Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 176

Chapter 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Introduction

The researchers seek to inform their readers about the mental and emotional

factors affecting the academic performance of a child in school regarding the working of

their parents overseas.

Nowadays, as life becomes uneasy to other families here in the Philippines,

parents tend to work overseas to offer a convenient living to their children. As a result, it

leads to several effects on the emotional and mental aspects of a child.

This study is concerned with regards to the upbringing of children by their

parents. A child's greatest need is quality time with their parents. Finding time to spend

together as a family can be difficult. In many households, parents have to go to work,

which limits the time they have to spend with their children. In addition, children are

involved in school and other activities. (Collins, 2010)

Based on surveys and statistical review, some common negative effects of

having OFW (Overseas Filipino Workers) parents are dropping out of school, taking

prohibited medicine, and getting into early pregnancy. These negative effects

sometimes occur when children do not get too much attention from their parent or either

guardian who is left behind. Children who dont have their parents guidance can easily

be influenced by peers. This is also a reason why abandoned children can change

their attitudes easily. But besides having negative effects, children having OFW parents

1
also change for good especially those who are in their adolescent age. Their OFW

parents serve as their inspiration to do better in their endeavor. (Tan, 2011)

It has a direct effect on the actions and behavior of an individual on how he or

she is developed mentally and emotionally. By actions, this study focuses entirely on the

reflected performance of students of Child Jesus of Prague School with parents that

work overseas in school.

Background of the Study

The analysis of the academic performance of OFW children studying in Child

Jesus of Prague School is aimed at providing guide to the school, faculty, students, and

guardians in terms of handling behaviors that affects learning at school.

Nowadays, there really is a need to give more attention to the needs of the youth.

These needs do not only pertain to material objects but also to the other needs such as

for security, love and belongingness, esteem and self-actualization as presented in the

hierarchy of needs by Abraham Harold Maslow.

Prevailing problems in this country is mainly contributed by youth-related causes

rooted by their upbringing. Emotional and mental problems lead to misbehavior of

children that affects their whole life in process.

People these times do receive very little from the privilege of formal studying. In order to

protect this, the researchers would give ample time to study more on the factors that

affect a childs performance in school without his or her parents around in order to

understand their cases.

2
The researchers decided to focus on the relationship of the parents to their

children simply because this plays an important role in the development of the well-

being of individuals. At the final course of this study, the researchers aspire to give a

great realization to the readers about this matter. They want to see through the silent,

yet big problem faced by the youth as centered in the high school students of Child

Jesus of Prague School.

Statement of the Problem

This study aims to know the Factors Affecting the Academic Performance of

OFW Children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y 2012-2013.

Moreover, it seeks to answer the following questions:

1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of:

1.1 Gender

1.2 Year level

1.3 Nature of parents profession abroad

1.4 Years spent of parents abroad

1.5 Average grade in the 2nd quarter

2. What are the factors affecting the academic performance of OFW children in Child

Jesus of Prague School?

3
3. Is there any significant relationship between the Factors Affecting the Academic

Performances of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School to the profile of the

respondents in terms of:

3.1 Gender

3.2 Year level

3.2 Nature of parents profession abroad

3.3 Years spent of parents abroad

3.4 Average grade in the 2nd quarter

Theoretical Framework

As the framework for the study being conducted by the researchers, theories

about parental involvement and attachment are used as supporting ideas for the

researches to be made.

Parent Involvement, according to a published article by Wendy S. Grolnick in

1994 and 1997, it affects student achievement because these interactions affect

students motivation, their sense of competence and belief they have control over their

success in school. It means that the involvement of parents serves as the basic

foundation in the development of a child in all aspects. Children spend most of their time

in schools than in their own house. The mere presence of parents at home after a

childs school hours makes a big difference in a childs development, being attached to

them more or not. Once an individual mind is muddled, it automatically affects his

actions and thus, it yields negative effects on a childs performance in school.

4
In relation to the study of the researchers, pertaining to the factors affecting the

academic performance of students in Child Jesus of Prague School with OFW parents,

one could already perceive that the relationship of the parents with their children counts.

This study centralizes on high school students; hence, respondents are all in the stage

of adolescence. It is known that adolescence is the stage of confusion in individuals.

This is the stage wherein the support from the family, especially the parents, is much

needed for their development.

The Attachment Theory proposed by William Sears states that the child forms a

strong emotional bond with caregivers during childhood with lifelong consequences.

Sensitive and emotionally available parenting helps the child to form a secure

attachment style, which fosters a child's socio-emotional development and well-being. In

extreme and rare conditions, the child may not form an attachment at all and may suffer

from reactive attachment disorder. Principles of attachment parenting aim to increase

development of a child's secure attachment and decrease insecure attachment.

When mothers taught to increase their sensitivity to an infant's needs and signals, this

increases the development of the child's attachment security.

In relation to the factors affecting the performances of the children in school, the

presence of the parents is important. It can be proven by this theory. This theory means

that as an individual grows up, there is a strong bond or attachment developed between

the child and parents. Parents were needed by their children to discipline, to teach

them, and to guide them properly. All children need the love and care of their parents.

5
Nowadays, some parents go abroad to work and earn more money for the needs

and the future of their children. Even though it is hard for them to leave their children to

their relatives, they are forced to do so, because they want them to give their children a

brighter future. However, the one who is really going to be affected are the children. It

can affect them physically, emotionally, mentally, and the way they communicate to

other people. Some children nowadays tend to have rebellion against their parents

because they thought that their parents do not love them anymore because they left

them. Through these instances, it can be truly said that the presence of parents is

important for the child to grow with good attitude and can perform well in everything they

do because they know that their parents are always there to support them.

Hypothesis

There is no significant relationship between the factors affecting the academic

performance of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School to the profile of the

respondents in terms of:

a. Year level

b. Nature of parents profession abroad

c. Years spent of parents abroad

d. Grades in four core subjects

6
Significance of the Study

A study is conducted to give a specific purpose for different individuals. These are the

following groups that will benefit the study of the researchers:

a. Respondents
This study conducted by the researchers centralized only on students with

parents working overseas. This would benefit them by means of making them

reflect on the performance that they are making without their parents with them

so that they will be able to understand their work positively and even become

more productive in their studies.


b. Students
This study will give benefit to the students because the study indicates the

factors that affect the academic performance of those students with OFW

parents. With these, it would help them to realize the effects of being away from

their parents so that they will be able to value them more and to have a positive

attitude to make a better performance in school.


c. Parents
It will give a big help to the parents because they will have an idea if their

son is not doing well in his academic performances. The researchers give some

tips that will help the parents working abroad on what they need to do to help

their children in his or her studies.


d. Teachers
As the students parents at school, they will have an idea on why are there

students who are having low grades in his or her different subjects and they will

find a way to help that student to cope up by giving them support and motivation

like parents do.


e. Researchers

7
In the future, this study would benefit those who would be making also

researches and a thesis regarding psychology in relation to the performance of

high school students in school.

f. Administration
They are in charge in promoting discipline inside school. With these, they

would understand the problems of students in terms of their performance in

school. One factor that contributes to discipline is proper handling of behavior

brought about by students whose parents are abroad.

Definition of Terms

Appraisals methods by which a performance is being evaluated


Authoritarian parents set firm controls, but they tend to be emotionally more

distant from the child.


Authoritative These parents set high standards and impose controls, but they

are also warm and responsive to the childs communications.


Aversive tending to avoid or causing avoidance of a noxious or punishing

stimulus
Bias generally is one-sided that lacks a neutral point of view
Brusquely abrupt and curt in manner or speech; discourteously blunt
Chronologically arranged in order of time of occurrence
Cognition a group of mental processes that includes attention, memory,

producing and understanding language, learning, reasoning, problem solving,

and decision making.


Compensation strategy whereby one covers up, consciously or unconsciously,

weaknesses, frustrations, desires, or feelings of inadequacy or incompetence in

one life area through the gratification or (drive towards) excellence in another

area.

8
Conscientious the state of being thorough, careful, or vigilant; it implies a

desire to do a task well.


Consolably the manner of allaying the sorrow or grief of something
Distortion the giving of statements that twists fact
Docile used to characterize one that is easily taught or handled.
Ethnographic studies it involves studying prospective customers to

understand social and environmental requirements.


Exosystem refers to settings that are not inhabited by children, but

nevertheless affect their experiences.


Futuribles independent center of study and reflection
Generation gap referring to differences between people of younger

generations and their elders, especially between children and their parents
Gregarious fond of company or being sociable.
Immense extremely large or great, esp. in scale or degree.
Indiscriminate not marked by careful distinction
Inherent existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic

attribute
Longitudinal study correlational research study that involves repeated

observations of the same variables over long periods of time often many

decades
Macrosystem the last level of Bronfenbrenners conceptualization of the

environment that consists of social class, ethnic and cultural customs, as well as

governmental laws and policies that frame the activities of children and their

families.
Mesosystem the level that comprises the connections among the various

Microsystems.
Microsystem refers to the daily face-to-face interactions with parents, siblings,

teachers, and peers characterize childrens experiences, and it includes

childrens homes, child care centers, and schools.


Perpetrator the one who initiates an offence or wrong-doing.

9
Prejudice used to refer to preconceived, usually unfavorable, judgments

toward people or a person because of gender, social

class, age,disability, religion, sexuality, race/ethnicity, language, nationalityor

other personal characteristics.


Proxy stands on behalf of someone else
Remittances transfer of money by a foreign worker to his or her home country.
Self-efficacy the measure of one's own ability to complete tasks and reach

goals.
Solicitousness the expression of care or concern.
Trepidation a feeling of fear or agitation about something that may happen.
Wariness a close attentiveness to avoiding danger

10
Chapter 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

Foreign Literature

In the development of every child, systems of environment influence his

personality, behavior and way of thinking. In this cycle, the involvement of parents

become vital for him to be emotionally and mentally fit; thus, performs efficiently in

school.

According to Charlotte J. Patterson (2009), Ecological Systems Theory is

developed by the American psychologist Urie Bronfenbrenner, ecological systems

theory emphasizes the importance of many different environments on childrens

development. According to Bronfenbrenner (1979), as cited by Charlotte J. Patterson

(2009), he viewed child development as a process that unfolds within a complex system

of relationships occurring in multiple environments. Moreover, in his view, childrens

environments are not simply diverse; they are also related in specific ways. Thus,

childrens homes and schools are located in neighborhoods, and neighborhoods are

located within larger cultural groups that prescribe customs and values. Not only do all

11
of these environments have an impact on a childs development, according to

Bronfenbrenner, but the interactions among them also exert considerable influence.

According to Patterson (2009), Bronfenbrenners model consists of four systems.

It begins with what he called the microsystem, in which daily face-to-face interactions

with parents, siblings, teachers, and peers characterize childrens experiences. The

microsystem includes childrens homes, child care centers, and schools. Within these

environments, systems of interaction develop, with every participant influencing every

other participant. For example, when a child becomes angry and aggressive at school,

the teacher must devote energy to calming that child down, and other students receive

less positive attention. However, when children are cooperative, the teacher can move

ahead with planned lessons, and everyone is likely to feel more relaxed. In this case,

students may experience their teacher as a happier and more positive person. Over

time, patterns of behavior like these may accumulate and have an important influence

on development.

The next level of Bronfenbrenners model, the mesosystem, comprises the

connections among the various Microsystems. For instance, there are mesosystem

connections between childrens lives at home and their lives at school. If a 10-year-old

boy heard his parents arguing before he left home in the morning, he might already feel

anxious and upset when another boy accidentally steps on his foot at school. Instead of

reacting calmly, he might start yelling and punch the other boy. A teacher who found the

two boys fighting would most likely discipline both. Had things gone smoothly at home,

a small incident at school might not have turned into a big problem. Another boy, whose

family sent him to school feeling happy and relaxed, might have reacted differently.

12
Interactions between people at home, at school, and in neighborhoods all influence one

another.

Bronfenbrenner used the term exosystem to refer to settings that are not

inhabited by children, but nevertheless affect their experiences. The exosystem includes

parents work environments, community groups, and extended families. Even though

children may never go to their parents workplaces, employers policies on flextime,

vacations, and health insurance can have an impact on their well-being. Similarly, even

though children may be unaware of grandparents contributions, the financial assistance

or help with other matters that they provide may be significant in their families daily

lives. Conversely, if parents have difficulties at work or if grandparents fall ill and require

care, exosystems can be a source of stress for families.

The macrosystem is the last level of Bronfenbrenners conceptualization of the

environment. It consists of social class, ethnic and cultural customs, as well as

governmental laws and policies that frame the activities of children and their families.

For instance in some environments, government-supported programs may offer children

opportunities related to nutrition, health care and education. In other environments, such

opportunities may be largely absent. Again, children may know nothing about the

influence of the macrosystem on their behavior or well-being; nevertheless these

environments can have an important impact on them.

According to Patterson (2009), maltreatment is more common among infants and

toddlers than among any other age group. The likelihood of being maltreated is highest

among infants and toddlers and declines as children grow older. A large majority of

13
perpetrators of child abuse and neglect are parents. Only about one in five maltreatment

cases does not include a parent as perpetrator.

Types of Maltreatment

According to Charlotte J. Patterson (2009), the most common form of child

maltreatment, neglect, occurs when a caregiver fails to provide adequate food, clothing,

supervision, or medical care. At last count, neglect accounted for more than 60% of

documented cases of child maltreatment each year. Physical abuse such as hitting,

slapping, shaking, and kicking with the intent to cause harmaccounted for about 19%

of cases. Sexual abuse including inappropriate exposure to sexual acts or materials,

sexual contact, and forced sexual behavior of any kindaccounted for approximately

10% of cases, mostly among older children. Emotional abuse, defined as demeaning,

coercive, or overly distant behavior by a caregiverincluding intimidation, humiliation,

and social isolationaccounted for about 5% of cases. Other forms of maltreatment

including abandonment, threats of harm, and congenital drug addiction accounted for

about 17% of cases. These numbers add up to more than 100% because many infants

and children experience multiple forms of maltreatment. (HHS, 2006)

Impact of Child Maltreatment on Later Development

According to Patterson (2009), when children who have been maltreated are

compared with children from similar backgrounds who have not been maltreated, those

who have been maltreated show many problems in adjustment. These problems may

include difficulties at school, problems with peers, low self-concept, and academic

failure. Many of these problems are interrelated. For example, maltreated youngsters

14
show higher levels of aggressive behavior than their peers, and since aggressive

behavior is aversive, their peers often grow to dislike them, increasing the likelihood that

they will be victimized. The longer an infant or toddler is maltreated, the more serious

the effects are likely to be. Some long-term effects of child maltreatment may depend on

biological factors.

Although the long-term impact of child-maltreatment is often serious, some

maltreated children fare better than others. One important factor seems to be strong

personal relationships with people outside the childs family. For instance, among

children who had been maltreated before entering school, a good-quality peer friendship

was protective against ill effects during elementary school. Children who had such a

friendship were less likely to experience negative outcomes. Another study found that

among maltreated children who attended a special therapeutic summer camp, those

who formed positive relationships with counselors fared best overall. Relationships both

within the family and outside it are important in fostering positive development of

children who have been maltreated.

Nonparental care

According to Charlotte J. Patterson (2009), most children do not spend every

waking minute with their parents. As the number of single-parent and dual-earner

families has increased in recent years, many children in the United States have had

some experience with nonparental care. In fact, recent national data show that 61% of

U.S. children from birth to 6 years of age receive some form of child care on a regular

basis from people other than their parents. In a large-scale study of child care

15
sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 92% of

children had experienced some form of nonparental care by the time they were 3 years

old, and 52% were regularly spending 30 or more hours per week in nonparental care.

The type of nonparental care that children receive varies with age. Infants and

toddlers are most likely to spend time in home-based child care arrangements, either

with a relative or a nonrelative. Preschoolers are more likely to be in center-based care

arrangements that put them into groups of more than six children, they catch more colds

and have more ear infections than do children who stay at home or who are in smaller

groups when away from home. Opinions differ as to whether these minor illnesses are a

problem or whether they actually benefit children by ensuring that they have developed

immunities before they enter school. Apart from these health issues, type of child care

does not seem to relate.

What makes a successful learner?

According to Diana Pardoe in 2009, it is important to define what we mean by the

word successful before we can begin to explore what makes a successful learner. As

detailed in the first edition of this book the thesaurus tells us that success has

synonyms such as eminence, fame, accomplishment, achievement, mastery,

attainment, victory, fortune and happiness. When asked what they understand by

success, many young learners give responses which focus upon:

Levels and grades


Being first, being the best, winning
External rewards stickers, merit, prizes

16
According to Pardoe (2009), children need to see being successful in the wider

context of achieving something new for the first time, improving their own personal

performance and reaching their own goals. Although this may seem straightforward,

there are many needs to be met before conditions are conducive to successful learning

experiences.

In exploring motivation and learning, the source of self-worth and the experience

of success, it is essential to make time to talk with children about their lives and their

learning, and providing them with the language of learning. Unless we give time and

attention to self-esteem and motivation of each learner, unless we recognize and value

difference, and unless we invest time in creating a healthy, safe and enabling

environment for learning, we are probably wasting our time. This word motivation is,

however, often inappropriately used as in How can we motivate these kids? or Come

on, motivate yourselves! We know that real motivation comes from within and therefore

we need to understand how to ignite it. Ian Gilbert, in Essential Motivation in the

Classroom, uses the phrase Hope fires a neuron... which he first heard used by

Professor John MacBeath from Strathclyde University.

So to foster intrinsic motivation we need to use positive language that promotes

hopefulness and creates energy, so that our learners are optimistic, have real ambition

and are consequently more likely to feel valued or valuable.

According to Richard J. Wagman (2000), communicating well with others is an

important part of emotional fitness.

