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University of Southern California

Rossier School of Education


Course Syllabus

EDUC 561 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Pedagogy I


Section 27709D: Spring 2011

Instructor: Christian W. Chun, Ph.D.


Phone:
Office:
Office Hours: TBA
Email: chuncw@usc.edu

Course overview

The purpose of this course, the first in a two-course sequence, is to provide an introduction to methods
of teaching English as a second/foreign language that can be used to design lessons appropriate for
student ages, English abilities, and backgrounds. This first course provides a comprehensive overview
of the history and development of methods for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
(TESOL) along with a critical examination of the underlying principles of these various methodologies.
Included is an examination of the theory and practice of teaching the four skills (reading, writing,
listening, and speaking) along with grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Attention will focus on
how various approaches and techniques can be realized in practice, in a range of contexts or educational
settings, and for a variety of different learners.

Throughout the course, we will be looking at examples of different teaching methods in classrooms,
both on video and in your live observations of teachers. In addition, participants in the class will
demonstrate the use of specific methods while being videotaped, and these videos will be analyzed and
discussed.

Why is this course in the MAT-TESOL program?


In the English as a second language classroom, students may come from a variety of cultures and
educational backgrounds. In order to most effectively teach these students, it is important to have an
understanding of the different English teaching methods they may have experienced in the past, as well
as to be well-versed in a variety of methods in order to select the ones best suited to the students needs
and the classroom context.

This course addresses particular problems of practice by:


developing participants familiarity with TESOL methods
emphasizing the learning and pedagogical theories that underlie TESOL methods
clarifying the challenges that students face when learning English as a second/foreign language
providing assessment and feedback strategies
emphasizing the importance of aligning instructional materials and resources with learning goals
discouraging overreliance on the compartmentalization of skills
developing participants knowledge of the integration of language and content and the need in the
language classroom to provide viable links to content
recognizing the value of professional collaboration surrounding classroom practices and research
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Course Syllabus

developing participants appreciation for the reciprocal nature of research and practice

Course Requirements and Assignments

As a graduate student, it is important to complete the readings and participate in class discussions.
Performance in this course is weighted heavily on the quality of participation during class sessions and
of any written work submitted. Written assignments must be typed and proofread with the care that a
graduate student should exhibit. All projects should demonstrate a careful processing of course lectures
and readings along with a thorough understanding of appropriate methodologies of teaching English as
a second/foreign language. Assignment due dates are before Class Time, unless otherwise specified.
Please be aware that late assignments are accepted only in the case of serious personal emergencies and
only with the prior approval of your instructor.

Preparation for class meetings


Assigned readings about theory and practice form the core of each weeks class session. All of these
readings and the accompanying reading responses should be completed before each class session as a
basis for an informed and penetrating analysis of the issues of this course. Advanced preparation for
course meetings is particularly important as it contributes to our engagement in purposeful academic
discussion and reflection.

Assignment 1: Class Time (10%)


Class Time sessions will take place weekly, and will last approximately 120 minutes. You are expected
to participate fully in them. You are also encouraged to ask questions and actively participate in both
planned and impromptu class discussions so long as the discussion promotes the purpose of the class.
During these sessions, students will experience a variety of activities--similar to the time students spend
with their instructor in a regular, on-campus class. Throughout the semester the class will be divided
into groups to accomplish a variety of tasks and participants will have opportunities to talk with their
instructor and each other about key topics and issues.

Although technical and connectivity issues do occur, students should make every effort to engage in
discussion through the 2SC site for video participation (not just via teleconference). Students who do
not participate in the video discussion or do not participate in the full 120-minute Class Time may be
given only partial credit for participation in that discussion session. Students who miss more than 20%
of the course (2 classes) will be required to repeat the course.

Assignment 2: Forum: Unit Reflection Questions (10%)


Participation in a weekly forum is required. These forums are intended to provide an opportunity to
discuss questions and ideas with your classmates prior to participating in the live class discussion. Each
participant is required to submit an original entry in response to one question from a list that
accompanies each units readings and videos. The length of each contribution can range from one to

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several paragraphs, but not more than one page. Responding to other student posts is encouraged, but
not required. All responses/reactions will be judged on the completeness and quality of the work.

Many participants find it valuable to form a study group (no larger than 4 students). The participants in
this class are also invited to do so. Those who do decide to participate in a study group may post their
responses and reactions to the reading/video discussion questions as a group. Please indicate all
members of the study group when posting. All members of the study group will receive the same grade
for the postings for any given week.

