanks in this position are refered to as Hull Down. No Armour Some vehicles on the chart have auto indicat-
A Hull Down tank will only be struck by hits that strike loca- ed on one or more locations. This indicates that, although the
tions 17,18,19, and 20 on the location chart for a front shot. vehicle is armored, there are substantial open areas. Hits to
Any tank may use the crest line of a hill to gain a Hull Down locations with an armor value of auto follow roll immedi-
position, but in so doing creates a shadow it cannot shoot into, ately on the Penetration Effects Chart.
see the Terrain section. Penetration If the number rolled was higher then the
Leadership Modifier A Tank leader who is directing an Penetration chance then no Penetration has occured. If the
action of fire can use his Modifier to adjust Hit Location gun was 37mm or larger refer to the Hit Location chart for
instead of as a bonus To Hit. The player must state that he is possible Non-Penetrating damage. Once this is complete, the
doing this before any To Hit dice are rolled. The modifier is shot is over.
not applied directly to the die roll but instead used to move Penetration If the number rolled was equal or less than the
the hit around the chart. A -1 leader can shift the hit one box Penetration chance then Penetration has occured. Move
up, down, left or right, but never at a diagonal. A -2 leader can immediately to the Penetration Effects Chart and roll for
shift one box down then one box left or 2 boxes up for exam- effect, using all modifers found on the chart. Apply the results
ple but never at a diagonal. A Leadership Modifier may never indicated to the target. In addition apply the Penetration effect
be used To Hit the 1 location from the front or rear. from the Hit Location chart to the target. Thus a target may
be out of action for some time and have a dead crew member,

12 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
be immobilized, or have other specific damage. HEAT warhead.
Un-buttoned Any model that is dealing with internal damage Stopping Heat Because HEAT rounds could be so effective,
will not button up their vehicle if it was Unbuttoned to begin especially the man-carried types, counter-measures were
with. developed. A HEAT round is dependent on hitting its target
Brewed-Up Any effect that is a 10 or less on the Penetration at exactly the right distance for its chemical reaction to have
effects chart is a Brew-Up. A result roll of a 10 or less will maximum effect. It was soon learned that a HEAT round
produce smoke. When this result is rolled place smoke on top could be stopped if the round was forced to detonate early. A
of the effected vehicle. This smoke will last the rest of the variety of methods were used to trigger HEAT rounds early.
game. Some American tanks had racks welded on and then filled the
Actions Any crew member that is dealing with internal dam- space between the rack and the armor with sandbags.
age will not take time to perform any other actions. If the con- Germans welded thin armored skirts to the sides and turrets
trolling player wishes, the crew may voluntarily abandon the of several tank and assault gun types. Russians improvised
vehicle. some of both methods. All of these methods were reasonably
Penetration Fall off Over Range All shells lose muzzle effective. If a HEAT round hits a location that is protected
velocity as they travel to their target. The greater the distance with sandbags or skirting, the Penetration of the round is
traveled, the more energy is lost. This can dramatically effect halved immediately. Subtract the targets armor value from the
a shells chance of penetrating armor. However long bar- warheads halved Penetration and roll to penetrate as normal.
relled guns where less susceptible to this fall-off because they
impart more initial velocity to their shell. The Penetration
Fall-Off Over Range Chart describes how much Penetration Special Fire Modes
will be lost by a shell based on barrel length and range.
Penetration and HEAT HEAT rounds do not depend on Linthicum peered through the sight and into the road. Holy
kinetic energy, velocity, to penetrate their target. Instead Smokes those Panthers are big! Sir, there it is, should I fire?
HEAT rounds use a chemical reaction to create a focused No answer. The Panther was filling his sight. Linthicums
explosion against armor and thus penetrate. Because of this hand shook. Sir?...
HEAT Penetration is never effected by range, even point
blank. Many guns have a HEAT round available and all Opportunity Fire
bazookas, panzerschreks, and panzerfaust weapons use a Opportunity Fire allows vehicles to forgo their normal turn in

easy eights Battleground World War II 13


Armored Combat
order to wait for the "opportunity" to fire the moment a target that suddenly moved into sight.
presents itself. This represents those models who know or
suspect that an enemy, not presently in sight or range, is about No passanger or rider may set Op-Fire while the vehicle that
to come into a position where the model can fire. The model they are in/on is in motion. If a vehicle moves during the turn
on Op-Fire may only take a shot while the enemy figure is any figures that are marked with Op-Fire and are passengers
taking an action. or riders on the vehicle will loose their Op-Fire and their turn.
To set Opportunity Fire the model must meet several condi-
tions. Op-Fire Spotting
The model must have a gun to fire. This can either be a main When a model is marked with an Opportunity Fire marker it
gun or a vehicle mounted machine gun. The vehicle may set will not make normal spotting checks. The model will take a
Op-Fire with some or all of the guns of a vehicle. Each spotting check whenever an enemy figure or model takes an
weapon on Op-Fire must have a seperate crew member to action within its Line of Sight. Therefore a model on Op-Fire
man it. A gunner cannot be on Op-Fire with the main gun and may take as many spotting checks as enemy actions taken
the coax machine gun. Nor can a gunner be on Op-Fire with with in its Line of Sight. In a vehicle where only part of the
the main gun and use the co-ax normally. crew is on Op-Fire this only applies to those members on Op-
Fire. The remaining crew roll spotting as normal.
The model may not have a valid target in LOS and effective
range. If you have a target in LOS and effective range you Ambush
must wait for your card to fire. You may set Op-Fire even if Ambush is a Special Fire mode that allows a model to wait
you are aware of enemy pieces, so long as those pieces are until an enemy piece comes in close. Typically a model may
not in Line of Sight or effective range. A vehicle with infantry not set Op-Fire if there are legal targets within Line of Sight.
in LOS and effective range may set Op-Fire with the main In some circumstances it may be desirable to wait until the
gun to shoot at armor, provided the main gun is loaded with enemy comes within a lethal range. Ambush reflects this by
AP. If the main gun is loaded with HEAT, which is effective allowing a model to go on a special Op-Fire mode that will
against infantry and armor, the player may still set Op-Fire allow the enemy to get closer even though they have been
vs. armor. To do so the player must state at the beginning of spotted. To be able to set Ambush the setting model must fit
the turn the intention to fire only at armor. Once Op-Fire has the following criteria.
been set under these circustances it will be impossible to
shoot the main gun vs. infantry for the entire turn, even if new Must never have been sighted in their present position
infantry come into sight.
The model must have a gun to fire. This can either be a main
The piece setting Op-Fire must be in good order. For vehi- gun or a vehicle mounted machine gun. The vehicle may set
cles this means all relevant crew must be unwounded, the Ambush with some or all of the guns of a vehicle. Each
crew can not be dealing with internal damage and the gun weapon on Ambush must have a seperate crew member to
must be loaded. Crew weapons must have a full crew, their man it. A gunner cannot be on Ambush with the main gun
weapon must be set up and be loaded. and the co-ax machine gun. Nor can a gunner be on Ambush
with the main gun and use the co-ax normally.
The piece must forego its normal turn. Once Op-Fire is set
the piece loses its turn. A piece cannot give up its Op-Fire The piece setting Ambush must be in good order. For vehi-
once it is set and the turn begun. If only part of a vehicle crew cles this means all relevant crew must be unwounded and the
set Op-Fire then only those crew members lose thier normal crew cannot be dealing with internal damage and the gun
turn. Thus the driver can drive while the hull machine gunner must be loaded. Crew weapons must have a full crew, their
is on Op-Fire. Any vehicle motion will ruin Op-Fire for a weapon must be set up and be loaded.
main gun. This exception represents the difficulty in aiming
and firing a large gun from a moving vehicle. Because of the The model must forego its normal turn. Once Ambush is set
limitations of the gunsights and traversing mechanisms, main the model loses its turn. A model cannot give up its Ambush
guns may never set Op-Fire if the vehicle is moving. once it is set and the turn begun.

The crew member loses one action. Once a target comes The model loses one action. Once a target comes into sight
into sight only one action of fire is allowed. This is to repre- only one action of fire is allowed. This is to represent the time
sent the time spent waiting and the effect of firing on a target spent waiting and the effect of firing on a target that sudden-

14 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
ly moved into sight.
Vehicle Smoke
The model on Ambush may not move during its turn. Most Tanks and AFVs were armed with smoke dischargers
that allowed the vehicle crew to launch smoke in order to
The model may never shoot at a target farther than 15 inch deny the enemy a clear target. When an action is taken to
range. launch smoke by the commander or the loader smoke is
placed in front of the vehicle. This smoke will last two full
turns. Any shot that fired through the smoke will be consid-
ered No Target and will receive a half To Hit modifier.
Smoke Availability Each AFV in the game has a chance that
is was armed with smoke launchers. On the vehicle chart
there is a column marked Smoke. This column indicates the
change on a d20 that smoke dischargers are availible for that
vehicle. Roll once at the beginning of the game.
Reloading Smoke Dischargers Most vehicle mounted
smoke launchers needed to be loaded from the exterior of the
vehicle. It takes 2 actions to reload smoke dischargers once
outside the vehicle. This was the loaders job.

Abandoned Tanks
Abandoned Tanks on the field can be very advantageous
cover for infantry men or a treasure trove of equipment. Any
infantry who come upon an abandoned tank will never
crew the tank but they may scrounge any machine guns
Vehicle Combat available. A tank may not be scrounged if it is on fire or ever
had a brew up result. Only two machine guns can be
Wittmann saw a fifth Sherman come over the hedge. Fire he removed during the scope of this game; the hull machinegun
called. CLICK. Gun Jam, Reload the gunner yelled. Fast and the anti-aircraft machinegun. It takes one action to
and steady he could hear his boys respond to the new crisis. remove the AAMG and two actions to remove the hull
Quickly surveying the situation Wittmann ducked his head machine gun. Abandoned tanks can also yield other items that
and punched the trigger on his external smoke canisters. might be useful during a scenario. Gas, ammunition and pio-
neer tools are all items that could prove useful to infantry
Ramming fighting in a battle.
When a vehicle rams another vehicle in combat there is a
chance that damage could be done to the target vehicle. In Tank Crews in Battle
order for a crew of a vehicle to ram the crew must pass a half Tank crews that are not present in tanks and are not broken
Gut Check. This Gut Check is not required if the target vehi- may participate in battle however the player sees fit. A tank
cle is unarmored or two sizes smaller. Unarmored vehicles crew is normally armed with SMGs except for the tank com-
can never ram armored vehicles and are required to pass a mander who will have a pistol. The crew will have a total of
half Gut Check versus any size of Unarmored vehicle. You d6 grenades available to them. They may take over a tank that
must begin at least half of your movement rate away from the has not been destroyed.
target in order to generate enough momentum to damage the
target. Determine the size of your vehicle then determine Anti-tank mines
your targets size. Index the Ramming Chart to determine the Any vehicle that moves over an anti-tank mine or minefield
number you must roll to damage the target vehicle. The play- will have a chance of striking a mine. The chance of striking
er of the target vehicle then also indexes the chart as if he was a mine is based on movement rate and listed on the Anti-Tank
ramming in return. He would roll as well to determine if the Mine chart below. Any vehicle that strikes a mine will roll on
ramming tank takes damage. After determining who receives the Anti-Tank Mine Effects Chart. Anti-tank mines are sight-
damage troll on the Ramming Damage Chart and apply the ed just like anti-personnel mines as described under Assault
results. Engineers. Vehicles that are Crew Covered or Buttoned-Up
will never sight a minefield.

easy eights Battleground World War II 15


Armored Combat
passes the Gut Check this movement may still take place if
Anti Tank Mines Chance to Hit Chart the owning player so wishes. If the figure has not moved dur-
Rate of Movement Hasty Improved Tricky ing the current turn then this movement is considered his
Road Not Looking 15 17 19 movement otherwise treat it as a free movement.
Full Not Looking 13 15 17
HE vs Infantry
Half Not Looking 11 13 15 Any vehicle whose gun carries a HE round may use that
Quarter Not Looking 9 11 13 round vs infantry targets. In order to fire HE at infantry and
Quarter Looking 9 11 13 soft targets follow this procedure.

1. Place a marker at the location where you want the HE


AT Mine Effects Chart round to land.
Die Effect
The Mine explodes between the tracks with enough force to
2. Determine a chance To Hit the target using the Gun To Hit
1-4 penetrate the underbody armor. Fuel and Ammo explode. The tank chart. All modifiers will apply as normal.
is totally destroyed.

The Mine explodes within the tracks. Track pieces and links are
5-8 blown apart. The track is permanently destroyed. 3. If a hit is scored place the HE effects template over the
The Mine explodes within the tracks. Track pieces and links are marker and roll for each figure that is under each ring. Each
9-12 twisted off the rollers. The tank is immobilized until 8 man actions
are spent on the tracks by the crew members for repairs. ring corresponds to a letter on the Effects Chart. All cover
Shrapnel and concussion rock the side of the tank . The effects are modifiers will apply if the cover is between the marker and
13-16 sufficient to slow the vehicle to half speed until the crew spends 6
man actions on the tracks to repair them. the target figure. The gun caliber will also have a modifier.
The explosion has caused slight track damage. The vehicle will lose
17-20 2 inches from its speed until the crew spends 4 man actions on the
tracks to repair them. 4. If the roll missed the HE round will deviate. Place the HE
effects template down over the marker. Roll a d8 and a d6.
Move the marker d6 inches in the direction indicated by the
Tank Vs. Man d8 on the HE effect template. See the HE size chart.

Sager watched impotently as the T34 pulled to a stop direct- Entrenchments Whenever firing a main gun directly at an
ly over his partners foxhole. The tank was clearly out of Entrenchment there is no chance for the HE round to actual-
range of his Panzerfaust. Sager could do nothing as the tank ly hit inside a foxhole or trench. Anyone that is not prone in
slowly shifted back and forth in place, then pulled away. the entrenchment will take damage as normal, with all cover
Seeing the deep depression the tank had left, Sager knew his modifiers, but any prone figure will be immune to damage.
friend must be dead. Equipment Any small equipment is considered destroyed if
within the A ring of an HE shell, while AT Guns and Artillery
Despite the invulnerability against the infantryman vehicle must make a roll on the HE Effect chart for whatever ring
crews where frequently required to protect their vehicle from they lie under. If a KIA or HW is rolled then the gun is out of
infantry using all kinds of tactics. In addition AFVs could be action for the game.
useful in knocking out strongpoints that friendly infantry Terrain Check the Terrain rules for special cases to this pro-
could not do alone. All of these missions required that the cedure.
tank move into close proximity of the infantry and engage HEAT vs Soft Targets Any HEAT round can be used against
them. a soft target instead in an anti-tank role. Roll To Hit just as for
HE shells. HEAT rounds do not deviate however, any HEAT
AFV Effects on Infantry round that misses will be ignored. This is because the shaped
At any time an AFV or Tank comes within 4 inches of an charge of a HEAT round will only produce effective explo-
infantry figure that figure must pass a Gut Check using the sive results if placed in the exact right spot. A HEAT round
modifications provided on the AFV effect on Infantry chart. that hits its target will explode exactly like an HE shell of the
If the Gut Check is passed the figure may remain in the loca- same size but will be one ring smaller.
tion occupied. If the figure fails the Gut Check then the fig-
ure must expend 4" and up to 8" of movement toward cover Vehicle Mounted Machineguns
to escape the AFV or Tank. The figure is not considered Most Armored Vehicles will have one or more machine guns
Broken only moving away from the vehicle. If the figure listed on their chart. It was vital in combat to keep infantry at

16 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
bay with machine gun fire to protect the vehicle. Vehicle the turret with no other type of main gun then it is a main gun
machine guns are treated as LMGs because they are not crew machine gun. These were designed specifically to operate
served, and have limited arcs of fire and visibility. They are with in the tank and keep the ammunition supply going as
not as effective as their infantry controlled equivalent. The such they do not suffer any penalties for being manned by a
only exception is a machine gun that is mounted as an AAMG crew of one. Main gun Machine Guns are inelligible for any
or a main gun. Vehicle Mounted machine guns follow all nor- sort of Pinning Fire, just as all other vehicle mounted
mal machine gun To Hit and Effect rules as described in the machine guns.
Infantry chapter.
Hull Machine Gun (Hull) The gun mounted in the lower Limitations of Vehicle Machine guns
hull of a tank is called the hull machine gun. It is manned by Machine guns that were mounted in vehicles were not served
the radio operator. It is operated by only one man and there- by a dedicated crew and typically had a limited arc of fire.
fore doesnt fulfill the requirements of a crew served machine Firing Arcs Most vehicle mounted machine guns had a lim-
gun. ited arc of fire.
Co-axial Machine Gun (Co-ax) The gun mounted next to Hull Machine Gun Any hull mounted machine gun has an arc
the main gun of a tank is called the co-axial machine gun. It of 45 out the front. In addition there were shadows created
is manned by the gunner. The gunner can only fire the co-ax by the structure of the tank. These limitations are 3 for
when he is not firing or aiming the main gun. The co-ax is standing infantry figures and 5 for prone infantry figures for
operated by only one man and doesnt fulfill the requirements all machine guns mounted in the tank.
of a crew served machine gun. Co-ax Machine Gun The co-ax has the same limitations as
Anti-Aircraft Machine Gun (AAMG) The machine gun the hull machine gun.
mounted in the commanders cupola is called the AAMG. It AAMG The AAMG has a limitation of 3 from the front and
can only be operated by an exposed crewmember. The 1 on the sides of the tank.
AAMG is operated by only one man and doesnt fulfill the Pinning Fire Any machine gun that is mounted on a vehicle
requirements of a crew served mahchie gun. Not all vehicles is not allowed to use any type of Pinning Fire. This is because
automatically carried an AAMG. The vehicle chart will have vehicle mounted machine guns do not have a complete crew.
a numer listed under AAMG, if you roll this number or less In addition Pinning Fire is outside the training and doctrine of
on a d20 there is a gun present. A dash on the chart indicates most armored crews.
no gun is ever available. Americans and Russians commonly
mounted a LCMG in the AAMG position. These weapons fire Crew Gun Fire
exactly like any other LCMG but may never use Pinning Fire. Tank crews could often protect their vehicle with small arms
Main Gun When a vehicle has a machine gun mounted in and grenades. Any crew wishing to fire in this fashion must

easy eights Battleground World War II 17


Armored Combat
be Unbuttoned. Determine the number of grenades availible
to the crew before any actions by rolling a d6. The crew will
Anti-Tank guns
follow all normal small arms and grenade rules. Blase yanked the cord and a third round sped away only to
Pistol Ports Many tanks in World War II had small holes in bounced off the Stalin tanks armor. In a flash another round
the armor to allow the crew to shoot out of the tank with was loaded and Blase yanked again. The tank kept coming...
excellent protection in return. Unfortunately they created a
limited arc with virtually no chance to see outside the tank. During World War II many nations developed guns that were
Only SMGs and pistols may be used out a Pistol Port. The No designed to destroy enemy armor. These guns were typically
Target modifier always applys when using a Pistol Port. Any towed by vehicles and where dug-in for defense. Anti-tank
crew member using a Pistol Port will not be allowed to per- guns use all the normal To Hit rules for Tank guns and all
form any other actions. Any added armor such as sandbags or modifiers that are associated with them.
skirts will render Pistol Ports useless. Pistol Ports are used by
Buttoned-Up crew members Rate Of Fire
Anti-tank guns are crewed by several men in an open envi-
Crushing Things ronment. Because of this they have a higher rate of fire than
A vehicle can deliberately drive over objects and men in the same gun mounted in a tank. An anti-tank gun that is fully
order to destroy them. manned and setup may fire and load in the same action. Any
Crushing a Foxhole Any fully tracked vehicle may crush a time there is not a full crew or the gun is not properly set up
foxhole by spending two actions of 180 turn. See vehicle the gun must fire and load in seperate actions. An anti-tank
movement rules. Any infantry in a foxhole so crushed is KIA. gun has an arc of fire of 30 off center.
A vehicle crushing a foxhole does actually spin in place, Large Anit-Tank Guns Large Guns normally take longer to
rather the vehicle simply grinds back and forth for two load than one action but the Anti-Tank version of the same
actions. The vehicles facing will not change. gun will load one action less then specified.
Running Down Men When any vehicle tries to run over a For example: An 88 Extra Long which normally loads in 2
figure the figure must make a Skill Check in order to dive or actions when mounted in a King Tiger will only take one
roll out of the way. If the figure is prone in the open they action to load when it is an anti-tank gun.
receive a +5 to the die roll. Light Wounded figures also
receive a +5 to the die roll. If this check is failed the figure Manhandling
receives a HW. In order to move a gun either in place or to a new location it
Damaging Equipment Any small equipment run over by a must be manhandled. It takes the full crew of the gun in order
vehicle is destroyed. This includes but not limited to machine to move it 3 or 90 in place in one action. If there is less then
guns, mortars and radios. the full crew moving the gun it will take twice as long. Rough
Artillery and AT Guns These weapons may only be damaged ground will halve the movement rate of a manhandled anti-
by fully tracked vehicles. Any gun run over by a tank will be tank gun. A manhandled gun may not cross any obstacles or
destroyed. When a tank or AFV runs over the gun it must take be moved up or down levels in a building.
a Bog Check. The size of the vehicle determines the Bog Limbering and UnLimbering Limbering is the act of
Check. Very Small vehicles bog on a 13. Small vehicles bog hooking up or unhooking a gun from its transport. The time it
on a 15. Medium vehicles will bog on a 17 and a Large vehi- takes to setup the gun is also included in the time it takes to
cle will bog on a 19. A Very Large will only bog on a 20. un-limber a gun. Limbering or un-limbering takes a number
of actions depending on the gun. The gun chart specifies the
number of actions it takes to un-limber and setup a gun.
Breakdown and limbering take the same number of action.
Primemovers Most anti-tank guns will have a primemover
available to move them about. This vehicle is usually a
wheeled or halftracked truck. The driver for the primemover
must come from the crew of the gun.

Crews
Any anti-tank gun is crewed by a particular number of fig-
ures. It takes all of these figures to man the gun effectively. If
any of the crew members are out of action or spending their
actions doing something else the gun will not be as effective

18 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
and will lose its rate of fire. If the gun is lost due to combat a machine gun is mounted. If no gun is availible for a loca-
any surviving crew members are allowed to fight as if tion it is possible to mount the squad machine gun in that
infantry. All crews are subject to normal infantry rules. location instead. No premachine gun can ever be considered
Gun Shields Gun Shields are armored plates that protect the mounted in a vehicle location.
crew from small arms fire. When behind a Gun Shield the
crew recieve +5 cover. A crew member may not claim both Fighting
a Gun Shield modifier and an emplacement modifier at the It is possible for the exposed squad to fight from a halftrack.
same time. The crew member is either behind the Gun Shield Only five men on each side of the halftrack are allowed to
or behind the emplacement. fight from the rear compartment. The squad will receive the
partial tank cover modifier to any fire they receive.
Furthermore passengers will receive the half To Hit modifier
when shooting while the halftrack is in motion. The crew may
only fight while Crew Exposed.
Grenades It is possible for figures to throw grenades from a
halftrack. If the grenade is thrown from a moving halftrack on
a roll of 20 on the To Hit die the grenade has been dropped
and will explode in the rear compartment of the halftrack.
Bazookas, Panzerschrecks and Panzerfausts When firing a
rocket propelled weapon from the back of the halftrack any
accompanying squad members must be Crew Covered with
only the shooter being Exposed. No type of man-carried rock-
et launcher may be fired while the vehicle is in motion.
Halftrack Mounted Guns Any halftrack that carries a main
gun carries the gun and crew in place of a squad. These
weapons may never gain a reload bonus due to an open fight-
ing compartment. However they can gain a bonus for a
halftracks Veteran crew.
Mortars When a halftrack contains a mortar it cannot carry
Smith drove as fast as the M3A1 halftrack could go. He had any additional men except for the mortar crew. The mortar is
to get between his squad and that machine gun. He turned not allowed to fire while on the move, otherwise it follows all
hard to the left and pulled to a stop in front of his squad. normal mortar rules. A halftrack mounted mortar never has to
Smith could hear hundreds of rounds tearing into the setup or break down.
armored side of his vehicle as the squad rose up and returned Breaking When a driver of an armored halftrack breaks due
fire. to combat he turns the vehicle around and seeks cover.
During World War II there was a need for an armored vehicle Passengers that are riding in a vehicle when they break will
to transport and protect infantry. Halftracks where designed drop prone in the vehicle. Riders will bail out.
because they could carry decent armor but were relatively
simple to manufacture and had good cross-country prefor- Halftracks and Halftrack Trucks
mance. Halftrack that do not have an armored fighting compartment
are considered Halftrack Trucks and do not gain any of the
Crew special rules as Halftracks. They do, however, move on the
The crew of any halftrack is the Squad or Gun Crew that use terrain chart as if they are halftracks.
it. The driver is always drawn from that squad. A halftrack
can hold up to 12 men internally. Figures in excess of 12 are
considered riders.
Trucks, Jeeps & Motorcyles
Riener poured rifle fire into the truck. He saw the driver
Halftrack Machine guns slump and the truck swerve and strike a fence. Riener gaped
Some halftracks had machine guns built into them. To deter- as two squads quickly lept out. He suddenly felt as if he had
mine if a particular halftrack carries a mounted machine gun dumped over a basket of snakes.
roll a d20 and check the availability number on the vehicle
chart. If the number is less then the availability number then

easy eights Battleground World War II 19


Armored Combat
Due to the advent of the internal combustion engine all kinds
of motorized vehicles were seen on the battlefield. Wheeled
Crash Chart
vehicles of all kinds were employed everywhere during the Die Effect
war. They were used to tow guns, transport supplies and men The driver tumbles out of the vehicle pulling the wheel to the left. The

and used as expedient fighting platforms. The wheeled vehi- 1-4 vehicle makes a sharp left turn moving one full action immediately. At the
end of the action the vehicle overturns. E column hit on all passengers
The driver slumps over the wheel pulling it to the left. The vehicle
cle was the most prevelent type of vehicle during the war. 5-8 makes a left turn moving one full action immediately. The vehicle
comes to a rest at the end of this movement.
The driver slumps forward as he gets hit. The vehicle is kept in a
Carryiing Capacity and Drivers 9-12 straight line moving one full action immediately.