The Significance of Talk

17
According to Pardoe (2009), at the end of 2006, the Report of the Teaching and

Learning in 2020 Review Group was produced more commonly referred to as 2020

Vision. The report presents a clear vision of what personalized learning might look like

in our schools in 2020 (2020 Vision 2006). This vision is one where the Every Child

Matters outcomes are realized for all children and young people. The report identifies

some key recommendations for schools to enable young people to develop the skills

and attitudes they will need to be successful citizens.

a. Helpful talk

b. Encouragement f. Explaining
c. Sharing ideas g. Being polite
d. Giving instructions h. Asking questions
e. Talking about learning

e.

f. Unhelpful talk

a. Gossip e. Chatting when its not about our


b. Arguing
c. Back chat learning
d. Interrupting f. Talking when someone else is

talking

18
g. Dwecks Motivational Model of Achievement

h. According to Ross Vasta (et. al) (1999), childrens academic self-concept,

of course, derives mainly from their academic performance. Those who do well in

school are likely to develop high options of their competence, whereas poor performers

are likely to develop low opinions. How well a child performs in school depends partly

on his academic abilities and partly on the amount of effort and motivation the child puts

forth.

i. According to Burhans and Dweck (1995) as cited by Ross Vasta (et. al)

(1999), based on over 20 years of research, Carol Dweck and her colleagues have

developed a theoretical model that attempts to explain the complex role that motivation

plays in childrens academic success The model focuses on two patterns of motivation

that have been observed in both younger and older children and that are reflected in

their affect, cognitions, and behavior.

j. According to Dienerand Dweck (1978 & 1980) as cited by Vasta (1999),

children in achievement situations generally react to failure experiences in one of two

ways. Some children display a mastery-oriented pattern. Despite having just failed at a

task or problem, these children retain a positive mood and express high expectations for

success on future attempts. As a result, they tend to persist at the task and they seek

out similar challenging problems. This motivational pattern usually leads to improved

academic performance over time.

k. Other children, however, display a helpless pattern. When they encounter

failure, their affect conveys sadness or disappointment, and they express doubt that

19
they can ever succeed at the task. These children show little persistence on the activity

and tend to avoid similar challenges in the future. Academic performance in these

children often remains considerably below what it could be. What could produce these

very different responses to failure?

l. Dwecks model proposes that at the heart of the problem are the childrens

feelings of self-worth. Children who develop the helpless pattern typically believe that

their self-worth depends on the approval and positive judgments of others. As a way of

validating their self-worth, they seek out situations in which success involves receiving

such approval. If the situation instead produces failure, these children view the absence

of approval as a blow to their goodness as a person (self-worth), which then leads to

the helpless pattern of negative affect low expectations for future success, low

persistence, and avoidance of similar situations.

m. In contrast, children who develop mastery-oriented pattern do not believe

that their self-worth depends on the opinions of others. They tend to seek out situations

in which, whether successful or not, they will learn from their experiences. When these

children fail, therefore, they view it simply as an opportunity to improve their ability on

the task, and so display the opposite pattern of affect, expectations, and persistence.

n. According the Dweck (1991); Smiley and Dweck (1994) as cited by Vasta

(1999), this position of the model can account for the development of the motivational

patterns in younger children. Support for it comes from several studies in which 4- and

5-year-olds were asked to solve a number of puzzles, only one of which could actually

be solved. When later given the opportunity to play with one of the puzzles again,

20
children who chose the solved puzzle (non-persisters) also displayed negative affect

toward the task and expressed lower expectations for success on another task. Children

who chose to persist on one of the unsolved puzzles showed the more positive pattern

of reactions.

o. According to Dweck and Leggett in 1998 as cited by Vasta in 1999, in

older children, the model becomes more complex. Beyond 10 years of age or so,

childrens cognitive abilities permit them to develop certain self-conceptions. One of

these is a theory of intelligence. Some children come to believe in an entity model, in

which the amount of a persons intelligence is fixed and unchangeable. Others

subscribe to an incremental learning model, in which a persons intelligence can grow

with experience and learning. A second self-conception involves childrens attributions

for success or failure. Some children believe that success or failure results primarily

from the amount of ability a person has; other children believe it depends on the amount

of effort a person applies to a task.

p. Children who develop the helpless pattern as we might expect, generally

believe that the amount of their intelligence is fixed (entity model) and that their lack of

success derives from their lack of ability. These two beliefs combine to give the child

little reason for optimism in the face of failure-after all, ability is unchangeable and the

child simply has too little of it. Predictably, then, these children feel helpless and

hopeless. A very different outlook, however, results from the two opposite beliefs, which

are generally held by mastery-oriented children. If intelligence can grow (incremental

model) and success depends largely on ones effort, then failure experiences need not

21
lead to feelings of despair or pessimism. These children believe they can do better next

time by simply trying harder.

q. Research has likewise supported this portion of the model. For example,

one study found that fifth-grade children who displayed elements of the helpless pattern

(non-persistence and low expectations for future success) following failure on as task

were more likely to hold the entity view of intelligence, whereas children displaying the

mastery-oriented pattern tend to believe in the incremental view (Cain and Dweck, 1995

as cited by Vasta et. al.). Evidence supporting the effects of different attributions for

success and failure derives from an early finding that the helpless pattern is more

common in girls (Dweck et. al. 1975 & 1973 as cited by Vasta 1999 et. al.). This gender

difference was subsequently shown to involve the way in which theaters typically

provided feedback to boys and girls. When boys failed, they were more often told that

they did not try hard enough (indicating lack of effort): when girls failed, they usually

were told simply that they had the wrong answers (implying lack of ability) (Dweck and

Goetz, 1980; Dweck etal., 1978 as cited by Vasta 1999 et. al.).

r. According to Vasta in 1999, Because all children sometimes fail, all

receive such feedback, and all can thus be influenced by it. In general, then, girls may

eventually come to believe that their abilities are inadequate (I failed because Im lousy

at math) and therefore approach new tasks in a pessimistic manner, whereas boys may

continue to assume that their failures result from too little effort (I could have done

better if I had studied harder) and so remain motivated in the face if new challenges.

Fortunately, feelings of helplessness based on these sorts of attributions have been

shown to be treatable, such as by training teachers to provide feedback in more

22
appropriate ways (Dweck et. al., 1978), or by retraining helpless children to attribute

their failures to effort rather than to ability. (Dweck, 1975 as cited by Vasta et. al. 1999)

s. A childs development is a process involving system of relationships

depending on their environment the interaction with individuals in the family, school

and the neighborhood. They also have emotional needs like being with their parents

and nonparental care becomes an issue. It is said that maltreatment does not only fall

under physical aspects but also neglect is one form. These kinds of maltreatment give

an impact on a childs adjustments from home to school and to his or her environment.

t. As these individuals grow up, they enter the stage of adolescence in which

their relationship with their parents becomes crucial because they are in the

state of confusion. There are individuals who are positive enough on that

situation that makes them productive and those who do not.

u. In schools, students are being motivated to be successful learners, and

talking is one significant element in the process. Motivation is one good thing to

be present in relation to the parent-child relationship in their learning process.

Not all talks are helpful in a childs learning because there are also influences of

talk that makes them unable to perform well in school since their emotional

needs are being put aside.

v. Local Literature

w. In different aspects, an individual develops be it from babyhood up to

senescence. Along the process, there is the stage of adolescence. As high

school students, learning about the necessary needs in this stage is important to

23
be guided to what contributes to their own success in schools depending on the

environment that influences them especially the family.

x.

y. Physiological Stages of Development

z. According to Charo L. Bayani (2005), physiological development is also

the biological development of humans. This involves the physical attributes of an

individual as it grows and matures chronologically. Once we say chronological stages of

development, it follows a certain pattern of development that has an orderly sequence.

aa. According to Bayani (2005), in the critical phase of developing personality,

infancy is known to be the time of true foundation of age. Although, it is true that other

stages of development is also critical, this stage is known to be the most critical phase

of developing personality because this is the time where the child is in depth in

acquiring all the knowledge and information that he can get from the world that he is

living in. It is a time where the child is so sensitive with all the behavioral, attitudinal and

emotional patterns that are being established by the people around him.

ab. According to Bayani (2005), this is the stage where the babies learn how

to catch the attention of the people around them in any way they can because of their

yearning to become a part of a certain social group. This craving will be justified through

their attachment behavior whenever they are with somebody who shows attention and

affection towards them.

24
ac. According to Bayani (2005), in childhood, a lot of people think that

childhood is the longest amongst all stages development a time when a child is

considered relatively helpless and dependent to others. This part of development is

divided into two stages early childhood and late childhood. The reason why this stage

is divided into two is not because of the physiological changes of the individual but

through their socialization style.

ad. According to Bayani (2005), in early childhood, the individual occupies this

stage when he is three to six years of age. The child in this stage have somewhat

developed their personality and unconsciously acquires more through the help of the

people with whom he is showing some interests. The interests with whom he is showing

is an important element in acquiring the introductory training and knowledge needed to

become a member of a gang in the late childhood. Since, the child in this stage gets

too interested with the people around him, whatever attitude, behavior or emotions laid

before him will somewhat reinforce the childs self-concept.

ae. According to Bayani (2005), in late childhood, the individual occupies this

stage when he is within the age range of seven to thirteen. This stage of development

shows the kids in depth interests with their peers. As they get too involved in getting the

approval of their peers, family relationship gets deteriorated affecting their personal and

social adjustments, which have a strong impact on their self-evaluation.

af. According to Bayani (2005), in adolescence, this stage extends from the

time a person enters the age of fourteen to seventeen. This is a stage that is known to

be the transitional stage, where a person becomes physically, emotionally and

25
psychologically mature, yet, immature. Since it is a stage of transition it is known to be a

problem age where adolescents are too eager to improve their personalities in the hope

of advancing their status in the social group they belong and a time for identity

confusion where relationships between adolescents and members of the families tend

to decline although these relationships often improve as they draws near to adulthood.

Self-concepts of the individuals in this stage are often beyond their control since they

are being influenced by a lot of conditions.

ag. In early childhood, our parents and other relatives are the most important

people in our lives.

ah. According to Paulhus Trapnell (et. al) (1999) as cited by James W. Kalat in

2010, they say that firstborn children are more successful and ambitious than

later-born. Firstborns also rate themselves as more honest and conscientious.

On the other hand, later-born children said to be more popular, more

independent, less comforting, less neurotic, and possibly more creative.

ai. The problem is that many firstborns come from families with only one

child, whereas later-born children necessarily come from larger families. Many

highly educated and ambitious parents have only one child and provide that

child with many advantages. Therefore, what appears to be a difference first-

and later-born children could be a difference between small and large families.

(Rogers, 2001)

26
aj. Psychologists have done a great deal of research comparing parenting

styles to the behavior and personality of the children. Much of this research is

based on four parenting styles:

ak. Authoritative parents: These parents set high standards and impose controls,

but they are also warm and responsive to the childs communications. They set

limits but adjust them when appropriate. They encourage their children to strive

toward their own goal.

al. Authoritarian parents: Like the authoritative parents, authoritarian parents set

firm controls, but they tend to be emotionally more distant from the child. They

set rules without explaining the reasons behind them.

am. Permissive parents: They are warm and loving but understanding.

an. Indifferent or uninvolved parents: These parents spend little time with their

children and do little more than provide them with food and shelter.

ao. According to Diana Baumrind in 1979 as cited by Kalat in 2010, the

research has found small but reasonably consistent links between parenting

styles and childrens behavior. For example, most of authoritative parents are

self-reliant, cooperate with others, and do well in school. Children of

authoritarian parents tend to be law- abiding but distrustful and not very

independent. Children of permissive parents are often socially irresponsible.

Children of Indifferent parents tend to be impulsive and undisciplined.

27
ap. According to Tronick Morelli and Ivey (1992) as stated by Kalat (2010), in

subsistence cultures, a mother returns to her task of gathering food and so forth

shortly after giving birth, leaving her infant most of the day with other women

and older children. Within the first few months, the infant establishes strong

attachments to several adults and children.

aq. Still, many psychologist in Europe and North America maintained that

healthy emotional development required an infant to establish a strong

attachment to a single caregiver ordinarily, the mother. When more and more

families began placing infants in day care so that both parents could return to

work shortly after their infants birth, a question arose about the psychological

effects on those children.

ar. Many studies compared children who stayed with their mothers and those

who entered day care within their first year or two of life. The studies examined

attachment, adjustment and well-being, play with other children, social relations

with adults, and Intellectual development.

as. According to Scarr (1998) as stated by Kalat (2010), the results were that

most children develop satisfactorily if they receive adequate day care. Later studies

have confirmed that children in dual income families do just as well academically as

those with a parent at home (Goldberg, et. al. 2008). One exception to this rule is that if

both parents return to work full time within the first year of an infants life, the child later

shows a slightly increased probability of problem behaviors toward both children and

adults (Hill, et. al. 2005). As always, we cannot be sure about cause and effect from

28
data such as these. Perhaps the families that use full-time day care in the first year

differ from other families in ways that influence the results.

at. Older children are less affected, and perhaps positively affected by having

both parents employed. One longitudinal study of 2,402 low-income families

examined preschoolers and older children before and after their mothers took

jobs. The preschoolers showed no behavioral changes, and the older children

showed slight benefits in some aspects of adjustments (Chase-Lansdale 2003).

au. According to Rita L. Antheonin 1993 as stated by Kalat (2010), our first

social contacts are with the persons who care for us in early infancy, usually the

parents. The manner in which a caregiver responds to the infants needs-

patiently, with warmth and concern or brusquely, with little sensitivity-will

influence the childs relationships with other people. Some Psychologists believe

that a persons basic feelings of trust in others are determined by experiences

during the first years of life (Bowlby, 1973).

av. By two months of age, the average child will smile at the sight of its

mother or fathers face. Delighted with this response, parents will go to great

lengths to encourage repetition. Indeed, the infants ability to smile at such an

early age may have evolved historically precisely because it strengthened the

parent-child bond. The first smiles tell the parents that the infant recognizes and

loves them-which is actually not true in any personal sense at this age-and

encourages them to be even more affectionate and stimulating in response. The

infant smiles and coos at the parents; they pat, smile, and vocalize in return,

29
thereby stimulating an even more enthusiastic response from the infant. A

mutually reinforcing system of social interaction is thus established and

maintained.

aw. By their third and fourth month, infants show that they recognize

and prefer familiar members of the household-by smiling or cooing more when

seeing these familiar faces of hearing their voices-but infants are still receptive

to strangers. At about seven or eight months, however, this indiscriminate

acceptance changes, many infants begin to show wariness or actual distress at

the approach of a stranger and, at the same time, to protest strongly when left in

an unfamiliar setting or with an unfamiliar person.

ax. Parents are often disconcerted to find that their formerly gregarious infant,

who had always happily welcomed the attentions of a baby-sitter, now cries

inconsolably when they prepare to leave-and continues to cry for some time after they

have left.

ay. Although not all infants show this so-called stranger anxiety- it appears

to be part of its distinctive temperament-the number of infants who do show it

increases dramatically from about eight months of age until the end of the first

year. Similarly, distress over separation from the parent-a distinct but related

phenomenon also partially related to inborn temperament-reaches a peak

between fourteen to eighteen months and then gradually declines. By the time

they are three years old; most children are secure enough in their parents

absence to be able to interact comfortably with other children and adults.

30
az. An infants tendency to seek closeness to particular people and to feel

more secure in their presence is called Attachment. The young of other species

show attachment to their mothers in different ways.

ba. According to Harlow (et. al) (1969) as cited by Kalat (2010), psychologists

at first theorized that the attachment to the mother developed because she was

the source of food, one of the infants most basic needs. However, some facts

did not fit. A series of well-known experiments with monkeys showed that there

is more to mother-infant attachment than nutritional needs.

bb. According to Harlow (et al.) as cited by Kalat (2010) although we should

be careful in generalizing from research on monkeys to human development,

there is evidence that the human infants attachment to the primary caregiver

serves the same functions: it provides the security necessary for the child to

explore his or her environment, and it forms the basis for the interpersonal

relationships in later years. It has been hypothesized that the failure to form

secure attachment to one or a few primary persons in the early years is related

to an inability to develop close personal relationships in adulthood

bc. According to Kalat (2010), most of the research on attachment in humans

has examined differences among infants in the security of their attachments to

their mothers, and whether those differences can be attributed to earlier patterns

of interactions between the infant and mother, to the infants inborn

temperament, or to both. A few progressive researchers have even thought to

examine infant-father attachments as well.

31
bd. According to Kalat (2010), puberty, the period of sexual maturation that

transforms a child into a biologically mature adult capable of sexual

reproduction, takes place over a period of about three or four years. It starts with

a period of very rapid physical growth accompanied by the gradual development

of the reproductive organs and secondary sex characteristics. Puberty also

affected the girls relationship with their parents; girls who were developmentally

advanced talked less with their parents and had fewer positive feelings about

family relationships than did less developed girls.

be. Related to the traditional view that adolescence is inevitably a period of

personal turmoil is the expectation that adolescents and their parents suffer from a

generation gap characterized by stormy adolescent-parent relationships. As a result,

parents often anticipate their youngsters approaching puberty with trepidation.

bf. According to Kalat (2010), most parents and teenagers manage to

negotiate a new form of interdependence that grants the adolescent more

autonomy, more equal role in family decisions, more responsibilities. If a

teenager fails to negotiate a working relationship with his or her parents in early

adolescence, then conflict may escalate into major difficulties by late

adolescence. This may be why we mistakenly think of adolescent-parent conflict

as more typical of the last years of high school when, in fact, conflict is more

likely to peak earlier, at puberty.

bg. According to Maccoby and Martin in 1983 as cited by Kalat in 2010,

parents who provide explanations for their decisions, who relax parental control

32
during adolescence, and who employ a democratic structure of decision making

within the family give their off spring a sense of autonomy that reduces conflict

and eases the transition to adulthood.

bh. An adolescents sense of identity develops gradually out of the various

identifications of childhood. Young childrens values and moral standards are

largely those of their parents; their feelings of self-esteem stem primarily from

their parents view of them. As youngsters move into a wider world of junior high

school, the values of the peer group become increasingly important, as do the

appraisals of the teachers and other adults. Adolescents try to synthesize these

values and appraisals into a consistent picture. If parents, teachers, and peers

project consistent values, the search for identity is easier.

bi.

bj.

bk. Piagets Formal Operational Thinker

bl. According to Brenda B. Corpuz, Ph.D. (2010), Piaget formulated the

theory of Formal Operational Thinking, which demonstrates how the cognitive

capacity of the adolescent allows him or her to go beyond the sensible and

concrete to dwell on what is abstract, hypothetical, multidimensional, and

possible. In this realm of though, the adolescent begins to attain subtlety in

thinking, entering the sphere of possible and futuribles. More specifically, formal

operational thinking consists in:

33
a. Propositional thinking making assertions outside visual evidence, and stating

what may be possible in things not seen by the eyes ( for example, whether an

unseen object is red or green, big or small, flat or round);

bm. b. Relativistic thinking subjectively making an opinion on facts

involving ones own bias, prejudice of distortion of facts- which may be either right or

wrong ( for example, arguing for or against the superiority of the races, whether

white, brown, yellow, or black);

bn. c. Real versus possible examining a situation and exploring the possible

terms of situations or solutions (e.g. possible success in implementing a student

project or a school policy).

bo. For Piaget, one indication of the presence of formal operational thinking is

the ability of the adolescent thinker for combinational analysis, which is his taking

stock of the effects of several variables in a situation, testing one variable at a time,

and not randomly. An application of a situation, which requires combinational

analysis, is the school laboratory experiment activity wherein high school students

test chemical elements singly and in combination resulting in an understanding of

chemical changes.

bp. A new thought capacity, known as Hypothetico-Deductive Reasoning,

emerges in the adolescent reasoning from general facts/situations to a particular

conclusion. The school pendulum experiment is an example of deducing from

variables and generating and recognizing a truth, expressed by the transitional

process of deriving a conclusion from a hypothesis.

34
bq. Scientific evidence shows that while adolescents may obtain the capacity

for formal operational thinking, only experience and education will allow them to

actually practice it. School math and science courses, such as performing

Physics-type problems (balance scales, pendulums, projection of images and

shadows, etc.)

br. Outside formal operational thinking which can be developed by

mathematical and science studies, the adolescent enters into a new capability,

which makes him a Problem-Solving Thinker. This involves identifying problems

and seeking new and creative solutions for them. The problem-finding thinker is

one who is able to rethink and reorganize ideas and ask important questions,

even defining totally new problems not previously seen.

bs. The adolescent may further experience an increase in depth of thought.

Thus, he/she is able to bring what is logically best for everyday life, whether or

not this may be the objectively correct solution or response to a situation or a

problem.

bt.

bu. Sieglers Information-Processing skills

bv. According to Corpus, Ph.D. (et al.) (2010), as in information-processing

theorist, Robert Siegler views the influence of the environment on thinking. He

sees cognitive growth, not as stages of development, but more of a sequential

acquisition of specific knowledge and strategies for problem solving. He

35
observes the quality of information the adolescent processes, and those

information influences him/her in his facing task through strategies or rules.

bw. Overachievers

bx. According to Corpuz Ph.D. (et. al) (2010), achievement and IQ test are

standard measurements of the learners abilities, as well as potentials for

success in given areas. While IQ test are alone do not measure the great

number of abilities that are part of human intelligence, they are still relatively

good predictors of success in school achievement. Indirectly, IQ test are

beneficial instrument in identifying learning deficiencies in learners.

by. In many societies, students who get IQ scores that place them in top 3

and 5 percent on the bell curve are considered gifted. Still, those whose IQ

tests are not in the top 3 and 5 percent on the bell curve may actually achieve

very high academic grades. The latter types of learners are labeled

overachievers.

bz. The cases of overachievers serve as a reminder that the IQ test is not only

determinant in school achievement. There are other factors such as, motivation,

interest, work habits, and personality development. Beyond what are statistically

shown by achievement in curricular subjects ( in English, Math, Science, Araling

Panlipunan, etc.), overachievers demonstrate superior work habits, greater

interest in school work, more consistency in doing assignments, and more

grade/performance consciousness. Overall, they show more responsibility,

36
consciousness and planning compared with normal achievers. Listed as

characteristics of overall achievers are:

ca. 1. Positive self-value (self-esteem, confidence, optimism)

cb. 2. Openness to authority (responsive to expectations of parents and

teachers)

cc. 3. Positive interpersonal relations (responsive and sensitive to feelings of

others)

cd. 4. Less conflict on the issue of self-autonomy (feels freedom to make right

choices, initiates and leads activities)

ce. 5. Academic orientation (disciplined work habits, high motivation to

discover and learn, interest in study values and varied fields of study)

cf. 6. Goal-orientation (efficiency and energy in organizing, planning, setting

target, prioritizing long-term goals over short-term pleasures)

cg. 7. Control over anxiety (well composed and relaxed in performing

organized tasks)

ch.Underachievers

ci. According to Corpuz Ph.D. (et. al) (2010), individuals whose performances

are below the measured IQ levels are labeled underachievers. In spite of

possible potentials to learn and scores in the top quarter on measured academic

ability, their grades are below their measured aptitudes for academic

37
achievement. Under achievements becomes more pronounced with the

beginning of adolescent years in high school when class work becomes more

demanding.

cj. As to types of underachievers, the withdrawn underachievers are

described as having a more pronounced tendency to be passive (their overt

behavior being submissive and docile). They follow the path of no-resistance,

not reacting against given assignments and actually following school

regulations. Generally quiet, they tend not to participate in class activities.