Assignment 3: Demonstration of teaching method (30%)


This is a group project. Groups should select a date and sign up to present their project to the class.
Each group will research one teaching method from the list below. They will then plan a lesson in
English that illustrates the key features of this method, prepare a 1-2 page handout outlining the key
features of the method using the Richards & Rodgers framework available in the course toolbox, and
one or more team members teach this lesson in class (10 minutes maximum). The method handout will
be presented to the class by the team, who will lead a class discussion and analysis (20 minutes
maximum). The handout and a detailed lesson plan must be submitted to the instructor on the Sunday
before the presentation and discussion. A lesson plan template can be found in the course toolbox.
Suggested topics:

Cognitive academic language English for specific purposes (ESP)


learning approach (CALLA)
Community language Grammar translation
learning/counseling learning
Computer assisted language learning Language experience approach
(CALL)
Content-based instruction (CBI) Natural approach
Theme-based Project work
Sheltered Silent way
Adjunct Suggestopedia
Cooperative learning Task-based learning
Direct method (Berlitz method) Whole language

Assignment 4: Textbook/materials review (30%)


This is an individual assignment that includes a materials review of 500-1000 words and a 10-minute
presentation. Each participant will choose a different textbook, videotape series, or software package to
evaluate and present to classmates. The material reviewed should be current (2006) or later. The
presentation should include sample activities from the text. During week 10 of instruction, participants
will form Study Groups to present their textbook/materials reviews. A detailed description of the
assignment and a template for the paper can be found in the online course toolbox.

Assignment 5: Guided Observation (20%)


Participants will visit a school ESL/EFL instructional setting for the purpose of focused observation. To
document the experience, which should total 20 hours of classroom time (2-3 hours/week), they should

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take observation notes (a guide is in the course toolbox) and upload weekly observation notes to the
instructor. Each week there will be suggestions to guide that weeks observations. During the course,
each participant will compose eight journal entries of approximately one page each. The collected
observation entries, along with a 1-page Summary Reflection, will be submitted to the instructor in
Week 10.

In the event of technical breakdowns, students may submit assignments to the instructor via email by
the posted due date. Remember to back up your work frequently, post assignments once completed,
load files to an external hard drive and keep a hard copy of papers and projects.

Textbooks and Other Materials

Texts for this course are available from the USC Bookstore. The texts for this course consist of a
textbook and a supplemental reader.
Nunan, D. (2003). Practical English language teaching. New York: McGraw Hill.
EDUC 561 Course Reader

Recommended texts
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological
Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.
Brown, H. D. (2007). Principles of language learning and teaching (3rd ed.). White Plains, NY:
Pearson.
Larsen-Freeman, D. (2000). Techniques and principles in language teaching (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford
University Press.
Richards, J. C., & Renandya, W. A. (2002). Methodology in language teaching: An anthology of
current practice. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Richards, J. C., & Rodgers, T. S. (2001). Approaches and methods in language teaching (2nd ed.).
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Grading

All course assignments must be completed and submitted by the deadlines specified. Assignment due
dates are before Class Time, unless otherwise specified. An extension or a grade of incomplete (IN) is
granted only in cases of documented medical problems or family emergencies and must be requested in
writing prior to the end of semester.

Assignments will be weighted as follows:

Points Percentage

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Assignment 1: Class Time 30 pts. 10%


Assignment 2: Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 30 pts. 10%
Assignment 3: Demonstration of Teaching Method 90 pts. 30%
Assignment 4: Textbook/Materials Review 90 pts. 30%
Assignment 5: Guided Observation 60 pts. 20%

Final course grades are based on the following:

A = 93-100% B+ = 88-89% C+ = 78-79%


A- = 90-92% B = 83-87% C = 73-77%
B- = 80-82% C- = 70-72%

Academic Accommodations

Any student requesting academic accommodations based on a disability is required to register with
Disability Services and Programs (DSP) each semester. A letter of verification for approved
accommodations can be obtained from DSP. Please be sure the letter is delivered to your instructor as
early in the semester as possible. DSP is located in STU 301 and is open 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. The phone number for DSP is (213) 740-7766.