Each vehicle type is allowed to carry the particular number of The driver slumps over the wheel pulling it to the right. The vehicle
figures indicated on the vehicle chart. The driver of the truck, 13-16 makes a right turn moving one full action immediately. The vehicle
comes to a rest at the end of this movement.
jeep or motorcycle must come from the unit being transport- The driver tumbles out of the vehicle pulling the wheel to theright. The

ed. 17-20 vehicle makes a sharp right turn moving one full action immediately. At
the end of the action the vehicle overturns. E column hit on all

Fighting Passengers and Riders


When fighting from a truck, figures use all of the rules that
Georgi clutched desperatly to the engine deck, the palm of
are associated with halftracks, but they receive no armor
his hand burning, the back of his hand near frostbite. The
bonus. Truck crews can never Button-Up or Crew Covered to
combination of noise, wind, cold, and heat was all but
protect themselves. When a driver of an unarmored vehicle
unbearable. There was a sudden, deafening, crash and
breaks due to combat he will turn the vehicle around and seek
Georgi jumped for the ground without a thought.
cover. Passengers that are riding in a vehicle when they break
will Bail-Out unless the vehicle is moving, in which case the
A Rider is a figure that is riding on top of a vehicle.
Broken figure will go prone and do nothing else.
A Passenger is any figure that is inside a vehicle intended to
carry infantry.
Shooting Trucks
When shooting at a truck with a gun use all normal rules that
Dismounting
apply To Hitting a vehicle target. The only difference is that
Dismounting is when a figure mounted in or on a vehicle gets
you use the Truck Hit Location Chart and the Truck Damage
off on their own accord. Figures that are forced off are
Chart. When attacking a truck the shooting player never rolls
Bailing Out. It takes an action to dismount from any mount-
for Penetration; Penetration is automatic.
ed position. In the action that the infantry dismount the vehi-
Machine guns Whenever figures engage a truck with
cle must be stopped and may not move at all. Five infantry
machine gun fire they must decide whether to shoot to dam-
men are allowed to dismount on each of the three sides: right,
age the truck itself or shoot to hit the men it is carrying. When
left, rear. These figures are placed directly next to the side
shooting at the men determine hits and damage as normal in
they dismounted on. The infantry are never required to exit
the infantry shooting rules. Men never receive any cover
any side as long as they conform to the above rules.
modifiers from trucks even if they are prone. When trying to
Example: If there are 13 men in a halftrack 5 may exit the left
shoot at the truck itself then use the following sequence:
side, 5 exit the right side and 3 exit the rear. This would allow
all of the men to get out of the halftrack in one action. Yet, if
1. Roll To Hit dice as if the truck was an infantry target.
the right side of the halftrack were under fire then 5 men
could exit the left side and 5 could exit the rear while 5 men
2. If there where a majority of hits for the gun type then roll
waited inside the halftrack until the next action phase.
for location on the truck Hit Location chart.
Bailing Out
3. The location is automatically damaged from the fire. In
Bailing Out is when a figure is forced to exit a vehicle. The
addition any personnel located in that location will receive
figure is placed next to the vehicle where the Bail Out
fire as normal.
occurred. Figures that Bail Out are Broken. Passengers or
Rifles, SMGs and Pistols You are not able to significantly
Riders that are forced to Bail Out never effect the actions of
effect a truck with a rifle. Rifles and other small arms can
the vehicle carrying them. It is up to the controller of the unit
always be used to shoot at figures in a the truck.
to declare what side the unit bails out at.
Driver Hit Whenever the driver receives a Light Wound,
A figure will Bail Out if:
HW, or a KIA then the Truck, Jeep or Motorcycle must roll
A figure dismounts while the vehicle is moving.
on the Crash Chart.
An armored vehicle that takes a hit forces a Bail Out for any

20 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
mounted riders.
An armored vehicle fires its main armament while carrying Rider Capacity
riders it forces a Bail Out for any mounted riders. Vehicle Size Number of Riders
A truck crashes.
A vehicle rotates its turret. Very Small 0
Moving Bail Outs Any figure that is forced to Bail Out from
a moving vehicle is at risk of injury. The figure must roll on Small 5
the SMG column of the Effects Chart. Medium 8
Crew Exposed / Buttoned-Up Large 12
Passengers use all of the normal rules for Buttoning-Up and
exposing. It takes one action to expose passengers. Riders are Very Large 16
always exposed.
Fighting Riders
Protection for Riders Figures on the back of tanks may not fire from thier positions
Riders can gain protection while riding on a vehicle. This while the Tank is moving. Otherwise they may fight as nor-
protection is afforded only when the line of fire is traced mal.
through the turret structure before reaching the troops.
Otherwise the units are exposed normally. vehicle Charts
Crew Served Weapons & Dismounting The Vehicle Charts are included in the Charts Chapter. The
Crew Served Weapons cannot be dismounted in the normal charts are by no means complete, containing only the most
time of one action. Two actions must be spent to remove the prevalent of the German, Russian, and American types.
weapon from a vehicle. Additional charts will be posted on our web site regularly,
Example: If a mortar team dismounts from a halftrack it will space and time limitations preclude a total listing here.
take 2 actions, during which half of the team will be dis- Wt. Weight in tons
mounted and next to the vehicle while the others are still in Size Vehicle size for targeting and ramming
the halftrack. The dismounted men must still remain next to HF Hull Front armor
the vehicle during the next action as they are assumed to be TF Turret Front armor
receiving the crew serviced weapon that is being handed to HS Hull Side armor
them. This does not apply to pre-machine guns or light TS Turret Side armor
machine guns. HR Hull Rear armor
TR Turret Rear armor
Crew Served Weapons & Bailing out Note: Turret armor applies to the upper structure of armored
Any Crew Served Weapon will be left behind when a unit is vehicles with no turret.
bailing out. A Bail Out is an instant reaction to an event and Speed The vehicles movement rate per action, in inches.
there is not enough time to retrieve the weapon in question. Load The number of actions it takes to load and lay the gun,
This rule doesnt apply to light machine guns or other indi- before modification for one man turret, crew quality, or SP
vidual small crew served weapons. Any weapon with a set up gun status.
time will be abandoned in a Bail Out. TR S indicates a slow turret
N indicates a normal speed turret
Riding Capacity * indicates a two man turret
Each vehicle can carry a certain amount of infantry as Riders. # indicates a one man turret
- indicates no turret
Indicating Riders/Passengers on a Vehicle If the figures T Vehicle type, as described on pg 2 of Armored Combat.
cannot be placed on/in the model then set them aside with Smoke Roll at the beginning of the game to see if each vehi-
some type of marker or indicator that the vehicle is caring rid- cle has a smoke discharger. Rolling this number or less indi-
ers or transporting passengers. Off table there should be a cates a launcher is present.
area set aside to allow the figures that are riding or passengers HMG This indicates the presence and type of hull machine
to be placed. They should relate to the marker in some fash- gun. If a number follows the gun type you must roll that num-
ion so that it is easy to tell which units are in what vehicles. ber or less on a d20 at the beginning of the game to have a
gun. A - indicates no gun was ever mounted. A LMG-T indi-

easy eights Battleground World War II 21


Armored Combat
cates that the hull machine gun was turret mounted. A x2 These sheets include detailed hit locations, as well as stats,
indicates two guns were present. crew lay out, and special rules. Because of limitations of
CMG Indicates presence and type of co-axial machine gun. space and time only these three vehicles were included. Use
AAMG Indicates the presence and type of anti-aircraft the T-34 Location Chart for all Russian tanks and so on. We
machine gun. If a number follows the gun type you must roll will be producing many more Location Charts for as many
that number or less on a d20 at the beginning of the game to vehicles as we can. 36 of the most common tanks are avail-
have a gun. able in Easy Eights Tankers Challenge.
Gun This indicates the size and length of the main gun. Any
gun in a vehicle with no turret is a hull mount. If there are two
guns listed with a / between then the vehicle has two main
guns, each in a seperate turret. A subsequent listing will
include the / to indicate stats for both guns.
Penetration Indicates the Penetration number for each type
of main gun round.
AP The standard round for anti-tank work
APCR/HVAP Rare, high powered, AP round
HEAT Shaped charge, not effected by range
HE The Penetration for a direct hit with an HE round.
HE Size The size of template to use for that HE round in the
anti-personnel role.

Location Charts

The rule set includes detailed Hit Location Charts for 3 of the
most common tanks of World War II. The M4 Sherman, the
PzKpfw IV H, and the T-34 Model 1941 are all included.

22 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
GERMAN VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Name Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP APCR HEAT HE Size
PzKpfw IB 6 S 2 2 2 2 1 1 10 - N T 12 - - - 2LMG - - - - -

PzKpfw IIA 9 S 2 2 2 2 1 1 10 - N T 12 - LMG - 20L AC 11 - - - -


PzKpfw IIF 9.5 S 5 4 2 2 1 1 9 - N T 15 - LMG - 20L AC 11 - - - -
PzKpfw IIL Lynx 13 S 5 4 2 2 2 2 11 - N T 15 - LMG - 20L AC 11 - - - -

PzKpfw IIID 16 M 3 2 2 2 1 1 9 1 N T 12 LMG LMG - 37L 16 18 - 6 Sm


PzKpfw IIIF 20 M 5 4 4 4 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 37L 16 18 - 6 Sm

PzKpfw IIIG 21 M 5 4 4 4 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 50 20 25 - 10 Sm


PzKpfw IIIH 22 M 11 7 5 6 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 50 20 25 - 10 Sm

PzKpfw IIIJ 22 M 11 11 5 6 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 50L 23 30 - 10 Sm


PzKpfw IIIM 22 M 11 13 5 6 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 50L 23 30 - 10 Sm
PzKpfw IIIN 23 M 11 11 5 6 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 75S 18 - 23 13 Med
PzKpfw IVC 19 M 5 5 2 3 2 2 9 1 N T 14 - LMG - 75S 18 - - 13 Med

PzKpfw IVD 20 M 5 5 4 4 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 75S 18 - - 13 Med


PzKpfw IVE 21 M 11 9 5 5 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 75S 18 - - 13 Med

PzKpfw IVF2 23 M 11 11 5 7 2 2 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG - 75L 30 35 - 13 Med


PzKpfw IVH 25 M 14 12 5 7 3 3 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG LMG-12 75L 30 35 - 13 Med

PzKpfw IVJ 25 M 14 12 5 7 3 3 9 1 N T 19 LMG LMG LMG-15 75L 30 35 - 13 Med


PzKpfw VD2 Panther 43 L 32 30 12 12 6 6 9 1 S T 10 LMG LMG LMG-10 75XL 40 - - 13 Med

PzKpfw VG Panther 45 L 32 30 12 12 6 6 10 1 S T 19 LMG LMG LMG-15 75XL 40 - - 13 Med


PzKpfw VIE Tiger I 57 L 21 26 14 14 7 12 8 1 S T 15 LMG LMG LMG-10 88L 35 40 - 14 Med

PzKpfw VIE Tiger I (late) 57 L 21 26 14 14 7 12 8 1 S T 19 LMG LMG LMG-15 88L 35 40 - 14 Med


PzKpfw VIB Royal Tiger 68 VL 46 42 15 29 7 10 6 2 S T 19 LMG LMG LMG-15 88XL 47 - - 14 Med

PzKpfw 35(t) 11 S 5 5 2 2 1 1 9 1 S* T 10 LMG LMG - 37L 16 18 - 6 Sm


PzKpfw 38(t)A 10 S 5 5 2 2 1 1 9 1 S* T 10 LMG LMG - 37L 16 18 - 6 Sm

PzKpfw 38(t)E 10 S 7 5 4 5 2 2 10 1 S* T - LMG LMG - 37L 16 18 - 6 Sm


PzJg I 7 S 2 2 2 2 1 auto 10 1 - SP - - - - 47L 19 23 - 7 Sm

Marder IIItH 11 S 7 4 2 2 1 auto 9 1 - SP - - - - 75L 30 35 23 13 Med


Marder IIItM 11 S 7 4 2 2 1 1 10 1 - SP 15 - - - 75L 30 35 23 13 Med

PzJg III/IV "Nashorn" 24 L 5 3 3 2 2 2 9 2 - SP - - - - 88XL 47 - - 14 Med


JgdPz 38(t) "Hetzer" 16 S 25 22 5 5 2 2 9 1 - AG - - - LMG-15 75L 30 35 23 13 Med

JgdPz IV/70 26 S 25 23 6 7 2 2 8 1 - AG 10 LMG - LMG-5 75XL 40 - - 13 Med


JgdPz V Jagdpanther 46 M 32 32 12 12 6 6 10 2 - AG 19 LMG - - 88XL 47 - - 14 Med
JgdPz VI Jagdtiger 70 VL 46 46 15 19 7 7 6 3 - AG 19 LMG - LMG-10 128L 58 - - 21 Lrg
PzJg VI Tiger Ferdinand 68 VL 32 32 14 18 7 9 5 2 - AG - - - - 88XL 47 - - 14 Med

StuG III B 20 S 9 8 5 5 2 2 9 1 - AG 15 - - - 75S 18 - - 13 Med


StuG III G 24 S 12 11 5 5 2 2 9 1 - AG 15 - - LMG-5 75L 30 35 23 13 Med

StuG III G (late) 24 S 12 11 5 5 2 2 9 1 - AG 15 - LMG LMG-5 75L 30 35 23 13 Med


StuH III 42 24 S 12 11 5 5 2 2 9 2 - AG 15 - - LMG-5 105 25 - 26 21 Lrg

StuH III 42 (late) 24 S 12 11 5 5 2 2 9 2 - AG 15 - LMG LMG-5 105 25 - 26 21 Lrg


Sdfk 251/1 Hanomag 9 M 2 2 2 2 2 2 10 - - HT - LMG-5 LMG-5 LMG-5 - - - - - -

Sdfk 250/1 9 S 2 2 2 2 2 2 10 - - HT - LMG-5 LMG-5 LMG-5 - - - - - -


PSW 222 5 S 4 2 2 2 2 2 15 - N AC 12 - LMG - 20L AC 11 - - - -

PSW 232 (8rad) 9 M 4 3 2 2 2 2 15 - N AC 12 - LMG - 20L AC 11 - - - -


PSW 234/2 Puma 12 M 7 7 2 2 2 2 15 1 S* AC 12 - LMG - 50L 23 30 - 10 Sm

easy eights Battleground World War II 23


Armored Combat
RUSSIAN VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Name Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP APCR HEAT HE Size
T60 M40 6 S 5 4 4 2 1 1 10 - S* T - - LMG - 20XL AC 12 - - - -

T60 M42 7 S 11 9 5 4 2 2 10 - S* T - - LMG - 20XL AC 12 - - - -


T70 9 S 11 11 7 7 2 2 9 1 S* T - - LMG - 45L 18 23 - 9 Sm

T26 M33 10 S 2 4 2 2 1 1 8 1 S* T - - LMG - 45L 18 23 - 9 Sm


T26 M37 10 S 5 5 2 3 1 1 10 1 S* T - - LMG - 45L 18 23 - 9 Sm

BT-5 12 S 4 3 2 2 1 1 14 1 S* T - - LMG - 45L 18 23 - 9 Sm


BT-7 14 S 4 2 2 3 1 1 15 1 S* T - - LMG - 45L 18 23 - 9 Sm

BT-7A 15 S 4 2 2 3 1 1 15 1 S* T - - LMG - 76S 16 - - 12 Med


T-34 M40 27 M 19 18 11 11 3 3 11 1 S* T - LMG LMG - 76 21 - - 12 Med
T-34 M41 29 M 19 18 11 11 3 3 11 1 S* T - LMG LMG - 76L 23 25 - 12 Med
T-34 M43 31 M 19 18 11 11 3 3 11 1 S* T - LMG LMG LCMG-5 76L 23 25 - 12 Med

T-34/85 32 L 19 19 11 13 4 4 10 1 N T - LMG LMG - 85L 30 33 - 13 Med


KV-1 M39 43 L 14 16 14 14 7 7 6 1 S* T - LMG LMG LMG-R 76 21 - - 12 Med

KV-1E 45 L 20 20 14 16 7 7 6 1 S* T - LMG LMG LMG-R 76 21 - - 12 Med


KV-1 M41 45 L 20 20 14 16 7 7 6 1 S* T - LMG LMG LMG-R 76L 23 25 - 12 Med

KV-1 M42 47 L 20 22 19 19 7 7 6 1 S* T - LMG LMG LMG-R 76L 23 25 - 12 Med


KV-1S 43 M 14 14 11 13 7 7 8 1 N T - LMG LMG LMG-R 76L 23 25 - 12 Med

KV-85 46 L 14 14 11 13 7 7 8 1 N T - LMG LMG LMG-R 85L 30 35 - 13 Med


KV-2 52 VL 14 17 14 14 7 7 5 3 - T - LMG LMG LMG-R 152S 30 - - 28 Lrg

IS-2 45 L 26 30 19 19 8 8 8 3 S T - LMG LMG LMG-R 122L 44 - 30 21 Lrg


IS-2m 46 L 46 42 19 19 8 8 9 3 3 T - LMG LMG LMG-R 122L 44 - 30 21 Lrg

T-35 46 VL 5 4 3 3 2 2 6 1/1 S*/S* T - LMG-T LMG LMG-R 76S/45L 16/20 - - 12 / 9 M/S


T-28 M34 28 L 5 5 3 4 2 2 8 1 S* T - LMG-T x2 LMG LMG-R 76S 16 - - 12 Med

T-28 M40 32 L 14 12 7 9 2 2 6 1 S* T - LMG-T x2 LMG LMG-R 76S 16 - - 12 Med


IS-3 46 M 46 46 19 26 8 8 8 3 S T 15 - LMG LCMG-15 122L 44 - - 21 Lrg

SU-76M 11 M 7 4 2 2 1 1 10 1 - SP - - - - 76L 23 25 - 12 Med


SU-122 31 M 19 18 10 10 5 5 10 3 - AG - - LMG - 122 - - 30 21 Lrg

ISU-122 46 L 25 22 11 13 6 6 9 3 - AG - - LMG - 122L 44 - 30 21 Lrg


SU-152 46 L 14 16 11 13 6 6 8 3 - AG - - LMG - 152 37 - - 28 Lrg

ISU-152 46 L 25 22 11 13 6 6 8 3 - AG - - LMG - 152 37 - - 28 Lrg


SU-85 29 M 19 19 11 11 5 5 10 1 - AG - - LMG - 85L 30 35 - 13 Med
SU-100 31 M 19 19 11 11 5 5 10 1 - AG - - LMG - 100L 47 - - 17 Lrg
BA-6 9 S 3 4 1 2 1 2 15 1 S* AC - - LMG - 45L 20 - - 7 Sm

BA-20 3 S 2 2 1 1 1 1 15 - S AC - - - - LCMG - - - - -

24 easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Combat
AMERICAN VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Name Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP APCR HEAT HE Size
M4 Sherman 30.5 L 14 14 7 9 5 5 9 1 N T 10 LMG LMG LCMG-15 75 25 - 23 13 Med
M4A1 Sherman 30.5 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 9 1 N T 10 LMG LMG LCMG-15 75 25 - 23 13 Med

M4A3 Sherman 30.5 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 10 1 N T 10 LMG LMG LCMG-15 75 25 - 23 13 Med


M4A3 (75) W 31.5 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 10 1 N T 10 LMG LMG LCMG-15 75 25 - 23 13 Med

M4A3E2 "Jumbo" 38 L 32 32 14 16 7 7 8 1 N T 15 LMG LMG LMG-5 75 25 - 23 13 Med


M4A3E2 (76) "Jumbo" 38 L 32 32 14 16 7 7 8 1 N T 15 LMG LMG LCMG-15 76L 30 35 23 13 Sm

M4A1 (76) W Sherman 32 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 9 1 N T 15 LMG LMG LCMG-15 76L 30 35 23 13 Sm


M4A3 (76) W Sherman 32 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 10 1 N T 15 LMG LMG LCMG-15 76L 30 35 23 13 Sm

M4 (105) Sherman 32 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 9 2 S T 15 LMG LMG LCMG-15 105 25 - 26 18 Lrg


M4A3 (105) Sherman 31 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 10 2 S T 15 LMG LMG LCMG-15 105 25 - 26 18 Lrg
M4A3E8 "Easy Eight" 32 L 19 14 7 9 5 5 10 1 N T 15 LMG LMG LCMG-15 76L 30 35 23 13 Sm
M3A1 Stuart 13 S 7 5 5 7 2 2 11 1 S* T - LMG LMG LMG-12 37XL 19 - - 7 Sm

M5A1 Stuart 16 S 10 7 5 7 2 2 11 1 S* T - LMG LMG LMG-12 37XL 19 - - 7 Sm


M24 Chaffee 18 S 10 10 5 7 2 2 11 1 N T 10 LMG LMG LCMG-10 75 25 - 23 13 Med

M26 Pershing 42 L 32 30 14 14 7 7 8 2 N T - LMG LMG LCMG-15 90L 37 47 - 14 Med


M10GMC 30 L 14 14 5 5 3 3 9 1 S TD 15 - LMG LCMG-12 76L 30 35 - 13 Sm

M18GMC "Hellcat" 18 M 5 4 2 2 2 2 15 1 N TD 15 - LMG LCMG-12 76L 30 35 - 13 Sm


M36GMC "Jackson" 29 L 14 14 5 5 3 3 9 2 N TD 15 - LMG LCMG-12 90L 37 47 - 14 Med
M3A1 Halftrack 8 M 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 - - HT - - - LCMG-15 - - - - - -
M8 Armored Car 8 S 4 4 2 1 1 1 15 1 S* AC 10 - LMG LCMG-15 37XL 19 - - 7 Sm

M20 Scout Car 7 S 4 auto 2 auto 1 auto 15 - - AC 10 - - LCMG - - - - - -


T8 Recon Vehicle 15 S 10 auto 5 auto 2 auto 11 - - TD - - - LCMG - - - - - -

SOFTSKIN VEHICLE STATISTICS


Name Wt. Size Speed Type AAMG Cap. Notes:

German
Kuebelwagen Kfz 1 1 VS
M 15 J LMG-5 4 The German Standard Jeep

Schwimmwagen Kfz1/20 1.5 VS 15/5 J LMG-5 4 Amphibious Jeep. 4 inch movement in water

Opel "Blitz" 3 ton 6.5 M 12 TR - 20

Horch Kfz 17 6 M 15 TR - 12
Ford Maultier 6.5 M 12 TR - 20 Halftracked Truck

SdfK 7 8 L 10 TR - 12 Halftracked Truck Prime Mover

Russian
GAZ-67B 1.5 VS 15 J LMG-5 4 The Russian Jeep

GAZ-MM 6 M
S 12 TR - 20

Ford, Russian 8 M 12 TR - 20

American
Jeep 1.5 VS 15 J LCMG-12 4
3/4 Ton Truck 3.5 M
S 12 TR - 10

11/2 Ton Truck 5.5 M 12 TR - 20


21/2 "Duece and a half" 7.5 M 12 TR - 20

easy eights Battleground World War II 25


Truck
truck effect chart
Small Arms Effects Small arms do not roll on these charts.
Roll To Effect passengers/driver with any hits as normal.
Machine guns may effect the truck or the passengers. When
effecting the truck all passenger effects apply. See Armored
Combat.

Main guns and Machine guns Main guns that shoot at


trucks will effect the vehicle and the passengers as
described in the chart below. The chart is specific to
machine gun fire and main guns firing AP, HE and HEAT
will have additional effect.
HE and HEAT HE and HEAT rounds will have all the
effects listed on the chart and will lay out a Effects
Template as well, rolling as normal for all passengers cov-
ered. In addition roll a d20. On a roll of 8 or less the vehicle
suffers a fuel explosion, see Location 1 on the Front Chart.

Front
20 Vehicle Passenger
1. Fuel Tank / Explosion 1. All roll on A column
2. Immobilized / Crash Check 2. Morale Check
17 18 19 3. Immobilized / Smoke
4. Immobilized / Smoke
3. Morale Check
4. Morale Check
5. Immobilized / Smoke 5. Morale Check
6. Immobilized / Crash Check 6. Morale Check
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. d3 HW
8. Immobilized / Smoke 8. Morale Check
9. Immobilized / Smoke 9. Morale Check
7 8 9 10 11 10. Immobilized / Smoke
11. No Effect
10. Morale Check
11. d3 HW
12. No Effect 12. 1 HW
13. Immobilized 13. 1 HW / Morale Check
3 4 5 14. Immobilized
15. Driver KIA / Crash Check / Immobilized
14. Morale Check
15. Morale Check
16. No Effect 16. 1 HW
17. No Effect 17. 1 HW
2 1 6 18. No Effect
19. Driver KIA / Crash Check
18. 1 HW
19. Morale Check
20. No Effect 20. 1 HW

Front hit location Front hit location

Vehicle side Passenger


1. Immobilized 1. Morale Check
2. Immobilized / Crash Check 2. Morale Check
3. No Effect 3. No Effect
4. No Effect 4. No Effect
5. Fuel Tank / Explosion 5. All roll on A column
16 17 18 19 20 6. Immobilized 6. Morale Check
7. Immobilized / Crash Check 7. Morale Check
8. No Effect 8. No Effect
9. Immobilized / Smoke 9. Morale Check
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 10. Immobilized / Smoke 10. Morale Check
11. Driver KIA / Crash Check 11. Morale Check
12. No Effect 12. d3 HW
1 3 4 5 6 8 13. No Effect 13. d3 HW
14. No Effect 14. d3 HW
2 7 15. No Effect 15. d3 HW
16. Driver KIA / Crash Check 16. Morale Check
17. No Effect 17. 1 HW
18. No Effect 18. 1 HW
19. No Effect 19. 1 HW
20. No Effect 20. 1 HW

Side hit location


Side hit location

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Pzkpfw IV ausf H

Front
20 No Penetration Penetration
1. Automatic Penetration 1. Normal Damage
2. Immobilized / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
17 18 19 4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Normal Damage
8. No Effect 8. Normal Damage
9. No Effect 9. Normal Damage
10. No Effect 10. Normal Damage
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. MG Destroyed / Radio Man -1 Action 13. Radio KIA / MC
3 4 5 14. No Effect
15. Driver -1 Action
14. Normal Damage
15. Driver KIA / MC
2 6 16. No Effect 16. Normal Damage
17. No Effect 17. Loader KIA / MC
18. Main Gun Destroyed 18. Main Gun Destroyed
1 19. No Effect 19. Gunner KIA / MC
20. Commander -1 Action 20. Commander KIA / MC

Front hit location Front hit location


Specifications Special Rules

The Mark IV was the most common German tank produced during Schurzen Almost all PzKpfw IV ausf H had fitted spaced armor
skirts called Schurzen. These were designed to protect the side hull
the war. The H version was in service from Spring, 1943 to the
and turret from shape charged (HEAT) weapons. The side skirts are
end of the war. removable and were often damaged in combat. The turret skirts
were permanent and could not be removed. Turret Schurzen cover
Introduced: Spring, 1943 Crew: 5 all turret side and rear locations. Schurzen halve the Penetration
Weight: 23.5 tons Number of any magnetic mines, bazookas, grenades, or other HEAT
Length: 18 8.5 rounds.
Width: 9 4 Side Hull Schurzen covers Availability: 14
Height: 8 7 Locations 1 -15
Ground Clearance: 1 3.5 Side/Rear Turret Schurzen covers Availability: 19
Track Width: 1 3 Locations 17-19
Main Gun: 7.5cm KwK L/48
Max Elevation: 20 Zimmerit A cement coating was also introduced with the ausf H
Ammunition: 2700 MG rounds / 87 Main Gun rounds model of the PzKpfw IV. The cement was known as Zimmerit. Its
cement makeup and rough texture significantly reduced the ability
Speed: 23.6 mph
of magnetic mines and sticky bombs to attach to a tank. Any tank
Range: 93 miles that is covered in Zimmerit will receive a +10 to the Close Assault
Trench Crossing: 7 6 Placement Chart with a magnetic mine. Availability: 14
Fording Depth: 2 9
Platoon A platoon of
Tank Crew Positions PzKpfw IVH was 5
Loader tanks on paper but
Radio Operator / Hull Gunner because of war time
limitations a platoon
generally consisted of
only 4 tanks.

