Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 3

Reflections on courses I have taught at Syracuse University

The various courses that I have taught from 2014-2017 are outlined below. Under the course title is the description from the Syracuse University (SU) Undergraduate Course Catalog. Below that is a list of the semesters during which I taught this class and my personal reflections on how they developed me as a teacher.

FRE 102: French II (4 credits, 55 minutes, 4 days per week) Course Catalog: Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in French. Students cannot enroll in FRE 102 after earning credit for FRE 201, FRE 202, or higher.

Taught Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Summer 2015, Spring 2016 This is the first class as well as the class I taught the most while at SU. Teaching a class multiple times presents some specific challenges as well as benefits. A beneficial side of it is that you can reuse many materials even if you don’t use the same textbook, as we often teach the same general concepts. A challenge, however, is that the instructor can get bored with the material and as a result, have less energy teaching the class. I believe the amount of energy in a lesson is crucial to student learning taking place, and the it is the teacher’s job to set this tone at the beginning of class. Luckily, due largely to my coworkers, I was able to find ways to constantly learn more about the material and keep presenting it in new ways to my students. In the summer of 2015, I worked as a Part-time instructor co-teaching this class independently of a Language Coordinator. Together we designed a syllabus and taught 2.5 hours per day, 4 days per week, to a class of only two students. This was a very challenging yet rewarding experience that taught me how to adapt my lesson planning to such long periods and to such a small audience. It really stressed the importance of preparation and individualizing the lesson to student needs. For more information on this, please see my CV. I was appointed Lead TA for Spring 2016, which carried its own responsibilities in regard to my teaching and planning. For more information on this, please see my Personal Statement.

FRE 201: French III (4 credits, 55 minutes, 4 days per week) Course Catalog: Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in French. Students cannot enroll in FRE 201 after earning credit for FRE 202 or higher.

Taught Fall 2015 and Fall 2016 Having taught this class twice, a year apart, I met some similar challenges and some unique ones. The first time I taught it, we used a textbook that was particularly challenging and thus a syllabus that was hard to grapple at times.

While I enjoyed pushing students to use their French in new formats to talk about social issues, they often felt intimidated that they did not know enough. In Fall 2016, the curriculum was a little more friendly with a new textbook and I believe the students felt more comfortable to take risks. A recurring theme in this level of French is that the students find themselves stuck between the level below (FRE 102 which teaches much of the same material as FRE 201) and the level above (FRE 202 which carries more advanced grammar than we reach in FRE 201). These two experiences taught me the importance of choosing materials that are

the right level for your students and build your students’ confidence in the face of a challenge.

I was appointed Lead TA for both of these semesters, which carried its own

responsibilities in regard to my teaching and planning. For more information on this, please see my Personal Statement.

FRE 202: French IV (4 credits; 80 minutes Tuesday/Thursday, 55 minutes Wednesday) Course Catalog: Continuing profiency-based course which focuses on reading, discussing, and analyzing authentic texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in French. Students cannot enroll in FRE 202 after earning credit for a course higher than FRE 202.

Teaching in Spring 2016

I am currently teaching FRE 202 and am enjoying the challenge of the highest

course level I can teach while a TA at SU. Due to their higher level of French than in other 4-credit classes I have taught, I am forced to raise my expectations of what my students are capable of doing. The class is challenging for the students and instructor as it only meets three days per week as opposed to four (like the rest of our 4-credit classes in the 100 and 200 series), and two of the days last 80 minutes. I have thus had to adjust my lesson planning to accommodate more material in less days. I am very glad to have been able to teach this course while at SU as I feel it is preparing me for potentially teaching 300-level (or higher) French courses one day.

FRE 210: Intermediate Oral Practice (1 credit, 55 minutes, 1 day per week) Course Catalog: Additional practice for students in FRE 201 or above. Attention confined to the spoken language. Weekly discussion of a variety of topics in French.

Taught Spring 2015, Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 Teaching FRE 210 is a very unique and valuable experience for a TA while at SU. Unlike the 4-credit classes we usually teach, for this course the TA is responsible for creating their own syllabus, including a grade composition, to be used for the semester. While the class only meets once a week and is composed

of ten students or less, a great deal of responsibility befalls the TA as they work rather independently of the Language Coordinator.

I loved teaching this course every time I was able as I designed the course

material in conjunction with my students on the first day of class. This allowed us

to incorporate the various interests of the students in the class within the curriculum - something we are seldom able to do in a 4-credit class. We would take field trips to the art gallery on campus, have debates on healthcare systems and more, and discuss current events ranging from Francophone politics to the tragic terrorist attacks in France in 2015. The students have a wide range of independence with the language and I encouraged the importance of confidence when speaking, even if mistakes are made. As a teacher, the liberty I was given in this experience allowed me to be creative with my teaching in ways I truly appreciated.