Incompletes

IN Incomplete (work not completed because of documented illness or some other emergency
occurring after the eighth week of the semester; arrangements for the IN and its removal should be
initiated by the student and agreed to by the instructor prior to the final exam). IXlapsed incomplete.

Conditions for Removing a Grade of Incomplete If an IN is assigned as the students grade, the
instructor will fill out the Incomplete (IN) Completion form which will specify to the student and to the
department the work remaining to be done, the procedures for its completion, the grade in the course to
date and the weight to be assigned to the work remaining to be done when computing the final grade. A
student may remove the IN by completing only the portion of required work not finished as a result of
documented illness or emergency occurring after the eighth week of the semester. Previously graded
work may not be repeated for credit. It is not possible to remove an IN by re-registering for the course,
even within the designated time.

Time limit for removal of an incomplete One calendar year is allowed to remove an IN. Individual

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academic units may have more stringent policies regarding these time limits. If the IN is not removed
within the designated time, the course is considered lapsed, the grade is changed to an IX and it
will be calculated into the grade point average as 0 points. Courses offered on a Credit/No Credit basis
or taken on a Pass/No Pass basis for which a mark of Incomplete is assigned will be lapsed with a mark
of NC or NP and will not be calculated into the grade point average.

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Academic Integrity and USC Student Conduct Code

SCampus, the USC student guidebook contains the Student Conduct Code and information on
Academic Integrity. It is the students responsibility to be familiar with and abide by these
guidelines, which are found at http://www.usc.edu/student-affairs/SJACS/docs/GradIntegrity.pdf. A
summary of behaviors violating University standards can be also found at:
http://www.usc.edu/dept/publications/SCAMPUS/gov/behavior.html. Student papers will be
analyzed with Turnitin for plagiarism.

Standards of Appropriate Online Behavior


The protocols defined by the USC Student Conduct Code will be upheld in distance classes.
Students are not allowed to post inappropriate material, SPAM to the class, use offensive language
or engage in online flaming. For more information, please visit http://www.usc.edu/student-
affairs/SJACS/

Overview of Assignments

Unit Topic Unit Assignments Points


Unit What is Weekly Readings
1 Method? Brown Getting Started
Nunan Methodology
Richards & Rodgers The Nature of Approaches and
Methods in Language Teaching
Spada Communicative Language Teaching: Current Status
and Future Prospects

Video Viewing
Audiolingualism

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions


3 points
Class Time
3 points
Unit Teaching Weekly Readings
2 Reading and Anderson Reading
Writing Ferris & Hedgcock Classroom Approaches to ESL Writing
Assessment

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Grabe Reading Assessment


Sokolik Writing

Video Viewing
How to Make a Good Video
Lee-Jones From Sheep to Ginza!
Providing Feedback on Student Writing

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Guided Observation 6 points

Class Time 3 points

Unit Teaching Weekly Readings


3 Listening and Bailey Speaking
Speaking Helgesen Listening
Richards Teaching Listening and Speaking: From Theory
to Practice

Video Viewing
Graham Teaching Jazz Chants to Young Learners

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Guided Observation 6 points

Demonstration of Method (Group 1 Video/Discussion) 90 points

Class Time 3 points


Unit Literacy and Weekly Readings
4 Cooperative Ediger Teaching Children Literacy Skills in a Second
Learning Language
Kagan New Cooperative Learning, Multiple Intelligences,
and Inclusion
Weinstein Developing Adult Literacies
Slavin An Introduction to Cooperative Learning

Video Viewing
Building Oral Language
Reading in a Preliminary English Class

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

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Guided Observation 6 points

Class Time 3 points


Unit Teaching Weekly Readings
5 Grammar Larsen-Freeman The Dynamics of Language
(Grammaring)
Nitta & Gardner Consciousness Raising and Practice in
ELT Textbooks
Nunan Grammar
Thornbury How to Test Grammar

Video Viewing
Frodesen The Importance of Discourse in Teaching
Grammar

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Guided Observation 6 points

Demonstration of Method (Group 2 Video/Discussion) 90 points

Class Time 3 points


Unit Teaching Weekly Readings
6 Pronunciation Goodwin Teaching Pronunciation
Gilbert Teaching Pronunciation: Using the Prosody
Pyramid
Jones Beyond Listen and Repeat: Pronunciation
Teaching Materials and Theories of Second Language
Acquisition
Murphy Pronunciation