APCR Was rarely


available and only in
small quantities.
Availability: 10
d6 rounds if available.
Driver Commander
Gunner

VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP APCR HEAT HE Size
PzKfw IV ausf H 25 M 14 12 5 7 3 3 9 1 N T 8 LMG LMG LMG-10 75L 30 35 23 13 Med.

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Pzkfw IV ausf H

No Penetration side Penetration


1. Immobilized/ MC 1. Immobilized / MC
2. No Effect 2. Immobilized / MC
20 3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
16 17 18 19 6. No Effect
7. No Effect
6. Immobilized / MC
7. Immobilized / MC
8. Immobilized/ MC 8. Immobilized / MC
9R. Hull MG Knocked Out 9R. Radio Operator KIA / MC
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9L. Driver -1 action 9L. Driver KIA / MC
10. No Effect 10. Normal Damage
11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. No Effect 13. Normal Damage
14. No Effect 14. Immobilized Smoke / MC
15. Engine Hit - Tank Half speed Smoke 15. Immobilized Smoke / MC
16. Main Gun Hit/ MC 16. Main Gun Hit
17. No Effect 17R. Normal Damage
18R. Loader -1 action 17L. Gunner KIA / MC
18L. No Effect 18R. Loader KIA / MC
19. No Effect 18L. Normal Damage
20. Commander -1 action 19. No Effect, cargo bin
20. Commander KIA / MC
Side hit location
Side hit location

Rear
20 No Penetration Penetration
1. Automatic Penetration 1. Normal Damage
2. Immobilized / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
17 18 19 4. No Effect 4. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect
8. No Effect
7. Immobilized / MC
8. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
9. Exhaust Hit Smoke 9. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
10. No Effect 10. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Immobilized / MC
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. No Effect 13. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
14. No Effect 14. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
3 4 5 15. No Effect 15. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
2 6 16. No Effect
17. No Effect
16. Normal Damage
17. Gunner KIA / MC
18. No Effect 18. No Damage / cargo bin
1 19. No Effect 19. Loader KIA / MC
20. Commander -1 Action 20. Commander KIA / MC

Rear hit location Rear hit location

R top
No Penetration Penetration
1. Main Gun Destroyed / MC 1. Main Gun Destroyed / MC
2 3 4 5 2. No Effect 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
7 8 9 5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
6 10 6. No Effect
7. Radio -1 Action
6. Immobilized / MC
7. Radio Man KIA / MC
8. Loader -1 Action
1 20 9. Half Move Smoke
8. Loader KIA / MC
9. Immobilized / Smoke / MC
10. Half Move / Smoke 10. Immobilized / Smoke / MC
11 13 15 11. No Effect 11. Immobilized / MC
12 12. Driver -1 Action 12. Driver KIA / MC
14 13. Gunner -1 Action 13. Gunner KIA / MC
14. Half Move / Smoke 14. Immobilized Smoke / MC
15. Half Move / Smoke 15. Immobilized Smoke / MC
16 17 18 19 16. No Effect 16. Immobilized / MC
17. No Effect 17. Immobilized / MC
18. No Effect 18. Immobilized / MC
19. No Effect 19. Immobilized / MC
L 20. Commander -1 action 20. Commander KIA / MC

top hit location


Side hit location

Easy eights Battleground World War II


T-34 Model 1941

Front
20 No Penetration Penetration
1. Automatic Penetration 1. Normal Damage
2.Immobilized / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
17 18 19 4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Normal Damage
8. No Effect 8. Normal Damage
9. No Effect 9. Normal Damage
10. No Effect 10. Normal Damage
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. MG Destroyed / Hull Gunner -1 Action 13. Hull Gunner KIA / MC
3 4 5 14. No Effect
15. Driver -1 Action
14. Normal Damage
15. Driver KIA / MC
2 6 16. No Effect 16. Normal Damage
17. No Effect 17. Loader KIA /MC
18. Main Gun Destroyed 18. Main Gun Destroyed
1 19. No Effect 19. Gunner KIA / MC
20. Commander -1 Action 20. Commander KIA / MC

Front hit location Front hit location


Specifications Special Rules
The introduction of the T-34 in combat created anxiety within the German tank corps. Turret The turret of the T-34 Model 1941 could only accomodate 2 crew members with
The combination of mobility and sloped armor proved successful. The T-34 base very little room to move. In addition when the turret was rotated the gunner and loader
model lead to many excellent modifications that lasted throughout the war. seats did not rotate. These factors combined to result in a very inefficient turret/gun
design. Therefore this tank cannot turn the turret and fire in the same action. If the tur-
Introduced: Summer, 1941 Crew: 4 ret is rotated in the previous action before firing there is a +2 to the To Hit die roll.
Weight: 28.5 tons Commander / Gunner The gunner in the T-34 Model 1941 also served as the com-
Length: 214 mander. This individual was very overworked and at no time could be Commander
Width: 99.5 Exposed when firing the main gun or coax. Whenever the commander is operating the
Height: 710 main gun he is acting as a gunner, not a commander. Therefore all main gun shots will
Ground Clearence: 1.5 suffer the No Commander penalty as well as the Buttoned-Up penalty.
Track Width: 17 Commander Exposed The T-34 Model 1941 had a large single hatch for the comman-
Main Gun: F-34 76.2mm der and the loader. The hatch folded forward to provide excellent cover from the front
Max Elevation: 30 but no cover from the sides or rear. The hatch will give a +7 modifier when being shot
Ammunition: 2394 MG rounds / 77 Main Gun rounds at from the front but only a +3 from the sides or rear.
AP 19 Radio Radios were only provided to command tanks. Radios in T-34 model 1941 tanks
HE 53 were operated by the tank commander. A commander must spend an action to use the
HE Frag 5 radio.
Speed: 30 mph Ammo Storage Only 9 rounds were available in the turret ready racks. When more
Range: 188 miles ammunition was needed the floor of the tank had to be removed. This took time and
Trench Crossing: 9 10 energy at perhaps a bad time. After 9 rounds have been fired, more ammunition must
Fording Depth: 2 9 be retrieved in the floor bin. It takes 1 action to remove the floor plate, 1 action for
every 3 rounds removed and a further 1 action to replace the floor plate. No other
actions may take place except driving until the floor is replaced. When using a T-34
Tank Crew Positions Model 1941 players should note what type of rounds are in the turret rack before the
game begins.
Hull Gunner Loader HE Frag The Russians made a HE Fragmentation round that delivered better anti-
infantry effects. A HE Frag round will impact the target area like a 60mm round but
extend to the E ring.
Ground Pressure The T-34 Model 1941 has very wide tracks and a low ground pres-
sure. Due to this the T-34 always receives a -1 to any Bog die roll.
Fuel The T-34 used diesel fuel that was not as volatile as gas. The T34 receives a +1 to
the Penetration Effects die roll.
Turret Overhang The turret of the tank had a dramatic rear overhang. Enemy infantry-
men would take advantage of the overhang to place a mine or demo charge. When the
mine or demo charge exploded it would send the turret flying. Whenever a figure in a
close assault successfully places a mine / demo charge in location 8 or 13, the
Penetration Effects will always be considered a 1 Catastrophic.
Driver Commander / Gunner

VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP APCR HEAT HE Size
T-34 Model 1941 28 M 19 18 11 9 3 3 11 1 S T - LMG LMG LCMG-5 76L 23 - - 12 Med.

Easy eights Battleground World War II


t34 model 1941

No Penetration side Penetration


1. Immobilized/ MC 1. Immobilized / MC
2. No Effect 2. Immobilized / MC
3. Immobilized / MC
20 3. No Effect
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
16 17 18 19 6. No Effect
7. No Effect
6. Immobilized / MC
7. Immobilized / MC
8. Immobilized/ MC 8. Immobilized / MC
9R. Hull MG Knocked Out 9R. Hull Gunner KIA / MC
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9L. Driver -1 action 9L. Driver KIA / MC
10. No Effect 10. Normal Damage
11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
1 8 12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
2 3 4 5 6 7 13. No Effect
14. No Effect
13. Normal Damage
14. Immobilized Smoke / MC
15. Engine Hit - Tank Half speed Smoke 15. Immobilized Smoke / MC
16. Main Gun Hit/ MC 16. Main Gun Hit
17. No Effect 17R. Normal Damage
18. No Effect 17L. Gunner KIA / MC
19. No Effect 18R. Normal Damage
20. Commander -1 action 18L. Loader KIA /MC
19. Normal Damage
20. Commander KIA / MC
Side hit location
Side hit location

Rear
20 No Penetration Penetration
1. Automatic Penetration 1. Normal Damage
2. Immobilized / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
17 18 19 4. No Effect 4. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect
8. No Effect
7. Immobilized / MC
8. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
9. Engine Hit - Tank Half Speed, Smoke 9. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
10. No Effect 10. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Immobilized / MC
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. No Effect 13. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
14. No Effect 14. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
3 4 5 15. No Effect 15. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
2 6 16. No Effect
17. No Effect
16. Normal Damage
17. Normal Damage
18. No Effect 18. Normal Damage
1 19. No Effect 19. No Effect
20. Commander -1 Action 20. Commander KIA / MC

Rear hit location Rear hit location

R top
No Penetration Penetration
1. Main Gun Destroyed / MC 1. Main Gun Destroyed / MC
2 3 4 5 2. No Effect 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
6 7 8 9 5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
10 6. Hull MG -1 Action 6. Hull Gunner KIA / MC
7. No Effect 7. Normal Damage
1 20 8. No Effect 8. Turret Overhang - see special rule
9. Half Move Smoke 9. Immobilized / Smoke / MC
11 12 15 10. No Effect 10. Immobilized / Smoke / MC
13 14 11. Driver -1 Action 11. Driver KIA / MC
12. Loader -1 Action 12. Loader KIA / MC
13. No Effect 13. Turret Overhang - see special rule
16 17 18 19 14. Half Move / Smoke
15. No Effect
14. Immobilized Smoke / MC
15. Immobilized Smoke / MC
16. No Effect 16. Immobilized / MC
17. No Effect 17. Immobilized / MC
18. No Effect 18. Immobilized / MC
19. No Effect 19. Immobilized / MC
L 20. Commander -1 action 20. Commander KIA / MC

top hit location


Side hit location

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Sherman M4

20 Front
No Penetration Penetration
1. Automatic Penetration 1. Normal Damage
17 18 19 2.Imobilization / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
6. Imobilization / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Normal Damage
8. No Effect 8. Normal Damage
9. No Effect 9. Normal Damage
10. No Effect 10. Normal Damage
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. MG Destroyed / Radio Man -1 Action 13. Radio Man KIA / MC
3 4 5 14. No Effect
15. Driver -1 Action
14. Normal Damage
15. Driver KIA / MC
2 6 16. No Effect 16. Normal Damage
17. No Effect 17. Gunner KIA / MC
18. Main Gun Destroyed 18. Main Gun Destroyed
1 19. No Effect 19. Loader KIA / MC
20. Commander -1 Action 20. Commander KIA / MC

Front hit location Front hit location

specifications special rules


The M4 Sherman was the most common of the numerous Sandbags: It was common practice for Sherman crews to sandbag
varieties of Sherman tank to see service in WWII. their tanks as a defense against German HEAT weapons such as
Introduced: July, 1942 Crew: 5 the panzerfaust. Sandbags were applied to the hull front and to the
Weight: 30.5 tons hull/turret sides. Sandbags halve the Penetration number of any
HEAT weapon.
Length: 19 4
Front Hull sandbags cover locations 3-5 & 7-16
Width: 8 7 Availability: 12
Height: 9 Side Hull/Turret sandbags cover locations 9-15 & 17-19
Ground Clearence: 1 5 Availability: 10
Track Width: 1 4.5 Gyro Stabilizer: Sherman tanks were equipped with a gun stabi-
Main Gun: 75mm M3 lizer that theoretically increased accuracy for tanks firing on the
Max Elevation: 25 move. The stabilizers were a first generation device and not popu-
Ammunition: 4750 MG rounds / 97 75mm rounds lar with crews. Stabilizers were often turned off by the dissatisfied
Speed: 24 mph gunners. Any M4 with a working stabilizer has reduced To Hit
penalties: Moved in Previous Action: +3 (not +5)
Range: 100 miles
Fire on Move: +6 (not +12)
Trench Crossing: 7 6 Stabilizer Turned On: Crew must pass a Half Skill Check at begin-
Fording Depth: 3 ing of game to use the Gyro Stabilizer.
High Ground Pressure: M4 Shermans had a very high ground
pressure compared to similiar armored vehicles. M4s suffer a +1
Tank Crew Positions on all Bog Checks.
Turret Speed: Compared to its German rivals, who generally had
Radio Operator / Hull Gunner Gunner a slow turret, the Shermans turret speed gave a substantial advan-
tage. Be sure to enforce turret speed when fighting Panthers and
Tigers!
Turret Access: The M4 turret has only one hatch, for the com-
mander. The commander and gunner can both use this hatch effec-
tively but the loader is at a disadvantage. Any time a Penetration
Effect indicates the crew must Bail-Out and pass a Morale Check
or be KIA, the loader is at +5 on the Morale Check to represent his
limited access to the hatch.
Ronson: Because of the M4s use of gasoline fuel and poorly
Driver Loader
designed ammo storage the tank was prone to catch fire easily.
Commander This led to the nickname ronson. All Penetration Effects are -1.
VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP HVAP HEAT HE Size
M4 Sherman 30.5 M 14 12 7 9 4 4 9 1 N T - LMG LMG LCMG-15 75 25 - 23 13 Med.

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Sherman m4

20 No Penetration side Penetration


1. Immobilized/ MC 1. Immobilized / MC
2. No Effect 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
16 17 18 19 4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
6. No Effect 6. Immobilized / MC
7. No Effect 7. Immobilized / MC
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 8. Tank Immobilized/ MC 8. Immobilized / MC
9R. Hull Machine Gun Knocked Out 9R. Radio Operator KIA / MC
9L. Driver -1 action 9L. Driver KIA / MC
10. No Effect 10. Normal Damage
11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. No Effect 13. Normal Damage
14. No Effect 14. Immobilized Smoke / MC
15. Engine Hit - Tank Half speed Smoke 15. Immobilized Smoke / MC
16. Main Gun Hit/ MC 16. Main Gun Hit
17. No Effect 17R. Normal Damage
18R. Loader -1 action 17L. Gunner KIA / MC
18L. No Effect 18R. Loader KIA / MC
19. No Effect 18L. Normal Damage
20. Commander -1 action 19. Normal Damage
20. Commander KIA / MC
Side hit location
Side hit location

20 Rear
No Penetration Penetration
17 18 19 1. Automatic Penetration
2. Immobilized / MC
1. Normal Damage
2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Immobilized / MC
8. No Effect 8. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
9. Exhaust Hit /Smoke 9. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
10. No Effect 10. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Immobilized / MC
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. No Effect 13. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
14. No Effect 14. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
3 4 5 15. No Effect 15. Immobilized /MC /Smoke
2 6 16. No Effect
17. No Effect
16. Normal Damage
17. Loader KIA / MC
18. No Effect 18. Normal Damage
1 19. No Effect 19. Gunner KIA / MC
20. Commander -1 Action 20. Commander KIA / MC

Rear hit location Rear hit location

R top
No Penetration Penetration
1. Main Gun Destroyed / MC 1. Main Gun Destroyed / MC
2 3 4 5 2. No Effect 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
7 8 9 5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC
6 10 6. Radio -1 Action
7. Gunner -1 Action
6. Radio Man KIA / MC
7. Gunner KIA / MC
8. Commander -1 action
1 20 9. Half Move / Smoke
8. Commander KIA / MC
9. Immobilized / Smoke / MC
10. Half Move / Smoke 10. Immobilized / Smoke / MC
11 13 15 11. Driver -1 Action 11. Driver KIA / MC
12 12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
14 13. Loader -1 Action 13. Loader KIA / MC
14. Half Move / Smoke 14. Immobilized Smoke / MC
15. Half Move / Smoke 15. Immobilized Smoke / MC
16 17 18 19 16. No Effect 16. Immobilized / MC
17. No Effect 17. Immobilized / MC
18. No Effect 18. Immobilized / MC
19. No Effect 19. Immobilized / MC
L 20. No Effect 20. Normal Damage

top hit location


Side hit location

Easy eights Battleground World War II


9

2 5
M3A1 Halftrack

20 Front
No Penetration Penetration
1. Automatic Penetration 1.Normal Damage
17 18 19 2.Imobilization / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC / SMoke
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC / SMoke
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC / SMoke
6. Imobilization / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Normal Damage
8. No Effect 8. Immobilized / MC / SMoke
9. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 9. Immobilized / MC / SMoke
10. No Effect 10. Immobilized / MC / SMoke
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. Radio Man -1 Action 13. Radio KIA / MC
3 4 5 14. No Effect
15. Driver -1 Action
14. Normal Damage
15. Driver KIA / MC
2 6 16. No Effect 16. Normal Damage
17. No Effect 17. AAMG gunner KIA / MC
18. No Effect 18. Normal Damage
1 19. No Effect 19. Driver KIA / MC
20. AAMG knocked out 20. AAMG gunner KIA / MC

Front hit location Front hit location

specifications Special rules


Armor: The M3A1s armor factor of 0 does not mean it is
The M3A1 halftrack was common with US forces. Despite automatically penetrated. The 0 indicates that the attacker
some good points it was unpopular because of its thin armor must roll under his Penetration number as usual, but the
and referred to as the Purple Heart Box. armor of the vehicle subtracts nothing. This makes the
M3A1 more vulnerable to MGs in the anti-armor role.
Introduced: May, 1941 Crew: 3 / 10 passengers
Weight: 10 tons Pulpit Mount: M3A1s that are equipped with an AAMG
Length: 20 9.5 carry the gun in the pulpit mount. There is no shadow for
Width: 7 3.5 the gun on the vehicles right side or front. The shadow on
Height: 7 5 the left side extends 3 out. The shadow to the rear extends
Ground Clearance: 11.25 out 6. Gunners standing in the pulpit mount are very
Track Width: 1 exposed and receive only +2 cover, not the usual +5.
Speed: 45 mph
Range:180 miles Crew: Unless stated otherwise in a scenario, the driver,
Fording Depth: 2 11 commander and AAMG gunner must come from the squad
transported in the halftrack.

Tank Crew Positions


Assistant Driver Commander

10 Passengers
Driver

VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP HVAP HEAT HE Size
M3A1 Halftrack 8 M 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 - - HT - - - LCMG-15 - - - - - -

Easy eights Battleground World War II


M4A1 Halftrack 9

2 5

No Penetration side Penetration


1. No Effect 1. Immobilized / MC
2. Immobilized / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
20 3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC
5. Immobilized / MC 5. Immobilized / MC
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
16 17 18 19 7. Immobilized / MC 7. Immobilized / MC
8. Immobilized / MC 8. Immobilized / MC
9.No Effect 9. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 10. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke
11R. No Effect
10. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
11R. 1 HW / MC
11L. Driver -1 action 11L. Driver KIA / MC
12. No Effect 12. d3 HW / MC
13. No Effect
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 14. No Effect
13. d3 HW / MC
14. d3 HW / MC
15. No Effect 15. d3 HW / MC
16. Driver -1 action 16. Driver KIA / MC
17. No Effect 17. 1 HW / MC
18. No Effect 18. 1 HW / MC
19. No Effect 19. 1 HW / MC
20. AAMG knocked out 20. AAMG gunner KIA / MC

Side hit location


Side hit location

20 Rear
No Penetration Penetration
17 18 19 1. Automatic Penetration
2. Immobilized / MC
1.Normal Damage
2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized /MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized /MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized /MC
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Immobilized / MC
8. No Effect 8. d3 HW / Normal Damage
9. No Effect 9. Normal Damage
10. No Effect 10. d3 HW / Normal Damage
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11.Normal Damage
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. No Effect 13. 1HW / Normal Damage
14. No Effect 14. Normal Damage
3 4 5 15. No Effect 15. 1 HW / Normal Damage
2 6 16. No Effect
17. No Effect
16. Normal Damage
17.AAMG gunner KIA / MC
18. No Effect 18. Normal Damage
1 19. No Effect 19. Normal Damage
20. AAMG knocked out 20. AAMG gunner KIA / MC

Rear hit location Rear hit location

R top
No Penetration Penetration
1.Immobilized / MC 1. Immobilized / MC
2. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 2. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
3. Immobilized / MC 3. Imobilized / MC
1 4. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 4. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
6 20 9 10 11 5. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 5. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
4 6. No Effect
7. No Effect
6. Normal Damage
7. Normal Damage
8. Driver -1 Action 8. Normal Damage
2 7 12 13 14 15 9. d3 HW / MC 9. d3 HW / MC / Immobilized
10. d3 HW / MC 10. d3 HW / MC / Immobilized
5 11. d3 HW / MC 11. d3 HW / MC / Immobilized
12. d3 HW / MC 12. d3 HW / MC / Immobilized
8 16 17 18 19 13. No Effect
3 14. No Effect
13. Immobilized / MC
14. Immobilized / MC
15. No Effect 15. Immobilized / MC
16. Driver KIA / MC 16. Driver KIA / MC
17. d3 HW / MC 17. d3 HW / MC / Immobilized
18. d3 HW / MC 18. d3 HW / MC / Immobilized
19. d3 HW / MC 19. d3 HW / MC / Immobilized
L 20. AAMG gunner KIA / MC 20. AAMG gunner KIA / MC

top hit location


top hit location

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Sdkfz 251/1

20 Front
No Penetration Penetration
1. Automatic Penetration 1. Normal Damage
17 18 19 2.Immobilized / MC 2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Normal Damage
8. No Effect 8. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
9. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 9. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
10. No Effect 10.Immobilized / MC / Smoke
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Normal Damage
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. Radio Man -1 Action 13. Radio Man KIA / MC
3 4 5 14. No Effect
15. Driver -1 Action
14. Normal Damage
15. Driver KIA / MC
2 6 16. No Effect 16. Normal Damage
17. No Effect 17. Normal Damage
18. No Effect 18. Normal Damage
1 19. No Effect 19. Driver KIA / MC
20. Hull MG gunner -1 Action 20. Hull MG gunner KIA / MC

Front hit location Front hit location

specifications special rules


The 251 was one of the most successful and popular vehi- Hull MG: The 251 generally carried a forward mounted
cles of WWII. However, by D-Day, 1944 its age was show- MG-34 (LMG) with a gun shield. The Hull MG, when
ing and a replacement was in the works, but never saw wide available, is operated by a Crew Exposed passenger. The arc
service. of fire is the front 180. The Hull MG has a 1 shadow
throughout its arc.
Introduced: Summer, 1939 Crew: 2 / 10 passengers
Weight: 9 tons AAMG: Some 251s carried a second MG-34 (LMG) on a
Length: 19 rear pintle mount. The AAMG may fire through the rear
Width: 6 11 180 and has no shadow. The AAMG may only be fired by
Height: 5 9 a Crew Exposed passenger. Squads commonly removed the
Ground Clearance: 1 AAMG and used it as a second squad weapon. If no AAMG
Track Width: 9.25 a squad may mount the squad weapon in its place. It takes
Speed: 33 mph one action to mount or dismount an AAMG.
Range: 124 miles
Trench Crossing: 6 6 Crew: Unless otherwise stated in a scenario, the driver and
Fording Depth: 2 commander must come from the squad using the halftrack.

Halftrack Crew Positions


Commander

10 Passengers
Driver

VEHICLE STATISTICS
Penetration HE
Wt. Size HF TF HS TS HR TR Speed Load TR Type Smoke HMG CMG AAMG Gun AP APCR HEAT HE Size
Sdfk 251/1 Hanomag 9 M 2 2 2 2 2 2 10 - - HT - LMG-5 - LMG-5 - - - - - -

Easy eights Battleground World War II


SDKFZ 251/1

No Penetration side Penetration


1. Immobilized/ MC 1. Immobilized / MC
2. No Effect 2. Immobilized / MC
20 3. Immobilized/ MC 3. Immobilized / MC
4. Immobilized/ MC 4. Immobilized / MC
5. Immobilized/ MC 5. Immobilized / MC
6. Immobilized/ MC 6. Immobilized / MC
16 17 18 19 7. Immobilized/ MC 7. Immobilized / MC
8. No Effect 8. Immobilized / MC
9.Engine Hit Half Speed / Smoke 9. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 10. No Effect
11R. No Effect
10. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
11R. 1 HW / MC
11L. Driver -1 Action 11L. Driver KIA / MC
12. No Effect 12. d3 HW / MC
13. No Effect
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 14. No Effect
13. d3 HW / MC
14. d3 HW / MC
15. No Effect 15. d3 HW / MC
16. Driver -1 Action 16. Driver KIA / MC
17. No Effect 17. 1 HW / MC
18. No Effect 18. 1 HW / MC
19. AAMG gunner -1 action 19. AAMG gunner KIA / MC
20. Hull MG gunner -1 action 20. Hull MG gunner KIA / MC

Side hit location


Side hit location

20 Rear
No Penetration Penetration
17 18 19 1. Automatic Penetration
2. Immobilized / MC
1. Normal Damage
2. Immobilized / MC
3. No Effect 3. Immobilized /MC
4. No Effect 4. Immobilized /MC
5. No Effect 5. Immobilized /MC
6. Immobilized / MC 6. Immobilized / MC
12 13 14 15 16 7. No Effect 7. Immobilized / MC
8. No Effect 8. d3 HW / MC
9. No Effect 9.d3 HW / MC
10. No Effect 10. d3 HW / MC
7 8 9 10 11 11. No Effect 11. Immobilized / MC
12. No Effect 12. Normal Damage
13. No Effect 13. 1 HW / MC
14. No Effect 14. Normal Damage
3 4 5 15. No Effect 15. 1 HW / MC
2 6 16. No Effect
17. No Effect
16. Normal Damage
17. Normal Damage
18. No Effect 18. Normal Damage
1 19. No Effect 19. Normal Damage
20. AAMG gunner KIA / MC 20. AAMG gunner KIA / MC

Rear hit location Rear hit location

R top
No Penetration Penetration
1. Immobilized / MC 1. Immobilized / MC
2. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 2. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
3. Immobilized / MC 3. Immobilized / MC
1 4. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 4. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
6 20 9 10 11 5. Engine Hit Half speed / Smoke 5. Immobilized / MC / Smoke
4 6. No Effect
7. No Effect
6. Normal Damage
7. Normal Damage
8. No Effect 8. Normal Damage
2 7 12 13 14 15 9. No Effect 9. d3 HW /MC
10. No Effect 10. d3 HW /MC
5 11. No Effect 11. d3 HW /MC
12. Hull MG gunner KIA / MC 12. Hull MG gunner KIA / MC
8 16 17 18 19 13. No Effect
3 14. No Effect
13. Immobilized / MC
14. Immobilized / MC
15. AAMG gunner KIA / MC 15. AAMG gunner KIA / MC
16. Driver -1 Action 16. Driver KIA / MC
17. No Effect 17. d3 HW /MC
18. No Effect 18. d3 HW /MC
19. No Effect 19. d3 HW /MC
L 20. No Effect 20. 1 HW /MC

top hit location


Side hit location

Easy eights Battleground World War II


Armored Quick play charts

Die Hero Type Special Abilities


Medal of Honor Never Checks Morale. +1 Morale. Becomes Elite 1 free action
1 Iron Cross immediately. Ignore any penetrations results that are 16 or higher.
Hero of USSR Never forced to button-up.