Meanwhile, the aggressive underachievers tend to be talkative, if not disruptive

and rebellious.

ck. Parental Involvement

cl. There are many theories on underachievement, but generally, the

influence of parents appears to be the dominant influence on the adolescents

achievement level, more than peer group influence. A summary of differences

between parents of high achievers and underachievers will help teacher

educators understand the significance of parental involvement in adolescent

learning and involvement in school activities.

cm. Generally, parents of high achievers demonstrate:

cn. 1. Positive attitudes about learning, school, teachers and intellectual

activities, such as by exposing their children to stimulating books, word

games, wholesome sports, travel, etc.;

38
co. 2. Harmonious and supportive relationship, inclusive of open, free and

enjoyable interaction within the family;

cp. 3. Their own capabilities for success, conflict management, independent

choices with which children can identify;

cq. 4. Encouragement and support for their childrens achievement without

undue pressure;

cr. 5. Active involvement in the school program and in parent-teacher

community activities.

cs. Meanwhile, parents of underachievers show little or none of the above

traits, while possibly showing:

ct. 1. Indifference and disinterestedness in academic and extracurricular

activities of their children;

cu. 2. Authoritarian, restrictive and rejecting attitudes or the opposite, namely

being excessively lax so as to leave their children on their own without

any involvement or support;

cv. 3. Excessive indulgence, solicitousness, and protectiveness, thus stifling

their childrens self-initiative.

cw. There are different stages of development. These are the beginning of life,

Babyhood, Childhood, Adolescence, and Adulthood. Life begins when the male sex cell

and female sex cell unite. In babyhood, the individual starts to develop his/her

personality. Moreover, he starts to acquire all the knowledge and information from the

39
people around him, unconsciously acquires more help of the people and develops

interests. Through this information, it explains that as the child gets older, he

changes physically, emotionally, mentally and socially.

cx. With the influence of the environment, it affects the thinking abilities of

adolescents (high school students) their capacity limited by different factors like

parental involvement.

cy. Foreign Studies

cz. Parents have no choice sometimes but to leave the country to earn more

income so that their children would have a better quality education to receive

from institutions; however separating themselves to their children.

da. According to Farooq, M.S. (2011), the home environment also affects the

academic performance of students. Educated parents can provide such an environment

that suits best for academic success of their children. The school authorities can

provide counseling and guidance to parents for creating positive home environment for

improvement in students quality of work (Marzano, 2003). The academic performance

of students heavily depends upon the parental involvement in their academic activities

to attain the higher level of quality in academic success (Barnard, 2004; Henderson,

1988; Shumox & Lomax, 2001).

db. According to King and Bellow (1989) as stated by Martha Kyoshaba in

2005, he used parents occupation as a proxy for income to examine the relationship

between income and achievement and found that children of farmers had fewer years of

schooling than children of parents with white-collar jobs. They also determined that the

40
schooling levels of both parents had a positive and statistically significant effect on the

educational attainment of Peruvian children. They argue that 34 how much education a

childs parents have is probably the most important factor in determining the childs

educational opportunities. They observe that the higher the attainment for parents, then

the greater their aspirations for children.

dc. According to Corey Cappelloni (2011), as migration increases, there is

also an increase in the number of children being left behind. Migrating parents often

leave their children in the care of relatives, friends, or no one at all for significant periods

of time. In short term, these children might experience an improvement in their material

well-being. Indeed, they have nicer clothes, refurbished homes, better quality school

supplies, and more entertainment devices compared to children without migrating

parents. However, despite the material advantages that remittances may provide,

insufficient attention is given to the psychological, educational, and social impacts of

migration on the children left behind.

dd. Education for their children is important to parents. They tend to give it by

means of working to the extent of leaving the country and their children to any relative,

friend or neighbor. Despite all the things received by those individuals, they lack when it

comes to the attention coming from their parents that yield to psychological impacts that

is reflected on their outputs in academics.

de.Local Studies

df. One reason why parents tend to work overseas is that they want a

convenient living for their children and of course to give a quality education as

41
possible. However, without given guidance, children barely understand these

things and as a result be emotionally strained that is why it affects their

performance in school.

dg. According to Joseph Regalado (2006), as stated by Pedrito R.Guinocor Jr.

(et. al) (2008), the worst scenario is when explanations are sought from children, who

may not always know why they performed below expectation.

dh. According to Andrew J. Fuligni (2006), as stated by as stated by Pedrito R.

Guinoco Jr. (et. al) (2008), one of the top reasons immigrants give for coming to the

United States is a desire to provide better educational and economic opportunities to

their families and children. Immigrants this statement regardless of their educational

level, financial standing or country of origin. Numerous ethnographic studies

demonstrate that the children in immigrant families are well aware of their parents

motivations for coming to the United States. By the time they reach adolescence, many

children with foreign-both parents acknowledge their parents efforts and cite their

parents sacrifices as sources of motivation for trying to succeed in American society.

Because childrens sense of obligation to their immigrant parents can affect their

adaptation and adjustment in the United States, several studies of children and

adolescents from Asian and Latin American immigrant families have been conducted to

gauge their level of obligation to the family. Several general themes emerge from this

research, including the childrens strong sense of obligation, the contribution of that

sense of obligation to their overall well-being, and obligation as a source of academic

motivation as well as an important consideration in life decisions.

42
di. According to Jere Brophy (1987), as stated by Pedrito R. Guinoco Jr. (et.

al) (2008), motivation to learn is a competence acquired through general experience

but stimulated most directly through modeling, communication of expectations, and

direct instruction or socialization by significant others specially parents childrens home

environment shapes the initial constellation of attitudes they develop toward learning.

When parents nurture their childrens natural curiosity about the world by welcoming

their questions, encouraging exploration, and familiarizing them with resources that can

enlarge their world, they are giving their children the message that learning is

worthwhile and frequently fun and satisfying. When children are raised in a home that

nurtures a sense of self-worth, competence, autonomy, and self-efficacy, they will be

more apt to accept the risks inherent in learning. Conversely, when children do not view

themselves as basically competent and able, their freedom to engage in academically

challenging pursuits and capacity to tolerate and cope with failure are greatly

diminished. Once children start school, they begin forming beliefs about their school-

related successes and failures. The sources to which contribute their success to family

effort, ability, or level of task difficulty and failures often lack of ability or luck of effort

have important implications for how they approach and cope with learning situations.

The beliefs teachers themselves have about teaching and learning the nurture of the

expectations they hold for students also exert a powerful influence.

dj. According to David Wilson (2002), as stated by Pedrito R. Guinoco Jr. (et.

al) (2008), the home is the first and most important school your child will ever have. You

may have heard this before, perhaps as part of a sales pitch your encyclopedias. It is,

however, more than a statement intended is to make a sale it is also a truth supported

43
by both research and common sense. And that truth is, parental involvement in is school

is important to academic success. Practically any teacher will verify this. Teachers will

tell you that their most success at student comes from a home where the parents

provide structure, support, and guidance. They will tell you from their own experiences

that students who have parents who really care about their education are usually more

successful than students who do not.

dk. Based on a research conducted by Castro (et. al) (2011), supervision and

presence of the parents mold the behavior and character of a child at his developmental

stage. The studys aim is to figure out the psychological effects of the absence of parent

to the personality of the students specifically those with parents who are an overseas

Filipino worker. According to Castro, et al., absence of father/mother has an immense

impact to a child since they supply half the genetic material for personality

development. Feist (as cited by Castro, et al., 2011) thought that the personality of a

person is based on his own individuality and stays as it is as that person grows.

dl. In an Attachment Theory of John Bowlby, Feist depicted that the effects of ones

relationships, attachment, emotional and psychological connections during his

childhood are apparently observed as the person goes through his adolescent stage.

Early detachment of a parent and a child would influence the childs psychological

growth as assumed by the researchers in which they implied that parents should have

built a tight rapport with the child as it gets mature and realizes that he was raised up by

one supportive and reliable parent.

44
dm. The results of the study served as significant variables that seemed also

to be factors affecting the personality of the college students having absentee parents.

1. Effects of the Absentee Parents on the Personality of the Students

dn. According to Castro (et . al) (2011), De La Garza comprehended that children

turned out to be prone on psychological and emotional strain when it comes to

abandonment or the setting of being left behind which lessens the confidence and

triggers damage to the childs patterns of socialization. One implication created by the

results of the study that a student may not be clued-up about the role of his absentee

parent throughout their lives which may be caused by inaccessible communication.

do. 2. Monetary Support as a Compensation for the Time Lost While Working

Overseas.

dp. According to Castro (et. al) (2011), there was not any problem regarding

financial support based on the respondents answers since most of them are regularly

supported by their parents. Communication was not that hard at hand with high-tech

gadgets which contribute to good relationship between the child and the parent.

dq. 3. Parental Authority While Being Away

dr. According to Castro (et. al) (2011), majority of the participants still treats

their parent as figures of authority. The type of attachment they had when they were

young has relations to the parent authority they have today. According to Cherry K. as

45
mentioned by Castro (et. al), students with high level of confidence and are socially

active have tight attachment with their parents.

ds. Factors Influencing the Childs Behavior

dt. According to Rosalyn V. Antazo (et. al.), the following are the factors that

influence a childs behavior.

A. Child Training method


1. The goal of all child training is to develop in the child for adjusting to the traditional

roles prescribed by the cultural group to which the childs family belongings.
2. There are two methods of child training.
a. Authorization consist of strict rules and regulations with severe punishment

for misbehavior.
b. Democratic involved discussion explanation and reasoning with the child,

with more lenient forms of punishment.

du. Parents from rural places are more authoritarian than urban parents.

Mother is less strict than fathers. Young parents are more democratic than older.

Foreign born parents are more authoritarian than native born parents.

B. Order of Birth
1. Oldest child often becomes selfish and spoiled, quarrelsome and more

prone to anger because at the first the parents elevate all their time to him but

with the arrival of the second child he is less taken care of by the mother.
2. Second born children less likely to over protected the child and are less

anxious about his welfare as a reared the second children are his dependent.

They tend to be less neurotic and introverted and more fun loving and

humorous.

46
3. Middle Children are somewhat neglected in a favour of oldest and youngest

children. They are usually gregarious but are more popular than others.
4. Youngest spoiled and dependent but punished by the older siblings if he

fails to do what is asked of him.


C. Family size
a. Small Families result in economic and social advantages for the child, more

attention from his parents, early social experiences in which he is protected

and the center of attention, great impact from crisis within the family because

there are fewer members to share them.


b. Large families there is little opportunity for over protection of any one child

of little nagging or pressure on the child.


D. Siblings Relationships
1. The relationship of a child to his siblings will be affected by many different

factors, such as the age differences of the siblings, the sex of the siblings and

the relationship between the different siblings in the family to their parents.
2. Conflicts and rivalry are the most common forms of siblings behavior.
3. In the case of jealousy, there is more in a girl girl combinations than in boy

boy or boy girl combination.


E. Parent Child Relationships it is dependent upon the parents attitudes. These

are influenced partly by:


a. Cultural attitudes
b. Personality patterns of parents
c. Concepts of the role parents
d. Age of the parents
e. Age of child
f. Educational level of the parents attitudes.

dv. Sometimes, the occupation of the parents affects the emotional

well-being of their children. Although it is inevitable, they have to do so to alleviate

the living of their own family, but also, it is important that children grow up to have

attachment to their parents in a positive manner. Family is one main factor and it

47
does not only focus directly on the work of parents because there are also factors

that they consider that made them choose to work overseas.

dw.

dx.

dy.

dz.

ea.

eb.

ec.

ed.

ee.

ef.

eg.Chapter 3

eh. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

ei. This chapter shows the process on how the researchers conducted their

study entitled An Analysis on the Factors Affecting the Academic Performance

of OFW Children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013

48
ej. This chapter comprises of the research method, subject of the study,

locale of the study, procedure of the study, research instrument and statistical

tool.

ek. Research Method

el. Among the types of research techniques, the researchers chose to use

the descriptive type of research technique consisting of describing, gathering

and analyzing facts and information.

em. Descriptive, from the name itself, is an adjective referring to giving

descriptions. Being the most appropriate method to use, this would describe

how the researchers conducted their study. The researchers gathered

information from different sources such as foreign and local literature and

studies and also from their respective respondents. As they go along with the

process of their study, they will analyze the data they have gathered from those

sources.

en.Subject of the Study

eo. The researchers see the need to focus on the performance children with

OFW parents since they know that having parents abroad is very hard and can

really affect their studies, specifically the high school students of Child Jesus of

Prague School. The high school students are composed of 15 sections; 4

sections from the freshmen, sophomores and juniors and 3 sections from the

seniors with approximately 38 students in each section. In relation to that, there

are only limited respondents for their study in which they centered to only

49
students with OFW parents. Preferably, they would be having 40 respondents

only randomly, overall, of the said year levels. In relation to this, they chose all

high school students of their school to be their respondents because in every

year level there are changes and different factors that affect their studies. Since

they have different scenarios and age, there can be different results on how

these factors affect them. The researchers know how hard it is not to be with

parents while growing up. So with this, they can know how to deal and advice

them.

ep.Locale of the Study

eq. For this study, the researchers chose respondents coming from all year

levels of Child Jesus of Prague School located in Barangay Batingan,

Binangonan, Rizal that offers the best quality education in Rizal and is also one

of the top performing schools in Luzon. Now in its thirtieth year of producing

outstanding citizens of this country, let us then explore the history and location of

this institution. Here is the vicinity map of the school.

er.

es.

et.

eu.

ev. Mrs. Antonia A. Aprecio and Mr. Bonifacio C. Aprecio Jr. founded Child

Jesus of Prague School in April 1982 offering education for nursery,

50
kindergarten and preparatory students. The name of the school then was

Aprecio-Arcilla Childrens House and it was previously located right below the

Aprecio residence in Libid, Binangonan, Rizal. The only employee of the school

then was Mrs. Antonia A. Aprecio and her aide, Mrs. Adoracion A. Cruz.

ew. In April 1984, construction of a bigger campus located in

Calumpang, Binangonan, Rizal was started. The new campus came with the

new name Child Jesus of Prague Learning Center and additional grade levels

were offered. From the original 1 st preparatory batch of 31 students, the

population of the school grew to more than 300 students. From 1984 to the early

90s, the growth rate was closed to 70% every year. In 1995, the total students

population of Child Jesus of Prague Learning Center reached as high as 714.

ex. Due to seemingly fast growth of the school and the additional levels being

offered, the owners thought that it will be wise to change its name again to

better describe its size. From its old name that connotes small in capability and

size, the Learning Center was changed to School . Child Jesus of Prague

School became as the institutions final name.

ey. After enjoying several years of growth and increase in enrollees, CJPS

gradually lost more than 200 students. From 1997 to 2000, the schools

population was averaging only 530. This was mainly due to the rise of new

learning institution in the area that offers cheaper tuition fee rates and the

continuous deterioration of the countrys economy.

51
ez. In March 2000, the founders decided to establish the high school

department in Batingan, Binangonan, Rizal. This came as response to the

growing demand for the institution to provide secondary education to its

elementary graduates. With only 38 students initially, the high school department

quickly gained recognition for the premium quality of education it renders. By its

secondary year of operation, Child Jesus of Prague School, HS Department,

more than doubled its student population.

fa.The institution was likewise given the recognition as one of the best performing

schools in Region IV-A by the Department of Education in 2000. This was due to

its consistent outstanding performance in the National Assessment Test (NEAT).

For three consecutive years since the above-mentioned exam was initiated, the

School was ranked in the TOP 5 PERFORMING Elementary Private Schools in

the entire province of Rizal.

fb. In 2007, when the Department of Education reinstated the NCAE (National

Career Assessment examination) Child Jesus of Prague school ranked #1 in

Binangonan and #6 out of the total of 108 private high schools in the region.

This status was again maintained based on the 2008 NCA tally sheet. In 2009,

CJPS ranked #1 TOP PERFORMING SCHOOL in Binangonan and #2 out of

133 private high schools in the entire province of Rizal for the same

examination.

fc. The CJPS institution does not only excel in academics but also in terms of their

extracurricular activities. To give proof to this statement, Child Jesus of Prague

52
School have reigned champions in the Binangonan Private Schools Association

(BPRISA) Sports Competition for two consecutive years. Finally, last August 20,

2011, the CJPS basketball varsity team joined in the Metropolitan School Sports

Association. This is the first time CJPS competed in the vicinity of Manila. It is

expected that their opponents are stronger than them but still, they still proved

their capacity and overwhelming skills.

fd. Our track record will speak for itself when asked about the quality of

education offered by the school. Below is a list of our accomplishments as an

organization:

In SY 2001-2002, Child Jesus of Prague School won 9 out of possible 16 Gold

Medals in the Annual Binangonan Inter Private School Academic Contest.

Child Jesus of Prague School in SY 2002-2003 won 11 out of 16 GOLD MEDALS

in the Binangonan Inter Private School Academic Contest.

In 2003 RIPRISA Academic Competitions, Child Jesus of Prague School

dominated the contest by winning 23 medals out of 29 events. Twelve of these

medals are Gold, 7 Silver and 4 Bronze. This competition was participated by

private schools in Binangonan and Angono. This made Child Jesus of Prague

School as the major representative of the two above mentioned towns to the

Provincial Level Inter- Private Schools Academic Competitions.

53
In the Provincial Level Inter Private Schools Academic Competitions, Child Jesus

of Prague School once again dominated the event and brought home 8 out of

possible 12 GOLD MEDALS

In school year 2010-2012 Child Jesus of Prague School won the Overall-

Championship of the Binangonan Private Schools Association (BIPRISA) Sports

Fest for the Third consecutive school year.

Consistent TOP 5 member of the National Elementary Assessment Test (NEAT)

conducted by then, DECS. The NEAT determines the level of academic

achievement of Grade Six or graduating students of all schools nationwide.

Child Jesus of Prague School was awarded by the Department of Education in

2000 as one of the TOP PERFORMING SCHOOLS in the country.

For TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS (2007-2008), we have been the NUMBER 1

TOP PERFORMING HIGH SCHOOL in Binangonan, Rizal and NUMBER 6 out

of 117 Private High Schools for the entire REGION IV-A in the National Career

Assessment Examination (NCAE).

Our graduates have passed entrance examinations and now enrolled in the

countrys most prestigious universities such as UP, De La Salle University,

University of Sto. Tomas, UA&P, Mapua, FEU and CEU.

The Child Jesus of Prague School became a champion in Binangonan Private

Schools Sports Association for 3 consecutive years, from 2007-2010.

54
fe. All these success give the institution a reputation of being one of the premiere

schools in Region IV-A.

ff. Presently, CJPS has the second biggest student population in

Binangonan, with more than one thousand enrollees. This came after more than 25

years of dedicated work towards making a difference in the field of education.

fg. Mission

fh. Child Jesus of Prague School will be one of the top performing learning

institutions in the Philippines in relation to its values formation, academic and non-

academic programs, human resources and facilities.

fi. Vision

fj. Child Jesus of Prague School passionately works toward holistic

development of the Filipino youth who embody strong faith in God and moral

values, intelligence that surpasses national standards, physical discipline, love

for the country and its people.

fk. The Schools General Objectives:

fl. In conformity to our vision and mission, CJPS aims to achieve the following:

1. To form students who emulate values of a Christian Filipino who is patient,

respectful, forgiving, non-judgmental, generous and have sense of gratitude.