Video Viewing
Introduction to Pronunciation Clearly Speaking
Peter Norton: Stress at the Suprasegmental Level Clearly
Speaking
Philip McIntyre: Linking Words Clearly Speaking

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Guided Observation 6 points

Class Time 3 points

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Unit Teaching Weekly Readings


7 Vocabulary Nation Teaching and Learning Vocabulary
Nation Vocabulary
Nation Testing Vocabulary Knowledge
McCarten Teaching Vocabulary: Lessons from the Corpus,
Lessons for the Classroom
Zimmerman. Helping Students Become Independent Word
Learners

Video Viewing
Graham - Teaching Jazz Chants to Young Learners
Sophia Hibbs8th Grade English

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Guided Observation 6 points

Demonstration of Method (Group 3 Video/Discussion) 90 points

Class Time 3 points

Unit English for Weekly Readings


8 Specific Benesch, S. A History of English for Academic Purposes
Purposes (EAP)
Flowerdew & Peacock The EAP Curriculum: Issues,
Methods, and Challenges
Hutchinson & Waters Section I: What is ESP?
Robinson Introduction
Robinson Needs Analysis

Video Viewing
Mollie Bullock8th Grade Math

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Guided Observation 6 points

Class Time 3 points

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Unit Content- and Weekly Readings


9 Task-Based Brinton Content-Based Instruction
Instruction Echavarria & Graves Sheltered Instruction in the Content
Areas
Shehadeh Task-Based Language Learning and Teaching:
Theories and Applications
Skehan Task-Based Instruction

Video Viewing
Katie Parrish Enhancing Mainstream Classrooms for
English Language Learners

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Guided Observation 6 points

Demonstration of Method (Group 4 Video/Discussion) 90 points

Completed Guided Observation 12 points

Class Time 3 points


Unit Looking Ahead Weekly Readings
10 Brown English Language Teaching in the Post Method
Era: Toward Better Diagnosis, Treatment, and
Assessment
Canagarajah TESOL at 40: What are the Issues?
Kumaravadivelu TESOL Methods: Changing Tracks,
Challenging Trends

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions 3 points

Textbook/Materials Review 90 points

Class Time 3 points

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Unit 1: What is method?

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to define what constitutes a method in teaching English as a
second language. Principles of communicative language teaching will be introduced
along with a historical overview of how methods have changed.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the organization of the course: course syllabus, management, course
requirements, etc.
Understand the meaning of method
Understand the role of shared inquiry and discussion in the construction of knowledge
in this course
Recognize the unique characteristics of communicative language teaching

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

rown, H. D. (2007)

unan, D. (2003). M

ichards, J. C., & Ro

pada, N. (2007). Co

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

Audiolingualism. Language Teaching by Diane Larsen-Freeman. U.S. Department of


State, Office of English Language Programs, Washington DC. 1990. (18 minutes).

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UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. What language teaching approaches have you experienced? Which one appealed most
to your own cognitive style and why?
3. What might be the advantages and disadvantages of a communicative approach to
language teaching in teaching situations that you are familiar with?
4. In your experience, are classroom teachers and/or administrators quick to adopt the
newest methods? If so, what factors might contribute to this tendency?

CLASS TIME

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Unit 2: Teaching Reading and Writing

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the underlying principles and current practices of
teaching reading and writing to English language learners. The reading/writing
connection and methods of assessing learners reading and writing skills will also be
covered.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Gain insight into the connection between reading and writing
Understand process vs. product approaches to writing
Understand the nature of reading
Explain the steps in designing reading/writing assessment measures

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

nderson, N. (2003).

erris, D., & Hedgco

rabe, W. (2008). Re

okolik, M. (2003).

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

1. From Sheep to Ginza!. Aino Lee-Jones. Teachers Voices 8: Explicitly Supporting


Reading and Writing in the Classroom by Anne Burns and Helen de Silva Joyce.
Macquarie University, Adult Migrant Education Program Research Centre, Sydney,
Australia. 2005. (7 minutes).

2. Providing Feedback on Student Writing: Workshop 6. Developing Writers: A


Workshop for High School Teachers. Annenberg Media, Washington, DC. 2010. (58
minutes)

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UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Does the interactive approach to reading describe your own reading process? Why or
why not? Give examples of your reading process to support your view.
3. Discuss the evolution of writing instruction from product to process approaches.
Which of these approaches have you experienced?
4. Both Sokolik and Ferris and Hedgcock discuss approaches to writing assessment. In
your experience as an academic writer, what procedures have your instructors used to
assess your writing performance? How helpful were these procedures?
Guided Observation

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class. This week, focus your comments on any reading and writing
activities that you observed.