Never Checks Morale. +1 Morale. Becomes Elite.


2-3 Stud Hero 1 free action immediately. Never forced to button-up.
+1 Morale. Becomes Elite.
4-5 Hero 1 free action immediately. Never forced to button-up.

6-10 Normal Hero +1 Morale. Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately.

11-20 Common Hero Becomes Elite. 1 free action immediately.

Crew Quality Crew Typical Leader Tank Platoon Integrity Check Modifiers
Command Command
Quality Morale Range Morale Range Condition Modifier
Green 10 8 12 -0 10 Tank in Defensive Position -1
Regular 12 10 14 -1 12 Tank Immobilized +1
Veteran 14 12 16 -1 14 Taking fire from side +1
Elite 16 14 17 -2 16
Taking fire from rear +2
Main Gun knocked out +2

Results of Tank Platoon Integrity Check


Die Result
1 Crew rolls on Tank Hero Chart

2-4 No Effect

The tank must seek cover away from the enemy. On next turn
5-9 the tank returns to normal. If tank is immobile then crew will
abandon the tank instead. The crew is not considered broken.
The tank will withdraw from enemy fire, facing the enemy, until it
10-14 is rallied at normal morale. No other actions are allowed. If tank
is immobile then crew will abandon the tank instead.
The tank will retreat from the enemy seeking any available cover.
15-19 The crew is considered broken. If tank is immobile then crew will
abandon the tank instead.
The tank crew immediately abandons the tank with no chance to
20 rally. They will flee of the board.
Armored Quick Play Charts

Crash Chart
Die Effect
The driver tumbles out of the vehicle pulling the wheel to the left. The
1-4 vehicle makes a sharp left turn moving one full action immediately. At the
end of the action the vehicle overturns. E column hit on all passengers
The driver slumps over the wheel pulling it to the left. The vehicle
5-8 makes a left turn moving one full action immediately. The vehicle
comes to a rest at the end of this movement.
The driver slumps forward as he gets hit. The vehicle is kept in a
9-12 straight line moving one full action immediately.

The driver slumps over the wheel pulling it to the right. The vehicle
13-16 makes a right turn moving one full action immediately. The vehicle
comes to a rest at the end of this movement.
The driver tumbles out of the vehicle pulling the wheel to theright. The
17-20 vehicle makes a sharp right turn moving one full action immediately. At
the end of the action the vehicle overturns. E column hit on all

Penetration Effects Chart


Die Effects
The incoming round has scored a direct hit on the ammunition racks. The
vehicle violently explodes sending the turret in a random direction for 1d6
1 Catastrophic inches. All crew are instantly killed and any unprotected personnel next to
(1) the vehicle sustains a roll on the C column on the effects chart.

The incoming round has scored a hit on the ammunition racks. All crew is
2-4 Total Destruction instantly killed and any unprotected personnel next to (1) the vehicle
sustains a Morale Check.

The incoming round has destroyed the tank. All internal systems are
destroyed while a heavy fire is started from the punctured fuel system.
5-10 Fatal Internal Each man failing a 1/2 Morale Check will be KIA, otherwise all crew must
Damage bail out. The bailed out crew is considered Broken and must seek cover
in their next turn if not rallied.

The incoming round has easily penetrated the armor before it and
damaged the interior and crew. Each crew member must take a morale
11-15 Heavy Internal check, failing the Morale Check will indicate a KIA on the member. The
Damage vehicle is out of play for 3 turns while the crew deals with the damage. All
further actions the vehicle takes are at +2 to any die roll.

The incoming round has slammed hard against the armor it just
penetrated, weakened but not yet finished the inside of the vehicle has
taken damage. Shrapnel is sprayed through the interior reeking havoc.
16-18 Internal Damage The vehicle is out of play for 2 turns while the crew deals with the
damage. Furthermore the vehicles radio is knocked out. To all further
actions the vehicle takes a +1 to its die rolls.

The armor of the vehicle absorbed most of the impact from the round.
19-20 Slight Internal The vehicle is out for 1 turn. The unit sustained no further damage.
Damage
ARtillery

Table of Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Off-Board Artillery . . . . . . . . . . . .4
On-Board Artillery . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Artillery Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Artillery Crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Fire Missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Crew Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Spotters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Crew Morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Impacting Artillery . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Mortar and Guns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Special Target Types . . . . . . . . . . .7
Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Gun Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Man Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 American Gun Chart . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Direct Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 German Gun Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Indirect Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Russian Gun Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Corrected Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Blind Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Multiple Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

easy eights Battleground World War II 1


Artillery
introduction Gunners Assistant Some guns, particularly anti-air
artillery, will have a gunners assistant who aids the comman-
Historically, Artillery and Mortars caused approximately der in sighting and will often have a range finder.
67% of all casualties in World War II. Barrages of shells
could break up an attack by disrupting concentrations of
Crew Quality
troops and by devestating attackers caught in open ground. A
Artillery crews have a quality rating just as infantry and vehi-
dug-in defender could fair better against artillery, but bar-
cle crews do. This rating represents the crews experience
rages prevented the moving up of reinforcements.
with the weapon and with combat in general.
Strongpoints can be eliminated by direct fire from large guns.
Green Green gun crews are new to their piece and to each
In Battleground, there are two types of artillery, On-Board
other. Although they can be servicable when using Indirect
and Off-Board. Off-Board Artillery is resolved during the
Fire, they will suffer when using direct fire and when setting
Artillery Phase. On-Board Artillery has a card exactly like
up the piece.
infantry and vehicles.
Regular Regular gun crews have some training and experi-
ence and are proficient with their piece. All gun crews are
ON-Board artillery assumed to be Regular unless specifically stated otherwise in
a scenario.
Veteran Veteran gun crews are strong and experienced team
On- Board Artillery refers to any artillery piece that actually
members who are ready to fight on, even in dire circum-
has a model on the table. Artillery of this type is treated much
stance.
like an anti-tank gun. The piece is placed on the table, includ-
Elite Elite gun crews are masters of their weapon and of
ing any crew, exactly like any other piece. On-Board Artillery
combat. They will receive bonuses when using Direct Fire.
pieces take actions just like any other piece in the game and
have a card in the deck Generally, On-Board Artillery will
take the form of one or two infantry support weapons such as Gun Crew Morale
light mortars or infantry howitzers. Artillery crews use the morale rules for infantry figures. They
are subject to normal Morale Checks and Suppression.
Broken artillery crew members are treated exactly like any
Artillery crews
other Broken infantry, and all Rally rules apply. In addition
Each type of gun or mortar has a crew of between two and
the crew as a whole are subject to Team Morale Checks as
ten. This crew is required for efficient loading, aiming and
described in the Infantry chapter. Gun crewmen can become
firing of the gun. Artillery crews are infantry figures and are
Heroes or Craven Cowards just like infantry figures.
subject to all infantry rules, including Morale Checks. Each
crew member receives two actions each turn when the pieces
card is drawn. All crew must complete their first action Mortars And Guns
before any crew begin a second action. A typical artillery There are two types of On-Board Artillery; mortars and guns.
crew will consist of a Gun Commander, a Gunner, and one Most rules will apply to both types but there are some subtle
or more Loaders. differences and special case rules will apply.
Gun Commander The gun commander is responsible for Mortars (M) A Mortar is a small tube fitted to a bipod that
directing the fire of the weapon either by personally sighting fires a shell on a high trajectory over relatively short range.
targets and directing fire or by contacting a forward observer Mortars are generally a smaller piece of equipment that may
and conveying corrections to the crew. Each gun will have a be moved easily by men or light vehicles. Mortars can only
commander; in addition entire batteries may have an overall use rules for Indirect Fire and may never set Special Fire
commander. Some guns, in particular light mortars with a two modes.
man crew, will not have a commander. A gun with only two Guns (G) A Gun is a field piece on a wheeled carriage that
crew members suffers no penalty for lacking a gun comman- requires a vehicle to move it around. Guns may use Direct
der. Fire or Indirect Fire as they choose. Guns using Direct Fire
Gunner The gunner is responsible for the aiming and firing use all anti-tank gun rules and may set Special Fire modes.
of the gun. The gunner is under the direction of the comman- Guns using Indirect Fire may not set Special Fire modes.
der and in communication with the loaders.
Loaders Each gun will have one, or more likely, two or more Actions
loaders. Loaders are responsible for loading the gun with new An artillery crew is a team that must work closely together to
shells and clearing spent brass. Most guns need more than operate their piece effectively. Each gun is allowed two
one loader to maintain maximum rates of fire. actions per turn just like vehicles and infantry. Artillery move

2 easy eights Battleground World War II


ARtillery
on a card draw as described in the Core Rules. ber of actions, depending on the mortar.
Fire Gun It consumes one action to fire a gun or mortar. Correct Fire An artillery spotter may spend an action cor-
This is performed by the gunner. recting fire for pieces using Indirect Fire.
Aim Gun The gunner may spend extra time lining up a shot Other Actions Anything a player can think of can be an
for extra accuracy. This action may not be the action the gun action for his crew, if the GM allows or both sides agree.
is being loaded. The gunner may not spend an action of Aim Repairing a wheel, firing a pistol or digging out a bogged gun
Gun without the direction of the commander. are all examples. For actions that may be difficult or danger-
Direct Fire A commander may spend an action directing the ous, see the Gut and Skill Check rules of the Infantry section.
fire or aiming of the gun. Any Fire Gun action taken without
the direction of the commander suffers the No Commander Manhandling
penalty. A gun commander may only use his Leadership In order to move a gun either in place or to a new location it
Modifier on a shot if he is Directing Fire in that action. must be manhandled. It takes the full crew of the gun one
Load Gun It takes one action to load the gun. The gunner is action in order to move it 3 or 90 in place. If there is less
laying the gun on target while the loader is loading. Some then the full crew moving the gun it will take twice as long.
guns may fire and load in the same action. Some guns Rough ground will halve the movement rate of a manhandled
require more then one action of loading. See the Gun Chart gun. A gun may not be manhandled across obstacles or up and
for more detail. down building levels.
Manhandle Gun It takes the full crew of the gun one action Limbering and UnLimbering Limbering is the act of
to move it 3 or rotate 90 in place. hooking up or unhooking a gun from its transport. Gun set-up
Limber Gun Limbering takes a number of actions, depend- is included as part of the Limber and Un-Limber time.
ing on the gun. Limbering or Un-Limbering takes a number of actions
Unlimber Gun Un-limbering takes a number of actions, depending on the gun. The Gun Chart specifies the number of
depending on the gun. actions it takes to limber and setup a gun. Breakdown and
Setup Mortar Setting up a mortar takes a number of Limbering take the same number of action.
actions, depending on the mortar. Setup And Breakdown All mortars must spend a number of
Breakdown Mortar Breaking down a mortar takes a num- actions setting up to fire. The number of actions required are
specified on the mortar chart. In addition some mortars must
spend actions to breakdown before they are able to be trans-
ported by their crews.

Direct Fire
Direct Fire mode is only available to guns firing at targets
within Line of Sight. Mortars may never use Direct Fire
mode. Guns using Direct Fire follow exactly the procedures
used by anti-tank guns and all modifiers apply to shooting,
rates of fire, and morale with the following exception.
Acquired Target Most artillery weapons were not equipped
with the same sights as vehicle weapons and anti-tank guns.
Thus artillery weapons may never gain an acquired target
modifier.
Ammo Only in extremely rare cases will an artillery gun be
equipped with any ammo except for HE and Smoke. Special
ammo types, such as anti-concrete or armor piercing rounds,
will rarely be seen. Therefore artillery guns fired against
armor will have to use the HE penetration for their gun. On
those rare ocasions where special rounds are available, there
will only be d6 rounds present.
Note: This is not always true. The entire line of Russian
76.2mm guns were equipped with AP and commonly used in
the anti-tank role. The same is true of the German Flak 18
88.

easy eights Battleground World War II 3


Artillery
Indirect Fire existing marker. Weapons which have a ROF that allows fire
Only mortars and artillery guns are allowed to use Indirect and load in the same action may fire both actions, rolling a
Fire. Any on-board piece using Indirect Fire resolves its fire d10 and d6 as above, with both rounds deviating from the
on its card, just like when using Direct Fire. Indirect Fire may same marker. Weapons with a slower rate will load one
be spotted by a spotter, a crew member, or blind fire. Blind action and fire one action at the existing marker. Weapons
fire will be highly inaccurate. may Fire for Effect at an existing marker until the marker is
Spotting All on-table pieces must have a spotter of some adjusted, the weapon runs out of ammo, or the crew is forced
sort. This spotter may be the gun commander or, in the case off the weapon. Once a marker is placed by a first round or
of weapons with no commander the gunner, or some separate by correction it is never moved by Fire for Effect.
spotter. Separate spotters must be platoon commanders or a
dedicated artillery spotter. Spotters can communicate with the Blind Fire
gun crew either by direct communication or via radio/phone. A mortar or gun may fire a round into a location that they
Direct communication To utilize direct communication the cannot see. When using Blind Fire use all of the rules for first
spotter must be within Line of Sight and Command Range of fire except that the round will deviate from the initial location
the artillery piece. 3d6 inches. Blind Fire may never use the Fire For Effect
Radio/Phone Spotters outside of LOS or Command Range rules.
must be in possesion of, or in base to base contact with, a
field telephone or wireless radio set. The gun commander Multiple Tubes
must also possess a wireless radio set or phone. When there is more then one artillery piece on table working
Correction Fire So long as the spotter is communicating with under the same spotter then those tubes form a make shift bat-
the artillery crew the spotter can correct fire, see below. If the tery. This has no effect on Direct Fire. When using Indirect
spotter loses communication, or there is no spotter present, Fire the battery will fire all together. Roll for deviation only
then the artillery piece may only use blind fire, see below. once, all tubes will work off the same result. The templates
The spotter may never correct while Broken or while spend- will then be laid out in a Loose Line pattern as described in
ing actions on any other activity. A light wounded spotter may Off-Board Artillery.
correct so long as he is not Broken or otherwise occupied.

Corrected Fire off-Board artillery


When using corrected fire with a spotter versus a new target
follow the procedure below.
First shot new target On the first shot at a new location Off-Board Artillery is any artillery weapon that does not have
place a target marker on the target point. This point must be a piece on the game table. Because of the long range of many
in Line of Sight of the spotter, and outside the minimum artillery weapons in World War II it was common for units to
range of the weapon. Roll a d8 and 2d6; the first round will receive fire support from distant batteries. This fire support
land at this location. Resolve damage as normal for any was dependent on a number of factors including: continued
pieces under the template. When firing at a new target it takes communication between the front line and the battery, higher
one action to aim the weapon and one action to fire. Leave a commands prioritizing fire, and the batteries ability to con-
marker at the location of the actual point of impact. tinue operation. Thus the battery of guns or mortars are not
Corrected Fire from first round If this initial round has always available for fire missions on a particular section of
landed within LOS of the spotter then the spotter may correct the battlefield. Players must remember that there is generally
the round. The first action for both the spotter and the crew is an entire battle happening at the same time that their small
to correct, and possibly load. The weapon crew will fire, or action is taking place. Communications between the front line
load and fire, in the second action. The spotter can correct the troops and the batteries located in the rear areas experienced
impact point up to 15 and only within his LOS and outside breakdowns and cut lines. It is important to note that not all
the weapons minimum range. Corrected fire will roll a d10 communication devices worked properly in the middle of
and a d6. Any roll or 9 or 10 on the d10 will indicate a direct combat. The spotter always requests artillery during the
hit and the d6 will be ignored. If a 1-8 is rolled move the Artillery Phase of the game, not when their card is drawn.
round in that direction the number of inches indicated on the The spotter is considered calling in fire during the entire turn
d6. Leave a marker at the actual point of impact. and is not allowed to perform any other actions, even when
Fire for Effect If there is a marker present, either from an their card is pulled.
initial shot or an adjusted shot the weapon crew may Fire for
Effect. In Fire for Effect the weapon crew will fire at the

4 easy eights Battleground World War II


ARtillery
Board support. This roll is only for a call being made that turn
and any spotter may call for a new Fire Mission each turn.

Spotters
All Off-Board artillery pieces must have a spotter. The spot-
ter must be declared at the start of the game. The figure des-
ignated as the spotter is the only one allowed to communicate
with the Off-Board Artillery. This communication is always
by radio or telephone. The rolls for Contact and Availability
are rolled for during the Artillery Phase but occupy the spot-
ter and the radio carrier for the entire turn. The requested
artillery will land in the following Artillery Phase. If at any
time during the turn the spotter is KIA, HW or Broken then
the spotter is unable to complete his call and any Fire
Missions requested by him for next turn will be cancelled.
Radios and Phones At any time that electronic communica-
tions is used the player must roll a Contact check. This check
represents the ability of that technology to deliver the mes-
sage back to the battery. When a radio is used the Contact
number is usually lower than with field phones. Whenever a
spotter wishes to request a Fire Mission that spotter must first
make a successful Contact roll.
Artillery Phase New Fire Mission When a spotter is calling artillery onto a
The Artillery Phase is used to resolve all requests for Off- point that is not within 8 inches of a current Fire Mission it is
Table Artillery for the next turn. Off-Board Artillery for the considered a New Fire Mission and will follow this proce-
present turn lands during the Artillery Phase and remains in dure. Artillery may not be called within 18 of friendly units.
play for the entire turn. 1. The spotter rolls the Contact die roll. If the roll is less than
or equal to the Contact number then the player now rolls for
Fire Missions Availability.
Artillery that is called from Off-Board are always referred to
as a Fire Mission. At the start of any scenario the player will 2. The spotter rolls for Availability. If the number rolled is
know the number of Fire Missions allotted to him. In addition less then or equal to the Availability number then proceed to
to the number of Fire Missions the scenario will indicate the plan the Fire Mission for the next turn.
number of tubes and size providing these missions.
For example: A scenario could call for 3 Fire Missions of 3 3. The player now decides the impact point and Pattern,
tubes of 81mm Mortars 16 Contact 15 Availability. The sce- Spread and Direction of the artillery Fire Mission. Record
nario could allocate zero Fire Missions with the number and this information and hold it until the Artillery Phase of the
size of tubes in support. This would indicate that artillery is next turn.
not generally available to the player but there is a chance that
during the engagement it could be reallocated to the players 4. The controlling player places a red marker in the location
sector. All Fire Missions are subject to availability and the where last turns artillery barrage was called for.
spotters ability to communicate to the battery.
Fire Mission Duration A Fire Mission will land in the 5.The impacting artillery will roll a d8 for the deviation direc-
Artillery Phase and remain in effect for the entire turn. tion and a 2d6 for the distance of the deviation. Move the red
Availability It is possible for the battery that has been marker to the actual landing point. Lay down effects tem-
assigned to you to be redirected to a more intense sector of plates based on the pattern selected. Roll for effect immediat-
the battle therefore you must be granted permission for each ly on any pieces within this area of effect. Leave the markers
Fire Mission requested. To represent this the game uses an to indicate the effected area for the entire turn.
Availability Number. The Availability Number is a number Correcting Fire During the Artillery Phase spotters may
between 1 and 20. This number indicates the chance that adjust an existing barrage rather then calling a new one. This
when a Fire Mission is called that it will be granted. This is called Correcting Fire. In order to correct fire on a barrage
number or less must be rolled in order to receive any Off- the spotter must have the barrage within Line of Sight. The

easy eights Battleground World War II 5


Artilery
2. The spotter rolls for Availability. If the number rolled is
less then or equal to the Availability number then proceed to
plan walking Fire Mission for the next turn.

3. The player must use the same pattern, spread and direction
of the previous artillery Fire Mission.

4. The spotter may move the impact point up to 4 inches in


the direction of the artillery Direction that was set in the orig-
inal Fire Mission.

5. The artillery will now impact in the following Artillery


Phase as long as the spotter is still alive and able to Direct
Fire. There is no deviation for this type of fire.
Fire For Effect When the spotter would like to continue the
artillery in the exact location that it is already being impacted
then the spotter declares Fire For Effect. Fire for Effect never
deviates but does require a Contact and Availability check.
Fire For Effect must be proceeded in the previous Artillery
Phase by some kind of Fire Mission. The mission can be any
of mission types available: New Fire Mission, Correcting
Fire, Walking Fire or Fire For Effect. The following proce-
dure applies to Fire For Effect:
1. The spotter rolls the Contact die roll. If the number rolled
is equal or less then the Contact number roll for Availability.

following sequence applies to any Fire Missions that are 2. The spotter rolls for Availability. If the number rolled is
being corrected. Artillery may not be called within 18 of less than or equal to the Availability number then plan Fire for
friendly units. Effect for next turn.

1. The spotter rolls the Contact die roll. If the roll is equal or 3. The player must use the same pattern, spread and direction
less than the contract number then the player now rolls for of the previous artillery Fire Mission.
Availability.
4. The artillery will now impact in the following Artillery
2. The spotter rolls for Availability. If the number rolled is Phase as long as the spotter is still alive and able to direct the
less then or equal to the Availability number then proceed to fire. The impacting artillery will use the marker from the
plan the corrected Fire Mission for the next turn. artillery Fire Mission that landed in the previous phase.

3. The player must use the same pattern, spread and direction Impacting Artillery
of the previous artillery Fire Mission. Artillery falls during the Artillery phase one turn after it is
called for, assuming the rolls where made correctly. The
4. The artillery will now impact in the following Artillery effects of Off-Board Artillery stay for the turn, just as Pinning
Phase as long as the spotter is still alive and able to Direct Fire for MGs. When artillery impacts during an Artillery
Fire. The impacting artillery will roll a d10 for deviation Phase markers are laid out according to what pattern, direc-
direction and a d6 for distance. tion and spread was selected by the spotter.
Walking Fire When the player wishes to move the artillery Pattern Each gun that is in a battery will have a marker on
impact zone up to 4 inches in a set direction this is Walking the table. The marker that was used to define the location of
Fire. The following sequence is used to Walking Fire. the impact point is used as the center for the patterns.
Artillery may not be walked within 8of friendly units Individual markers never deviate, they will always land in the
1. The spotter rolls the Contact die roll. If the number rolled pattern called.
is equal or less then the Contact number roll for Availability. Loose Point Each gun in the battery will have a marker that

6 easy eights Battleground World War II


ARtilery
is arranged around the spotter marker 4 inches away. so that if it is walked the direction is determined. The direc-
Tight Point Each gun in the battery will have a marker that is tion is simply stated beforehand using the standard deviation
arranged around the spotter marker 2 inches away. template directions of 1 through 8.
Loose Line Each gun in the battery will have a marker that is Changing Patterns or Directions Artillery Batteries will
arranged in a line. The spotter marker is used as the center of take 1 turn to change any characteristics. After Changing
the line as much as possible. Each marker is 4 inches away Pattern or Direction a new Fire Mission must be used to call
from each other in the line. in the new fire even if it is going to hit the same point.
Tight Line Each gun in the battery will have a marker that is The Beaten Zone Each marker that is placed on the table for
arranged in a line. The spotter marker is used as the center of a pattern is the center of a template. The Beaten Zone is the
the line as much as possible. Each marker is 2 inches away area under the template that corrosponds to the size of the
from each other in the line. round.
Direction The direction of the artillery pattern must be stated Beaten Zone Effects Once an artillery Beaten Zone is placed,
all models within 2 or within the Beaten Zone immediately
drop prone/button up before any actions are taken or fire is
Off-Table Artillery Patterns resolved. Green troops are not allowed to drop prone until
after their card has been drawn and fire is resolved. Each fig-
ure or model that is caught within the Beaten Zone during the
Artillery Phase will receive an attack as if they where just hit
Loose Point by On-Board Artillery. Each figure or model that spends any
action with in the Beaten Zone will receive an attack as if
they where just hit by On-Board Artillery. Resolve fire effects
6 inches
for any pieces in the Beaten Zone. Any piece still in the
Beaten Zone on second action is attacked again. The effects
of the Beaten Zone last all turn.

special target types

When a target is hit by Indirect artillery fire either On-Board


Tight Point or Off-Board it may not necessarily be hit directly. The fol-
lowing is a list and explanation of types of targets that are
harder to hit and effect then normal.
3 inches
Foxhole / Trench Artillery which lands on top of a foxhole
or trench does not automatically land inside the hole. After
hitting the top of the foxhole or trench roll a d6, on a result of
a 1 then the artillery round lands inside the foxhole or trench
and will KIA anyone inside automatically. If the shell did not
go in the foxhole then figures that are in the foxhole are
effected as normal. Any figure that is prone inside the fox-
hole will be immune to damage unless the shell lands in the
Loose Line hole. When a foxhole or trench is under an artillery pattern
then there is the same chance that it will receive a direct hit.
6 inches
This roll is made during the Artillery Phase and when the fig-
ures occupying the foxhole or trench take actions.
Armored Vehicle AFVs that are targeted are not necessarily
hit unless a supplementary die roll of a d6 results in a 1 or 2.
If a direct hit is scored then roll for a location on the top chart
of the vehicle in question. Then look up the HE penetration
Tight Line value of the type of round. Roll to penetrate as normal versus
the top armor of the vehicle. Apply breakthrough effects if
2 inches the shell penetrates. Direct hits will cause Non-Penetration
effects.

easy eights Battleground World War II 7


Artilery
Open Topped Armored Vehicle Open top vehicles are effected Crew The number of crew necessary for effecient operation.
exactly like other AFV. In addition rounds may land directly Having one crew member LtW or even prone means you do
in the open crew area. If the hit location indicates that the not have a full crew.
open area of the vehicle was hit then the round landed inside Set-Up The number of actions it takes to un-limber and set up
of the vehicle. Any figures or crew that are inside the vehicle or to break down and limber.
at the time will be KIA and the vehicle rolls on the Range
Penetration Effects Chart at a -3. Min The minimum range applies only to indirect fire
Trucks and Jeeps Trucks and Jeeps must be directly hit, just Max Maximum range applies only to indirect fire, a
as for armored vehicles, to destroy them. Figures and crew of weapon must have a max range of UN to be used as Off-
the vehicles can be effected if they fall under the ring of a Board artillery.
round that landed close by. Roll for each figure as normal. Penetration Indicates the Penetration number for each type
Equipment Any piece of equipment like a machine gun or of main gun round.
an anti-tank gun that is under an effect template must make a AP The standard round for anti-tank work
roll as if it was a figure. If a KIA or HW is the result then the APCR/HVAP Rare, high powered, AP round
equipment is considered destroyed. Use this method to deter- HEAT Shaped charge, not effected by range
mine if any particular item takes damage from attack. HE The Penetration for a direct hit with an HE round.
Artillery in the Forest Artillery was especially brutal on HE Size The size of template to use for that HE round in
infantry caught in the woods. Far from offering protection the the anti-personnel role.
canopy of trees detonate the rounds in the air, greatly increas-
ing the amount of shrapnel. Any artillery shells landing in any
sort of forest: light woods, heavy woods, or orchards, will
have increased effect.
Increase area of effect Artillery landing in forest will be one
ring larger then indicated on the chart. Thus guns that nor-
mally extend to the D ring will now go out to the E ring.
Reduced cover Infantry receive no cover for being prone
when under artillery attack in the forest. In addition any other
cover is halved. Thus foxholes, halftracks, trenches and the
like only offer +3, not +5. Figures which are prone in fox-
holes may still be attacked. Infantry in covered foxholes or
crews buttoned up in closed top armored vehicles will be
immune to attack.
No direct Hits Artillery landing in a forest will never receive
a direct hit against any type of vehicle or entrenchment. The
shells are detonated by the trees and will not land on the
ground.

the gun chart


The gun chart is a representative listing of the artillery used
by Americans, Germans, Russians. Additional guns will be
featured on our web site.