2. To develop self-appreciation as he is created in the image and likeness of God.

55
3. To be Christ-centered individuals

4. To respect the faith and belief of others

5. To be morally upright

6. To develop ones competence in expressing himself in oral and in written forms

using both English and Filipino

7. To apply learned skills in interpreting and analyzing problems as applied in their

daily lives.

8. To gain knowledge about science and mathematical concepts and principles

applicable to real life situations.

9. To think critically and respond intelligently to national and international issues

10. To harness God-given talents and bring forth self-expression through Music and

Arts

11. To develop other academic, athletic, cultural, religious, leadership and personal

potentials through different club activities

12. To be physically active and healthy

13. To have a sound mind and sound body

14. To have confidence and high self-esteem

56
15. To mingle and accept individuals from different classes of society

16. To form responsible Filipino citizens who uphold the pride and dignity of being a

Filipino

fm. Our culture which is guided by our core values defines the characteristics

needed to achieve our vision:

1. Hardworking

2. Dedicated

3. Professional

4. Honest

5. God-fearing and loving

6. Thinks like a winner

fn.

fo. Procedure of the Study

fp. Right from the start, each class of the seniors is composed of nine groups with

four to five members. First task given to the researchers is to brainstorm for

three topics each which then focused on the psychology of adolescents that

would only be in concern of CJPS students. After presenting topics, the

researchers thesis adviser approved of the factors affecting the performance of

57
students with parents working abroad which was then formulated into the title of

An Analysis on the Factors Affecting the Academic Performance of OFW

Children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

fq. After the formulation of the title, the researchers then proceeded on working for

the first chapter entitled The Problem and Its Background. The researchers

were first asked to work on with the first three chapters, the Introduction,

Background of the Study and the Statement of the Problem. Introduction deals

with the overview of the mini-thesis of the researchers. It is about what the

researchers expect their readers to know about their study from general to

specific. It is composed of the researchers own ideas supported by studies

conducted by other personalities. Next, the Background of the Study deals with

the presentation, discussion and explanation about why the researchers chose a

particular topic, establishment of goals and its effects to the readers. After this,

the Statement of the Problem deals with three specific questions about the

profile of the respondents (gender, age, etc.), dependent variables versus the

topic (categories about factors, effects, etc.) and if there is any significant

relationship between the given profiles of the respondents to the dependent

variables cited.

fr. After the accomplishment of the first three parts of Chapter 1, the

researchers then proceed to the next three parts, the Theoretical Framework,

Hypothesis and the Significance of the Study. In Theoretical Framework, it

would serve as the support for our study. This part consists of theories and their

relevance to the topic, and researchers provided two theories namely the Parent

58
Involvement by Wendy S. Grolnick and the Attachment Theory by William Sears.

After which is the hypothesis. The researchers used the null hypothesis for this

which states that There is no significant relationship between the There is no

significant relationship between the factors affecting the academic performance

of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School to the profile of the

respondents in terms of gender, year level, nature of parents profession abroad,

years spent of parents abroad and average grade in the 2 nd quarter. For the

Significance of the Study, the researchers cited individuals who will benefit from

our study and how. The researchers include the respondents themselves,

students, parents, teachers, researchers, and the administration.

fs. Lastly, the Definition of Terms is the last part of Chapter 1. It involves the

alphabetical list of all the unfamiliar terms that can be found in the mini-thesis

created by the researchers.

ft. After all these, the researchers were provided with two days for a library

tour for the gathering of data from different literature and studies about child

development and parental guidance for the Chapter 2 entitled as Related

Literature and Studies. From the title itself, it is made up of related sources to

support the said study of the researchers. Literature refers to any printed

material such as books, encyclopedias, newspapers, etc. Studies, on the other

hand, refer to any unpublished studies such as theses, researches and

dissertations. Literature and studies both consist of foreign and local sources.

The researchers gathered most of the literature sources from the National

College of Business and Arts in Taytay, Rizal and in San Beda College Rizal

59
Campus. For the local studies, the researchers were able to gather their data

from the University of Rizal System Binangonan and the University of Rizal

System Angono. For the Foreign Studies, the researchers gathered their data

through the internet. They found a lot of difficulties in looking for sources simply

because the required publishing year for the literature source would be limited

only from the year 2000 up to the present. There are several great materials that

could support our study; however, the publishing years went beyond as early as

1900s.

fu. After completing the Chapter 2, creating the citations and list for the

bibliography are the most important parts of this chapter simply because to give

credit to the authors used for a basis in the study.

fv. Chapter 3 which is entitled as Research Methodology then comes in with

its first three parts, the Research Method, Subject of the Study and the Locale of

the Study. A Research Method has four types Descriptive, Qualitative,

Quantitative and Quasi. For this, the researchers used the descriptive method

for describing, gathering and analyzing facts and information. For the Subject of

the Study, they are none other than the respondents. The researchers are

limited to forty respondents that are all considered to be OFW children. In

choosing them, the researchers used the Fishbowl Method. This method refers

to the random picking of the respondents to avoid having any bias in the

statistics. Afterwards, the Locale of the Study is all about the school where the

study is conducted. It involves the schools history, foundation, mission, vision

and objectives, achievements and its vicinity map.

60
fw. After finishing the first three parts of Chapter 3, the researchers now

proceeded to the administration of survey questionnaires consisting of the

profile questionnaire and the survey questionnaire. The survey questionnaire is

categorized into four identified factors Communication, School, Socialization

and Learning Process. After this, the researchers went on a review regarding

the proper creating of the bibliography for the Chapter 2.

fx. During the break, the researchers made tallies regarding numbers per

profile of students and numbers per category items to profiles. Right after, the

researchers created the tabulation forms for Chapter 4 entitled as Presentation,

Analysis and Interpretation of Data. Tables are categorized into three types

profile, distribution of responses and the use of Chi-square. It involves the

complete tallies with their corresponding weight for the Statistics and Chi-

square, and every table consists of verbal interpretation.

fy. Lastly, Chapter 5 is entitled as Summary of Findings, Conclusion and

Recommendation. This chapter includes the findings that would answer the

statement of the problem and about all the interpretation of data found-out by

the researchers. For the conclusion, it answers the statement of the problem

about generalizing the data gathered and stating credible conclusions for the

end results from the fourth chapter. Finally, recommendation answers the

significance of the study. These are specific, original and creative means of

giving suggestion to benefit the said individuals well.

61
fz. Going back to the third chapter, the researchers then proceed on finishing

the last three parts that include the Procedure of the Study, Research Instrument

and the Statistical tool. Procedure of the study refers to the narration of the

processes that took place in the making of the mini-thesis. The research

instrument refers to the effective means of conducting the study, through survey.

Last, but not the least, the statistical tool refers to the definition of terms used in

Statistics used for the study and their functions and also the formulas used to

compute for the different calculations.

ga.Research Instrument

gb. A research instrument is a survey, questionnaire, test, scale, rating, or tool

designed to measure the variable(s), characteristic(s), or information of interest,

often a behavioral or psychological characteristic. Research instruments could be in

a form of observations, interviews (structured, semi-structured, unstructured

closed and open-ended), focus group discussions, diary methods, and

psychometrics (self-report questionnaires or tests). Among the cited instruments

possible, the researchers used the survey questionnaires. Survey questionnaires are

set of printed or written questions with a choice of answers, devised for the purposes

of a survey or statistical study. They are research instruments consisting of a series

of questions and other prompts for the purpose of gathering information from

respondents. Statistically, it is under survey methodology. It has advantages over

some other types of instruments because they do not require as much effort from the

respondents as verbal or telephone surveys, and often have standardized answers

that make it simple to compile data. The responses are gathered in a standardized

62
way, so questionnaires are more objective, certainly more so than

interviews. Potentially, information can be collected from a large portion of a group in

a short time.

gc. The survey questionnaire made by the researchers is composed of two

parts which are first, regarding the profile of the respondents, and the second one is

regarding the identified factors in the survey proper. For the profile, it is composed of

five items asking for the gender, year level, nature of parents profession abroad,

years spent working abroad and average grade in the 2 nd quarter of the respondents

chosen randomly. For the second part, the researchers identified four categories

which are Communication, School, and Learning Process with five items each, and

the last is Socialization with four items. Summing them up, the researchers

formulated a total of nineteen questions for the second part.

gd. Statistical Tool

ge. Statistics is the study of the collection, organization, analysis,

interpretation and presentation of data. It deals with all aspects of this, including the

planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments.

Statistical tool provides prediction and forecasting the use of data and statistical

models. As for this, the results from the data gathered from the survey

questionnaires would be the basis of the researchers. For the tabulation of data, the

researchers used different formulas to compute for every value located in the tables

in the following chapter:

63
gf.

Frequency refers to the number of respondents for a each profile and the

number of answers in each of the items in all categories.


Percentage refers to a number or a ratio as a fraction of 100. It is the

percentage of each frequency divided by the total frequency of the profile multiply

by 100.The formula in getting the percentage is:

Frequency
gg. 100
Total Frequency

Ranking - In getting the ranking, it depends on the percentage when it is in terms

of the profile of the respondents and the test-type questionnaires while when it is

in terms of the survey type questionnaires, the researchers depend on the

weighted mean.
Total weight is the summation of the frequency of answers on each item

multiplied by the corresponding numerical ratings (Always-5, Often-4,

Sometimes-3, Seldom-2 and Never-1)

F (X 1+ X 2+ ..+ Xn)
gh. n

gi. Where F is the frequency that a given X was chosen by the respondents

and X represents any of the numerical ratings 5 (Always), 4 (Often), 3

(Sometimes), 2 (Seldom), 1 (Never) and n is the total number of respondents

Weighted mean it is the amount obtained when the total weight is divided into

the total number of responses in each item. It is represented by the formula:

64
TotalWeight
gj. Total Responses

gk.

gl. The Chi- square

gm. In survey type questionnaires, chi-square is used to get the computed

value. This computed value will be compared in the calculated value which will

determine if the null hypothesis is accepted or not. The following formulas are used:

O
E
OE
(O E)2
OE2
E

gn. Where:

go. O = Computed Weighted Mean

gp. E = Expected Weighted Mean

gq. In order to compare for the computed and tabulated value, per profile, the

summation of the quotient of the square of the difference between the computed

weighted mean and expected weighted mean then compared to the equivalent value of

the degree of freedom in the chi-square under the value 0.50. The null hypothesis is

approved when the calculated value is less than the tabulated value.

Degree of Freedom

65
gr. df= (k-1)(n-1)

gs. The degree of freedom within is equal to the number of categories

subtracted by one times the number of options under each profile subtracted by one.

gt.

gu.

gv.

gw.

gx.

gy.

gz.

ha.

hb.

hc.

hd.

he.

hf.

hg.

hh.

66
hi.

hj. Chapter 4

hk. PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

hl. This chapter aims to present, analyze and interpret data gathered by the

researchers. This shows the relationship of the profile of the respondents with the

factors affecting the academic performance of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague

School this school year 2012-2013 through tabulation form.

hm. TABLE 1: Frequency Distribution of Respondents in Terms of Gender

hn. Gend ho. Frequ hp. Perce hq. Rank


er ency ntage
hr. Male hs. 18 ht. 45% hu. 2
hv.Female hw. 22 hx. 55% hy. 1
hz. Total ia. 40 ib. 100% ic.
id.

ie. Table 1 shows that there are more females used as respondents with a

number of 22 (55%) than males with a count of 18 (45%).

if. TABLE 2: Frequency Distribution of Respondents in Terms of Year Level

ig. Year Level ih. Frequency ii. Percentage ij. Rank


ik. First Year il. 10 im. 25% in. 1
io. Second ip. 10 iq. 25% ir. 1
Year
is. Third Year it. 10 iu. 25% iv. 1
iw. Fourth Year ix. 10 iy. 25% iz. 1
ja. Total jb. 40 jc. 100% jd.
je.

67
jf. Table 2 shows that the number of respondents is equally divided in the

four year levels. There are forty respondents so in each year level, there are ten

respondents used.

jg. TABLE 3: Frequency Distribution of Respondents in Terms of the Nature of

Their Parents Profession Abroad

jh. Nature of ji. Frequency jj. Percentage jk. Rank


Parents
Profession
Abroad
jl. Engineer- jm. 20 jn. 50% jo. 1
related
jp. Medicine- jq. 1 jr. 2.50% js. 4
related
jt. Business- ju. 7 jv. 17.50% jw. 3
related
jx. Service- jy. 12 jz. 30% ka. 2
related
kb.Total kc. 40 kd. 100% ke.
kf.

kg. Table 3 shows that half of the respondents have a parent whose work is

related to engineering. There are twelve respondents who have a parent whose work is

related to giving service such as care giving. Third in ranking, there are seven

respondents who have a parent abroad whose work is related to business. Lastly, there

is only one among the respondents who have a parent whose work is related to

business.

kh.TABLE 4: Frequency Distribution of Respondents in Terms of Years Spent

by Parent(s) Abroad

68
ki. Years kj. Frequency kk. Percentage kl. Rank
km. Less kn. 2 ko. 5% kp. 5
than a year
kq.1-2 years kr. 9 ks. 22.50% kt. 3
ku.3-5 years kv. 12 kw.30% kx. 1
ky. 6-10 years kz. 10 la. 25% lb. 2
lc. 11 years ld. 7 le. 17.50% lf. 4
above
lg. Total lh. 40 li. 100% lj.
lk.

ll. Table 4 shows that most of the respondents have a parent/parents

working abroad in a range of 3-5 years. This table shows that it corresponds to 30% of

the total respondents followed by those respondents with a parent/parents working

abroad for 6-10 years with a percentage of 25%, then by 1-2 years with 22.50%, next is

11 years and above with 17.50% and the least is less than a year holding 5% of the total

respondents.

lm.TABLE 5: Frequency Distribution of Respondents in Terms of Average

Grade in 2nd Quarter

ln. Average lo. Frequency lp. Percentage lq. Rank


Grade in 2nd
Quarter
lr. 74 and ls. 0 lt. 0% lu. 3.5
below
lv. 75 -80 lw. 18 lx. 45% ly. 1
lz. 81-85 ma. 12 mb. 30% mc. 2
md. 86-90 me. 10 mf. 25% mg. 3
mh. 91 mi. 0 mj. 0 mk. 3.5
and above
ml.Total mm. 40 mn. 100% mo.
mp.

69
mq. This table shows that there are no respondents who have an average

grade of 74 and below and also 91 and above used for the study. Majority of the

respondents have a range of average grade of 75-80 which corresponds to 45% of the

total respondents followed by those students with an average grade of 81-85 which

corresponds to 30% and lastly with 25%, these are the respondents with an average

grade of 91 and above.

mr.

ms.

mt.

mu.

mv. TABLE 1.1: Distribution of the Responses in Category A

(Communication) in Terms of Gender

mw. mx. my. na. nc. So ne. ng. ni. nj. nl. W nm.
Ge I Al O me Se N T To e R
ti i
mz. nb. me nf. nh. nk. g
(5) ( s (2) ( W h
nd. (3) t
e
d

m
e
a
n
nn. no. np. nq. nr. 4 ns. nt. nu. nv. nw. nx.
M 1 9 5 0 0 1 7 4.28 2

ny. nz. oa. ob. oc. 7 od. oe. of. og. oh. 4 oi.
2 7 4 0 0 1 7 . 5

70
0
0
oj. ok. ol. om. on. 1 oo. op. oq. or. os. 4 ot.
3 9 7 1 0 1 7 . 1
3
3
ou. ov. ow. ox. oy. 3 oz. pa. pb. pc. pd. 4 pe.
4 9 5 1 0 1 7 . 4
2
2
pf. pg. ph. pi. pj. 4 pk. pl. pm. pn. po. 4 pp.
5 9 5 0 0 1 7 . 2
2
8
pq. pr. ps. pt. pu. pv. pw. px. py. pz. T qb.
o
t
a
l
:
qa. 2
1
.
1
1
qc. qd. qe. qf. qg. 1 qh. qi. qj. qk. ql. 4 qm.
Fe 1 1 5 1 0 2 1 . 1
5
5
qn. qo. qp. qq. qr. 2 qs. qt. qu. qv. qw. qx.
2 1 7 1 0 2 9 4.36 3

qy. qz. ra. rb. rc. 7 rd. re. rf. rg. rh. 3 ri.
3 9 4 2 0 2 8 . 5
9
1
rj. rk. rl. rm. rn. 6 ro. rp. rq. rr. rs. 4 rt.
4 1 2 1 0 2 9 . 4
2
3
ru. rv. rw. rx. ry. 2 rz. sa. sb. sc. sd. 4 se.

71
5 1 4 1 0 2 9 . 2
5
0
sf. sg. sh. si. sj. sk. sl. sm. sn. so. T sq.
o
t
a
l
:
sp. 2
1
.
5
5
sr.

ss. Table 1.1 shows that in Category A (Communication), majority of the

respondents, both male and female answered Always. Few only answered Seldom and

none answered Never. This table shows that most of the respondents in terms of

gender are having a regular communication with their parent(s). Furthermore in

Category A (Communication), most answers from the male are from Item 3 (Do they

check-up on you on a regular basis?) and most answers from the female are from Item

1 (Do you have a regular communication with your parents?).

st. In this category also, it shows that the least answers of male are from Item

2 (Is there the presence of your means in communicating with your parents abroad?),

and the least answers from the female are from Item 3.

su.TABLE 1.2: Distribution of the Responses in Category B (School) in Terms

of Gender

sv. sw. sx. sz. tb. So td. tf. th. ti. tk. W tm.
Ge I Al O me Se N T To e R

72
ti i
sy. ta. me te. tg. tj. g
(5) ( s (2) ( W h
tc. (3) t
e
d
tl. M
e
a
n
tn. to. tp. tq. tr. 4 ts. tt. tu. tv. tw. 3 tx.
M 1 5 7 0 2 1 6 . 5
7
2
ty. tz. ua. ub. uc. 3 ud. ue. uf. ug. uh. 3 ui.
2 6 7 1 1 1 7 . 3
8
9
uj. uk. ul. um. un. 2 uo. up. uq. ur. us. 4 ut.
3 1 6 0 0 1 8 . 2
4
4
uu. uv. uw. ux. uy. 2 uz. va. vb. vc. vd. 4 ve.
4 1 4 0 0 1 8 . 1
5
6
vf. vg. vh. vi. vj. 6 vk. vl. vm. vn. vo. 3 vp.
5 6 4 2 0 1 6 . 4
7
8
vq. vr. vs. vt. vu. vv. vw. vx. vy. vz. T wb.
o
t
a
l
:
wa.
20.3
9
wc. wd. we. wf. wg. wh. wi. wj. wk. wl. 4 wm.
Fe 1 11 9 1 0 1 2 9 . 3
3
2

73
wn. wo. wp. wq. wr. 1 ws. wt. wu. wv. ww. wx.
2 1 8 3 0 2 9 4.14 4

wy. wz. xa. xb. xc. 2 xd. xe. xf. xg. xh. 4 xi.
3 1 8 0 0 2 9 . 1
4
5
xj. xk. xl. xm. xn. 3 xo. xp. xq. xr. xs. 4 xt.
4 1 6 0 0 2 9 . 1
4
5
xu. xv. xw. xx. xy. 7 xz. ya. yb. yc. yd. 3 ye.
5 6 9 0 0 2 8 . 5
9
5
yf. yg. yh. yi. yj. yk. yl. ym. yn. yo. T yq.
o
t
a
l
:
yp. 2
1
.
3
1
yr.

ys. Table 1.2 shows that in Category B (School), still, majority of the

respondents, both male and female, answered Always. For the least, three answered

Never from the male and only one answered Never from the female.

yt. Furthermore, in Category B (School), most of the answers coming from

the male are from Item 4 (Does your school conduct activities that enhances

your talents/skills?) while most of the answers coming from the female are

equally from Item 3 (Does your school provide activities for students self-

74
improvement?) and also Item 4. On the contrary, least of the answers coming

from the male are from Item 1 (Does the school provide motivational techniques

toward you?) while least of the answers coming from the female are from Item 5

(Does the school provide activities that let you discover who you really are?).

yu.TABLE 1.3: Distribution of the Responses in Category C (Socialization) in

Terms of Gender

yv. yw. yx. yz. zb. So zd. zf. zh. zi. zk. W zm.
Ge I Al O me Se N T To e R
ti i
yy. za. me ze. zg. zj. g
(5) ( s (2) ( W h
zc. (3) t
e
d
zl. M
e
a
n
zn. zo. zp. zq. zr. 6 zs. zt. zu. zv. zw.3 zx.
M 1 2 5 2 3 1 5 . 4
0
6
zy. zz. aaa. aab. aac. aad. aae. aaf. aag. aah. aai.
2 2 3 11 2 0 1 5 3.28 3

aaj. aak. aal. aam. aan. aao. aap. aaq. aar. aas. aat.
3 7 1 5 2 3 1 6 3.39 1

aau. aav. aaw. aax. aay. aaz. aba. abb. abc. abd. abe.
4 4 4 7 1 2 1 6 3.39 1

abf. abg. abh. abi. abj. abk. abl. abm. abn. abo. abq.
Tota
l
:
abp.
13.1

75
2
abr. abs. abt. abu. abv. abw. abx. aby. abz. aca. acb.
Fe 1 3 4 11 3 1 2 7 3.23 2

acc. acd. ace. acf. acg. ach. aci. acj. ack. acl. acm.
2 5 8 7 2 0 2 8 3.73 1

acn. aco. acp. acq. acr. acs. act. acu. acv. acw. acx.
3 7 0 6 5 4 2 6 3.05 3

acy. acz. ada. adb. adc. add. ade. adf. adg. adh. adi.
4 2 6 7 3 4 2 6 2.95 4

adj. adk. adl. adm. adn. ado. adp. adq. adr. ads. adu.
Tota
l
:
adt.
12.9
6
adv.

adw. Table 1.3 shows that in Category C (Socialization), this time majority of the

respondents answered Sometimes both for male and male, and the number of

respondents who answered Never increased.

adx. Furthermore, it shows that most of the answers coming from the male are

equally from Item 3 (Are you not seeking love coming from having a boyfriend/girlfriend)

and Item 4 (Do peer pressure and relationships do not interfere with your studies?)

while most of the answers coming from the female are from Item 2 (Does your

classmate help you when you have a problems at home or in school?). On the contrary,

least of the answers coming from the male are from Item 1 (Are you not preferring to be

with your friends over your family?) while least of the answers coming from the female

are from Item 4.