CLASS TIME

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Unit 3: Teaching Listening and Speaking

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the underlying principles and current practices of
teaching speaking and listening to English language learners. The roles of fluency and
accuracy in speaking, the interactive nature of listening as a process, and methods of
integrating speaking and listening in the curriculum will be highlighted.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the underlying theory and practice of teaching listening as a complex,
interactive process that builds on prior knowledge
Understand the underlying theory and practice of teaching speaking as a meaning-
driven process involving a continuum of informal to formal speech
Recognize the reciprocal nature of listening and speaking
Develop the ability to critically assess speaking and listening texts based on theories
presented in the course

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

ailey, K. (2003). Sp

elgesen, M. (2003).

ichards, J. C. (2008

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

Teaching Jazz Chants to Young Learners by Carolyn Graham. U.S. Department of State,
Office of English Language Programs, Washington DC. 2006. (27 minutes).

UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

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Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Why is it important for teachers to understand the notion of top-down vs. bottom-up
processing?
3. Think of a foreign language that you learned in a school setting. How would you
assess your speaking ability in this language? To what extent was this ability affected
by the method used to teach the language?
4. According to Bailey, students need practice with both fluency and accuracy to
develop speaking skills. Think of examples of speaking activities from the videos you
have viewed thus far in this class. Which of these activities promoted fluency? Which
promoted accuracy?

Guided Observation

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class. This week, focus your comments on any listening and speaking
activities that you observed.

Demonstration of Method (Group 1 Video/Discussion)

CLASS TIME

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Unit 4: Literacy and Cooperative Learning

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is twofold: to examine the underlying principles and current
practices in literacy instruction and to examine the role played by cooperative learning
techniques to enhance social interaction in the communicative language classroom. Also
examined will be the impact of a supportive classroom environment and pair/small group
interactions on second language acquisition.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the foundations of second language literacy and best practices in literacy
teaching
Compare and contrast the challenges of acquiring literacy in a second language for
children versus adults
Explain the advantages of cooperative learning as a way to promote social interaction
necessary for language acquisition.
Recognize cooperative learning as part of classroom best practices

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

diger, A. (2001). Te

agan, S. (1998). Ne
MD: Brookes Publi

einstein, G. (2001).

lavin, R. E. (1995).

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UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

1. Building Oral Language. Teaching Reading: K-2. Annenberg Media, Washington,


DC. (26 minutes)

2. Reading in a Preliminary English Class. Teachers Voices 8: Explicitly Supporting


Reading and Writing in the Classroom by Anne Burns and Helen de Silva Joyce.
Macquarie University, Adult Migrant Education Program Research Centre, Sydney,
Australia. 2005. (22 minutes).

UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Compare and contrast the issues and challenges of teaching literacy to children and
adults.
3. In what way does cooperative learning depart from more traditional approaches to
second language learning/teaching? As a teacher, what challenges might you face in
implementing this approach?
4. Considering Kagans discussion of multiple intelligences, reflect on your own
preferred modes of learning. How would a teacher best approach you as a learner
based on this theory?

Guided Observation

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class. This week, focus your comments on any literacy or cooperative
activities that you observed. You should also comment on the materials used during the
class.

CLASS TIME

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Unit 5: Teaching Grammar

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the underlying principles and current practices in
grammar instruction. Also examined will be the intersections between grammar and the
other skill areas in an integrated language curriculum and effective methods of assessing
and providing feedback on grammar.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the paradigm of form, meaning and use and how grammar serves
meaning
Understand the constructs of consciousness-raising and practice as they pertain to the
acquisition of grammatical structures
Analyze ESL/EFL textbook grammar activities and categorize them based on form,
meaning, and use
Recognize appropriate procedures for grammar assessment and feedback

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

arsen-Freeman, D.

itta, R., & Gardner,

unan, D. (2003). Gr

hornbury, S. (1999)

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

Frodesen. The Importance of Discourse in Teaching Grammar. Wingspan Video.

UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions


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Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Explain the difference between the descriptive and prescriptive views of grammar.
Which would you prefer as a learner? As a teacher?
3. Consider the various activities for teaching grammar discussed in the readings. Which
would appeal to you most as a learner? Why?
4. In your opinion, which type of test better represents a students grammatical
competencea discrete item test or a performance test? Why?