Type
M Indicates mortar, mortars may never use direct fire
G Indicates gun, guns may use direct and indirect fire
ATG indicates anti-tank gun, ATG may never use indirect
fire
Gun Indicates size and length of the gun, length is irrelevent
to mortars.
Load The number of actions it takes to load and lay the gun,
before modification for crew quality.

8 easy eights Battleground World War II


AMERICAN GUN STATISTICS
Range Penetration HE
Name Type Gun Load Crew Set-Up Min Max AP HVAP HEAT HE Size Notes:
M2 60mm Mortar M 60 1/2 2 1 23 UN - - - 11 Sm Smoke

M1 81mm Mortar M 81 1/2 3 1 30 UN - - - 14 Med Smoke


M3A1 37mm Anti-Tank Gun ATG 37XL 1/2 3 2 - - 19 - - 6 Sm No Smoke.
M1 57mm Anti-Tank Gun ATG 57L 1/2 4 2 - - 26 32 - 11 Sm No Smoke. HVAP availability is a 12, d6 rounds if available.
M5 3-in. Anti-Tank Gun ATG 76L 1/2 4 2 - - 30 35 23 12 Sm HVAP availability is a 12, d6 rounds if available. Smoke

M2A1 105mm Howitzer G 105 1 8 4 45 UN 25 - 26 18 Lrg AP/ HEAT availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available. Smoke
M1A1 155mm Gun G 155L 2 8 250 45 UN 49 - - 28 Lrg AP availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available. Smoke
M1 8in. Howitzer G 203 2 10 250 60 UN - - - 35 Lrg Smoke

M1A2 37mm AA Gun AC 37L - 5 2 - - 16 - - - - When used vs infantry roll To Hit as a HMG, Effect as a LCMG -7
M1 40mm AA Gun AC 40L - 5 2 - - 18 - - - - When used vs infantry roll To Hit as a HMG, Effect as a LCMG -7

M2 90mm AA Gun G 90L 1 5 4 - - 37 47 - 14 Med HVAP availability is a 12, d6 rounds if available.

GERMAN GUN STATISTICS Range Penetration HE


Name Type Gun Load Crew Set-Up Min Max AP APCR HEAT HE Size Notes:
5cm leGrW 36 M 50 1/2 2 0 22 120 - - - 10 Sm The crew may operate mortar from prone posistion. Smoke
8cm GrW 34 M 81 1/2 3 1 30 UN - - - 14 Med Smoke

10cm NbW 35 M 105 1 5 2 45 UN - - - 17 Lrg This mortar was uncommon.


12cm GrW 42 M 120 1 7 2 45 UN - - - 21 Lrg This mortar was a copy of a Soviet model.

3.7cm PaK 35/36 ATG 37L 1/2 3 2 - - 16 18 - 6 Sm APCR availability is a 8, d6 rounds if available.
5cm PaK 38 ATG 50L 1/2 4 2 - - 23 30 - 10 Sm APCR availability is a 8, d6 rounds if available. Smoke

7.5cm PaK 40 ATG 75L 1/2 4 2 - - 30 35 23 13 Med APCR availability is a 10, d6 rounds if available. Smoke
8.8cm PaK 43/41 ATG 88XL 1 5 3 - - 47 - - 14 Lrg Smoke

7.5cm leIG 18 G 75S 1/2 4 1 45 UN - - - 13 Med Smoke

15cm sIG 33 G 150S 1 6 2 45 UN - - - 28 Lrg Smoke


10.5cm leFH 18 G 105 2 8 3 45 UN - - - 21 Lrg Smoke
s 10cm K 18 G 105L 2 8 3 45 UN 36 - - 21 Lrg AP is for anti-concrete rounds, availability 3, d6 rounds. Smoke

15cm sFH 18 G 150 2 8 4 60 UN - - - 28 Lrg Smoke

15cm K 18 G 150L 2 8 4 60 UN 45 - - 28 Lrg AP is for anti-concrete rounds, availability 3, d6 rounds. Smoke

2cm Flak 30 AC 20L AC - 4 2 - - 11 - - - - When used vs infantry roll To Hit as a HMG, Effect as a LCMG -2

easy eights Battleground World War II


2cm FlaKvierling 38 AC 20L AC - 7 2 - - 11 - - - - Four gun mounting of the 2cm FlaK gun. 8 dice To Hit per action.
3.7cm FlaK 37 AC 37L AC - 5 2 - - 16 - - - - When used vs infantry roll To Hit as a HMG, Effect as a LCMG -7

9
ARtilery

8.8cm FlaK 18 G 88L 1 5 4 45 UN 35 40 - 14 Med APCR availability is a 10, d6 rounds if available. Smoke
10
RUSIAN GUN STATISTICS
Range Penetration HE
Name Type Gun Load Crew Set-Up Min Max AP APCR HEAT HE Size Notes:
50mm RM obr. 40 M 50 1/2 2 1 22 120 - - - 10 Sm Smoke

82mm BM obr. 37 M 82 1/2 3 1 30 UN - - - 14 Med Smoke


120mm PM obr. 38 M 120 1 7 2 45 UN - - - 21 Lrg Smoke
45mm PTP obr. 32 ATG 45L 1/2 4 2 - - 20 21 - 7 Sm APCR availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available.
Artilery

45mm PTP obr. 42 ATG 45XL 1/2 4 2 - - 20 23 - 7 Sm APCR availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available.
57mm PTP obr. 43 ATG 57XL 1/2 4 2 - - 26 31 - 10 Sm APCR availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available.
100mm PTP obr. 44 ATG 100L 1 5 2 - - 47 - - 17 Lrg -
76.2mm PP obr. 27 G 76S 1/2 4 1 45 UN - - - 12 Med Smoke

76.2mm P obr. 02/30 G 76 1/2 4 1 45 UN 21 - 23 12 Med APCR availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available. Smoke
76.2mm P obr. 39 G 76L 1/2 4 2 45 UN 23 25 23 12 Med APCR availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available. Smoke

76.2mm P obr. 36 G 76XL 1/2 4 2 45 UN 28 - 23 12 Med Smoke


85mm P obr. 44 G 85L 1/2 4 2 45 UN 30 33 - 14 Med APCR availability is a 5, d6 rounds if available. Smoke
122mm G obr. 38 G 122 2 8 4 60 UN - - 30 21 Lrg Smoke HEAT availability 15.

122mm G obr. 31 G 122L 2 8 3 60 UN 44 - 30 21 Lrg Smoke AP available. HEAT availability 15.


152mm G obr. 38 G 152S 2 8 3 60 UN 30 - 37 28 Lrg Smoke AP available. HEAT availability 15.

152mm G obr. 37 G 152 2 8 4 60 UN 37 - 37 28 Lrg Smoke AP available. HEAT availability 15.


37mm ZP obr. 39 AC 37L - 5 2 - - 16 - - - - When used vs infantry roll To Hit as a HMG, Effect as a LCMG -7.

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terrain
introduction
Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ground
2

Open Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Rough Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Poor Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Hills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Hill example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Woods
Light woods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Heavy woods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Orchards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Natural Obstacles
Brush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Hedge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Bocage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Bocage example . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Gully . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Emplacements
Shell holes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Wall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Foxhole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Trenches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Sandbags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Pillboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Roadblocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Graveyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Partial Tank Cover . . . . . . . . . 10
Water
Stream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Small River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Large Rive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Deep Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Marsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Buildings
Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Rubble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Smoke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Reducing Buildings
Reducing Buildings . . . . . . . . 13

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terrain

introduction
We use a variety of terrain in Battleground World War II, from the ruins of
Stalingrad to the sunken roads of Normandy. Each type of terrain will have an
effect on movement, on sighting, and on cover. This section includes a brief
description of all basic terrain types and their effects on game play.

Ground

Open Ground
Open Ground can be any area of table without other terrain. It provides no
cover, has no effect on movement, and no effect on sighting. Pieces in open
ground are Open. Figures in open ground can still go prone for the +2 bonus
and count any man-made terrain, such as foxholes, as that terrain type if in the
foxhole.
Modeling A ground cloth such as an old army blanket or similar material can
cover the whole table as a base. This default terrain can be open ground.

ROUGH GROUND
Rough Ground can also be any area of the table, from a fallow field to the
entire table.
Sighting No effect, models in rough ground are Open.
Movement See chart. Rough ground will slow wheeled vehicles.
Cover Rough Ground provides no additional cover, but figures may still go
prone and use foxholes, etc.
Modeling Rough ground can be represented by patches of brown, gray, or
green felt. Rough ground can also be the default terrain of the ground cloth.

ROAD
Roads on the table are considered to be in reasonably good condition with a
minimum of shell holes, etc. They can be of any length or width, but 4 wide
and several feet long are good averages.
Sighting Models on road are Open.
Movement Vehicles that start and end an action on road can move at double

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terrain
or triple normal speed, see Terrain chart. Infantry that start and end an action
on Road can move an extra 1 for a total of 5 per action.
Cover Infantry on Road are very exposed. They receive a -1 cover modifier.
This modifier applies even while prone, so infantry prone in the road are only
+1. This modifier does not apply to infantry riding in/on hard or soft vehicles,
only to infantry on foot.
Modeling Roads can be represented with 4 wide strips of gray felt.

Poor Road
Poor road is an unpaved road such as a dirt path or corderoy road. This type
of road is common on the Eastern Front and rural regions in the west. Poor
roads will generally run through forest or large areas of rough ground.
Sighting Poor road is identical to standard road.
Movement Poor road provides no movement bonus. Figures and models
move on poor road just as across open ground.
Cover Poor road is identical to standard road.
Modeling Poor roads can be represented by 3 wide strips of brown or tan felt.

FIELDS
Fields are areas of cultivated land. In the game they can be of any size, 8" x
12" works well. Fields can be fallow or planted.
Sighting Fallow fields have no effect on sighting. Fields of tall crops such as
wheat or sunflowers count infantry and vehicles as Concealed.
Movement Any type of field is Rough Ground.
Cover No type of field will offer any cover. Infantry may go prone normally.
Modelling Rectangles of colored felt work well, brown for fallow fields,
gold for fields of tall crops such as grain. Fields can be bought from hobby
stores or various fake furs can be used for 3-D fields.

hills
Hills are natural rises in the terrain. Hills can either be gentle or steep and can
be of any height. Hills can be covered by another terrain type, such as light
woods or rough ground. In this case the rules for both types of terrain apply.
Sighting Models and figures on hills are considered open unless the hill is
covered by another type of terrain. Hills block Line of Sight to any pieces
looking across one. Hills also cause shadows in Line of Sight to models on the
hill.
Movement Gentle hills have no effect on movement. Steep hills reduce all
infantry and vehicles to 1/2 rate. If the hill is covered with another type of ter-
rain, all of that terrain types movement modifiers apply as well.
Cover Hills provide no additional cover. Figures may go prone as normal. Any
cover for other terrain types apply as normal. Vehicles can use hills to gain
hull down positions, see Vehicle Hit Locations.
Modeling Hills can be modeled with store bought hills. They can also be cut
from foam and painted and/or flocked. Books, cereal bowls, and anything else
can be stacked and covered with a drop cloth to make inexpensive hills.

easy eights Battleground World War II 3


terrain
Crest line of Hill Hills and Line of Sight

8" to edge of hill The tank in this example has pulled to within
1 of the crest line of the lower level of the hill
(level 1). Therefore this tank is hull down to
any enemy firing at it over the crest. Having
the crest between the firing tank and enemy tar-
gets creates a shadow that the tank cannot fire
8" of "Shadow" into. To determine the size of this shadow
Tank Hulldown from opposite of
hill crest line. Tank has no line of sight of this area. measure the distance from the crest to the edge
of the hill. In this case 8. Then measure from
the base of the hill out away from the tank 8.
The area from the base of the hill to 8 out is
the shadow. The tank has no Line of Sight to
this area and cannot engage any targets within
the shadow. To engage targets in the shadow
the tank must pull forward over the crest, thus
losing the hull down position. The level 2 hill
to the tanks right blocks all line of sight to or
from the tank. It cannot engage or be engaged
over the level 2 hill.
Level 2 hill blocks line of sight
from this direction.

woods

LIGHT WOODS
Light woods are areas of forest on the tabletop. They vary in size from small
6 copses to the entire table. They can be of any size or type of tree, light
refers to the spacing of the trees and density of undergrowth.
Sighting No one can draw a Line of Sight through more then 6 of light
woods. Any model in light woods is Concealed.
Movement See Chart. Vehicles are slowed as they maneuver around trees.
Cover Infantry in light woods receive a +3 modifier on the Effects Chart. This
modifier assumes the infantry are using trees as cover and can be added with
a prone bonus but with no other kind of cover modifier. It is not possible to
hide behind a tree while in a foxhole.
Vehicle Cover: Any vehicle in light woods is +3 to be hit. This is an excep-
tion to the normal way terrain covers vehicles because individual trees are not
generally represented on the table. See Vehicle Hit Locations.
Modeling Light woods can easily be represented by a patch of green felt with
a few trees spread around. The felt patch will more clearly show the bound-
aries of the wood. Trees can be store bought or home made from sponge or
foam which is painted and/ or flocked.

HEAVY WOODS
Heavy woods are areas of dense forest with thick undergrowth. They can be
of any size on the table, just as light woods. Heavy woods can be of any type
of tree, the heavy refers to the spacing of trees and the density of undergrowth.
Sighting No one can trace a line of sight through more then 4 of heavy
woods. Any model or figure in heavy woods is Concealed.
Movement See Terrain Chart. Vehicles are not able to push between trees and

4 easy eights Battleground World War II


terrain
through the thick undergrowth. Infantry are slowed as they hack through the
undergrowth.
Cover Heavy woods provide +4 cover to infantry. Just as with light woods,
this bonus may be added with prone but with no other bonus.
Modeling Heavy woods are modeled exactly as light woods, possibly with a
different color of felt to differentiate.

ORCHARDS
Orchards are areas of man-made forest. Because they are spaced more wide-
ly, orchards have less effect on movement then light woods, but in all other
respects are identical.

natural obstacals

BRUSH
Brush is an area of bushes, flowers, or scrub anywhere on the table. Brush can
be man-made or natural and can be of any size. If it covers a large area, there
should be a large number of small bushes, not one large bush.
Sighting Brush offers no sighting cover to vehicles. Infantry that are in base
contact with brush are considered concealed. Brush does not block Line of
Sight except to prone infantry.
Movement Brush has no effect on movement. Wheeled vehicles and infantry
can easily go around, and tracks easily go over.
Cover Brush provides +1 cover, which may be added to prone, but no other
cover.
Modeling Brush can be easily made from railroad lichen or by pieces of
sponge or foam dipped in flocking.

HEDGE
Hedges are areas of linear brush set by man. They generally outline a field or
garden. Areas of thick natural brush can use the rules for hedge.
Sighting Hedge is generally tall enough to block Line of Sight. Infantry in
base contact with hedge are considered concealed. Vehicles against hedge,
with the hedge between them and the viewer, are considered Concealed.
Movement It takes infantry and wheeled or halftracked vehicles one action to
cross a hedge. Full tracked vehicles cross hedge at no penalty.
Cover Hedge provides +2 cover to infantry. This bonus may be added with
prone but with no other bonus.
Modeling Hedge can be modeled just like brush, just set out in lines. Lines
of pre-made hedge can also be bought in hobby stores.

yyy
,,,
bocage
Bocage is a type of sunken road common to the Normandy region of France.

,,,
yyy
It consists of a section of Road that lies below the ground level with an earth-
en embankment on each side. This embankment is surmounted with a hedge
and individual trees that rise above the ground level. Bocage compartmental-
izes the battlefield, hiding enemy forces and making coordinated action diffi-
cult.
Sighting Bocage blocks Line of Sight. Models and figures in one side may Bocage

easy eights Battleground World War II 5


terrain
look down into the road, but may not see across the other side. Figures in or
against one side are Concealed. Models and figures in the road are Open.
Movement Models and figures in the road treat the road as any other road.
Figures require one action to cross one side of bocage. Fully tracked vehicles
require one action to cross one side of bocage and face a Bog Check of 18.
Halftracked and wheeled vehicles may not cross bocage except at breaks.
Cover Models and figures in the road follow standard road rules. Figures in
the bocage being fired at from the other side recieve +3 cover. This may be
added with prone but with no other cover.
Breaks Over time, farmers cut breaks into the bocage to allow farm impli-
ments to pass from one field to the next. Any figure or model may use a break
at the rough ground rate.
Modeling Bocage is most easily modeled with roads lined with hedge. Breaks
can be marked with colored felt or simply represented by holes in the hedge. Bocage Line of Sight example
In this example, solid lines show open line of
sight, dashed lines show blocked line of sight.
1.

Tank 1 has pulled up to the bocage and can


see through into the road. Because there is a
break across from Tank 1 it can see part way
into the the opposite field. But where the
2.

break ends Tank 1 loses Line of Sight at the


opposite bocage.
Tank 2 is in the road. Tank 2 has Line of
Sight down the road and to the bocage on
either side. Tank 2 cannot see into any of the
3.

fields. Tank 2 will see Tank 1 because Tank 1


has pulled up against the bocage. But Tank 2
will not see Tank 1 until it fires or Tank 2 is
directly beside it.
Tank 3 is in the field. Tank 3 cannot see into
the road and can only see tanks directly
against the opposite hedges.

GULLY
Gullies are linear obstacles, old ditches or dry streams, that can sometimes
serve as emergency trenches in the game. A gully on the table should be about
an inch wide and several feet long.
Sighting Infantry or vehicles in a gully are Concealed.
Movement The modifiers on the chart are for crossing the gully. Infantry and
any vehicles that fit in the gully may move up and down the line at the rough
ground rate.
Cover Infantry in a gully receive +3 cover. Infantry prone in a gully are out
of sight to enemy outside the gully just as being prone in a foxhole.
Modeling Gullies can be easily represented by 2" wide strips of brown or tan
felt.

emplacements

SHELLHOLES
Shellholes are large craters left by aerial bombing and Off-Board Artillery.
Generally tank guns, mortars, and other On-Table guns will not leave usable

6 easy eights Battleground World War II


terrain
craters. Shellholes can be between 1" and 4" diameter, with the 1" type the
most common.
Sighting Infantry in a shellhole are Concealed. Vehicles will be considered
Open unless they find the crater of a 2 ton bomb to hide in.
Movement Shellholes are considered Rough Ground.
Cover Infantry in a shellhole receive a +3 cover. Infantry who go prone in a
shellhole may not fire out and can only be hit by fire directly into the hole,
either from shells or grenades falling in, or infantry fire from within 2"
Modeling Shellholes are relatively inexpensive at hobby shops. They can be
custom made with Modeling clay. Modelling clay is especially useful for larg-
er size holes.

WALL
Walls are linear stone structures used to define the boundaries of a field, yard,
or garden. Walls can be of any length but will generally surround an approxi-
mately 6"x6" area or one side or corner of a larger area.
Sighting Infantry against a wall are Concealed. Small vehicles will be
Concealed if against the far side of a wall. Most walls are not high enough to
block Line of Sight. Some walls will block Line of Sight and should be des-
ignated as such at the start of the game.
Movement Infantry take one action to cross a wall. Tracked vehicles of size
small or less and halftracks may push through a wall in one action. Tracked
vehicles of medium size or larger may push through a wall at 1/2 movement
rate. Wheeled vehicles may not push through walls. When vehicles push
through a wall they leave a gap of rough ground as wide as the vehicle.
Cover Infantry behind a wall gain +5 cover. Infantry prone behind a wall may
not shoot or be shot from across the wall. Infantry may not shoot over a wall
tall enough to block Line of Sight.
Modeling Walls can be modeled with walls from hobby shops. Walls can be
scratch built from strips of card or balsa wood textured with sand in their
paint.

FOXHOLE
Foxholes are man-made holes that infantry use for cover on the battlefield.
Foxholes are generally 1" diameter circles or 1"x2"-3" ovals. Large mortar pits
and dug in positions for AT guns also act as foxholes.
Sighting Foxholes are Concealed if dug in concealing terrain or if the digging
infantry had time to camouflage the hole, as determined by scenario.
Otherwise foxholes count as Open. Note that foxholes will be sighted even if
empty. Anyone who sights a foxhole is allowed an immediate Sighting Check
to determine if the hole is empty or occupied. Infantry in a foxhole are
Concealed or Open depending on their hole.
Movement Anyone crossing a foxhole counts it as rough ground. It is free
movement to enter or exit a foxhole.
Cover Infantry in a foxhole gain +5 cover. Infantry who go prone in a foxhole
may not fire out and can only be hit by fire directly into the hole, either from
shells or grenades falling in, or infantry fire from within 2"
Crushing a Foxhole Any fully tracked vehicle may crush a foxhole by spend-
ing two actions of 180 turn. See vehicle Crushing Things rules. Any infantry
in a foxhole so crushed are KIA.
Covered Foxholes If infantry have had time, as determined by scenario, a roof

easy eights Battleground World War II 7


terrain
of logs and dirt can be fashioned over a foxhole. Covered foxholes allow the
occupying infantry to ignore the forest penalty for artillery fire, see Artillery.
In addition, grenades can only be thrown in from within 2" range, and then
with the window penalty to hit. Any covered foxhole that receives a direct hit
from a mortar or artillery shell offers +5 cover to the occupying infantry, but
all other effects apply as normal. In all other respects, covered foxholes are
identical to uncovered holes. Covered foxholes will be relatively rare in
games.
Modelling Foxholes can be scatch built from clay. To differentiate between
shellholes and foxholes, include a few clay sandbags around the rim of the
hole. Covered foxholes are available in hobby shops.

TRENCHES
Trenches are foxholes longer then 3". Trenches are crossed exactly like gul-
lies. When a trench is crushed, only the area equal to the length of the crush-
ing vehicle is destroyed. Otherwise they are identical to foxholes.
Modeling Trenches can be cheaply represented by 2" wide strips of brown
felt. More satisfying trench systems will require a lot of time and money, refer
to a dedicated book on terrain making.

SANDBAGS
Sandbags are stacked up to create cover in areas where it is impractical or
impossible to dig. They are identical to foxholes in all respects except they are
automatically crushed when any vehicle of size small or larger moves over
them. This is free movement for the vehicles and infantry may avoid just as if
rammed in the open. See vehicle movement rules.
Modelling It is relatively hard to model sandbag emplacements. A selection
of sandbag emplacements are available in hobby stores. To model individual
sandbags, squish a small ball of clay into shape between your fingers.

PILLBOXES
Pillboxes are reinforced, covered foxholes that make deadly machine gun
placements and command bunkers. Pillboxes range in size from a single MG
team to a coastal artillery structure. A series of small pillboxes are sometimes
connected with trenches or tunnels. Small pillboxes will be more common in
scenarios.
Sighting All pillboxes are Concealed and are sighted as vehicles. Size modi-
fier is determined by the size of the pillbox, therefore a single MG team pill-
box would be very small and an artillery structure very large. It is never pos-
sible to determine if the pillbox is occupied without moving to within 6" and
making a Sighting Check. When a pillbox is sighted the barrels of any 20mm
or larger guns should be mentioned.
Movement Small pillboxes will count as rough ground. For larger pillboxes,
look at the model and determine what type of terrain it might be. Most pill-
boxes will be impassable to vehicles and count at least as rough ground to
infantry. Vertical surfaces will take at least an action to go up, if they can be
climbed at all. Pillboxes are often surrounded and/or strewn with wire.
Cover Pillboxes offer +12 cover to anyone within. This may never be added
with prone. Anyone forced prone may not fire out or be hit by incoming fire.
Grenades may only be put in at 0 inch range. Any infantry firing into a gun-

8 easy eights Battleground World War II


terrain
slit from outside and from within 2" deny the +12 cover to those in the box.
Instead the occupants get +5. This counts only to infantry fire during an action,
not any Special Fire mode, and only for fire from within 2. It is not general-
ly possible to reduce a pillbox during the course of a game.
Doors Pillbox doors may be opened by causing 2 Damage Points with a
75mm or larger gun (see Reducing Terrain) or by an engineer spending two
actions to affix a demo pack.
Modelling Several shapes of pillboxes are available in hobby stores. Custom
made pillboxes will require an investment of time and research.

WIRE
Barbed wire was commonly used on all fronts in WW II to channel infantry
movement. Barbed wire will be a linear obstacle about 2" wide and of any
length.
Sighting Wire has no effect on sighting and is easily seen.
Movement Wire takes two actions for infantry to cross, at the end of which
the infantry must make a Skill Check. If passed the figure is through and may
act as normal next action. If failed the figure must make a Check at the end of
each its subsequent action and is stuck until the Check is passed. Any wheeled
vehicle may cross wire at half rate, except jeeps and motorcycles, which may
not cross. Any tracked or halftracked vehicle may at full movement rate, but
will face a Bog Check, see below.
Cover Wire offers no cover, and generally may not be crawled under.
Cutting Gaps Any tracked or halftracked vehicle automatically leaves a gap
when it crosses wire but faces a Bog Check. Infantry with cutters can make a
2" wide gap with 2 actions of cutting. Engineers may make gaps with banga-
lore torpedoes and line charges, see Assault Engineers.
Bogging Vehicle crews were not able to run down wire obstacles at will. The
wire had a tendency to rap up in the suspension of vehicles and possibly cause
serious damage. Any vehicle crossing a wire obstacle must take an immediate
bog check. For wheeled vehicles this check is an 8, for halftracks a 10, and
fully tracked vehicles bog on a 12 or greater. Any vehicle that bogs in a wire
obstacle rolls on the Grenade versus Track Effects Chart in the Man vs Tank
section of the Infantry rules. It will take twice as many actions as listed to
repair any damage because of the difficulty in removing razor sharp wire from
a vehicle suspension.
Modelling Wire is easily made by taking picture frame wire and wrapping it
around a dowel rod. The resulting coil can be cut to length and used as is.