76
ady.

adz. TABLE 1.4: Distribution of the Responses in Category D (Learning

Process) in Terms of Gender

aea. aeb. aec. aee. aeg. aei. aek. aem. aen. aep. aer.
Ge I Al O Somet Se N T To Weig R
im h
aed. aef. es aej. ael. aeo. t
(5) ( aeh. (2) ( W e
(3) d
aeq.
Mea
n
aes. aet. aeu. aev. aew. aex. aey. aez. afa. afb. afc.
M 1 4 5 7 0 2 1 6 3.50 4

afd. afe. aff. afg. afh. afi. afj. afk. afl. afm. afn.
2 7 4 5 2 0 1 7 3.89 1

afo. afp. afq. afr. afs. aft. afu. afv. afw. afx. afy.
3 2 1 8 3 4 1 4 2.67 5

afz. aga. agb. agc. agd. age. agf. agg. agh. agi. agj.
4 6 5 6 1 0 1 7 3.89 1

agk. agl. agm. agn. ago. agp. agq. agr. ags. agt. agu.
5 3 5 10 0 0 1 6 3.61 3

agv. agw. agx. agy. agz. aha. ahb. ahc. ahd. ahe. ahg.
Total:
ahf.
17.5
6
ahh. ahi. ahj. ahk. ahl. ahm. ahn. aho. ahp. ahq. ahr.
Fe 1 1 5 6 1 0 2 9 4.09 1

ahs. aht. ahu. ahv. ahw. ahx. ahy. ahz. aia. aib. aic.
2 7 6 5 3 1 2 8 3.68 3

aid. aie. aif. aig. aih. aii. aij. aik. ail. aim. ain.
3 1 4 9 4 4 2 6 2.73 5

77
aio. aip. aiq. air. ais. ait. aiu. aiv. aiw. aix. aiy.
4 9 4 6 3 0 2 8 3.86 2

aiz. aja. ajb. ajc. ajd. aje. ajf. ajg. ajh. aji. 3 ajj.
5 5 3 11 2 1 2 7 . 4
4
1
ajk. ajl. ajm. ajn. ajo. ajp. ajq. ajr. ajs. ajt. T ajv.
o
t
a
l:
aju.
17.7
7
ajw.

ajx. Table 1.4 shows that female respondents regard their studies highly than

off the male respondents. Generalizing, most of the answers for both genders fall under

Sometimes and few only answered Never.

ajy. Furthermore, it shows that most of the answers coming from the male are

equally from Item 2 (Do you show total focus in your studies?) and Item 4 (Do you give

priority to your academic goals?) while most of the answers from the female are from

Item 1 (Do you show optimism in learning your lessons?). On the contrary, least of the

answers coming from both male and female are from Item 3 (Do you study in advance

for your lessons?).

ajz.

aka. TABLE 2.1: Distribution of the Responses in Category A

(Communication) in Terms of Year Level

78
akb. akc. akd. akf. akh. akj. akl. akn. ako. akq. aks.
Y I Al O Someti Sel N T T Wei R
me g
ake. akg. s akk. akm. akp. h
(5) ( aki. (3) (2) (1 W t
e
d
akr. M
e
a
n
akt. aku. akv. akw. akx. 0 aky. akz. ala. alb. alc. 4 ald.
1 1 9 1 0 0 1 4 . 1
9
0
ale. alf. alg. alh. ali. 4 alj. alk. all. alm. aln. 4 alo.
2 5 1 0 0 1 4 . 5
1
0
alp. alq. alr. als. alt. 1 alu. alv. alw. alx. aly. 4 alz.
3 8 1 0 0 1 4 . 3
7
0
ama. amb. amc. amd. ame. amf. amg. amh. ami. amj. 4 amk.
4 9 1 0 0 0 1 4 . 1
9
0
aml. amm. amn. amo. amp. amq. amr. ams. amt. amu. amv.
5 7 1 2 0 0 1 4 4.50 4

amw. amx. amy. amz. ana. anb. anc. and. ane. anf. T ang.
o
t
a
l
:

2
3
.
1
0
anh. ani. anj. ank. anl. 3 anm. ann. ano. anp. anq. 4 anr.
2 1 5 2 0 0 1 4 . 3
2
0
ans. ant. anu. anv. anw.2 anx. any. anz. aoa. aob. 4 aoc.
2 3 5 0 0 1 4 . 4
1
0
aod. aoe. aof. aog. aoh. 1 aoi. aoj. aok. aol. aom. aon.
3 3 5 1 0 1 4 4.00 5

aoo. aop. aoq. aor. aos. 1 aot. aou. aov. aow. aox. 4 aoy.
4 6 2 1 0 1 4 . 2
3
0

79
aoz. apa. apb. apc. apd. 2 ape. apf. apg. aph. api. 4 apj.
5 6 2 0 0 1 4 . 1
4
0
apk. apl. apm. apn. apo. app. apq. apr. aps. apt. T apv.
o
t
a
l
:
apu. 2
1
.
0
0
apw. apx. apy. apz. aqa. 0 aqb. aqc. aqd. aqe. aqf. 4 aqg.
3 1 7 3 0 0 1 4 . 1
7
0
aqh. aqi. aqj. aqk. aql. 1 aqm. aqn. aqo. aqp. aqq. 4 aqr.
2 5 4 0 0 1 4 . 3
4
0
aqs. aqt. aqu. aqv. aqw.3 aqx. aqy. aqz. ara. arb. 4 arc.
3 4 3 0 0 1 4 . 5
1
0
ard. are. arf. arg. arh. 3 ari. arj. ark. arl. arm. 4 arn.
4 5 2 0 0 1 4 . 4
2
0
aro. arp. arq. arr. ars. 0 art. aru. arv. arw. arx. 4 ary.
5 8 1 1 0 1 4 . 2
6
0
arz. asa. asb. asc. asd. ase. asf. asg. ash. asi. T ask.
o
t
a
l
:
asj. 2
2
.
0
0
asl. asm. asn. aso. asp. 2 asq. asr. ass. ast. asu. 3 asv.
4 1 3 4 1 0 1 3 . 3
9
0
asw. asx. asy. asz. ata. 2 atb. atc. atd. ate. atf. 4 atg.
2 4 3 1 0 1 4 . 2
0
0
ath. ati. atj. atk. atl. 2 atm. atn. ato. atp. atq. 3 atr.
3 4 2 2 0 1 3 . 4
8
0

80
ats. att. atu. atv. atw. 5 atx. aty. atz. aua. aub. 3 auc.
4 2 2 1 0 1 3 . 5
5
0
aud. aue. auf. aug. auh. 2 aui. auj. auk. aul. aum. aun.
5 3 5 0 0 1 4 4.10 1

auo. aup. auq. aur. aus. aut. auu. auv. auw. aux. T auz.
o
t
a
l
:
auy. 1
9
.
3
0
ava.

avb. Table 2.1 shows that in Category A (Communication) in terms of year

level, there is regular communication between the parents and their children for having

the highest number of answers under Always. Few only answered under Often and

Sometimes. Comparing the number of answers in Seldom among the four year levels,

more of it came from the fourth year. Furthermore, it shows that most of the answers

coming from the first year are equally from Item 1 (Do you have a regular

communication with your parents?) and Item 4 (Are you open in communicating with

your parents?). Most of the answers coming from the second year and fourth year are

both from Item 5 (Do your parents give you a sense of encouragement even theyre not

with you?), and most of the answers coming from the third year are from Item 1. On the

contrary, least of the answers coming from the first year are from Item 2 (Is there the

presence of means in communicating with your parents?). Least of the answers coming

from the second year and third year are both from Item 3 (Do they check up on you on a

regular basis?). Lastly, least of the answers coming from the fourth year are from Item

4.

81
avc. TABLE 2.2: Distribution of the Responses in Category B (School) in

Terms of Year Level

avd. ave. avf. avh. avj. So avl. avn. avp. avq. avs.W avu.
Y I Al O me Sel N T T e R
tim i
avg. avi. es avm. avo. avr. g
(5) ( avk.(3) (2) (1 W h
t
e
d
avt. M
e
a
n
avv. avw. avx. avy. avz. 2 awa. awb. awc. awd. awe.4 awf.
1 1 5 3 0 0 1 4 . 4
3
0
awg. awh. awi. awj. awk.0 awl. awm. awn. awo. awp.4 awq.
2 7 3 0 0 1 4 . 1
7
0
awr. aws. awt. awu. awv.1 aww. awx. awy. awz. axa. 4 axb.
3 8 1 0 0 1 4 . 1
7
0
axc. axd. axe. axf. axg. 0 axh. axi. axj. axk. axl. 4 axm.
4 6 4 0 0 1 4 . 3
6
0
axn. axo. axp. axq. axr. 2 axs. axt. axu. axv. axw. 4 axx.
5 5 3 0 0 1 4 . 4
3
0
axy. axz. aya. ayb. ayc. ayd. aye. ayf. ayg. ayh. T ayj.
o
t
a
l
:
ayi. 2
2
.
6
0
ayk. ayl. aym. ayn. ayo. 2 ayp. ayq. ayr. ays. ayt. 4 ayu.
2 1 5 3 0 0 1 4 . 3
3
0
ayv. ayw. ayx. ayy. ayz. 2 aza. azb. azc. azd. aze. 4 azf.
2 3 5 0 0 1 4 . 4
1
0
azg. azh. azi. azj. azk. 1 azl. azm. azn. azo. azp. 4 azq.

82
3 6 3 0 0 1 4 . 2
5
0
azr. azs. azt. azu. azv. 0 azw. azx. azy. azz. baa. 5 bab.
4 10 0 0 0 1 5 . 1
0
0
bac. bad. bae. baf. bag. 4 bah. bai. baj. bak. bal. 3 bam.
5 3 3 0 0 1 3 . 5
9
0
ban. bao. bap. baq. bar. bas. bat. bau. bav. baw.T bay.
o
t
a
l
:
bax. 2
1
.
8
0
baz. bba. bbb. bbc. bbd. 0 bbe. bbf. bbg. bbh. bbi. 4 bbj.
3 1 4 6 0 0 1 4 . 2
4
0
bbk. bbl. bbm. bbn. bbo. 2 bbp. bbq. bbr. bbs. bbt. 4 bbu.
2 4 4 0 0 1 4 . 4
2
0
bbv. bbw. bbx. bby. bbz. 0 bca. bcb. bcc. bcd. bce. 4 bcf.
3 6 4 0 0 1 4 . 1
6
0
bcg. bch. bci. bcj. bck. 1 bcl. bcm. bcn. bco. bcp. 4 bcq.
4 5 4 0 0 1 4 . 2
4
0
bcr. bcs. bct. bcu. bcv. 3 bcw. bcx. bcy. bcz. bda. 3 bdb.
5 2 5 0 0 1 3 . 5
9
0
bdc. bdd. bde. bdf. bdg. bdh. bdi. bdj. bdk. bdl. T bdn.
o
t
a
l
:
bdm.
21.5
0
bdo. bdp. bdq. bdr. bds. 1 bdt. bdu. bdv. bdw. bdx. 3 bdy.
4 1 2 4 3 0 1 3 . 3
5
0
bdz. bea. beb. bec. bed. 0 bee. bef. beg. beh. bei. 3 bej.
2 2 3 4 1 1 3 . 5
1

83
0
bek. bel. bem. ben. beo. 2 bep. beq. ber. bes. bet. 4 beu.
3 2 6 0 0 1 4 . 1
0
0
bev. bew. bex. bey. bez. 4 bfa. bfb. bfc. bfd. bfe. 4 bff.
4 4 2 0 0 1 4 . 1
0
0
bfg. bfh. bfi. bfj. bfk. 4 bfl. bfm. bfn. bfo. bfp. 3 bfq.
5 2 2 2 0 1 3 . 4
4
0
bfr. bfs. bft. bfu. bfv. bfw. bfx. bfy. bfz. bga. T bgc.
o
t
a
l
:
bgb. 1
8
.
0
0
bgd. Table 2.2 shows that the respondents coming from the first year and

second year regard the school to be of great help for their development rather than the

respondents coming from the third year and fourth year level. Always, corresponding for

the positive answer, ranges from minimum of two and a maximum of six. Four from the

fourth year answered Seldom and no one answered Never for this category.

bge. Furthermore, it goes to show that in Category B (School), most of the

answers coming from the first year are equally from Item 2 (Do your teachers manage

to provide time to help you in your difficulties?) and Item 3 (Does your school provide

activities for students self-improvement?). Most of the answers coming from the second

year and third year are from Item 4 (Does your school conduct activities that enhances

your talents/skills?) and Item 3 respectively. Lastly, most of the answers coming from

the fourth year are equally from Items 3 and 4. On the contrary, least of the answers

coming from the first year are equally from Item 1 (Does the school provide motivational

techniques toward you?) and Item 5 (Does the school provide activities that let you

84
discover who you really are?). Least of the answers coming from the second year and

third year are from Item 5, and least of the answers coming from the fourth year are

from Item 2.

bgf.

bgg.

bgh.

bgi.

bgj. TABLE 2.3: Distribution of the Responses in Category C

(Socialization) in Terms of Year Level

bgk. bgl. bgm. bgo. bgq. bgs. bgu. bgw. bgx. bgz. bhb.
Y I Al O Someti Sel N T T Wei R
me g
bgn. bgp. s bgt. bgv. bgy. h
(5) ( bgr. (3) (2) (1 W t
e
d
bha.
Mea
n
bhc. bhd. bhe. bhf. bhg.5 bhh. bhi. bhj. bhk. bhl. 3 bhm.
1 1 2 3 0 0 1 3 . 1
7
0
bhn. bho. bhp. bhq. bhr. 3 bhs. bht. bhu. bhv. bhw. bhx.
2 3 2 2 0 1 3 3.60 3

bhy. bhz. bia. bib. bic. 0 bid. bie. bif. big. bih. 3 bii.
3 6 1 0 3 1 3 . 1
7
0
bij. bik. bil. bim. bin. 7 bio. bip. biq. bir. bis. 3 bit.
4 1 2 0 0 1 3 . 4
4
0
biu. biv. biw. bix. biy. biz. bja. bjb. bjc. bjd. T bjf.
o
t
a

85
l
:
bje. 1
4
.
4
0
bjg. bjh. bji. bjj. bjk. 2 bjl. bjm. bjn. bjo. bjp. 3 bjq.
2 1 2 2 4 0 1 3 . 4
2
0
bjr. bjs. bjt. bju. bjv. 6 bjw. bjx. bjy. bjz. bka. 3 bkb.
2 2 2 0 0 1 3 . 1
6
0
bkc. bkd. bke. bkf. bkg. 5 bkh. bki. bkj. bkk. bkl. 3 bkm.
3 3 0 2 0 1 3 . 2
4
0
bkn. bko. bkp. bkq. bkr. 2 bks. bkt. bku. bkv. bkw. bkx.
4 2 3 2 1 1 3 3.30 3

bky. bkz. bla. blb. blc. bld. ble. blf. blg. blh. T blj.
o
t
a
l
:
bli. 1
3
.
5
0
blk. bll. blm. bln. blo. 4 blp. blq. blr. bls. blt. 3 blu.
3 1 2 2 1 1 1 3 . 4
3
0
blv. blw. blx. bly. blz. 4 bma. bmb. bmc. bmd. bme. bmf.
2 1 4 1 0 1 3 3.50 2

bmg. bmh. bmi. bmj. bmk. bml. bmm. bmn. bmo. bmp. bmq.
3 4 0 3 2 1 1 3 3.40 3

bmr. bms. bmt. bmu. bmv. bmw. bmx. bmy. bmz. bna.3 bnb.
4 3 2 5 0 0 1 3 . 1
8
0
bnc. bnd. bne. bnf. bng. bnh. bni. bnj. bnk. bnl. T bnn.
o
t
a
l
:
bnm.
14.0

86
0
bno. bnp. bnq. bnr. bns. 4 bnt. bnu. bnv. bnw. bnx. 2 bny.
4 1 1 2 0 3 1 2 . 2
8
0
bnz. boa. bob. boc. bod.5 boe. bof. bog. boh. boi. 3 boj.
2 1 3 1 0 1 3 . 1
4
0
bok. bol. bom. bon. boo.2 bop. boq. bor. bos. bot. 2 bou.
3 2 0 3 3 1 2 . 3
5
0
bov. bow. box. boy. boz. 1 bpa. bpb. bpc. bpd. bpe.2 bpf.
4 0 2 2 5 1 2 . 4
0
0
bpg. bph. bpi. bpj. bpk. bpl. bpm. bpn. bpo. bpp.T bpr.
o
t
a
l
:
bpq.1
0
.
7
0
bps.

bpt. Table 2.3 shows that answers for all year levels, majority of the

respondents answered Sometimes. With a great difference, most of the answers under

Never came from the fourth year level and there are also three coming from the first

year level. This table goes to show also that first year respondents are more attached to

their family than the succeeding year levels.

bpu. Furthermore in Category C (Socialization), it shows that most of the

answers coming from the first year are equally from Item 1 (Are you not preferring to be

with your friends over your family?) and Item 3 (Are you not seeking for love coming

from having a boyfriend/girlfriend?). Most of the answers coming from the second year

and fourth year are both from Item 2 (Does your classmate help you when you have

87
problems at home or in school?) while most answers from the third year are from Item 4

(Do peer pressure and relationships interfere with your studies?). On the contrary, least

of the answers from the first year and fourth year are both from Item 4, while least

answers coming from the second year and third year are from Item 1.