Observation Journal

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class. This week, focus your comments on any grammar instruction or
feedback on grammar that you observed.

Demonstration of Method (Group 2 Video/Discussion)

CLASS TIME

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Unit 6: Teaching Pronunciation

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the underlying principles and current practices in
pronunciation instruction. Also examined will be the intersections between pronunciation
and the other skill areas in an integrated language curriculum and effective methods of
assessing and providing feedback on pronunciation.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the major components of the sound system of English
Explore the theory of teaching pronunciation as it relates to practical classroom
strategies
View experienced teachers working on pronunciation in the classroom

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

oodwin, J. (2001). T

ilbert, J. B. (2008).

ones, R. H. (2002).
(pp. 178-187). New

urphy, J. (2003). Pr

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

Clearly Speaking by Anne Burns and Stephanie Claire, Macquarie University, AMEP
Research Centre, Sydney, Australia (2004).
Introduction to Pronunciation (1:00)
Peter Norton: Stress at the Suprasegmental Level (12:13)
Philip McIntyre: Linking Words (8:31)

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UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Who is better equipped to teach pronunciationa non-native speaking teacher who
speaks the first language of her students or a native speaker of English who is not?
Why?
3. Which features do you believe play a larger role in learner intelligibility--segmental
(e.g., vowel and consonant distinctions) or suprasegmental (e.g., intonation,
blending)?
4. Both Goodwin and Murphy discuss the importance of feedback in teaching
pronunciation. Give specific examples of teacher feedback that you observed in this
weeks videos.

Guided Observation

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class. This week, focus your comments on any pronunciation
instruction or feedback on pronunciation that you observed. You may also comment on
any student pronunciation issues that you observed.

CLASS TIME

23
10/7/2010
University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

Unit 7: Teaching Vocabulary

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the underlying principles and current practices in
vocabulary instruction. Also examined will be the importance of teaching vocabulary in
context, the intersections between vocabulary and the other skill areas in an integrated
language curriculum, the role of corpus linguistics in vocabulary teaching, and effective
methods of assessing and providing feedback on vocabulary.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the role played by morphology and etymology in English vocabulary and
how to apply it in the classroom
Recognize the importance of teaching vocabulary in context as well as how to use
context to ascertain meaning
Encourage the development of student strategies to assist vocabulary acquisition
Recognize appropriate procedures for vocabulary assessment and feedback
Recognize the contribution of corpus linguistics to vocabulary teaching

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

ation, I. S. P. (2005

ation, I. S. P.(2003)

ation, I. S. P. (2008

cCarten, J. (2007) T

immerman, C. B. (2

24
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University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

1. Teaching Jazz Chants to Young Learners by Carolyn Graham. U.S. Department of


State, Office of English Language Programs, Washington DC. 2006. (27 minutes).

2. Sophia Hibbs: 8th Grade EnglishIntroducing the Topic. Word Generation: Middle
School Literacy Development Using Academic Language. Strategic Education
Research Partnership. Washington DC. 2008. (9 minutes)
URL: http://wordgeneration.org/observe/hibbsM1.html
a. Segment 1: Marking Unfamiliar Words
b. Segment 2: Discussing Definitions

UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Reflect on your own vocabulary learning strategies. What do you find to be most
helpful? Do the strategies you use vary depending on the language you are learning?
3. How does knowledge of the history of the English language help us explain features
of English vocabulary?
4. As a language teacher, how could you use a linguistic corpus to prepare vocabulary
lessons?

Guided Observation

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class. This week, focus your comments on any vocabulary instruction
that you observed. You may also comment on any student vocabulary issues that you
observed.

Demonstration of Method (Group 3 Video/Discussion)

CLASS TIME

25
10/7/2010
University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

Unit 8: English for Specific Purposes

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the discipline of English for Specific Purposes
(ESP) along with its underlying principles and current practices. Highlighted in this unit
will be the difference between ESP and English for General Purposes in terms of the
student populations served, the analysis of student needs, and the differing curricular
goals. As a subdiscipline of ESP, English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and the
underlying issues of EAP course design will be examined.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the underlying theory and applications of ESP
Identify the various sub-disciplines of ESP
Recognize the intersection between English for academic and specific purposes.
Understand the way in which needs analysis shapes the ESP syllabus

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

enesch, S. (2001). A

lowerdew, J., & Pea


Press.

utchinson, T., & Wa

obinson, P. (1991).

obinson, P. (1991).