ROADBLOCKS
Roadblocks are man-made obstacles designed to deny a road to vehicle traf-
fic. Road blocks can be made of logs, rubble, overturned vehicles, or more fre-
quently all three. Roadblocks are generally an inch or two wider then the road
they aim to block. Roadblocks can be either small or large, this is determined
by the model and the scenario.
Sighting Roadblocks are sighted as small size vehicles. Roadblocks are
Concealed if built across a road in concealing terrain such as forest or a city.
Otherwise the road block is Open. Infantry in a roadblock are always
Concealed. Vehicles behind a road block are Concealed.
Movement Vehicles may not cross a large roadblock. A small roadblock may
be crossed by spending two actions and making a 16 Bog Check every action.

easy eights Battleground World War II 9


terrain
Infantry may cross any road by spending one action.
Cover Infantry in a roadblock receive +4 cover. They may not add this bonus
to any other cover including prone. Infantry wishing or forced to go prone are
considered to be behind the road block and may not fire or be fired upon from
the far side.
Reducing Road Blocks Small roadblocks can be reduced by a medium size
or larger fully tracked vehicle spending two actions to cross and then spend-
ing two actions to reduce. The vehicle is subject to Bog Checks all four
actions. Large vehicles gain a -1 to these checks, Very Large receive a -2.
Small roadblocks may also be reduced by gaining 3 DP results from a 75mm
or larger gun. Large roadblocks may only be reduced by receiving 6 DP
results from 75mm or larger guns or by receiving 2 DP results from 120mm
or larger guns (see Reducing Terrain).
Modelling Small roadblocks can be purchased in hobby shops. Roadblocks
can also be fashioned from modeling clay. Large roadblocks look best if they
include steps for defenders, timbers, and even vehicle pieces in the model.

GRAVEYARD
Graveyards will be commonly found near churches, or sometimes on isolated
hills. Graveyards will generally be about 6" x 6"
Sighting Infantry in a graveyard are Concealed. Vehicles in a graveyard are
Open.
Movement Graveyards are rough ground.
Cover Infantry in a graveyard receive +3 cover, this assumes hiding behind
headstones. This bonus may be added with prone but no other cover.
Modelling Gravestones can be custom made out of card or modeling clay.
Gravestones can also be bought. Several gravestones will be needed for a
graveyard.

PARTIAL TANK COVER


Partial tank cover is given to any exposed crew member on an armored vehi-
cle. This cover is also given to tank riders if the fire crosses the turret or cen-
ter superstructure to hit the riders. No cover is given to riders between enemy
fire and the turret or superstructure. Partial Tank Cover also applies to
exposed infantry riding in an armored vehicle such as a halftrack. This cover
is also given to infantry on the ground using an immobile armored vehicle as
cover. This bonus may be combined with prone. Infantry may not use a
brewed up vehicle for cover. Partial Tank Cover is +5.

Water

STREAM
Streams are linear obstacles, small creaks that run across the table. Streams
should be an inch or two wide and several feet long.
Sighting Infantry or vehicles in a stream are Concealed.
Movement The modifiers on the chart are for crossing the stream. Infantry
and any vehicle that will fit may move up and down the stream at half the
rough ground rate.
Cover Infantry in a stream receive +1 cover. Infantry may never go prone in
a stream and ignore suppression results.

10 easy eights Battleground World War II


terrain
Modeling Streams can be represented by 2" wide strips of blue felt.

SMALL RIVERS
Small rivers are linear obstacles that run across the table. Small Rivers should
be 3-12" wide and run the length or width of the table. It is common for there
to be hedge, brush, and light woods along the banks of rivers. The Rapido
River in Italy would be a 12" wide small river. All the river rules assume a
mild current. In faster currents, disallow wading outside of fords. In super fast
currents disallow infantry to cross fords and penalize boats.
Sighting Infantry wading the river are Concealed. Infantry in boats or any
vehicle in a ford are Open.
Movement Infantry can wade a small river at any point at 1/4 rate.Vehicles
and infantry may cross at fords at 1/2 rate. Any infantry or vehicle may cross
a bridge at road movement.
Cover Infantry wading or crossing at a ford are in Deep Water and recieve -2
cover. In addition, infantry in a river may never go prone and ignore
Supression.
Modeling Small rivers can be represented with 5-13 wide strips of blue felt.

LARGE RIVERS
Large rivers should be rare in games. They should be at least 18" wide and
cross the entire table. Large rivers can only be crossed by bridges and at rare
fords. Frequently in a game, only one side of the river will be on the table. The
Rhine River at Remagen would be a large river.

Deep Water
Deep water is any river, pond, or ocean beach. Infantry in deep water are sub-
ject to all rules for the type of water they are in (river for example). In addi-
tion, infantry in deep water may never go prone, ignore supression, may never
fire or throw grenades out of the water, and suffer a -2 cover penalty.

MARSH
Marshes are areas of soft, wet ground, interspersed with small ponds and mud
bogs. They can be of any size, but because marshes seriously reduce move-
ment, use should be carefully planned.
Sighting Infantry in a marsh are Concealed
Movement Infantry are slowed to a 1/3 rate, vehicles of any kind may not
cross a marsh.
Cover Infantry in a marsh gain a +1 cover bonus. Infantry may never go prone
in a marsh and ignore any Suppression result.
Modelling Marshes can be modeled with an irregular patch of blue-green felt
strewn with lichen and an ocassional tree.

Buildings
Buildings are any man made structure on the tabletop. Depending on the sce-
nario buildings may be bombed out or whole, the rules for both types are the
same except for the listed exceptions. Buildings are either of stone or wood
construction. Designate this before the battle begins. There may be any num-
ber of buildings in a game and they can be of any size, depending upon the

easy eights Battleground World War II 11


terrain

models available.
Sighting Buildings are automatically sighted. Infantry in a building are
Concealed. Vehicles partially behind a building are Concealed. Buildings
block Line of Sight.
Movement Buildings block all vehicle movement. Infantry may enter/exit
buildings through open doors for free. It takes infantry one action to enter/exit
a window or a closed door. Infantry may move around inside a building at
normal rate. It takes an action to go up or down a staircase.
Cover Wood buildings provide +5 cover. Stone Buildings provide +7 cover.
Infantry may fire out windows and doors at full cover. Prone infantry may not
shoot or be shot at, but are still effected by HE effects with prone bonus.
Infantry in a building are forced prone as normal by a Supression result on the
Fire Effects Chart. Cover applies to any model being fired at from outside the
room the model is in. Two rival models in the same room have no cover.
HE effects vs buildings Any HE direct fire shell that hits a wood building
will blast through and spray those inside with shrapnel. Once a hit has been
determined, use the HE blast template and place the center point on the wall
at point of impact, with arrow pointing in the direction of fire. Then refer to
the 90 cone lines on either side of the arrow. Any model within this cone is
effected, in whatever ring he falls under, just as any other HE shot. Figures in
the cone recieve no cover from the building because of the large amount of
shrapnel produced by the building. Figures that are prone receive full prone
bonus. Figures behind sandbag emplacements within the building receive full
cover for the sandbags. Resove effects as normal.
Stone Buildings The HE effects proceedure is exactly the same for stone
buildings. However, any HE shell must be at least 60mm to effect the inte-
riour of a stone building. Smaller guns can use AP shells. AP shells resolve
fire in the same way as HE except they use the narrow cone on the HE blast
template. Note AP will not generate sufficient shrapnel to be effective vs
wood buildings.
Indirect Fire vs Buildings All Indirect Fire works exactly as normal vs build-
ings with no roof. Versus buildings with a roof, mortars and guns up to
100mm have no effect except to figures in the attic who are effected as nor-
mal, with wood building cover but ignoring prone. If larger guns land on a
roof once in the game resolve normally. If larger guns land on a roof a second
time remove the roof and effect any models below.
Reducing Buildings With the exception of roof removal, buildings cannot be
reduced during a game without specific scenario rules. Tank guns and On-
Board Artillery would have to spend hundreds of rounds to reduce a building.
It takes big guns or aerial bombing to take a building down.
Starting Fires Wood buildings and the roofs of stone buildings can be burned
during play. Any hit by an HE shell on a wood building or roof has a 1 on a
d20 chance of starting a fire. White Phosphorus shells can start a fire on a 7
or less. Flamethrowers can start a fire on a 14 or less. It will take at least 10
- 15 turns for a building to become fullly involved. However they will quick-
ly fill with smoke and any figure in a burning building 5 turns after the fire
starts will need to make a Gut Check to stay. Figures failing the Check will be
put outside at the nearest exit, figures remaining will be at -20% on all sight-
ing. Any figure still in a fully involved building must pass a Gut Check or die.
Figures passing the Check are put outside the building by the nearest exit
Bombed Out Buildings Some buildings have been bombed and shelled

12 easy eights Battleground World War II


terrain
before the game begins. These buildings are have no doors, only open door-
ways. They have no roofs unless the model comes with one. Some models will
have low wall sections where a piece of wall collapsed. These low sections
may be crossed by infantry or vehicles exactly as a wall, see above. Because
of the wide variety of bombed building models available, it will often be nec-
essary to make specific building rules for the models used before each game,
using these rules as a guide.
Modelling Bombed out buildings are widely available in hobby stores, though
expensive. Intact buildings are also available in hobby stores. In addition,
some model railroad buildings will work. Buildings can be scratchbuilt from
card, thin wood, or foam core. Intact buildings can be made with simple
shapes and have all window and other details painted on. Bombed buildings
are best with windows and doors cut, and jagged sections of low wall.

rubble
Rubble is formed by the colapsed ruins of buildings and will be common in
bombed out villages and cities. Rubble can for excellent defensive positions.
Sighting Infantry in rubble are concealed. Vehicles will be concealed if behind
a large pile.
Movement Infantry move through rubble at normal rate. Vehicles will be
restricted and suffer a Bog Check.
Cover Rubble provides +4 cover to any infantry. Figures may combine this
with prone but with no other cover. Vehicles may use rubble to cover Hit
Locations.
Modeling Rubble can be scratch built by gluing rocks or bits or wood to a
base. Texture with sand and dry brush.

smoke
Smoke is layed out by a variety of sources, grenades, main guns, artillery,
smoke dischargers, and burning vehicles and terrain. Burning vehicles and ter-
rian follow the smoke rules in Reducing Terrain.
Sighting Smoke blocks all Line of Sight. Pieces may shoot into smoke with
the No Target penalty.
Cover Smoke provides no cover.
Movement Smoke does not effect movement but vehicles should use care dri-
ving full speed with obscured vision.
Disipation Smoke will rapidly fade away. It will drift d6 inches in a random
direction (use a d8 and the HE Effect template). Grenade and discharger
smoke will last 3 turns. Artillery smoke will last 4 turns. Burning vehicles and
terrain will last for the entire game.
Modeling Cotton balls make perfect smoke.

Reducing Terrain
Hit Effect Damage Points
Some types of terrain can be destroyed in the course of a game. Each terrain
Gory Death 2
type includes specific rules on how it is reduced. Foxholes, for example, can
be crushed. Generally, if a terrain type does not include specific rules on how KIA 1
that terrain is reduced, that type of terrain cannot be reduced in the course of HW 1/2
a game.
Other 0
Damage Points Some terrain types are assigned a number of Damage Points
or DP. Damage points can only be inflicted by main guns of the listed caliber

easy eights Battleground World War II 13


terrain
or higher. To inflict DP on a terrain type, roll To Hit as normal, using HE or HEAT
ammo. If a hit is scored, then roll once for effect on the HE results table, taking the
modifiers for gun caliber in to account, but no other modifers apply. Any infantry in
the blast radius are effected normally. Then consult the chart to see how many DP are
caused.
Starting Fires Some terrain types are flammable and may burn during the game.
Rules for burning buildings are included in the building section. Any sort of wood or
tall fields can also be burned. White Phosphorus shells will start woods or fields to
burning on a roll of 5 or less. A flamethrower will start a fire on a 14 or less.
Smoke Burning forest and fields will generate smoke. Once a fire has been started lay
down the HE effects template. The initial fire will cover out to the Small HE Effects
template. Roll a d8. The number rolled will indicate wind direction. Every turn, dur-
ing the artillery phase, roll a d3. This will indicate how many inches the smoke will
spread in the direction of the wind. No piece may enter more then 2 into the smoke
because of the heat and lack of oxygen. This applies only to smoke from a fire, not
a smoke screen.

obstacles
Figures can build obstacles during the game. The Construction Time Chart indicates
how many man actions are required to construct various obstacles. Some obstacles
may be built by any type of troop, some take non-engineers longer and some can only
be built by engineers. Artillery and Vehicle crews can dismount and create obstacles
as well.

Construction Time Chart Modifiers


Number of Max Number for Normal
Obstacle Actions of Men troops

2 man Foxhole 16 4 -

2" Trench 24 4 -

Gun Pit 36 6 -

Covered Foxhole 24 4 x2

Small Road Block 72 6 x2

Large Road Block 288 12 x4

6" Wire 12 4 N/A

Demo Foxhole 10 2 N/A

Conceal x2 - x4

Improved Conceal x4 - N/A

Constructed Conceal x6 - N/A

Hasty Minefield 2"x2" 32 4 N/A

Improved Minefield 2"x2" 64 4 N/A

Tricky Minefield 2"x2" 128 4 N/A

Booby Trap 8 1 N/A

14 easy eights Battleground World War II


Scenarios

Table of Contents
getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 give me shelter
Give Me Shelter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
high noon
High Noon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Advanced Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 russian gold
to the front
Playing the game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Ring of desperation
Gamemasters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 la neuville
Players . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 bloody bocage
Whats That Rule! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

limited intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

scenArio design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

easy eights Battleground World War II 1


Scenarios
getting started turn two. When the first card is drawn take first action with
those five figures. Remember to make Sighting Checks at the
beginning of every action. Continue this procedure until all
Beginning to play Battleground World War II is simple if you cards are drawn and all actions taken for turn two. Play as
introduce yourself to the game a piece at a time. To begin many turns as necessary until one squad fails a group morale
with read Core Rules and the Infantry section up to and check. This initial scenario will help you answer many pro-
including Special Fire modes. For now ignore Assault ceedural questions and give you a feel for the games flow.
Engineers and other specialized areas. Concentrate on the During this first scenario refer to the rules as much as is nec-
sections outlining the card initiative system, spotting, infantry essary, paying special attention to the sections on Spotting,
morale, actions and small arms fire. Ignore or include Special Actions, and Morale.
Fire modes as you see fit for now. More Give Me Shelter When finished with Game 1 of
Give Me Shelter read the rules for Machine Guns and
give me shelter Special Fire modes. Now you are ready to play Game 2. Use
Once you are familiar with the Core Rules and the first part the exact same terrain set-up as you did for Game 1, simply
of the Infantry section you are ready to play Give Me add the card counters for the machine gun and crew. Game 3
Shelter. This scenario is designed to introduce players to will add another squad of infantry and a mortar. For rules on
Battleground World War II in a simple and exciting manner. the mortar see the Artillery section and the sub-section for
You can use the cut-out card figures provided with the rules On-Board Artillery.
or use any figures you have at hand. Once you have the coun- Russian Gold When you have played all three games of
ters or figures gathered, give one order sheet to your oppo- Give Me Shelter then you are ready to play the Russian
nent and take the other sheet, both of you should review your Gold scenario. Russian Gold is essentially a large version
orders and see if you have any questions about the squad or of Give Me Shelter set in an urban environment. Terrain
its equipment. for Russian Gold can be developed out of any buildings
Set Up When you have finished reading your orders, you and available or by using 2D card buildings laid flat on the table
your opponent should lay out the table with whatever terrain with windows and doors drawn on. Eventually most people
you have available. Use the map on the back of your order will want to collect purpose built terrain but for now use
sheets as a guide. Concentrate on getting started quickly, so whatever you have to get gaming quickly. Russian Gold
use colored paper or felt to represent the woods and the cabin will add Snipers to your gaming, so look over that section of
for now if no other terrain is available. Try to keep the cabin the Infantry rules. In addition you can expect extensive use
at the exact center of the table so as not to give either side an of Grenades and Hand to Hand combat, so review those sec-
advantage. The map is drawn to a 4x4 table, but a covered tions of the Infantry section if you havent already.
dining room table would work just as well. If using a larger
table it is best to keep the game down to about 4x4.
Card Deck Next form a deck of 4 playing cards, a red ace high noon
and deuce and a black ace and deuce. Each squad should be After you have finished with Give Me Shelter and have
divided in half, with squad members 1-5 going on the ace and read the Armored Combat section you are ready to add tanks
6-10 going on the duce. The Axis player will be black cards, to your gaming. High Noon is designed to help you add
the Allied player will be red cards. Shuffle the card deck. vehicles easily one step at a time. Use the card counters pro-
First Turn To begin the first turn, draw a single card. Then vided or any tank models you have available.
move the five figures whose card is drawn on to their table Orders and Set Up High Noon plays exactly like Give
edge. The figures first action has been to move on to the Me Shelter and will follow the same pattern of setting up.
table. They may do whatever action they choose for a second Again use whatever terrain is handy to represent the road and
action. When all five figures are done with their second bocage. A review of the Terrain section for rules on road
action, draw the next card. Now move those five figures on movement and bocage may be worthwhile. Because there are
the table and then take their second action. Continue until all only 2 cards in the initiative deck for Game 1 it may be easi-
four cards are drawn and all twenty figures have taken their er to roll die each turn to determine intitiative for Game 1
two actions. Reshuffle the deck. only. Pay extra attention to Movement, Actions, and
Continuing Play Now mark any figures who wish to use a Unbuttoned/ Buttoned Up status. Play until one tank is pene-
Special Fire mode in turn two. Roll to Rally any figures trated and out of play for one or more actions, or until one
Broken in turn one, if appropriate. Resolve any Squad Morale tank is abandoned.
if appropriate. Ignore Artillery Phase. When done marking Game 2 Game 2 adds a squad of infantry, armed with anti-
Special Fire and resolving Morale begin drawing cards for tank weapons and transported in a halftrack to High Noon.

2 easy eights Battleground World War II


Scenarios
For Game 2 you will need a card deck with 4 cards, one for exciting combined arms action. Use of Limited Intelligence is
each tank and one for each squad. To play Game 2 you will very beneficial.
need to review the Man vs Tank section of the Infantry rules
and the Halftracks and Passengers and Riders sections of the
Armored Combat rules. Play Game 2 of High Noon as playing the game
many times as necessary to answer any questions you have
about vehicles or infantry and vehicles together. Battleground World War II puts the gamers in charge of how
To the Front To the Front is essentially an enlarged ver- they wish to play. The game can be played with or without a
sion of High Noon. This scenario adds an entire platoon of gamemaster and using a variety of different methods. This
tanks to each side. Examine the rules on Tank Platoon allows two gamers to have a stand up fight on one table
Integrity in the Armored Combat section. Once you have quickly or for a gamemaster to put on a double blind game
played To the Front you can play a variant with 4 tanks per with random elements and suprises. We have included a num-
side and 4 halftracks with infantry squads per side. A meet- ber of tips and suggestions on how to get the most out of your
ing engagement of this size will take 3-5 hours to play, gaming by emphasising the fog of war.
depending on the experience level of the players and will give
an excellent view of mobile combined arms gaming.

advanced scenerios
Once you have both Give Me Shelter and High Noon
under your belt you will be in a good positon to begin design-
ing your own scenarios and using the other scenarios avail-
able in these rules. We have included a section on designing
your own scenarios later in this chapter. Below is a short
description of each of our five scenarios included in these
rules and what rules are required to play them.
Russian Gold This scenario is set in the ruins of Stalingrad
in the winter of 42/43. It involves two equal forces of
infantry supported by snipers battling for control of a bank. A
good understanding of all Infantry rules including Sighting,
Special Fire modes, Grenades, and Snipers as well as the
Terrain rules for Buildings is required. If you can play this
scenario you have the Infantry rules down well.
To the Front This scenario features four Mk IV H tanks in a
meeting engagement with four M4 Sherman tanks. It should
incorporate all basic Armored Combat rules including Gamemasters
Morale, Hit Location and Penetration, and vehicle Sighting as A gamemaster can serve a number of valuable functions and
well as Special Fire modes. If you can play To the Front enjoy a very rewarding game to boot. A GM can witness
you have a good understanding of the Armored Combat rules. secret rolls, keep track of hidden movement and settle any
Ring of Desperation This scenario features a Soviet armored questions that arise during the game. Gamemasters can also
force versus an all infantry German defense. This scenario run third party or neutral forces. Gamemasters can also take
uses the Infantry and Armored Combat rules, especially Man the initiative to create their own scenarios. This can be very
Vs Tank and Tank Vs Man. This scenario will greatly bene- exciting for players because they will have only vague infor-
fit from the use of Limited Intelligence. mation about the opposing players mission and forces. A well
La Neuville This scenario features Germans trying to capture designed and carefully run scenario can provide a
an American held bridge during the Battle of the Bulge. It Gamemaster with the ultimate joy of watching both sides
adds Anti-Tank Guns, Mortars, and Engineers to the basic sweat and cheer as the game unfolds. In any club there will
Infantry and Armored Combat rules. This scenario also uses be several gamers who have the desire and the knack to be
several Terrain rules and Bogging. Use of Limited good GMs. Really anyone can do it. And it takes a load off of
Intelligence is suggested. everyone if a different person presents a game each week.
Bocage This scenario is set in Normandy soon after D-Day Running a Game Gamemasters will be in charge of setting
and depicts the American advance on St. Lo. This large sce- up terrain, issuing orders and forces to both sides, and mak-
nario incorporates almost every facet of the rules into an ing and drawing from the card deck. Gamemasters can also

easy eights Battleground World War II 3


Scenarios
take control of broken units and handle any special case rules nent as much as possible. Then set up the terrain together,
or situations. They can also be the voice on the other end of using the map as a guide, and substituting terrain as necessary
the radio, issue new orders to one or both sides mid-game, or desired. Build a card deck as described and deploy any
and generally contribute to the chaos of war on the table top. forces that begin on table as per scenario, using whatever
form of Limited Intelligence you desire. Begin play when
ready.

Whats that Rule!


In any game without a GM any rules discrepancy that cannot
be resolved by a quick reading of the rule should be resolved
by each side rolling a die, the low die deciding the ruling.
After the game, talk the rule through in a more relaxed con-
text, and jot down the decision you reach together for future
games. Always remember that the point of a game is to have
fun!
How did you know that? In many games an argument that
comes up often is: That squad would never do that because
in reality they would not know about my hidden HMG that is
in this hedge. In Battleground World War II we avoid this
argument by keeping the HMG hidden using some form of
Limited Intelligence. If you choose not to use any form of
Limited Intelligence in your game you should accept the
omniscience of all forces on both sides so long as sighting
Players checks are properly made.
Players are the heart of any game. Players control one or
more squads or vehicles on the table top. In Battleground
World War II you will need at least one player per side. Limited Intelligence
Players have total control over the actions of their forces so In a small unit battle such as Battleground World War II, any
long as all rules are observed. There is no rule against being scenario can be greatly enhanced through the use of Limited
outlandish, cunning, or stupid in Battleground World War II. Intelligence. In real WWII wartime conditions, unit comman-
However the Morale rules and common sense should keep ders often had little information about the enemy. The idea
most players in the realm of reason. In addition players will behind Limited Intelligence in this game system is to accu-
have a more enjoyable time if they use thier forces in realis- rately portray this reality, by keeping players from knowing
tic and reasonable manners. anything their forces do not know. This includes, but is not
Unrealistic Actions In playing Battleground World War II limited to, the enemys strength and mission, location of all
there will be times when players take actions that just dont terrain features, and even the precise location of enemy units.
make any sense. There is no actual rule against using the There are several techniques when using Limited Intelligence
primemover of an anti-tank gun as a shield for an infantry in tabletop games. Remember, it is key to keep players from
advance, for example. But this is an activity rarely seen in knowing their opponents forces and mission. This can work
real war, especially considering the value of vehicle transport in any game with a GM and even without one, if both players
and the survival instincts of truck drivers. Some GMs may are using a scenario written by a third party and if both are
disallow such silliness, others require a Gut Check. In games unaware of each others briefing. Below, are some other meth-
without a GM a player must be ready to justify these actions ods.
to their rightly outraged opponent, and possibly make a Gut
Check. If a player insists on taking silly, unrealistic actions, Mapping Maps are commonly drawn by a defender in
regularly stop gaming with that player. defend/assault games and the defender reveals their units as
Starting a Game Games played without a gamemaster will the attacker discovers them. In this system the defender
require that both players agree on a scenario; either provided makes a map of the placement and status of all of his forces.
by us, or created by the players, or some other third party. The attacker then moves his forces on to the table, making
Then each player should pick either the Allied or Axis power sighting checks as normal. Whenever a defending piece is
and read the orders for that side only. Gather your forces indi- sighted that piece is placed on the table. Any movement out
vidually, keeping the make up of your force from your oppo- of sight of the attacker is marked on the map, as are Special