bpv. TABLE 2.4: Distribution of the Responses in Category D (Learning

Process) in Terms of Year Level

bpw. bpx. bpy. bqa. bqc. bqe. bqg. bqi. bqj. bql. W bqn.
Y I Al O Someti Sel N T T e R
me i
bpz. bqb. s bqf. bqh. bqk. g
(5) ( bqd. (2) (1 W h
(3) t
e
d
bqm.
Mea
n
bqo. bqp. bqq. bqr. bqs. 2 bqt. bqu. bqv. bqw. bqx. 4 bqy.
1 1 6 2 0 0 1 4 . 1
4
0
bqz. bra. brb. brc. brd. 1 bre. brf. brg. brh. bri. 4 brj.
2 6 2 1 0 1 4 . 2
3
0
brk. brl. brm. brn. bro. 5 brp. brq. brr. brs. brt. 3 bru.
3 2 2 1 0 1 3 . 5
5
0
brv. brw. brx. bry. brz. 4 bsa. bsb. bsc. bsd. bse. 4 bsf.
4 4 2 0 0 1 4 . 3
0
0
bsg. bsh. bsi. bsj. bsk. 6 bsl. bsm. bsn. bso. bsp. 3 bsq.
5 2 2 0 0 1 3 . 4
6
0
bsr. bss. bst. bsu. bsv. bsw. bsx. bsy. bsz. bta. T btc.
o
t
a
l
:
btb. 1
9

88
.
8
0
btd. bte. btf. btg. bth. 4 bti. btj. btk. btl. btm.3 btn.
2 1 1 5 0 0 1 3 . 4
7
0
bto. btp. btq. btr. bts. 3 btt. btu. btv. btw. btx. 3 bty.
2 3 3 1 0 1 3 . 3
8
0
btz. bua. bub. buc. bud.4 bue. buf. bug. buh. bui. 3 buj.
3 3 1 2 0 1 3 . 5
5
0
buk. bul. bum. bun. buo.3 bup. buq. bur. bus. but. 3 buu.
4 4 2 1 0 1 3 . 1
9
0
buv. buw. bux. buy. buz. 4 bva. bvb. bvc. bvd. bve. 3 bvf.
5 3 3 0 0 1 3 . 1
9
0
bvg. bvh. bvi. bvj. bvk. bvl. bvm. bvn. bvo. bvp. T bvr.
o
t
a
l
:
bvq. 1
8
.
8
0
bvs. bvt. bvu. bvv. bvw. bvx. bvy. bvz. bwa. bwb. bwc.
3 1 2 4 4 0 0 1 3 3.80 1

bwd. bwe. bwf. bwg. bwh. bwi. bwj. bwk. bwl. bwm. bwn.
2 3 2 4 1 0 1 3 3.70 3

bwo. bwp. bwq. bwr. bws. bwt. bwu. bwv. bww. bwx. bwy.
3 0 2 5 1 2 1 2 2.70 5

bwz. bxa. bxb. bxc. bxd. 3 bxe. bxf. bxg. bxh. bxi. 3 bxj.
4 3 3 1 0 1 3 . 1
8
0
bxk. bxl. bxm. bxn. bxo. 4 bxp. bxq. bxr. bxs. bxt. 3 bxu.
5 3 2 1 0 1 3 . 3
7
0
bxv. bxw. bxx. bxy. bxz. bya. byb. byc. byd. bye. T byg.
o
t
a

89
l
:
byf. 1
7
.
7
0
byh. byi. byj. byk. byl. 3 bym. byn. byo. byp. byq. 3 byr.
4 1 4 0 1 2 1 3 . 2
3
0
bys. byt. byu. byv. byw. byx. byy. byz. bza. bzb. 3 bzc.
2 3 0 3 4 0 1 3 . 3
2
0
bzd. bze. bzf. bzg. bzh. 2 bzi. bzj. bzk. bzl. bzm. bzn.
3 0 0 3 5 1 1 1.70 5

bzo. bzp. bzq. bzr. bzs. 2 bzt. bzu. bzv. bzw. bzx. 3 bzy.
4 5 1 2 0 1 3 . 1
9
0
bzz. caa. cab. cac. cad. 6 cae. caf. cag. cah. cai. 3 caj.
5 1 1 2 0 1 3 . 4
1
0
cak. cal. cam. can. cao. cap. caq. car. cas. cat. T cav.
o
t
a
l
:
cau. 1
5
.
2
0
caw.

cax. Table 2.4 shows that the first year respondents regard highly their studies

more than the succeeding year levels. From the second year level, there are

respondents who answered more in Seldom and two respondents from the third year

answered Never. Lastly, answers under Seldom and Never greatly increased for the

fourth year students.

90
cay. Furthermore, it shows that in Category D (Learning Process), most of the

answers coming from the first year are from Item 1 (Do you show optimism in learning

your lessons?). Most answers coming from the second year are equally from Item 4 (Do

you give priority to your academic goals?) and Item 5 [Do you show control over your

anxieties (being relaxed in performing organized tasks)?]. Most answers coming from

the third year students are equally from Items 1 and 4. Most answers coming from the

fourth year are from Item 4. On the contrary, least answers coming from all year levels

are all coming from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your lessons?).

caz.

cba.

cbb.

cbc.

cbd.

cbe.

cbf.

cbg. TABLE 3.1: Distribution of the Responses in Category A

(Communication) in Terms of Nature of Parents Profession Abroad

cbh. cbi. cbj. cbl. cbn. cbp. cbr. cbt. cbu. cbw. cby.
Natur I Al O Someti Sel N T T Wei R
e m g
of cbk. cbm. es cbq. cbs. cbv. h
P (5) ( cbo. (2) ( W t
ar (3) e
e d

91
nt cbx.
s Mea
P n
r
of
e
s
si
o
n
A
b
r
o
a
d
cbz.E cca. ccb. ccc. ccd. 2 cce. ccf. ccg. cch. cci. 4 ccj.
n 1 13 5 0 0 2 9 . 1
gi 5
n 5
e
er
-
re
la
te
d
cck. ccl. ccm. ccn. cco. 6 ccp. ccq. ccr. ccs. cct. 4 ccu.
2 11 3 0 0 2 8 . 4
2
5
ccv. ccw. ccx. ccy. ccz. 3 cda. cdb. cdc. cdd. cde. 4 cdf.
3 10 6 1 0 2 8 . 4
2
5
cdg. cdh. cdi. cdj. cdk. 5 cdl. cdm. cdn. cdo. cdp. 4 cdq.
4 11 4 0 0 2 8 . 3
3
0
cdr. cds. cdt. cdu. cdv. 3 cdw. cdx. cdy. cdz. cea. 4 ceb.
5 12 5 0 0 2 8 . 2
4
5
cec. ced. cee. cef. ceg. ceh. cei. cej. cek. cel. T cen.
o
t
a
l
:
cem.
21.8
0
ceo. cep. ceq. cer. ces. 1 cet. ceu. cev. cew. cex. 3 cey.
Medic 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 4
in 0

92
e- 0
re
la
te
d
cez. cfa. cfb. cfc. cfd. 1 cfe. cff. cfg. cfh. cfi. 3 cfj.
2 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 4
0
0
cfk. cfl. cfm. cfn. cfo. 0 cfp. cfq. cfr. cfs. cft. 4 cfu.
3 0 1 0 0 1 4 . 1
0
0
cfv. cfw. cfx. cfy. cfz. 0 cga. cgb. cgc. cgd. cge. 4 cgf.
4 0 1 0 0 1 4 . 1
0
0
cgg. cgh. cgi. cgj. cgk. 1 cgl. cgm. cgn. cgo. cgp. 3 cgq.
5 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 4
0
0
cgr. cgs. cgt. cgu. cgv. cgw. cgx. cgy. cgz. cha. T chc.
o
t
a
l
:
chb. 1
7
.
0
0
chd. che. chf. chg. chh. 2 chi. chj. chk. chl. chm. chn.
Busin 1 4 1 0 0 7 3 4.29 2
e
s
s-
re
la
te
d
cho. chp. chq. chr. chs. 0 cht. chu. chv. chw. chx. 4 chy.
2 2 5 0 0 7 3 . 2
2
9
chz. cia. cib. cic. cid. 2 cie. cif. cig. cih. cii. 4 cij.
3 3 2 0 0 7 2 . 4
1
4
cik. cil. cim. cin. cio. 2 cip. ciq. cir. cis. cit. 3 ciu.
4 2 1 2 0 7 2 . 5
4
3
civ. ciw. cix. ciy. ciz. 1 cja. cjb. cjc. cjd. cje. 4 cjf.
5 4 2 0 0 7 3 . 1

93
4
3
cjg. cjh. cji. cjj. cjk. cjl. cjm. cjn. cjo. cjp. T cjr.
o
t
a
l
:
cjq. 2
0
.
5
8
cjs. S cjt. cju. cjv. cjw. 0 cjx. cjy. cjz. cka. ckb. 4 ckc.
er 1 7 4 1 0 1 5 . 2
vi 4
c 2
e-
re
la
te
d
ckd. cke. ckf. ckg. ckh. 2 cki. ckj. ckk. ckl. ckm. ckn.
2 5 4 1 0 1 4 4.08 4

cko. ckp. ckq. ckr. cks. 3 ckt. cku. ckv. ckw. ckx. 4 cky.
3 6 2 1 0 1 4 . 4
0
8
ckz. cla. clb. clc. cld. 2 cle. clf. clg. clh. cli. 4 clj.
4 9 1 0 0 1 5 . 1
5
8
clk. cll. clm. cln. clo. 1 clp. clq. clr. cls. clt. 4 clu.
5 8 2 1 0 1 5 . 2
4
2
clv. clw. clx. cly. clz. cma. cmb. cmc. cmd. cme. cmg.
Total
:
cmf. 2
1
.
5
8
cmh.

cmi. Table 3.1 shows that in Category A (Communication) in terms of the nature

of parents profession abroad, most of the respondents have a parent/parents whose

work is related to engineering and for the least, there is only one who has a parent

94
whose work is related to medicine. It goes to show that there is a greater chance of

communication to those parents whose work is engineering-related than the others. In

this table, a few only answered Seldom and no one answered Never.

cmj. Furthermore, it shows that in Category A (Communication), most of the

answers of those with a parent/parents whose work is related in engineering are from

Item 1 (Do you have a regular communication with your parents?). One with a parent

whose work is related to medicines answer weighed most equally from Items 3 (Do

they check up on you on a regular basis?) and 4 (Are you open in communicating with

your parents?). Those with a parent/parents whose work is related to business are from

Item 5 (Do your parents give you a sense of encouragement even theyre not with

you?), and those with a parent/parents whose work is related to service are from Item 4.

On the contrary, least answers of those with a parent/ parents whose work is related to

engineering and service are both equally from Items 2 (Is there the presence of your

means in communicating with your parents?) and 3. One with a parent whose work is

related to medicines answer weighed the least equally from Items 1, 2 and 5.

cmk.

cml.

cmm.

cmn.

cmo.

cmp.

95
cmq.

cmr.

cms. TABLE 3.2: Distribution of the Responses on Category B (School) in

Terms of Nature of Parents Profession Abroad

cmt. cmu. cmv. cmx. cmz. cnb. cnd. cnf. cng. cni. W cnj.
Natur I Al O Someti Sel N T T e R
e m i
of cmw. cmy. es cnc. cne. cnh. g
P (5) ( cna. (2) ( W h
ar (3) t
e e
nt d
s
P M
r e
of a
e n
s
si
o
n
A
b
r
o
a
d
cnk. cnl. cnm. cnn. cno. 2 cnp. cnq. cnr. cns. cnt. 3 cnu.
Engin 1 9 6 0 3 2 7 . 3
e 9
er 0
-
re
la
te
d
cnv. cnw. cnx. cny. cnz. 4 coa. cob. coc. cod. coe. 3 cof.
2 5 8 2 1 2 7 . 5
7
0
cog. coh. coi. coj. cok. 3 col. com. con. coo. cop. 4 coq.
3 14 3 0 0 2 9 . 1
8
0
cor. cos. cot. cou. cov. 2 cow. cox. coy. coz. cpa. 4 cpb.
4 13 5 0 0 2 9 . 2
5

96
5
cpc. cpd. cpe. cpf. cpg. 5 cph. cpi. cpj. cpk. cpl. 3 cpm.
5 6 7 2 0 2 7 . 4
8
5
cpn. cpo. cpp. cpq. cpr. cps. cpt. cpu. cpv. cpw. cpy.
Total
:
cpx. 2
0
.
8
0
cpz.M cqa. cqb. cqc. cqd. 1 cqe. cqf. cqg. cqh. cqi. 3 cqj.
e 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 4
di 0
ci 0
n
e-
re
la
te
d
cqk. cql. cqm. cqn. cqo. 0 cqp. cqq. cqr. cqs. cqt. 4 cqu.
2 0 1 0 0 1 4 . 2
0
0
cqv. cqw. cqx. cqy. cqz. 0 cra. crb. crc. crd. cre. 4 crf.
3 0 1 0 0 1 4 . 2
0
0
crg. crh. cri. crj. crk. 0 crl. crm. crn. cro. crp. 5 crq.
4 1 0 0 0 1 5 . 1
0
0
crr. crs. crt. cru. crv. 1 crw. crx. cry. crz. csa. 3 csb.
5 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 4
0
0
csc. csd. cse. csf. csg. csh. csi. csj. csk. csl. T csn.
o
t
a
l
:
csm.
19.0
0
cso. csp. csq. csr. css. 1 cst. csu. csv. csw. csx. 4 csy.
Busin 1 3 3 0 0 7 3 . 3
e 2
s 9
s-
re
la

97
te
d
csz. cta. ctb. ctc. ctd. 0 cte. ctf. ctg. cth. cti. 4 ctj.
2 3 3 1 0 7 2 . 4
1
4
ctk. ctl. ctm. ctn. cto. 0 ctp. ctq. ctr. cts. ctt. 4 ctu.
3 4 3 0 0 7 3 . 1
5
7
ctv. ctw. ctx. cty. ctz. 1 cua. cub. cuc. cud. cue. 4 cuf.
4 4 2 0 0 7 3 . 2
4
3
cug. cuh. cui. cuj. cuk. 2 cul. cum. cun. cuo. cup. 3 cuq.
5 1 4 0 0 7 2 . 5
8
6
cur. cus. cut. cuu. cuv. cuw. cux. cuy. cuz. cva. T cvc.
o
t
a
l
:
cvb. 2
1
.
2
9
cvd. cve. cvf. cvg. cvh. 1 cvi. cvj. cvk. cvl. cvm. cvn.
Servi 1 4 7 0 0 1 5 4.25 3
c
e-
re
la
te
d
cvo. cvp. cvq. cvr. cvs. 0 cvt. cvu. cvv. cvw. cvx. 4 cvy.
2 8 3 1 0 1 5 . 1
5
0
cvz. cwa. cwb. cwc. cwd. cwe. cwf. cwg. cwh. cwi. 4 cwj.
3 4 7 0 1 0 1 5 . 4
1
7
cwk. cwl. cwm. cwn. cwo. cwp. cwq. cwr. cws. cwt. 4 cwu.
4 7 3 2 0 0 1 5 . 2
4
2
cwv. cww. cwx. cwy. cwz. cxa. cxb. cxc. cxd. cxe. 4 cxf.
5 5 4 3 0 0 1 5 . 4
1
7
cxg. cxh. cxi. cxj. cxk. cxl. cxm. cxn. cxo. cxp. T cxr.
o

98
t
a
l
:
cxq. 2
1
.
5
1
cxs.

cxt. Table 3.2 shows that majority of the responses coming from respondents

in terms of their parents profession abroad fall under Always. Answers under Seldom

ranges from the minimum of one to the maximum of two, and no one answered Never in

this category.

cxu. Furthermore, it shows that in Category B (School), most of the answers of

those with a parent/ parents whose work is related in engineering and business are both

from Item 3 (Does your school provide activities for students self-improvement?). One

with a parent whose work is related to medicines answer weighed most from Item 4

(Does your school conduct activities that enhance your talents/skills?), and those with a

parent/ parents whose work is related to service are from Item 2 (Do your teachers

manage to provide time to help you in your difficulties?). On the contrary, least answers

of those with a parent/ parents whose work is related to engineering are from Item 2.

One with a parent whose work is related to medicines answer weighed the least equally

from Items 1 (Does the school provide motivational techniques toward you?) and 5

(Does the school provide activities that let you discover who you really are?). Least

answers of those with a parent/ parents whose work is related to business are from Item

5, and those with a parent/ parents whose work is related to service are equally from

Items 3 (Does your school provide activities for students self-improvement?) and 5.

99
cxv.

cxw.

cxx.

cxy.

cxz.

cya.

cyb.

cyc. TABLE 3.3: Distribution of the Responses in Category C

(Socialization) in Terms of Nature of Parents Profession Abroad

cyd. cye. cyf. cyh. cyj. So cyl. cyn. cyp. cyq. cys.W cyt.
Natur I Al O m Sel N T T e R
e eti i
of cyg. cyi. m cym. cyo. cyr. g
P (5) ( es (2) ( W h
ar cyk.(3) t
e e
nt d
s
P M
ro e
fe a
s n
si
o
n
A
br
o
a
d
cyu. cyv. cyw. cyx. cyy. 9 cyz. cza. czb. czc. czd. 2 cze.
Engin 1 1 4 3 3 2 5 . 4
e 8
er 5
-

100
re
la
te
d
czf. czg. czh. czi. czj. 10 czk. czl. czm. czn. czo. 3 czp.
2 3 4 3 0 2 6 . 2
3
5
czq. czr. czs. czt. czu. 3 czv. czw. czx. czy. czz. 3 daa.
3 10 1 4 2 2 7 . 1
6
5
dab. dac. dad. dae. daf. 7 dag. dah. dai. daj. dak. 3 dal.
4 3 5 1 4 2 6 . 3
1
0
dam. dan. dao. dap. daq. dar. das. dat. dau. dav. T dax.
o
t
a
l
:
daw.
12.9
5
day.M daz. dba. dbb. dbc. 0 dbd. dbe. dbf. dbg. dbh.4 dbi.
e 1 0 1 0 0 1 4 . 1
di 0
ci 0
n
e-
re
la
te
d
dbj. dbk. dbl. dbm. dbn.1 dbo. dbp. dbq. dbr. dbs. 3 dbt.
2 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 2
0
0
dbu. dbv. dbw. dbx. dby. 1 dbz. dca. dcb. dcc. dcd. 3 dce.
3 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 2
0
0
dcf. dcg. dch. dci. dcj. 0 dck. dcl. dcm. dcn. dco. 2 dcp.
4 0 0 1 0 1 2 . 4
0
0
dcq. dcr. dcs. dct. dcu. dcv. dcw. dcx. dcy. dcz. T ddb.
o
t
a
l
:
dda.1
2

101
.
0
0
ddc. ddd. dde. ddf. ddg.4 ddh. ddi. ddj. ddk. ddl. 2 ddm.
Busin 1 0 1 1 1 7 1 . 4
e 7
s 1
s-
re
la
te
d
ddn. ddo. ddp. ddq. ddr. 2 dds. ddt. ddu. ddv. ddw. ddx.
2 0 2 3 0 7 2 2.86 3

ddy. ddz. dea. deb. dec. 3 ded. dee. def. deg. deh.3 dei.
3 1 0 2 1 7 2 . 2
1
4
dej. dek. del. dem. den.0 deo. dep. deq. der. des. 3 det.
4 1 4 1 1 7 2 . 1
4
3
deu. dev. dew. dex. dey. dez. dfa. dfb. dfc. dfd. T dff.
o
t
a
l
:
dfe. 1
2
.
1
4
dfg. S dfh. dfi. dfj. dfk. 5 dfl. dfm. dfn. dfo. dfp. 3 dfq.
er 1 4 2 1 0 1 4 . 3
vi 7
c 5
e-
re
la
te
d
dfr. dfs. dft. dfu. dfv. 4 dfw. dfx. dfy. dfz. dga.4 dgb.
2 4 4 0 0 1 4 . 1
0
0
dgc. dgd. dge. dgf. dgg.3 dgh. dgi. dgj. dgk. dgl. 3 dgm.
3 5 0 2 2 1 4 . 2
8
3
dgn. dgo. dgp. dgq. dgr. 7 dgs. dgt. dgu. dgv. dgw. dgx.
4 2 1 1 1 1 3 3.17 4

dgy. dgz. dha. dhb. dhc. dhd. dhe. dhf. dhg. dhh.T dhj.