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

26
10/7/2010
University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

Mollie Bullock: 8th Grade MathProblem of the Week. Word Generation: Middle
School Literacy Development Using Academic Language. Strategic Education Research
Partnership. Washington DC. 2008. (28 minutes)
URL: http://wordgeneration.org/observe/bullockmath1.html
a. Segment 1: Activity Overview
b. Segment 2: Working the Problems
c. Segment 3: Class Discussion of Problems

UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Describe the characteristics of students enrolled in an ESP class versus those enrolled
in a general purpose English class.
3. A perennial issue in ESP is the need for specialized knowledge on the part of the
teacher? Do you believe it is more important for the teacher to be an expert in the
field (e.g., business, law, medicine) or to have TESOL training?
4. Describe the different types of needs that learners have. Why is it important to
analyze this entire range of needs when designing an ESP curriculum?

Guided Observation

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class. This week, focus your comments on any academic language
that you observed. You may also comment on any content-based materials that were used.

CLASS TIME

27
10/7/2010
University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

Unit 9: Content- and Task-Based Instruction

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the underlying principles and current practices
associated with content- and task-based instruction. In addition to examining the
characteristics of an effective task and the role that tasks play in content-based instruction
(CBI), the unit will also highlight one prototype of CBI, the sheltered content classroom,
in which content and language instruction are integrated with the goal of providing more
effective instruction for English language learners.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Understand the underlying theory and applications of content-based and task-based
instruction
Identify the varieties of content-based instruction and their appropriate contexts
Define the nature of a task according to task-based language teaching
Understand the criteria for assessing student performance in task-based instruction

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

rinton, D. M. (2003

chavarria, J., & Gra

hehadeh, A. (2005)

kehan, P. (2003). Ta

UNIT VIDEOS (to be viewed before Class Time)

Enhancing Mainstream Classrooms for English Language Learners, Teachers of English


to Speakers of Other Languages (2005). (17 minutes)

UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

28
10/7/2010
University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.
2. Given the readings you have done, what do you believe to be the optimal features of a
task?
3. How are learners assessed in task-based instruction? What are the main difficulties
encountered in the assessment process?
4. In the sheltered content classroom, teachers make various types of accommodations
for English language learners to assist the learning process. Discuss the types of
accommodations that you observed in the videos for this week.

Guided Observation

You are required to use the template found in the toolbox for all classroom observations.
Upload your observation notes to your instructor and be prepared to discuss your class
observation during class.

Demonstration of Method (Group 4 Discussion/Video)

Completed Observations and Summary Reflection (30 points)

CLASS TIME

29
10/7/2010
University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

Unit 10: Looking Ahead

PURPOSE

The purpose of this unit is to examine the concept of method and the role that it plays in
the post methods era. An additional goal is for candidates to evaluate materials as they
contribute to effective instruction and to critically examine their own beliefs about the
teaching/learning process as it has evolved during the course.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this unit, candidates will:


Examine and evaluate the rationale behind commercial materials and resources
Synthesize key concepts of the course and formulate individual beliefs about the
second language learning/teaching process
Enter into a professional exchange about these beliefs
Critically assess the role of method in the field of TESOL today

UNIT READINGS (to be read before Class Time)

rown, H. D. (2002)
(pp. 9-18). New Yo

anagarajah, A. S. (2

umaravadivelu, B.

UNIT ASSIGNMENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Forum: Unit Reflection Questions

Respond to one of the questions below in not more than one page. Post your answers to
the Forum.

1. Select one or more of this weeks readings/videos. Using specific examples, describe
how the concepts presented appear in the classroom that you are observing.

30
10/7/2010
University of Southern California
Rossier School of Education
Course Syllabus

2. The three readings for this week all presume a post-methods era. What does this
mean? What impact might it have on your teaching?
3. Both Kumaravadivelu and Canagarajah discuss their dissatisfaction with the current
state of methods today. Summarize the unresolved issues that these two authors
discuss.
4. Select one issue from this weeks readings that resonates with your personal
experience. Explain your stance on the issue and your reasons for this stance.

Textbook/Materials Review (90 points)

CLASS TIME

31
10/7/2010