4 easy eights Battleground World War II


Scenarios
Fire modes. The map should be kept as neat and accurate as especially useful in commando raids, bunker assaults, and
possible, and shown to the attacker at the end of the game. In any game where one side is static and may not be fun to play.
GMd games, maps can also be used by the attacker with the Gamemasters of these games should take care to keep their
GM referring to both maps and placing models on the game forces actions as random and realistic as possible. Single
table as they fire or are fired upon. This method can be cum- sided games will not work if the players perceive that the
bersome but will work with a level headed GM and if play- enemy is using knowledge it should not have, whether this
ers on both sides enjoy a quieter, slightly abstract game with perception is accurate or not.
great excitement at the end. In addition to taking longer, Double Blind Play Double blind is a great way to give play-
mapped games do not give the hands on fun of moving ers the ultimate in Limited Intelligence on the game table.
models on the table until the game is almost over. Double blind games are games with two identical tables in
Dummy counters Counters can be used to represent real and different rooms. They require an GM and a double set of ter-
fake units on the table. This method does not even require a rain and a double set of figures and models for both sides.
GM and can be effective if both sides keep careful track of Although this may seem daunting, it is actually quite easy to
their pieces. A ratio of one fake per two real units works well. do, and it is surprising how even a small group of gamers can
Generally a fake is removed as soon as an opponent makes a come up with enough figures for a large game.
successful sighting check of it and a real model is placed on Sighting In a double blind game, each side is assigned to a
the game table as soon as its counter is sighted. Sighting rolls different table. On one side should be the Axis player with all
are made in secret by the controlling player, who then looks of his forces and all the terrain he is aware of. The Axis play-
at the chart and tells his opponent what type of unit, if any, he er moves his forces on the table in the normal turn sequence
would see. When rolling for a fake, the controlling player and does normal sighting checks. Whenever an Allied figure
always claims to have rolled an unsuccessful spotting check. or model is spotted, that piece is placed on the Axis table in
The great draw back is that both players know when theyve its position. Do not tell the Allied player his piece has been
been sighted and when their fakes are gone. It also looks bor- spotted. The Allies have their own table, showing all of their
ing on the table until most of the real models are sighted. own models and any Axis pieces they have spotted. In all
Single sided Games In gamemastered games, sometimes it other respects, double blind games are exactly like single
may be useful to have all the players on one side. The table games.
gamemaster then plays all the forces on the other side. This is

easy eights Battleground World War II 5


Scenarios
Set Up If care is taken in setup, double blind games are easy of breaking out without being savaged by artillery and
to run and very exciting to play. Separate rooms are not even airstrikes. Tailor the scenario to be realistic and fair. And
necessary, a sheet or partition will do. And, identical figures remember, history is replete with what if?
are not necessary. Using US troops on the Allied table and Game Idea When taking a game idea and placing it in a his-
British or Russian on the Axis is fine, so long as the Axis torical context, begin simple, by placing it on a front. From
player knows. In some games they need not even be told that. there research a specific time and campaign. History is full of
For example, on the morning of June 6, 44, there is no need nameless villages and short intense firefights that were never
to tell the Germans if they are facing US, UK, or Partisan recorded in history books, but were of great importance to the
forces. The terrain does not even need to be exact to the inch, men involved. Feel free to take any situation you can imag-
just close. ine, place in the appropriate place and time, and say it takes
Running the Game When measuring LOS (Line of Sight) and place at Village R, or Hill 737. World War II lasted for six
range, always work from the attackers table. This will settle years by official count and involved millions of men on six of
most arguments. And never explain anything. Simply tell the the seven continents. Chances are that if you can imagine it
players what they see and what happens. Players will always something very similiar actually happened in World War II.
question the GM, but never answer them other then to say Truth truly is stranger, and more exciting, than fiction.
that you know the rules and everything was taken in to Example: In Guy Sagers autobiography The Forgotten
account. If you make a mistake, dont tell anyone. Simply, fix Soldier, Sager rarely knew where he was or what unit he was
the mistake on whichever table it occurred, if possible. If a facing. But Sager remembered fine details about a number of
mistake cannot be fixed, ride through it and apologize if engagements that, though part of a larger campaign, made no
caught. It is just a game and the goal is for both sides to have difference to anyone except him, his squad, and their Russian
fun, not to comment on the GMs style or ability. opposites. Guy Sager was one of millions of men on all fronts
with similiar experiences.
Have Fun Regardless of the method you choose, try to
remember that Battleground World War II is primarily a
game, not a simulation. Although we feel the rules do simu-
late well the diverse elements of skirmish level combat in the
1930s and 40s, the intent is to make a fun game, not a rigid
following of history.

scenario design
There are two basic approaches to designing your own sce-
nario; taking a historical action and making it into a scenario,
or taking your scenario idea and placing it in a historical con-
text. In scenario design everyone will have their own taste,
and their own balance of history and game balance.
Historical Battle When starting with a historical situation,
research the number of units, the types of units, and from
your reading try to gather as much as possible about the troop
qualities and specific equipment of the participants. Also pay
as much attention as possible to the terrain and deployment of
the opposing forces. Fill in any gaps with research that is gen-
eral to the front and time of the encounter. Endeavor to make
the scenario as fair as possible within its historical context, no
one wants to play the Germans in the Falaise Pocket; unless
they are playing one small group of Germans with a chance

6 easy eights Battleground World War II


russian Give me shelter
orders
Date: February 3, 1942
Location: Outside Moscow, Russia
Background: Your squad is separated from its parent divi-
sion and lost on the steppes of Russia. Running low on pro-
visions and without shelter you do not expect to live
through the night. In the distance you see a lone cabin, your
only hope for survival. But, you also see a small group of
gray clad figures moving towards this shelter from the West.
Orders: You must capture the cabin.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
Enter on Board Turn 1:
Game 1
One squad of Regular infantry
1 Squad Leader with TT33 and PPSh-41 ML 12 -1
1 Asst Squad Leader with PPSh-41 ML 11
1 Gunner with DP ML 10
1 Asst Gunner with Mosin-Nagant ML 10
6 Riflemen with Mosin-Nagant ML 10
All squad members carry 2 grenades

Game 2
One squad of Regular infantry, as described in Game 1
One Maxim 1910 HMG with 3 Regular crew ML 10
All crew carry a Mosin-Nagant and no grenades

Game 3
Two squads of Regular infantry, as described in Game 1
One Maxim 1910 HMG as described in Game 2
One 50mm RM obr. 40 mortar with 3 Regular crew- ML 10
All crew carry a Mosin-Nagant and no grenades

Rules tips note


1. In Game 1, pay close attention to individual and squad
Morale rules, in Infantry page 2. This scenario is intended to introduce players to the rules a
2. In Game 2, make note of Special Fire modes, especially step at a time. By adding elements one by one in a single
Pinning Fire in Infantry page 11. exciting setting, players will be able to assimilate the rules
3. Rules for the Mortar are covered in the Artillery section. easily. Play these scenarios over and over until you feel you
Only the rules for On-Table Artillery will apply. Artillery have a good understanding of the infantry and infantry
page 2. weapons rules.

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


GIVE ME SHELTER

RU
SIA S
N
ST
AR
TL
IN
E
1.

1.
E
T LIN
AR
ST
A N
RM
GE
KEY
Field

Light Woods

Tree
1 Level House
p
Ma
1

nd
Bocage & Road
u
o ft.
r
l eg ID= 1
tt GR
1. 1 Level Hill

ba ALE
SC

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


german Give me shelter
orders
Date: February 3, 1942
Location: Outside Moscow, Russia
Background:Your squad is separated from its parent divi-
sion and lost on the steppes of Russia. Running low on pro-
visions and without shelter you do not expect to live
through the night. In the distance you see a lone cabin, your
only hope of survival. But, you also see a small group of
brown clad figures moving towards this shelter from the
East.
Orders: You must capture the cabin.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
Enter board on Turn 1:
Game 1
One squad of Regular infantry
1 Squad Leader with P-08 and MP-40 ML 12-1
1 Asst Squad Leader with MP-40 ML 11
1 Gunner with MG-34 LMG ML 10
1 Asst Gunner with Kar 98k ML 10
6 Riflemen with Kar 98k ML 10
All squad members carry 2 grenades

Game 2
One squad of Regular infantry, as described in Game 1
One MG-34 HMG with 3 Regular crew ML 10
All crew carry Kar 98k and no grenades

Game 3
Two squads of Regular infantry as described in Game 1
One MG-34 HMG as described in Game 2
One 50mm leGrW 36 with 3 Regular crew ML 10
All crew carry a Kar 98k and no grenades

Rules tips Note


1. In Game 1 pay close attention to individual and squad This scenario is intended to introduce players to the rules a
Morale rules, in Infantry page 2. step at a time. By adding elements one by one in a single
2. In Game 2 make note of Special Fire modes, especially exciting setting, players will be able to assimilate the rules
Pinning Fire, in Infanty page11. easily. Play these scenarios over and over until you feel you
3. Rules for the mortar are covered in the Artillery section. have a good understanding of the infantry and infantry
Only the rules for On-Table Artillery will apply. weapons rules.

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


GIVE ME SHELTER

RU
SIA S
N
ST
AR
TL
IN
E
1.

1. E
T LIN
AR
ST
M AN
G ER

KEY
Field

Light Woods

Tree
p
1 Level House Ma
nd
1

u
o ft.
Bocage & Road
r
l eg ID= 1
tt GR
1. 1 Level Hill ba ALE
SC

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


american High noon
orders
Date: June 23, 1944
Location: Near St. Lo, France
Background: A lone Sherman tank is separated from his
company and attempting to return to friendly lines.
Moments ago the commander sighted a German Mark IV.
Both tanks immediately drove for cover in the bocage. Now
you must get past the enemy tank and exit the opposite
table edge.
Orders: Return to friendly lines by crossing the opposite
table edge.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
Enter on Board Turn 1
Game 1
One M4 Sherman tank with Regular crew ML 12
AAMG M2HMG .50 cal 15 or less
Unlimited HE and AP rounds
d6 Smoke rounds
Vehicle Smoke Launchers 15 or less

Game 2
One M4 Sherman tank as described in Game 1
One M3 halftrack
AAMG M2HMG .50 cal 12 or less
One squad of Regular infantry
1 Squad Leader with Colt 1911A1 and Thompson M1 ML 12-1
1 Asst Squad Leader with M3A1 Grease Gun ML 11
1 Gunner with BAR ML 10
1 Asst BAR Gunner with M1 Garand ML 10
1 Bazooka Gunner with BAZ 44 ML 10
1 Bazooka Loader with 5 HEAT rockets and M1 Garand ML 10
4 Riflemen with M1 Garand ML 10
All squad members carry 2 grenades

Rules tips note


1. In Game One roll to check the availability of vehicle This scenario is intended to introduce players to the Armor
Smoke Launchers and AAMG before starting play. rules a step at a time. Play Game 1 as many times as desired
2. In Game Two pay close attention to the rules for Man vs to get a good feel for armored combat. Then run Game 2 to
Tank in the Infantry section. introduce halftracks and Man vs. Tank rules. Play game 2 as
3. In Game Two remember the driver for the halftrack must much as desired to get a good feel for combined arms.
come from the Infantry squad.

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


high noon

GE
RM
AN
ST
AR
TP

1.
OI
NT
1

INT
PO
1
T
AR
ST
N
ICA
ER
AM

KEY
Field

Light Woods

Tree
1 Level House
1

Bocage & Road


p
Ma
d
1 Level Hill
un ft.
1.

o
r 1
g
t le RID=
at E G
b AL
SC

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


German high noon
orders
Date: June 23, 1944
Location: Near St. Lo, France
Background: A lone Mk IV H tank is separated from his
company and attempting to return to friendly lines.
Moments ago the commander sighted an American
Sherman. Both tanks immediately drove for cover in the
bocage. Now you must get past the enemy tank and exit the
opposite table edge.
Orders: Return to friendly lines by crossing the opposite
table edge.

forces available
Enter on Board Turn 1
Game 1
One Mk IV H with Regular crew ML 12
MG-34 AAMG 15 or less
Unlimited HE and AP rounds
d6 Smoke rounds
Vehicle Smoke Launchers 15 or less

Game 2
One Mk IV H tank as described in Game 1
One Sdfk 251 halftrack
MG-34 Hull MG 12 or less
One squad of Regular infantry
1 Squad Leader with P-38 Walther and MP-40 ML 12-1
1 Asst Squad leader with MP-40 ML 11
1 Gunner with MG-34 LMG ML 10
1 Asst Gunner with Kar 98k ML 10
1 Panzerjaeger with panzerschreck ML 10
1 Panzerschreck loader with 5 HEAT rockets and Kar 98k ML 10
4 Riflemen with Kar 98k ML 10
All squad members carry 2 grenades

Rules tips note


1. In Game One roll to check the availability of vehicle This scenario is intended to introduce players to the Armor
Smoke Launchers and AAMG before starting play. rules a step at a time. Play Game 1 as many times as desired
2. In Game Two pay close attention to the rules for Man vs to get a good feel for armored combat. Then run Game 2 to
Tank in the Infantry section. introduce halftracks and Man vs. Tank rules. Play game 2 as
3. In Game Two remember the driver for the halftrack must much as desired to get a good feel for combined arms.
come from the Infantry squad.

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


HIGH NOON

GE
RM
AN
ST
AR
TP

1.
OI
NT
1

INT
PO
1
T
AR
ST
N
ICA
ER
AM

KEY
Field

Light Woods

Tree
1 Level House
1

Bocage & Road p


Ma
d
o un ft.
1 Level Hill g r 1
le RID=
1.

t
at E G
b AL
SC

EASY EIGHTS Battleground World War II


german russian gold
orders
Date: September 14, 1942
Location: Stalingrad, Russia
Background: After weeks of brutal, close quarters fighting
your platoon has settled into a defensive line within the
ruins of the city. A Russian platoon has set up its line just
two blocks away. The dead zone between you is dominat-
ed by a large building. You have just received word that that
building is a bank and may be full of valuables.
Orders: You must capture the bank. To capture the bank
you must have figures in the building and there can be no
Russian figures in the building at the end of the game.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
A platoon of the 711th Infantry Division, 6th Army

Deploy within your defensive zone at the beginning of the game.

Three squads of Veteran infantry, each squad includes:

1 Squad Leader with P-08 and MP-40 ML 14-1


1 Asst Squad Leader with MP-40 ML 13-1
1 Gunner with MG-34 LMG ML 12
1 Asst Gunner with Kar 98k ML 12
6 Riflemen with Kar 98k ML 12
All squad members carry 4 grenades

One Veteran platoon headquarters:


1 Platoon Leader with P-08 and MP-40 ML 15-2
1 Platoon Sergeant with P-08 and MP-40 ML 14-1
1 Grenadier with Kar 98k and 4 rifle grenades ML 12
1 Medic with P-08 and no grenades ML 14
1 MG-34 MMG with 3 crew and no grenades ML 12
All headquarters personnel carry 4 grenades
One Veteran sniper team:
1 Sniper with Kar 98k with scope ML 14
1 Observer with MP-40 and binoculars ML 14

Special Rules
1. No Quarter is in effect. Any figure who would Surrender
will go Fanatic instead.
2. Ignore the medic if not using the Im Hit! rule.
3. All figures may begin moving at the top of turn 1.

easy eights Battleground World War II


russian gold

Y
KE
ld
Fie
RU
le
S bb
Ru se
SIA
N H ou
ST el
AR ev
TL 1L
IN
ble
E

2
ub

1
r
w ith
le s
tab lhole

1
t e r l
Lit d she
an

1
1

2
2

1
3
1

2
2

E
T LIN
AR
1

ST
1

M AN
1

GER
2

p
Ma
d
o un ft.
g r 1
t le RID=
b ALat E G
C S

easy eights Battleground World War II


russian russian gold
orders
Date: September 14, 1942
Location: Stalingrad, Russia
Background: After weeks of brutal, close quarters fighting
your platoon has been taken out of reserve and pushed into
the front. A German platoon has set up its line just two
blocks away. The dead zone between you is dominated by
a large building. You have just received word that that
building is a bank and may be full of valuables.
Orders: You must capture the bank. To capture the bank
you must have figures in the building and there can be no
German figures in the building at the end of the game.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
A rifle platoon of the 10th NKVD Division, 62nd Army

Deploy within your defensive zone at the begining of the game.

Three squads of Veteran infantry, each squad includes:


1 Squad Leader with TT33 and PPSh-41 ML 14 -1
1 Asst Squad Leader with PPSh-41 ML 13-1
1 Gunner with DP ML 12
1 Asst Gunner with Mosin-Nagant ML 12
6 Riflemen with Mosin-Nagant ML 12
All squad members carry 4 grenades

One Veteran platoon headquarters:


1 Platoon Leader with TT33 and PPSh-41 ML 15-2
1 Platoon Sergeant with TT33 and PPSh-41 ML 14-1
1 Rifleman with Mosin-Nagant ML 12
1 Medic with TT33 and no grenades ML 14
1 Maxim HMG with 3 crew and no grenades ML 12
all headquarters personnel carry 4 grenades
One Veteran sniper team:
1 Sniper with Mosin-Nagant with scope ML 14
1 Observer with PPSh-41 and binoculars ML 14

Special Rules
1. No Quarter is in effect. Any figure who would Surrender
will go Fanatic instead.
2. Ignore the medic if not using the Im Hit! rule.
3. All figures may begin moving at the top of turn 1.

easy eights Battleground World War II


russian gold

Y
KE
ld
Fie
RU
le
S bb
Ru se
SIA
N H ou
ST el
AR ev
TL 1L
IN
ble
E

2
ub

1
r
w ith
le s
tab lhole

1
t e r l
Lit d she
an

1
1

2
2

1
3
1

2
2

E
T LIN
AR
1

ST
1

M AN
1

GER
2

p
Ma
d
o un ft.
g r 1
t le RID=
b ALat E G
C S

easy eights Battleground World War II


to the front
orders
Date: 0642 July 8, 1944
Location: Near St-Fromond Eglise, France
Background: After the American forces broke out of the
bocage country they were able to move out into more open
terrain. This terrain was more suitable to mobile tank fight-
ing. As your platoon of Shermans advances you encounter
a platoon of Mk IVHs coming into your sector.
Orders: You must engage and destroy the enemy tank pla-
toon. The platoon is destroyed when all of the enemy vehi-
cles are Brewed-Up, Abandoned, or Broken.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
One platoon from Combat Command B, 3rd Armored Division

Move onto own table edge on turn 1.

Three M4 Sherman tanks with Regular crew ML 12


AAMG M2HMG .50 cal 15 or less
Unlimited HE and AP rounds
d6 Smoke rounds
vehicle Smoke Launchers 15 or less

One M4 Sherman tank with Regular crew


Tank Leader ML 14-1
AAMG M2HMG .50 cal 15 or less
Unlimited HE and AP rounds
d6 Smoke rounds
vehicle Smoke Launchers 15 or less

Special Rules
1. Check for each vehicle to determine if it has an opera-
tional gun stabilizer.

easy eights Battleground World War II R


to the front

1
GE
RM
AN
ST
AR
TL
IN
E

1
1.

1.

E
L IN
A RT
ST
N
ICA
ER
AM
1

KEY
Field
1

Light Woods
1

Tree
1 Level House
1

p
Bocage & Road Ma
u nd
r o ft.
1 Level Hill
l eg ID= 1
1

1.

tt GR
ba ALE
SC

easy eights Battleground World War II


to the front
orders
Date: 0642 July 8, 1944
Location: Near St-Fromond-Eglise, France
Background: After the American forces broke out of the
bocage country they were able to move out in to more open
terrain. This terrain was more suitable to mobile tank fight-
ing. As your platoon of Mk IVHs advances in a counterat-
tack you encounter a platoon of Shermans coming into your
sector.
Orders: You must engage and destroy the enemy tank pla-
toon. The platoon is destroyed when all of the enemy vehi-
cles are Brewed-Up, Abandoned, or Broken.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
One platoon from the 2nd SS Division, Das Reich attached to the 257th Fusilier Battalion of Battle Group
Heintz

Move on to your table edge on turn 1.

Three Mk IV Hs with Regular crew ML 12


MG-34 AAMG 15 or less
Unlimited HE and AP rounds
d6 Smoke rounds
vehicle Smoke Launchers 15 or less

One Mk IV H with Regular crew


Tank Leader ML 14-1
MG-34 AAMG 15 or less
Unlimited HE and AP rounds
d6 Smoke rounds
vehicle Smoke Launchers 15 or less

Special Rules
1. Roll for each tank to determine if they carry schurzen or
zimmerit.

easy eights Battleground World War II G


Scenarios

1
GE
RM
AN
ST
AR
TL
IN
E

1
1.

1.

E
IN
TL
TAR
S
N
ICA
ER
AM
1

KEY
Field
1

Light Woods
1

Tree

1 Level House
1

p
Bocage & Road Ma
d
o un ft.
r 1
eg =
tl GRID
1 Level Hill
1

1.

t
a E
b AL
SC

easy eights Battleground World War II


russian Ring of Desperation
orders
Date: January 14, 1943
Location: Outside Pitomnik, Russia
Background: The ultimatum given to the Germans at
Stalingrad was rejected and so orders were issued to annihi-
late the Germans. Under the operation name Ring the
Russian 65th Army attacked toward Stalingrad. The opera-
tion has been only four days old and the desperation of the
German soldier is apparent. The Russian forces are just a
few miles from the main German airport outside Stalingrad.
Orders: The forces under your command must push past
any defending Germans. You must exit half of your T-34 off
the opposite edge of the table.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
Men and tanks from Russian 65th Army

Enter on Board Turn 1

8 T-34/76 Model 1941 with Regular crews ML 12

2 Squads of Regular infantry each with,


1 Squad Leader with TT33 and PPSh ML 13-1
1 Asst Squad Leader with PPSh ML 12-1
1 Gunner with DP ML 10
1 Asst Gunner with Mosin-Nagant ML 10
6 Riflemen with Mosin-Nagant ML 10
All squad members carry two grenades

Special Rules
All Russian Squads must enter the game as Riders on the
T-34s. A maximum of a half squad may ride on the back of
any one tank.
All Russian forces must enter the west edge of the game
board on Turn one.

easy eights Battleground World War II


ring of desperation

1.

E
IN
TL
TAR
S
N
SSIA
RU
GE
RM
AN
ST
AR
TL
IN
KEY E
Field

Light Woods

Tree
1 Level House
p
Ma
1

Bocage & Road


u nd
o ft.
r 1
l eg ID=
1 Level Hill tt GR
ba ALE
1.

SC

Battleground World War II easy eights


german Ring of Desperation
orders
Date: January 14, 1943
Location: Outside Pitomnik, Russia
Background: High Command has refused a Russian order
that they surrender. In response the Russians are attempting
to crush all Germans in the south. Under the operation name
Ring the Russian 65th Army attacked toward Stalingrad.
The tenatious Germans of the 6th Army tried to stop the
Russians from moving in any closer. It became an desperate
struggle to maintain the defensive line around Stalingrad.
Now the Russians are threatening to overrun the airport in
Pitomnik.
Orders: The forces under your command must stop the
Russian advance. Destroy the majority of the Russian armor
to win the game.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
Men from the scattered units of the 6th Army

1 Squad of Veteran engineers: 1 Squad of Veteran infantry


1 Squad Leader with P-38 and MP40 ML 15-1 1 Squad Leader with P-38 and MP40 ML 14-1
1 Asst Squad Leader with MP40 ML 14-1 1 Asst Squad Leader with MP40 ML 13-1
1 Engineer with Flamethrower (6 Bursts) ML 13 1 Gunner with MG-34 LMG ML 12
7 Engineers with Kar 98k ML 13 1 Asst Gunner with Kar 98k ML 12
This squad has to divide between its members: 6 Riflemen with Kar 98k ML 12
5 Teller Mines This squad has to divide between its members:
2 Magnetic Mines 5 Teller Mines
5 Cluster Grenades 2 Magnetic Mines
8 Smoke Grenades 5 Cluster Grenades
8 Smoke Grenades
1 MG 34 MMG with 3 Veteran crew ML 12
all crew carry Kar 98k and no grenades

1 Pak 40 75L anti-tank gun with 4 Veteran crew ML 12


all crew carry Kar 98k and no grenades

Special Rules
The German forces may setup in foxholes and trenches.
The Pak 30 may start the game entrenched.

A Teller mine may be laid as a single, hasty AT mine in


front of a tank or in a close assault. In a close assault a
Teller mine follows all rules for Satchel Charges.

easy eights Battleground World War II


ring of desperation

1.

E
IN
TL
TAR
S
N
SSIA
RU
GE
RM
AN
ST
AR
TL
KEY IN
E
Field

Light Woods

Tree
1 Level House
p
1

Bocage & Road Ma


u nd
o ft.
r 1
l eg ID=
tt GR
1. 1 Level Hill
ba ALE
SC

Battleground World War II easy eights


american La neuville
orders
Date: December 21, 1944
Location: La Neuville, Belgium
Background: To the south of Trois Point the 3d Battalion
of the 505th had been deployed on a wide front which was
extended still farther as its neighboring battalion concentrat-
ed at Trois Points. Near the three or four houses of the ham-
let of La Neuville a bridge still spanned the Salm, covered
by the 505th on the east bank. This is one of the last bridges
that still spanned the Salm. It is of prime importance to
demolish the bridge in order to halt the advancing Germans.
Orders: The forces under your command must destoy the
bridge at La Neuville and then retreat.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
Men from 3d Battalion of the 505th Regiment, set up anywhere at begining of game.
Set up anywhere at begining of game: Arriving on turn 3 on the road on the American edge:

One Squad of Regular infantry One squad of Regular engineers:


1 Squad Leader with Colt 1911A1 and Thompson M1 ML 12-1 1 Squad Leader with Colt 1911A1 and Thompson M1 ML 12-1
1 Asst Squad Leader with M3A1 Grease Gun ML 11 1 Asst Squad Leader with M3A1 Grease Gun ML 11
1 BAR Gunner ML 10 1 BAR Gunner with Browning Automatic Rifle ML 10
1 Asst BAR Gunner with M2 Carbine ML 10 1 Asst BAR Gunner with M2 Carbine ML 10
6 Riflemen with M1 Garand ML 10 6 Riflemen with M1 Garand ML 10
All squad members carry 2 grenades All squad members carry 2 grenades.

Two Regular bazooka teams, each team includes: The engineers are equipped with a total of 7 Demo
1 Gunner with BAZ-44 and Colt 1911A1 ML 10 Packs which they can use to destroy the bridge.
1 Loader with 6 HEAT rounds and M2 Carbine ML 10
The bazooka teams can be attached to infantry squads The engineers are transported in a truck, the driver of
the truck must come from the engineer squad.
One 57L anti-tank gun with 3 Regular crew ML 10
all crew carry M2 Carbine and no grenades

One 76L anti-tank gun with 4 Regular crew ML 10


all crew carry M2 Carbine and no grenades

Special Rules
Each engineer with a demo pack must spend a turn on the
bridge to set their explosive. The engineers may try to blow
the bridge at any time but will have to roll a d20 to do so.
Each demo pack counts as 2 points on the d20. For example
if there are 5 pack set correctly then there is a 10 or less
chance to blow the bridge.

Easy eights Battleground World War II


La Neuville

E
IN
TL
TAR
GE S
N
CA
RM
I
ER
AN
ST
AR AM
TL
IN
E
1.

KEY
Field

Light Woods

Tree
1 Level House
1

p
Bocage & Road
Ma
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Battleground World War II easy eights


german La Neuville
orders
Date: December 21, 1944
Location: La Neuville, Belgium
Background: SS-Oberfuehrer Mohnke was tasked with res-
cuing the cut-off Peiper. Mohnke made his main effort with
a westward thrust at the Salm River Line, first in the direc-
tion of Trois Point, then as a groping attempt to find some
weak spot farther south. Near the three or four houses of the
hamlet of La Neuville a bridge still spanned the Salm.
Villagers have informed you that the bridge is being guard-
ed by Americans who are in the process of rigging the
bridge for demolition
Orders: You must capture the bridge before the Americans
can destroy it.
Game Length: 10 Turns

forces available
Men and Armor From the 1st SS Panzer Division
All forces move on to table on turn 1.

Three squads of Regular infantry, each squad includes:


1 Squad Leader with P-38 and MP-44 ML 12-1
1 Asst Squad Leader with MP-44 ML 11
1 Gunner with MG-42 LMG ML 10
1 Asst gunner with Kar 98k ML 10
6 Riflemen with Kar 98k ML 10
all squad members carry 2 grenades
one rifleman carries a panzerfaust 60

3 SPW 251/1 halftracks


The driver of the halftrack must come from an infantry squad.