102
o
t
a
l
:
dhi. 1
4
.
7
5
dhk.

dhl. Table 3.3 shows that majority of the answers in Category C(Socialization)

in terms of the nature of profession of parents abroad fall under Sometimes. This table

also shows that most of the answers under Never were answered by respondents with

parents whose work is related to engineering compared to the other three.

dhm. Furthermore, it shows that in Category C (Socialization), most of the

answers coming from students with parents whose work is engineer-related are from

Item 3 (Are you not seeking for love coming from having boyfriend or girlfriend?). One

with a parent whose work is related to medicines answer weighed most from Item 1

(Are you not preferring to be with your friends over your family?). Most of the answers

coming from students with parents whose work is businessrelated are from Item 4 (Do

peer pressure and relationships do not interfere with your studies?), and lastly, most of

the answers coming from students with parents whose work is servicerelated are from

Item 2 (Does your classmate help you when you have problems at home or in school?).

On the contrary, least of the answers coming from students with parents whose work is

engineer-related and business-related are both from Item 1. Least of the answers

coming from students with parents whose work is medicine-related and service-related

103
are both from Item 4 (Do peer pressure and relationships do not interfere with your

studies?)

dhn.

dho.

dhp.

dhq.

dhr.

dhs.

dht.

dhu.

dhv. TABLE 3.4: Distribution of the Responses in Category D (Learning

Process) in Terms of Nature of Parents Profession Abroad

dhw. dhx. dhy. dia. dic. So die. dig. dii. dij. dik. W dil.
Natur I Al O m Sel N T T e R
e eti i
of dhz. dib. m dif. dih. g
P (5) ( es (2) ( h
ar did. (3) t
e e
nt d
s
P M
r e
of a
e n
s
si
o
n
A

104
b
r
o
a
d
dim. din. dio. dip. diq. 7 dir. dis. dit. diu. div. 3 diw.
Engin 1 6 5 0 2 2 7 . 3
e 6
er 5
-
re
la
te
d
dix. diy. diz. dja. djb. 6 djc. djd. dje. djf. djg. 3 djh.
2 8 2 4 0 2 7 . 2
7
0
dji. djj. djk. djl. djm. 7 djn. djo. djp. djq. djr. 2 djs.
3 3 2 3 5 2 5 . 5
7
5
djt. dju. djv. djw. djx. 6 djy. djz. dka. dkb. dkc. 3 dkd.
4 8 3 3 0 2 7 . 1
8
0
dke. dkf. dkg. dkh. dki. 9 dkj. dkk. dkl. dkm. dkn. 3 dko.
5 5 4 2 0 2 7 . 4
6
0
dkp. dkq. dkr. dks. dkt. dku. dkv. dkw. dkx. dky. T dla.
o
t
a
l
:
dkz. 1
7
.
5
0
dlb. M dlc. dld. dle. dlf. 1 dlg. dlh. dli. dlj. dlk. 3 dll.
e 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 3
di 0
ci 0
n
e-
re
la
te
d
dlm. dln. dlo. dlp. dlq. 1 dlr. dls. dlt. dlu. dlv. 3 dlw.
2 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 3
0
0

105
dlx. dly. dlz. dma. dmb. dmc. dmd. dme. dmf. dmg. dmh.
3 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 2.00 5
dmi. dmj. dmk. dml. dmm. dmn. dmo. dmp. dmq. dmr.3 dms.
4 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 . 3
0
0
dmt. dmu. dmv. dmw. dmx. dmy. dmz. dna. dnb. dnc. 4 dnd.
5 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 . 1
0
0
dne. dnf. dng. dnh. dni. dnj. dnk. dnl. dnm. dnn.T dnp.
o
t
a
l
:
dno.1
5
.
0
0
dnq. dnr. dns. dnt. dnu.1 dnv. dnw. dnx. dny. dnz. 4 doa.
Busin 1 3 2 1 0 7 2 . 1
e 0
s 0
s-
re
la
te
d
dob. doc. dod. doe. dof. 1 dog. doh. doi. doj. dok. 3 dol.
2 1 3 2 0 7 2 . 3
4
3
dom. don. doo. dop. doq.3 dor. dos. dot. dou. dov. 2 dow.
3 0 1 1 2 7 1 . 5
4
3
dox. doy. doz. dpa. dpb.1 dpc. dpd. dpe. dpf. dpg.3 dph.
4 1 4 1 0 7 2 . 2
7
1
dpi. dpj. dpk. dpl. dpm. dpn. dpo. dpp. dpq. dpr. 3 dps.
5 1 1 5 0 0 7 2 . 3
4
3
dpt. dpu. dpv. dpw. dpx. dpy. dpz. dqa. dqb. dqc. T dqe.
o
t
a
l
:
dqd.1
7
.

106
0
0
dqf. S dqg. dqh. dqi. dqj. 3 dqk. dql. dqm. dqn. dqo.3 dqp.
er 1 4 4 1 0 1 4 . 3
vi 9
c 2
e-
re
la
te
d
dqq. dqr. dqs. dqt. dqu.1 dqv. dqw. dqx. dqy. dqz. 4 dra.
2 5 5 1 0 1 5 . 1
1
7
drb. drc. drd. dre. drf. 6 drg. drh. dri. drj. drk. 3 drl.
3 2 2 2 0 1 4 . 5
3
3
drm. drn. dro. drp. drq. 4 drr. drs. drt. dru. drv. 4 drw.
4 6 2 0 0 1 5 . 1
1
7
drx. dry. drz. dsa. dsb. 5 dsc. dsd. dse. dsf. dsg. 3 dsh.
5 4 3 0 0 1 4 . 3
9
2
dsi. dsj. dsk. dsl. dsm. dsn. dso. dsp. dsq. dsr. T dst.
o
t
a
l
:
dss. 1
9
.
5
1
dsu.

dsv. Table 3.4 shows that those most of the respondents with parents whose

work is related to engineering answered Sometimes and most of the respondents with

parents whose work is related to giving service answered Always. Answers under Never

were only filled by two respondents with parents whose work is related to business and

five from those who have parents whose work is related to engineering.

107
dsw. Furthermore, it shows that Category D (Learning Process), most of the

answers coming from students with parents whose work is engineer-related is from Item

4 (Do you give priority to your academic goals?). Most of the answers coming from

students with parents whose work is medicine-related are from Item 5 (Do you show

control over your anxieties (being relaxed in performing organized tasks)?). Most of the

answers coming from students with parents whose work is business-related are from

Item 1 (Do you show optimism in learning your lessons?). Most of the answers coming

from students with parents whose work is service-related are from Items 2 and 4 (Do

you show total focus in your studies?) (Do you give priority to your academic goals?),

respectively. On the contrary, least of the answers coming from students with parents

whose work is engineer-related, medicine-related, business-related and service-related

are from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your lessons?).

dsx.

dsy.

dsz.

dta.

dtb.

dtc.

dtd.

dte.

108
dtf. TABLE 4.1: Distribution of the Responses in Category A

(Communication) in Terms of Years Spent by Parent(s) Abroad

dtg. dth. dti. dtk. dtm. dto. dtq. dts. dtt. dtu. W dtv.
Ye I Al O Someti Sel N T T e R
me i
dtj. dtl. s dtp. dtr. g
(5) ( dtn. (3) (2) (1 h
t
e
d

M
e
a
n
dtw. dtx. dty. dtz. dua.0 dub. duc. dud. due. duf. 4 dug.
Le 1 1 1 0 0 2 9 . 2
5
0
duh. dui. duj. duk. dul. 0 dum. dun. duo. dup. duq.4 dur.
2 1 1 0 0 2 9 . 2
5
0
dus. dut. duu. duv. duw. dux. duy. duz. dva. dvb. 4 dvc.
3 1 0 1 0 0 2 8 . 5
0
0
dvd. dve. dvf. dvg. dvh. 0 dvi. dvj. dvk. dvl. dvm. dvn.
4 1 1 0 0 2 9 4.50 2

dvo. dvp. dvq. dvr. dvs. 0 dvt. dvu. dvv. dvw. dvx. 4 dvy.
5 1 1 0 0 2 9 . 2
5
0
dvz. dwa. dwb. dwc. dwd. dwe. dwf. dwg. dwh. dwi. T dwk.
o
t
a
l
:
dwj. 2
2
.
0
0
dwl. dwm. dwn. dwo. dwp. dwq. dwr. dws. dwt. dwu. dwv.
1-2 1 7 1 1 0 0 9 4 4.67 2

dww. dwx. dwy. dwz. dxa. 2 dxb. dxc. dxd. dxe. dxf. 5 dxg.
2 5 2 0 0 9 4 . 1
0

109
0
dxh. dxi. dxj. dxk. dxl. 4 dxm. dxn. dxo. dxp. dxq. 3 dxr.
3 3 2 0 0 9 3 . 5
8
9
dxs. dxt. dxu. dxv. dxw. dxx. dxy. dxz. dya. dyb. 4 dyc.
4 5 0 4 0 0 9 3 . 3
1
1
dyd. dye. dyf. dyg. dyh. 0 dyi. dyj. dyk. dyl. dym. dyn.
5 5 2 2 0 9 3 4.11 3

dyo. dyp. dyq. dyr. dys. dyt. dyu. dyv. dyw. dyx. T dyz.
o
t
a
l
:
dyy. 2
1
.
7
8
dza. dzb. dzc. dzd. dze. 1 dzf. dzg. dzh. dzi. dzj. 4 dzk.
3-5 1 9 2 0 0 1 5 . 1
6
7
dzl. dzm. dzn. dzo. dzp. 2 dzq. dzr. dzs. dzt. dzu. 4 dzv.
2 7 3 0 0 1 5 . 4
4
2
dzw. dzx. dzy. dzz. eaa.2 eab. eac. ead. eae. eaf. 4 eag.
3 7 3 0 0 1 5 . 4
4
2
eah. eai. eaj. eak. eal. 2 eam. ean. eao. eap. eaq.4 ear.
4 7 3 0 0 1 5 . 4
4
2
eas. eat. eau. eav. eaw. eax. eay. eaz. eba. ebb.4 ebc.
5 9 0 3 0 0 1 5 . 2
5
0
ebd. ebe. ebf. ebg. ebh. ebi. ebj. ebk. ebl. ebm. ebo.
Total
:
ebn.2
2
.
4
3
ebp. ebq. ebr. ebs. ebt. 1 ebu. ebv. ebw. ebx. eby. 4 ebz.
6- 1 4 4 1 0 1 4 . 4
1
0

110
eca. ecb. ecc. ecd. ece. 3 ecf. ecg. ech. eci. ecj. 3 eck.
2 4 2 1 0 1 3 . 5
9
0
ecl. ecm. ecn. eco. ecp. 0 ecq. ecr. ecs. ect. ecu. 4 ecv.
3 4 5 1 0 1 4 . 3
2
0
ecw. ecx. ecy. ecz. eda.1 edb. edc. edd. ede. edf. 4 edg.
4 6 2 1 0 1 4 . 2
3
0
edh. edi. edj. edk. edl. 2 edm. edn. edo. edp. edq.4 edr.
5 6 2 0 0 1 4 . 1
4
0
eds. edt. edu. edv. edw. edx. edy. edz. eea. eeb.T eed.
o
t
a
l
:
eec. 2
0
.
9
0
eee. eef. eeg. eeh. eei. 2 eej. eek. eel. eem. een.4 eeo.
11 1 3 2 0 0 7 2 . 3
1
4
eep. eeq. eer. ees. eet. 2 eeu. eev. eew. eex. eey. 4 eez.
2 2 3 0 0 7 2 . 4
0
0
efa. efb. efc. efd. efe. 0 eff. efg. efh. efi. efj. 4 efk.
3 4 2 1 0 7 3 . 1
2
9
efl. efm. efn. efo. efp. 2 efq. efr. efs. eft. efu. 3 efv.
4 3 1 1 0 7 2 . 5
8
6
efw. efx. efy. efz. ega.1 egb. egc. egd. ege. egf. 4 egg.
5 3 3 0 0 7 3 . 1
2
9
egh. egi. egj. egk. egl. egm. egn. ego. egp. egq.T egs.
o
t
a
l
:
egr. 2
0

111
.
5
8
egt.

egu. Table 4.1 shows that most of the respondents with parents working abroad

regardless of the years of work answered Always. Answers under Sometimes only

ranged from one to four and answers under Seldom ranged from one to two. No one

answered Never.

egv. Furthermore, it shows that in Category A (Communication), most of the

answers coming from the students with parents working abroad for 1-2 and 3-5 years

are both Item 1 (Do you have a regular communication with your parents?). Those with

parents working abroad for 6-10 years are from Item 5 (Do your parents give you a

sense encouragement even theyre not with you?). Lastly, those with parents working

for more than 11 years are from equally from Items 3 (Do they check up on you on a

regular basis?) and 5. On the contrary, least of the answers coming from the students

with parents working less than a year and 1-2 years abroad are from Item 3. Those with

parents working for 3-5 years are from equally distributed in Items 2 (Is there the

presence of your means in communicating with your parents?), 3 and 4 (Are you open

in communicating with your parents?). Lastly, those with parents working for 6-10 years

are from Item 2.

egw.

egx.

egy.

112
egz.

eha.

ehb.

ehc. TABLE 4.2: Distribution of the Responses in Category B (School) in

Terms of Years Spent by Parent(s) Abroad

ehd. ehe. ehf. ehh. ehj. So ehl. ehn. ehp. ehq. ehs. eht.
Ye I Al O me Sel N T T Wei R
tim g
ehg. ehi. es ehm. eho. ehr. h
(5) ( ehk. (2) (1 W t
(3) e
d

M
e
a
n
ehu. ehv. ehw. ehx. ehy. 0 ehz. eia. eib. eic. eid. 5 eie.
Le 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 . 1
0
0
eif. eig. eih. eii. eij. 1 eik. eil. eim. ein. eio. 4 eip.
2 1 0 0 0 2 8 . 4
0
0
eiq. eir. eis. eit. eiu. 0 eiv. eiw. eix. eiy. eiz. 5 eja.
3 2 0 0 0 2 1 . 1
0
0
ejb. ejc. ejd. eje. ejf. 0 ejg. ejh. eji. ejj. ejk. 4 ejl.
4 0 2 0 0 2 8 . 4
0
0
ejm. ejn. ejo. ejp. ejq. 0 ejr. ejs. ejt. eju. ejv. 4 ejw.
5 0 2 0 0 2 8 . 4
0
0
ejx. ejy. ejz. eka. ekb. ekc. ekd. eke. ekf. ekg. T eki.
o
t
a
l
:
ekh. 2

113
2
.
0
0
ekj. ekk. ekl. ekm. ekn. 1 eko. ekp. ekq. ekr. eks. 4 ekt.
1-2 1 5 2 0 1 9 3 . 4
1
1
eku. ekv. ekw. ekx. eky. 1 ekz. ela. elb. elc. eld. 4 ele.
2 3 4 1 0 9 3 . 5
0
0
elf. elg. elh. eli. elj. 1 elk. ell. elm. eln. elo. 4 elp.
3 5 3 0 0 9 4 . 1
4
4
elq. elr. els. elt. elu. 1 elv. elw. elx. ely. elz. 4 ema.
4 4 4 0 0 9 3 . 2
3
3
emb. emc. emd. eme. emf.2 emg. emh. emi. emj. emk. eml.
5 4 3 0 0 9 3 4.22 3

emm. emn. emo. emp. emq. emr. ems. emt. emu. emv. emx.
Total
:
emw.
21.1
0
emy. emz. ena. enb. enc. 2 end. ene. enf. eng. enh.4 eni.
3-5 1 3 7 0 0 1 4 . 4
0
8
enj. enk. enl. enm. enn.1 eno. enp. enq. enr. ens. 4 ent.
2 7 3 1 0 1 5 . 3
3
3
enu. env. enw. enx. eny. 1 enz. eoa. eob. eoc. eod.4 eoe.
3 6 5 0 0 1 5 . 2
4
2
eof. eog. eoh. eoi. eoj. 1 eok. eol. eom. eon. eoo.4 eop.
4 9 2 0 0 1 5 . 1
6
7
eoq. eor. eos. eot. eou.6 eov. eow. eox. eoy. eoz. 3 epa.
5 3 3 0 0 1 4 . 5
7
5
epb. epc. epd. epe. epf. epg. eph. epi. epj. epk. T epm.
o
t
a
l
:

114
epl. 2
1
.
2
5
epn. epo. epp. epq. epr. 2 eps. ept. epu. epv. epw. epx.
6- 1 3 4 0 1 1 3 3.80 3

epy. epz. eqa. eqb. eqc. 1 eqd. eqe. eqf. eqg. eqh.3 eqi.
2 2 5 2 0 1 3 . 4
7
0
eqj. eqk. eql. eqm. eqn.1 eqo. eqp. eqq. eqr. eqs. 4 eqt.
3 4 5 0 0 1 4 . 2
3
0
equ. eqv. eqw. eqx. eqy. 2 eqz. era. erb. erc. erd. 4 ere.
4 8 0 0 0 1 4 . 1
6
0
erf. erg. erh. eri. erj. 4 erk. erl. erm. ern. ero. 3 erp.
5 1 4 1 0 1 3 . 5
5
0
erq. err. ers. ert. eru. erv. erw. erx. ery. erz. T esb.
o
t
a
l
:
esa. 1
9
.
9
0
esc. esd. ese. esf. esg. 0 esh. esi. esj. esk. esl. 4 esm.
11 1 3 3 0 1 7 2 . 4
0
0
esn. eso. esp. esq. esr. 0 ess. est. esu. esv. esw. esx.
2 3 3 0 1 7 2 4.00 4

esy. esz. eta. etb. etc. 1 etd. ete. etf. etg. eth. 4 eti.
3 5 1 0 0 7 3 . 1
5
7
etj. etk. etl. etm. etn. 1 eto. etp. etq. etr. ets. 4 ett.
4 4 2 0 0 7 3 . 3
4
3
etu. etv. etw. etx. ety. 2 etz. eua. eub. euc. eud.4 eue.
5 4 1 0 0 7 3 . 1
5
7
euf. eug. euh. eui. euj. euk. eul. eum. eun. euo.T euq.

115
o
t
a
l
:
eup.2
1
.
5
7
eur.

eus. Table 4.2 shows that in Category B (School), most of the answers of those

respondents answered Always. Answers under Seldom range from a count of one to

two. Answers under Never are only filled by a single respondent from all year ranges

except from those whose parents work within less than a year and in a range of 3-5

years.

eut. Furthermore, it goes to show that in Category B (School), most of the

answers coming from students with parents working abroad for less than a year are

equally from Items 1 (Does the school provide motivational techniques toward you) and

3 (Does your school provide activities for students self-improvement?). Those with 1-2

years are from Item 3. Those with 3-5 and 6-10 years are both from Item 4 (Does your

school conduct activities that enhance your skills and talents?). Lastly, those with

parents working abroad for more than 11 years are from equally from Items 3 and 5

(Does the school provide activities that let you discover who you really are?). On the

contrary, least answers coming from those with parents working abroad for less than a

year are distributed evenly on Items 2, 4 and 5. Those with 1-2 years are from Item 2.

Those with 3-5 and 6-10 years are both from Item 4. Lastly those with parents working

abroad for more than 11 years are from Items 3 and 5.