2 PzKpfw IVH with Regular crew ML 12

2 PzKpfw VIB with Regular crew ML 12

Special Rules
1. All Snow Banks count as rough ground.
2. Moving through a snow bank requires a Bog Check:
Pz VIB 17
Pz IVH 18
Sdk 251 16

Easy eights Battleground World War II


la neuville

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SC

Battleground World War II easy eights


german bloody Bocage
orders
date:July 27 1944
Location:Le Lorey, France
Background: SS-Unterscharfuehrer Ernst Barkmann of the
The 2nd SS-Panzer Regiment found himself in the front lines of
the American advance with very little support. As infantry were
retreating in the face of Allied pressure Barkmann rallied a strag-
gling squad and talked an anti-tank gun into supporting him in
defending the crossroads from Le Lorey and St. Lo. With his now
refurbished Panther and a small support element he was ready to
meet the American Threat.
orders:
You are to hold the crossroads near the Church, until reinforce-
ments arrive. You are to defend against all attacks that are expect-
ed to come through this area. Do not allow any Allied units to
capture the intersection or exit your table edge.

Game Length: 11 turns

forces available
Elements of 4th Co. SS-Panzer Regiment 2, SS-Panzer Division Das Reich

1 PzKpfw VG Panther with Elite crew One Squad of Elite infantry:


Tank Leader Barkmann ML 17-21 Squad Leader with P-38 and MP-44 ML 16-2
1 Asst Squad Leader with MP-44 ML 15-1
2 PzKpfw VIE (l) Tigers with Elite crew ML 15 1 Gunner with MG-42 ML 14
( Historically no Tigers where present, we added them for game bal- 1 Asst Gunner with Kar 98k ML 14
ance. Try the game without them if you think youre a Barkman ) 6 Riflemen with Kar 98k ML 14
all squad members carry 2 grenades
1 Pak 40 75L anti-tank gun with 4 Elite crew ML 14 one rifleman carries a panzerfaust 60
all crew carry Kar 98k and no grenades
One team of Elite engineer tank hunters:
1 Heavy Weapon section: 1 Team Leader w MP-44 & magnetic mine ML 16-2
1 MG-42 MMG with 3 Elite crew ML 14 1 Engineer with Kar 98k & cluster grenade ML 14
all crew carry Kar 98k and no grenades 1 Engineer with Kar 98k & panzerfaust 60 ML 14
1 50mm leGrW 36 mortar with 3 Elite crew ML 14 1 Engineer with P-38 & panzerschrek ML 14
2 Elite spotters with field phone ML 14 1 Engineer with Kar 98k & 6 HEAT rockets ML 14
all crew carry Kar 98k and no grenades all team members carry 2 grenades

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,,,,,
Special Rules
1. All roads in this scenario are roads with bocage on both

,,,,,
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sides. All bocage rules apply, see Terrain.
2. All German forces may begin anywhere on the table. All
infantry and crew weapons may be dug-in.
3. Use of Limited Intelligence, such as mapping or double
blind is highly recommended.
Bocage

easy eights Battleground World War II


Bloody Bocage

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ica
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SC

easy eights Battleground World War II


american Bloody bocage
orders
date:July 27 1944
Location:Le Lorey, France
Background: Americans are trying to expand the beachead and
force a breakout. Unfortunately the hedgerow terrain in the north
of France is aiding the determined German resistance. Little head-
way has been gained since the invasion. American forces have
moved out in strength from the village of St. Lo and run into very
little resistance. Hoping to break the defensive back of the
Germans, the Americans pushed relentlessly forward.
Orders:
Troops under Allied command, are instructed to take and hold the
crossroads near the Church. Military intelligence reports light
resistance in the area. It is believed that this sector is held by a
reconnaissance unit of the 3rd Fallschirmjager Division. In other-
words this should be a milk run.
Game Length: 11 turns

forces available
Elements of 137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Infantry Division with elements of 737th Tank Battalion
2 M10 GMC with Regular crew ML 12 Four squads of Regular infantry, each squad includes:
unlimited AP, only d6 HE rounds
1 Squad Leader with Colt 1911A1 and Thompson M1 ML 12-1
4 M4A1 Shermans with Regular crew ML 12 1 Asst Squad Leader with M3A1 Grease Gun ML 11
unlimited AP, HE, and Smoke rounds 1 BAR Gunner ML 10
1 Asst BAR Gunner with M1 Carbine ML 10
Reconn. section: 6 Riflemen with M1 Garand ML 10
All squad members carry 2 grenades
2 M8 Greyhounds with Regular crew ML 12
Each squad rides in a M3 halftrack, the driver for the half-
unlimited AP and HE rounds track must be taken from the squad.
2 Jeeps each with 2 Regular crew ML 10
M2HMG .50 cal LCMG mounted Two Regular bazooka teams, each team includes:
all M8 and Jeep crew carry M3A1 SMGs & 2 grenades 1 Gunner with BAZ-44 and Colt 1911A1 ML 10
1 Loader with 6 HEAT rounds and M1 Carbine ML 10
4 M3 halftracks, each carries an infantry squad The bazooka teams can be attached to an infantry squad.

Determine availability of AAMGs and Smoke Dischargers for


all vehicles. Determine if the Sherman tanks have operational
Gun Stabilizers.

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,,,,,
Special Rules
1. All roads in this scenario are roads with bocage on both

,,,,,
yyyyy
sides. All bocage rules apply, see Terrain.
2. All American forces move on their table edge on turn 1.
The Americans enter the board in any order they choose.
3. Use of Limited Intelligence, such as mapping or double
blind is highly recommended. Bocage

easy eights Battleground World War II


bloody bocage

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SC

easy eights Battleground World War II


Glossary
AAMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Armored Combat 17 limited numbers. It fires three times an action like an SMG,
Anti Aircraft Machine Gun. This weapon is located on the but effects like a rifle. This weapon was good and was the
top of a tank turret near the commanders cupola; designed inspiration for the Soviet AK-47.
to protect a tank from aircraft, it can be especially deadly Armored Car . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 2
when used against enemy infantry, lightly armored AFVs Wheeled, armored vehicle usually armed with an Auto
and defenses. Examples of common AAMGs include the Cannon or a small caliber gun and a LMG; the American M-
U.S. .50 Cal. and the Soviet DDSh 12.7mm. 8 Greyhound is a good example.
Abandoned Tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 15 AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 7
AC (Auto Cannon) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 13 Armor Piercing. A gun round designed to specifically pene-
Defined as a fully automatic main gun; generally anti-aircraft trate armor.
guns deployed for ground use or as automatic tank guns. This APDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 7
weapon is always mounted in a vehicle or on a towed mount. Armor Piercing Discarding Sabot; also known as APCR or
The German 20mm Flak 38 is a prime example. HVAP (the Silver Bullet by American troops), this shell
Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 5 gave more penetrating power than the standard AP shell.
Armored Combat Artillery Crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 2
Artillery ATR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Infantry 22
The basic time element of the game: roughly the amount of Anti Tank Rifle. A large caliber rifle that shoots a very large
time it takes a soldier to load and fire a bolt-action rifle twice and solid bullet and is able to penetrate thin or weak armor;
while being shot at. Each individual unit or figure gets two this weapon soon became popular with infantry, especially
actions each game turn. Common actions include firing, mov- snipers, for shooting enemy infantry with devastating results.
ing, loading, etc. The German Panzerbusche 38 is a good example.
AFV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 2 Assault Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 16
Armored Fighting Vehicle. This category includes any A type of infantry responsible for assaulting enemy fortifica-
armored vehicle including Tanks, Halftracks, SP Guns, Tank tions with the intent of blowing them up.
Destroyers, etc. Bangalore Torpedo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 17
AFV Effects On Infantry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 19 A long pipe filled with explosives, used by engineers to blow
Ambush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 10 holes in barbed wire, holes in buildings (rat holes), and to
A Special Fire mode that allows a figure or model to wait remove obstacles.
until an enemy piece comes in close in order to fire upon it; Bail-Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 3
similar to Opportunity Fire, but with special rules in regard to Any time a crew fails its Morale Check caused by combat
range and concealment. (other than small arms), it will Bail-Out of their vehicle
Ammunition Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 7 immediately.
Anti-Personnel Mines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 18 Bazooka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Infantry 22
Mines specifically designed to explode and shoot hundreds of An American, reloadable infantry weapon that shoots armor-
small pieces of metal into the air when stepped on by an piercing rockets (HEAT) designed to destroy tanks or enemy
enemy soldier; the German Bouncing Betty was a deadly defenses.
and common anti-personnel mine. Blind Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 4
Anti-Tank Guns (AT Guns) . . . . . . . Armored Combat 18 Bocage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 5
A gun designed to shoot AP shells at enemy AFVs; the Bogging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 5
German 88 was the most famous anti-tank gun of the war, Bombed Out Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 11
though it began its career as an anti-aircraft gun. Booby Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 18
Anti-Tank Mines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 18 Concealed explosives hidden in secret places with the intent
Mines specifically designed to explode when an AFV rolled of blowing up unsuspecting victims; stairwells, doors, and
over it; anti-tank mines destroyed enemy tracks and suspen- equipment are excellent places to hide such treats.
sions and could also injure or kill enemy crews inside an Bow MG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 17
unlucky AFV. The German Teller mine gained the most The LMG on a tank located in the hull opposite the driver;
notoriety during WWII. this secondary armament helps to keep infantry from swarm-
AR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 6 ing the front of the tank.
Assault Rifle. The Assault Rifle was developed by the Brewed Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 13
Germans late in the war and was designed to give the A destroyed tank that is smoking and cooking off spare
infantryman more firepower. The German MP-44 was the ammo rounds inside the tank.
most common, being used mostly on the Russian Front in

easy eights Battleground World War II 1


Glossary
Broken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3 Reserved for crews of halftracks and other open-topped
A unit is considered to be Broken anytime it fails its Morale armored vehicles who do not possess crew hatches; a crew
Check as a result of hostile fire or loss of unit morale; a bro- must be Crew Exposed to fire small arms and machine guns.
ken unit must immediately move 8 toward cover and be Figures are standing up in the crew compartment while Crew
marked with a Broken counter. A unit unable to reach cover Exposed.
within the 8, will move 8each Rally Phase of each turn until Crew Gun Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 17
rallied by a leader or cover is reached. Units Broken while in Crew Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 21
hard cover can refuse to move the 8, but must seek new Artillery 3
cover if enemy fire or loss of unit morale results in another Crew Served Weapons .......See Machine guns and Artillery
Broken effect. Crew Served Weapons /Bailing Out...Armored Combat 21
Brush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 5 Crew Served Weapons /Dismounting.Armored Combat 21
Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 11 Crushing Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 18
Buttoned-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 5 Cutting Wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 9
Term used to describe armor crews shutting their crew hatch- Damage Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 13
es; this may be done at the beginning or end of an action for Deep Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 11
no cost. Crews Buttoned-Up cannot use road bonus, will have Demolition (Demo) Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 17
a harder time seeing the enemy and receive a penalty To Hit A large pack filled with explosives; can be thrown like a
on all main gun shots. grenade out to 2 or placed and detonated like a satchel
Card Initiative System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Core Rules 3 charge, with the exception that these can also be electronical-
Carrying Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20 ly detonated. Very nasty when used against enemy bunkers
Close Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 19 and fortifications.
Term used to describe infantry attacking AFVs with grenades, Dice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2
magentic mines, etc.; figures must start an action in base to Direct Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 3
base contact with an AFV to Close Assault. Directed Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4
Co-axial (Co-ax) MG . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 17 Occurs when a Leader personally directs any action that
The LMG located in many tanks right beside the main gun in requires a Skill Check or Morale Check; a Leaders modifier
the turret; it cannot be fired in the same action as the main is applied to the die roll when the Leader is in base to base
gun. This secondary armament can keep a target engulfed in contact with the figure he is effecting.
fire until another round can be loaded. Directed Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4
Command Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4 Occurs when a Leader directs an action of infantry fire; a
Equals the figures morale divided by two, rounding up; any Leaders modifier is applied to the die roll when the Leader
figure within this range and LOS are considered to be within is in base to base contact with the figure he is effecting.
the Command Range of that figure. Dismounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20
Commander Exposed . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 6 Drivers (see Crew) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20
Indicates that only the tanks commander is partially exposed Duds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 14
in order to increase the commanders visibility or to enable Elite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2
him to man the tanks AAMG; vehicles must be marked with Troops who are the best in training, morale, and pure fight-
a CE marker to gain this option. ing ability; these troops have a Morale of 14 and includes
Corrected Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 4 such specific types as paratroopers and commandos.
Cover Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9 Effects Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 8
Crash Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20 Effect Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9
Craven Coward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3 Fanatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3
Results whenever an unmodified 20 is rolled on an initial Fanatics are caused by No Quarter or a roll of 1 on a Squad
Morale Check caused by enemy fire (does not apply to Morale Check. Fanatics never take Morale Checks or
Rallying); a Craven Coward is Broken for the rest of the Suppressed and will rush into hand to hand with any enemy
game and immediately removed from play. within range.
Crew Covered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 6 Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 3
Reserved for crew of halftracks and other open-topped Fighting Riders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 21
armored vehicles who do not possess crew hatches; crews Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2
Crew Covered suffer a penalty in spotting the enemy, firing a Fire For Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Artillery 4
main gun and do not receive a road bonus. Fire Missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 4
Crew Exposed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 6 Flamethrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 17

2 easy eights Battleground World War II


Glossary
An infantry weapon that shoots streams of flammible fuel
(stored in a backpack-type tank) short distances; flamethrow- Hero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3
ers are lethal when used against AFVs, bunkers, and can also The result of rolling a natural 1 on an initial d20 Morale
start fires, see Reducing Terrain. Check; heroes automatically roll an immediate d20 on the
Foxhole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 7 Hero Chart to determine what degree of a hero that figure is.
Graveyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 10 Note that all heroes automatically become Elite in Morale
Grenade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 13 and gain a free action to be taken immediately before any
A small, hand-held explosive used by infantry; comes in other actions take place. Heroes tend to receive their medals
many forms including fragmentation, incendiary, and smoke posthumously.
varieties. Hills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 3
Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2 Hit Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 10
Troops who are raw recruits with little training and no com- HMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 13
bat experience; these troops have a Morale of 8, and includes Heavy Machine Gun. This type of machine gun is defined as
such specific types as Home Guard and Volksgrenadiers. a full rate of fire, water-cooled machine gun. It must be con-
Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2 sidered set-up (which takes 2 actions) with a tripod in use in
Gully . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 6 order to fire; the Russian Maxim M1910 w/ wheelbase is an
Gun Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery example of a HMG.
Gun Duel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Infantry 12 Hull Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 10
Results from friendly and enemy machine guns both laying Name given to a defensive position where a tank is in a locale
Pinning Fire on each other. where only its turret is showing and its hull is down behind
Gun Crew Morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 2 an obstacle; tanks often are placed in specially designed pits
Gun pits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .See Foxholes that give them a Hull Down advantage.
Gun Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 6 HVAP - See APDS.
Gut Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4 HW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9
Whenever there is question that a figure will complete an Heavy Wound. This type of wound is life threatening and ren-
insane or dangerous action, a Gut Check is rolled using the ders one ineffective in the combat zone. Someone better get a
figures Morale to see if that figure will actually attempt the Medic on the double!
action. Im Hit! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 23
Halftrack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 19 An optional rule that causes all HW figures to plead for help
An AFV that has the front suspension of a truck and the rear from their comrades; the presence of a Medic will help a
of a tracked vehicle; the American M-3A1 is a good example. squad focus more in the combat at hand and less on their
Halftrack Machineguns . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 19 screaming, bleeding and unlucky comrades.
Hand to Hand Combat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 15 Immobilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 10
Fighting to the death in close quarters where anything goes: A vehicle no longer able to move.
pistols, knives, bayonets, shovels, fists, teeth, etc. Impacting Artillery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 6
HE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 7 Indirect Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 4
High Explosive. A soft target round very effective in chew- Indirect Fire Vs. Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terrain 11
ing up infantry and artillery, but not as useful against armor. Jamming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9,12
HE Effects On Infantry . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 16 Armored Combat 10
HE Effects Vs.Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 11 Occurs when a gun is fired and the breakdown / jam number
Heavy Woods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 4 for that weapon is rolled or greater. This indicates that the gun
Hedge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 5 has misfired for some reason. Example: If a particular gun
HEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 7 has a breakdown number of 20, the gun will jam any time its
High Explosive Anti Tank. This round uses a chemical war- To Hit die roll(s) are greater or equal to 20. Once a gun jams,
head to shoot hot gas when the round hits the target, easily one action must be spent to clear the round before the gun can
penetrating armor. Because this round could be fired by low be fired again. Weapons that have a load time must load again
velocity, infantry manned weapons, it totally revolutionized after clearing a Jam.
the infantrymans ability to fight armor. The U.S. Bazooka Jeeps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20
and the German Panzerfaust were the most famous weapons A small, unarmored wheeled vehicle used to transport men
that used the HEAT round. and supplies aound the battlefield; the American Willys is the
HEAT Vs. Soft Targets . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 16 most famous jeep of WWII.
HEAT rounds can also be unfriendly to infantry. KIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9

easy eights Battleground World War II 3


Glossary
Killed In Action. Manhandling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 18
Large River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 11 Artillery 3
LCMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 13 Marsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 11
Large Caliber Machine Gun. This type of machine gun is Medic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 24
defined as a full rate of fire, air cooled machine gun capable A combat medical specialist trained to apply first-aid to
of shooting a very large round; this type must be considered wounded soldiers and to remove them from the battlefield;
set-up (which takes two actions) with a tripod or on a vehicle Medics are helpful to combat troops and when playing the
mount to be able to fire. Many LCHM are utilized as Im Hit! optional rule.
AAMGs, including the American .50 Cal. and the Soviet Mine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 18
12.7mm DDSH. Any weapon that can rip holes into aircraft A defensive weapon buried under the earth that is activated to
is especially unkind to people. detonate when pressure is applied to it; mines come in anti-
Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4 tank and anti-personnel models and can be extremely brutal
The guy everyone looks to, who makes sure the job gets in denying the enemy an approach or area. Mines can also be
done; his leadership modifier improves the weapons fire he rigged as Booby Traps.
directs and rallies Broken figures. Miniatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2
Leader Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4 MMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 12
Losing a leader to a KIA, HW, or Broken result can be deflat- Medium Machine Gun. This type of machine gun is a full rate
ing in the heat of combat; if a leader goes down, his squad of fire, air cooled weapon; it must be crewed and deployed
must pass individual Morale Checks; otherwise, those not with a tripod (set-up taking 1 action) to be fired. The
passing will become Broken and head for hard cover! American .30 Cal. is a good example.
Leader Rally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3 Molitov Cocktail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 20
To be eligible for Leader Rally a figure must start the turn in A gas-filled bottle that is lit with a crude wick and thrown at
Command Range and LOS of a Leader; during the Rally enemy infantry and AFVs; named after the Russian Foreign
Phase, a d20 must be rolled less than or equal to that figures Minister during WWII, this homemade weapon was cheap
morale, adding or subtracting any Leader modifiers. and deadly.
Light Woods - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 4 Morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2
Limitations of Vehicle Mounted MGs . . . . . . . Armored A number which represents the training and desire of a figure
Combat 10 or unit to stay in the thick of it when the going gets rough and
Line Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 17 the combat zone heats up.
A board or pole with a series of small explosives attached to Morale Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2
its length; great for destroying small roadblocks or a section An Effect that requires a die roll of less than or equal to a fig-
of wire. ures units on a d20; passing a Morale Check means that the
Line of Sight (LOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 4 figure/unit is uneffected by the Effect, while failing indicates
Term used to desribe what a figure can see within his line the figure/unit is now Broken.
of sight; this takes into account terrain features and shadows. Mortar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 2
LMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 12 A tubed weapon that hurls an explosive round; mortars come
Light Machine Gun. This type is defined as a full rate of fire in many sizes, are portable, and provide infantry support
machine gun with a bipod and is easily transported by between the ranges of hand grenades and artillery.
infantry. In order to fire, a LMG must be considered to have Movement Into Close Combat With AFV . . . .Infantry 19
its bipod in use, braced, or with the crew prone. This weapon Motorcycles - Motorcycles were popular with military police
does not require an action to set-up; a good example of a units and with couriers carrying vital information across the
LMG is the German MG-34. LMGs give infantry squads battlefield; the Harley-Davidson was popular with the
effective and portable firepower. American Army.
LW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9 Multiple Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 4
Light Wound. This wound reduces combat effectiveness; No Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3
effected figures lose one action a turn. Two Light Wounds When enemy units surrender, the side accepting the surrender
result in a Heavy Wound. can ignore the Geneva Convention and attempt a 1/2 Morale
Machine Guns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 12 Check; if successful the surrendering enemy are ruthlessly
Machine Gun Crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 13 gunned down. A state of No Quarter then exists, where nei-
Machine Gun Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 12 ther side accepts prisoners and Fanatics can appear.
Man Vs. Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Infantry 10 Observer - see Spotter.
Man Vs. Tank Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Infantry 21 Off-Board Artillery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 4

4 easy eights Battleground World War II


Glossary
On-Board Artillery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artillery 2 there are two types: Self Rally and Leader Rally.
Open Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 2 Ramming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 15
Opportunity Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9 Reducing Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 13
Allows vehicles to forego their movement in a turn, in order Reducing Terrain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 13
to wait for an opportunity to fire the moment a target pre- Refused Surrender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3
sents itself. Occurs when surrendering troops are stripped of their
Op-Fire Spotting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 10 weapons and ordered to the rear; it takes one of the refusing
Orchards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 5 players two actions to search the prisoner and then the pris-
Panzerfaust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Infantry 22 oner is removed from play.
A German single-shot, disposable infantry weapon that Regular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2
shoots a shaped charge (HEAT) round designed to totally Troops who have experienced some action at the front and
brew up an enemy tank. have good combat knowledge; these troops have a Morale of
Panzershreck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 22 10, and all troops are considered to be such unless specifical-
A German reloadable infantry weapon (bazooka) that shoots ly stated differently in a scenario.
HEAT rockets designed to destroy enemy tanks or positions. Reverse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 5
Partial Tank Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terrain 10 Riders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20
Passengers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20 Those who ride the back deck of a AFV (Tank, Tank
Those who are transported in the back of a truck or halftrack. Destroyer, etc.) into combat.
Penetration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 12 Riding Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 21
Penetration Effects Chart . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 11 Rifle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 6
Pillbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 8 The standard infantrymans weapon in the field; common to
Pinning Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 11 WWII was the German Kar 98k, and the Russian Moisin-
Special Fire designed to pin down the enemy; comes in Nagant.
three modes: Raking, Plunging, and Spraying Fire. Rifle Grenade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 14
Pistol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 6 A grenade that is fired off the muzzle of a rifle using a spe-
A small, hand-held firearm perfect for engaging the enemy at cial launcing device, giving it a much longer range than a
close ranges or in Hand to Hand Combat; the American Colt hand-thrown grenade.
.45, the German Walther P-38 and the Russian Tokarev are Roadblocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 9
the most common. ROF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 6
Plunging Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 11 Rate of Fire, the number of To Hit dice a weapon rolls per
A specific type of Pinning Fire where a machine gun is liter- action of fire.
ally elevated to plunge bullets into a small, specific area Rough Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 2
from long range. Rubble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 13
Pole Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 17 Sandbags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 8
A single demo pack attached to the end of a 8-10 pole; used Satchel Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 16
in close assaults to attack pillbox gun slits and second story A small bag of explosives which can be thrown like a grenade
windows. or placed beside an object. Perfect for blowing up small
Poor Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 3 items, holes, and for felling trees.
Pre MG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 12 Self Rally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3
Pre Machine Gun. This type of machine gun is defined as In order to Self Rally a figure must start the turn in hard cover
having a limited magazine which is clip-fed and is difficult to and prone; in order to then Rally, the figure must roll half of
load and change ammunition; it is essentially a fully auto- his morale or less (subtracting or adding any modifiers before
matic rifle. The American BAR (Browning Automatic Rifle) halving) to become Rallied.
is a good example. Shooting Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 6
Projectile Attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 22 Armored Combat 8
Raking Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 11 Shooting Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20
A specific type of Pinning Fire where a MG is positioned to Sighting Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 5
rake a specific area about two feet above the ground in Sighting Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 5
order to deny that specific area to the enemy; devestating Sighting Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 4
when employed properly. SLR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 5
Rally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3 Self Loading Rifle. Like a normal rifle, but one where the
Broken figures must Rally before they will rejoin the battle; rounds are automatically fed into the firing chamber as

easy eights Battleground World War II 5


Glossary
opposed to manually being placed by bolt-action. The Taking Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 4
American M-1 Garand is a good example. Tank Crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 2
Skill Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4 Tank Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 3
Whenever there is a question whether a figure can complete Tank Platoon Integrity Check . . . . . . Armored Combat 3
a certain action, a Skill Check is used to determine success or Tank Vs. Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 16
failure, using that figures Morale number. TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 2
Small Arms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 5 Tank Destroyer. An armored tracked vehicle armed with a
Small Arms Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 7 large gun in a traversible, open-topped turret; the American
Small Rivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 10 M-10 is an example.
SMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 6 Team of One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2
Sub Machine Gun. A hand-held, clip-fed weapon that can Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2
spray pistol-caliber rounds over short ranges; the American To Hit Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 8
Thompson, German MP-40, and Soviet PPSh-41 are the most To Throw Grenades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 13
common. Trenches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 8
Smoke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 13 Troop Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2
Squad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2 This indicates the level of training and experience, and hence
The core unit of the game. A typical squad contains a Squad the Morale, a unit has; the greater the troop quality, the
Leader and an Asst. Squad Leader (both NCOs), a LMG with greater the Morale!
a gunner and a loader, and 6 other riflemen. Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 20
Squad Morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 4 Turning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 5
Special Fire Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9 Turn Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 3
SP Gun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 2 Typical Armor Crew . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 10
Self-Propelled Gun. An artillery piece mounted on the chas- Unbuttoned - Refers to the state where all crew members
sis of a tank, open-aired with only an armored gun shield for have their hatches open to allow for better ventilation and vis-
protection; the German Wespe is a good example. ibility, though at greater risk to the crew from enemy fire.
Spotter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Artillery 5 Always costs one action to perform.
Spraying Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 11 Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2
This Special Fire mode enables a figure to concentrate SMG Veteran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 2
fire on a small location like a window or a doorway. Troops who have been in the front lines for years; these
Squad Morale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 4 troops are hardened, tough, and know that it is safer to stay
Squads have a personality not unlike that of ordinary soldiers and fight than run away. These troops have a Morale of 12.
and this is indicated by the squads Morale; if a squad suffers Vehicle Smoke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 15
casulties (KIAs, HWs, Broken, Captured) below its break Vehicle Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armored Combat 2
point, the Squads Morale must be rolled equal to or less than Vehicles (Models) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2
on a d20 during the Squad Morale phase of the turn. Weapon Types (Small Arms) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 6
Otherwise, the Squad is Broken. Wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 9
Starting Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 13
Stream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terrain 10
Suppressed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 9
This combat effect pins down its target, forcing the target
to dive prone. This makes the target less of a target and hard-
er to wound / kill, but slows the target down (the target must
now expend an action to get up).
Surrender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Infantry 3
This occurs when a broken figure/unit cannot find cover or
escape from enemy forces. The men will spend the rest of the
war in a POW camp; that is, if theyre not gunned down!
T - Tank. A totally enclosed and armored tracked vehicle
armed with a large gun in a traversible turret; the American
Sherman, German Mk. IV, and Soviet T-34 are the most com-
mon.
Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Core Rules 2

6 easy eights Battleground World War II