116
euu.

euv.

euw.

eux.

euy.

euz.

eva. TABLE 4.3: Distribution of the Responses in Category C

(Socialization) in Terms of Years Spent by Parent(s) Abroad

evb. evc. evd. evf. evh. evj. evl. evn. evo. evq. evr.
Ye I Al O Someti Sel N T T Wei R
me g
eve. evg. s evk. evm. evp. h
(5) ( evi. (3) (2) (1 W t
e
d

M
e
a
n
evs. evt. evu. evv. evw. evx. evy. evz. ewa. ewb. ewc.
Le 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 6 3.00 3

ewd. ewe. ewf. ewg. ewh. ewi. ewj. ewk. ewl. ewm. ewn.
2 0 1 0 1 0 2 6 3.00 3

ewo. ewp. ewq. ewr. ews. ewt. ewu. ewv. eww. ewx. ewy.
3 1 0 1 0 0 2 8 4.00 1

ewz. exa. exb. exc. exd. 1 exe. exf. exg. exh. exi. 4 exj.
4 1 0 0 0 2 8 . 1
0
0
exk. exl. exm. exn. exo. exp. exq. exr. exs. ext. T exv.
o
t
a
l

117
:
exu. 1
4
.
0
0
exw. exx. exy. exz. eya. 6 eyb. eyc. eyd. eye. eyf. 3 eyg.
1-2 1 0 3 0 0 9 3 . 4
3
3
eyh. eyi. eyj. eyk. eyl. 2 eym. eyn. eyo. eyp. eyq. 3 eyr.
2 3 3 1 0 9 3 . 1
8
9
eys. eyt. eyu. eyv. eyw. eyx. eyy. eyz. eza. ezb. 3 ezc.
3 4 0 3 1 1 9 3 . 3
5
6
ezd. eze. ezf. ezg. ezh. 5 ezi. ezj. ezk. ezl. ezm. ezn.
4 2 2 0 0 9 3 3.67 2

ezo. ezp. ezq. ezr. ezs. ezt. ezu. ezv. ezw. ezx. T ezz.
o
t
a
l
:
ezy. 1
4
.
4
5
faa. fab. fac. fad. fae. 5 faf. fag. fah. fai. faj. 3 fak.
3-5 1 3 2 2 0 1 4 . 1
5
0
fal. fam. fan. fao. fap. 5 faq. far. fas. fat. fau. 3 fav.
2 2 3 2 0 1 4 . 2
4
2
faw. fax. fay. faz. fba. 5 fbb. fbc. fbd. fbe. fbf. 2 fbg.
3 2 1 1 3 1 3 . 4
8
3
fbh. fbi. fbj. fbk. fbl. 3 fbm. fbn. fbo. fbp. fbq. 3 fbr.
4 3 3 2 1 1 4 . 2
4
2
fbs. fbt. fbu. fbv. fbw. fbx. fby. fbz. fca. fcb. T fcd.
o
t
a
l
:
fcc. 1

118
3
.
1
7
fce. fcf. fcg. fch. fci. 5 fcj. fck. fcl. fcm. fcn. 2 fco.
6- 1 2 0 1 2 1 2 . 3
9
0
fcp. fcq. fcr. fcs. fct. 7 fcu. fcv. fcw. fcx. fcy. 3 fcz.
2 0 3 0 0 1 3 . 1
3
0
fda. fdb. fdc. fdd. fde. 1 fdf. fdg. fdh. fdi. fdj. 3 fdk.
3 4 0 3 2 1 3 . 2
1
0
fdl. fdm. fdn. fdo. fdp. 4 fdq. fdr. fds. fdt. fdu. 2 fdv.
4 1 1 2 2 1 2 . 4
7
0
fdw. fdx. fdy. fdz. fea. feb. fec. fed. fee. fef. T feh.
o
t
a
l
:
feg. 1
2
.
0
0
fei. fej. fek. fel. fem.1 fen. feo. fep. feq. fer. 2 fes.
11 1 0 3 1 2 7 1 . 4
7
1
fet. feu. fev. few. fex. 4 fey. fez. ffa. ffb. ffc. 3 ffd.
2 2 1 0 0 7 2 . 2
7
1
ffe. fff. ffg. ffh. ffi. 1 ffj. ffk. ffl. ffm. ffn. 3 ffo.
3 4 0 2 0 7 2 . 1
8
6
ffp. ffq. ffr. ffs. fft. 2 ffu. ffv. ffw. ffx. ffy. 2 ffz.
4 0 3 0 2 7 2 . 3
8
6
fga. fgb. fgc. fgd. fge. fgf. fgg. fgh. fgi. fgj. T fgl.
o
t
a
l
:
fgk. 1
3

119
.
1
4
fgm.

fgn. Table 4.3 shows that the rate of answers under Always decreases as it the

range of years spent by parents abroad increases. Under the range of 3-5 years, there

is an increase under those who answered Never ranging a count from one to three.

fgo. Furthermore, it shows that in category C (Socialization), most of the

answers coming from the students with parents working abroad for 1-2 and 6-10 years

are from Item 2 (Does your classmate help you when you have problems at home or in

school?). Those with parents working for less than a year are equally from Items 3 (Are

you not seeking love coming from having a boyfriend/girlfriend?) and 4 (Do peer

pressure and relationships do not interfere with your studies?). Most of the answers

coming from the students with parents working abroad for 3-5 years are from Item 1

(Are you not preferring to be with your friends over your family?). Lastly, most of the

answers of those with parents working abroad for more than 11 years are from Item 3.

On the contrary, least of the answers from those with parents working for less than a

year are equally from Items 1 and 2. Least of the answers coming from the students

with parents working abroad for 1-2 and more than 11 years are from Item 1. Those with

parents working for 3-5 years are from Item 3, and those with parents working for 6-10

years are from Item 4.

fgp.

fgq.

120
fgr.

fgs.

fgt.

fgu.

fgv.

fgw. TABLE 4.4: Distribution of the Responses in Category D (Learning

Process) in Terms of Years Spent by Parent(s) Abroad

fgx. fgy. fgz. fhb. fhd. So fhf. fhh. fhj. fhk. fhm. fhn.
Ye I Al O me Sel N T T Wei R
tim g
fha. fhc. es fhg. fhi. fhl. h
(5) ( fhe. (3) (2) (1 W t
e
d

M
e
a
n
fho. fhp. fhq. fhr. fhs. 1 fht. fhu. fhv. fhw. fhx. 3 fhy.
Le 1 0 1 0 0 2 7 . 2
5
0
fhz. fia. fib. fic. fid. 1 fie. fif. fig. fih. fii. 2 fij.
2 0 0 1 0 2 5 . 4
5
0
fik. fil. fim. fin. fio. 1 fip. fiq. fir. fis. fit. 2 fiu.
3 0 0 0 1 2 4 . 5
0
0
fiv. fiw. fix. fiy. fiz. 0 fja. fjb. fjc. fjd. fje. 3 fjf.
4 0 1 1 0 2 6 . 3
0
0
fjg. fjh. fji. fjj. fjk. 1 fjl. fjm. fjn. fjo. fjp. 4 fjq.
5 1 0 0 0 2 8 . 1
0
0
fjr. fjs. fjt. fju. fjv. fjw. fjx. fjy. fjz. fka. T fkc.

121
o
t
a
l
:
fkb. 1
5
.
0
0
fkd. fke. fkf. fkg. fkh. 3 fki. fkj. fkk. fkl. fkm. 4 fkn.
1-2 1 6 0 0 0 9 3 . 2
3
3
fko. fkp. fkq. fkr. fks. 3 fkt. fku. fkv. fkw. fkx. 3 fky.
2 4 1 1 0 9 3 . 3
8
9
fkz. fla. flb. flc. fld. 5 fle. flf. flg. flh. fli. 2 flj.
3 0 2 0 2 9 2 . 5
7
8
flk. fll. flm. fln. flo. 3 flp. flq. flr. fls. flt. 4 flu.
4 5 1 0 0 9 4 . 1
8
9
flv. flw. flx. fly. flz. 4 fma. fmb. fmc. fmd. fme.3 fmf.
5 2 1 2 0 9 3 . 4
3
3
fmg. fmh. fmi. fmj. fmk. fml. fmm. fmn. fmo. fmp.T fmr.
o
t
a
l
:
fmq.1
9
.
2
2
fms. fmt. fmu. fmv. fmw. fmx. fmy. fmz. fna. fnb. 3 fnc.
3-5 1 3 4 4 1 0 1 4 . 3
7
5
fnd. fne. fnf. fng. fnh. 2 fni. fnj. fnk. fnl. fnm.3 fnn.
2 4 4 2 0 1 4 . 1
8
3
fno. fnp. fnq. fnr. fns. 5 fnt. fnu. fnv. fnw. fnx. 2 fny.
3 0 1 5 1 1 3 . 5
5
0
fnz. foa. fob. foc. fod. 5 foe. fof. fog. foh. foi. 3 foj.
4 3 4 0 0 1 4 . 1

122
8
3
fok. fol. fom. fon. foo. 7 fop. foq. for. fos. fot. 3 fou.
5 2 3 0 0 1 4 . 4
5
8
fov. fow. fox. foy. foz. fpa. fpb. fpc. fpd. fpe. T fpg.
o
t
a
l
:
fpf. 1
7
.
4
9
fph. fpi. fpj. fpk. fpl. 5 fpm. fpn. fpo. fpp. fpq. 3 fpr.
6- 1 3 1 1 0 1 3 . 2
6
0
fps. fpt. fpu. fpv. fpw. 2 fpx. fpy. fpz. fqa. fqb. 3 fqc.
2 3 3 1 1 1 3 . 2
6
0
fqd. fqe. fqf. fqg. fqh. 4 fqi. fqj. fqk. fql. fqm.2 fqn.
3 1 1 2 2 1 2 . 5
7
0
fqo. fqp. fqq. fqr. fqs. 3 fqt. fqu. fqv. fqw. fqx. 4 fqy.
4 5 2 0 0 1 4 . 1
2
0
fqz. fra. frb. frc. frd. 6 fre. frf. frg. frh. fri. 3 frj.
5 1 2 0 1 1 3 . 4
2
0
frk. frl. frm. frn. fro. frp. frq. frr. frs. frt. T frv.
o
t
a
l
:
fru. 1
7
.
3
0
frw. frx. fry. frz. fsa. 0 fsb. fsc. fsd. fse. fsf. 3 fsg.
11 1 2 4 0 1 7 2 . 3
8
6
fsh. fsi. fsj. fsk. fsl. 2 fsm. fsn. fso. fsp. fsq. 3 fsr.
2 3 1 1 0 7 2 . 3
8

123
6
fss. fst. fsu. fsv. fsw. 2 fsx. fsy. fsz. fta. ftb. 2 ftc.
3 2 0 1 2 7 2 . 5
8
6
ftd. fte. ftf. ftg. fth. 1 fti. ftj. ftk. ftl. ftm. 4 ftn.
4 4 1 1 0 7 2 . 1
1
4
fto. ftp. ftq. ftr. fts. 3 ftt. ftu. ftv. ftw. ftx. 3 fty.
5 2 2 0 0 7 2 . 3
8
6
ftz. fua. fub. fuc. fud. fue. fuf. fug. fuh. fui. T fuk.
o
t
a
l
:
fuj. 1
8
.
5
8
ful.

fum. Table 4.4 shows that majority of the respondents answered Always and

answers both under Seldom and Never ranges from one to two.

fun. Furthermore, it goes to show that in Category D (Learning

Process), most of the answers from students with parents working abroad for 1-

2, 6-10 and more than 11 years are all from Item 4 (Do you give priority to your

academic goals?). Those with parents working for less than a year are from Item

5 [Do you show control over your anxieties? (being relaxed in performing

organized tasks?)], and those with parents working for 3-5 years are equally

from Items 2 (Do you show total focus in your studies?) and 4. On the contrary,

least of the answers of all the respondents regardless of the working years of

parents abroad are from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your lessons?).

124
fuo.

fup.

fuq.

fur.

fus.

fut.

fuu.

fuv.

fuw.

fux.

fuy. TABLE 5.1: Distribution of the Responses in Category A

(Communication) in Terms of Average Grade in 2nd Quarter

fuz. fva. fvb. fvd. fvf. So fvh. fvj. fvl. fvm. fvn. W fvo.
Av I Al O me Sel N T T e R
ti i
fvc. fve. me fvi. fvk. g
(5) ( s (2) ( h
fvg. (3) t
e
d

M
e
a
n
fvp. fvq. fvr. fvs. fvt. 0 fvu. fvv. fvw. fvx. fvy. 0 fvz.
74 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0

125
fwa. fwb. fwc. fwd. fwe. 0 fwf. fwg. fwh. fwi. fwj. 0 fwk.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
fwl. fwm. fwn. fwo. fwp. 0 fwq. fwr. fws. fwt. fwu. 0 fwv.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
fww. fwx. fwy. fwz. fxa. 0 fxb. fxc. fxd. fxe. fxf. 0 fxg.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
fxh. fxi. fxj. fxk. fxl. 0 fxm. fxn. fxo. fxp. fxq. 0 fxr.
5 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
fxs. fxt. fxu. fxv. fxw. fxx. fxy. fxz. fya. fyb. T fyd.
o
t
a
l
:
fyc. 0
.
0
0
fye. fyf. fyg. fyh. fyi. 3 fyj. fyk. fyl. fym. fyn. 4 fyo.
75- 1 10 5 0 0 1 7 . 1
3
9
fyp. fyq. fyr. fys. fyt. 4 fyu. fyv. fyw. fyx. fyy. 4 fyz.
2 6 8 0 0 1 7 . 5
1
1
fza. fzb. fzc. fzd. fze. 3 fzf. fzg. fzh. fzi. fzj. 4 fzk.
3 8 6 1 0 1 7 . 3
1
7
fzl. fzm. fzn. fzo. fzp. 4 fzq. fzr. fzs. fzt. fzu. 4 fzv.
4 9 4 1 0 1 7 . 3
1
7
fzw. fzx. fzy. fzz. gaa.3 gab. gac. gad. gae. gaf. 4 gag.
5 10 4 1 0 1 7 . 2
2
8
gah. gai. gaj. gak. gal. gam. gan. gao. gap. gaq.T gas.
o
t
a
l
:
gar. 2
1
.

126
1
2
gat. gau. gav. gaw. gax. 2 gay. gaz. gba. gbb. gbc. 4 gbd.
81- 1 7 3 0 0 1 5 . 2
4
2
gbe. gbf. gbg. gbh. gbi. 4 gbj. gbk. gbl. gbm. gbn.4 gbo.
2 6 2 0 0 1 5 . 5
1
7
gbp. gbq. gbr. gbs. gbt. 1 gbu. gbv. gbw. gbx. gby. 4 gbz.
3 6 4 1 0 1 5 . 4
2
5
gca. gcb. gcc. gcd. gce. 2 gcf. gcg. gch. gci. gcj. 4 gck.
4 7 3 0 0 1 5 . 2
4
2
gcl. gcm. gcn. gco. gcp. 2 gcq. gcr. gcs. gct. gcu. 4 gcv.
5 7 3 0 0 1 5 . 2
4
2
gcw. gcx. gcy. gcz. gda. gdb. gdc. gdd. gde. gdf. T gdh.
o
t
a
l
:
gdg.2
1
.
6
8
gdi. gdj. gdk. gdl. gdm. gdn. gdo. gdp. gdq. gdr. 4 gds.
86- 1 7 2 0 1 0 1 4 . 2
5
0
gdt. gdu. gdv. gdw. gdx. 1 gdy. gdz. gea. geb. gec. 4 ged.
2 8 1 0 0 1 4 . 1
7
0
gee. gef. geg. geh. gei. 2 gej. gek. gel. gem. gen.4 geo.
3 5 2 1 0 1 4 . 4
1
0
gep. geq. ger. ges. get. 3 geu. gev. gew. gex. gey. 4 gez.
4 6 0 1 0 1 4 . 4
1
0
gfa. gfb. gfc. gfd. gfe. 3 gff. gfg. gfh. gfi. gfj. 4 gfk.
5 7 0 0 0 1 4 . 3
4
0
gfl. gfm. gfn. gfo. gfp. gfq. gfr. gfs. gft. gfu. T gfw.
o

127
t
a
l
:
gfv. 2
1
.
8
0
gfx. gfy. gfz. gga. ggb.0 ggc. ggd. gge. ggf. ggg.0 ggh.
91 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
ggi. ggj. ggk. ggl. ggm. ggn. ggo. ggp. ggq. ggr. 0 ggs.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
ggt. ggu. ggv. ggw. ggx. 0 ggy. ggz. gha. ghb. ghc. 0 ghd.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
ghe. ghf. ghg. ghh. ghi. 0 ghj. ghk. ghl. ghm. ghn.0 gho.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
ghp. ghq. ghr. ghs. ght. 0 ghu. ghv. ghw. ghx. ghy. 0 ghz.
5 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gia. gib. gic. gid. gie. gif. gig. gih. gii. gij. T gil.
o
t
a
l
:
gik. 0
.
0
0
gim.

gin. Table 5.1 shows that when it comes to communication, the frequency of

answers range only from Always up to Sometimes. No one answered Never in this

category.

gio. Furthermore, it shows that in Category A (Communication), most of the

answers coming from students with average grade of 75-80 are from Item 1 (Do you

128
have a regular communication with your parents?). Most of the answers coming from

the students with an average grade of 81-85 are equally distributed from Items 1, 4 (Are

you open in communicating with your parents?) and 5 (Do your parents give you a

sense of encouragement even theyre not with you?). Lastly, most of the answers

coming from students with an average grade of 86-90 are from Item 2 (Is there

presence of your means in communication with your parents abroad?). On the contrary,

least of the answers coming from the students with an average grade of 76-80 and 81-

85 are both from Item 2, and least of the answers from students with an average grade

of 86-90 are equally from Item 3 (Do they check up on you on a regular basis?) and

Item 4.

gip.

giq.

gir.

gis.

git.

giu.

giv.

giw.

gix.

129
giy. TABLE 5.2: Distribution of the Responses in Category B (School) in

Terms of Average Grade in 2nd Quarter

giz. gja. gjb. gjd. gjf. So gjh. gjj. gjl. gjm. gjn. W gjo.
Av I Al O me Sel N T T e R
ti i
gjc. gje. me gji. gjk. g
(5) ( s (2) ( h
gjg. (3) t
e
d

M
e
a
n
gjp. gjq. gjr. gjs. gjt. 0 gju. gjv. gjw. gjx. gjy. 0 gjz.
74 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gka. gkb. gkc. gkd. gke. 0 gkf. gkg. gkh. gki. gkj. 0 gkk.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gkl. gkm. gkn. gko. gkp. 0 gkq. gkr. gks. gkt. gku. 0 gkv.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gkw. gkx. gky. gkz. gla. 0 glb. glc. gld. gle. glf. 0 glg.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
glh. gli. glj. glk. gll. 0 glm. gln. glo. glp. glq. 0 glr.
5 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gls. glt. glu. glv. glw. glx. gly. glz. gma. gmb. gmd.
Total
:
gmc.
0.00
gme. gmf. gmg. gmh. gmi. 4 gmj. gmk. gml. gmm. gmn. gmo.
75- 1 8 5 0 1 1 7 4.06 3

gmp. gmq. gmr. gms. gmt.3 gmu. gmv. gmw. gmx. gmy. gmz.
2 6 7 2 0 1 7 3.94 4

gna. gnb. gnc. gnd. gne.1 gnf. gng. gnh. gni. gnj. 4 gnk.
3 12 5 0 0 1 8 . 1
6
1
gnl. gnm. gnn. gno. gnp.2 gnq. gnr. gns. gnt. gnu.4 gnv.

130
4 11 5 0 0 1 8 . 2
5
0
gnw. gnx. gny. gnz. goa.6 gob. goc. god. goe. gof. 3 gog.
5 3 8 1 0 1 6 . 5
7
2
goh. goi. goj. gok. gol. gom. gon. goo. gop. goq.T gos.
o
t
a
l
:
gor. 2
0
.
8
3
got. gou. gov. gow. gox. 2 goy. goz. gpa. gpb. gpc. 3 gpd.
81- 1 2 7 0 1 1 4 . 5
7
5
gpe. gpf. gpg. gph. gpi. 1 gpj. gpk. gpl. gpm. gpn.4 gpo.
2 6 4 0 1 1 5 . 2
1
7
gpp. gpq. gpr. gps. gpt. 2 gpu. gpv. gpw. gpx. gpy. 4 gpz.
3 4 6 0 0 1 5 . 2
1
7
gqa. gqb. gqc. gqd. gqe.1 gqf. gqg. gqh. gqi. gqj. 4 gqk.
4 8 3 0 0 1 5 . 1
5
8
gql. gqm. gqn. gqo. gqp.3 gqq. gqr. gqs. gqt. gqu.3 gqv.
5 4 4 1 0 1 4 . 4
9
2
gqw. gqx. gqy. gqz. gra. grb. grc. grd. gre. grf. T grh.
o
t
a
l
:
grg. 2
0
.
5
9
gri. grj. grk. grl. grm. grn. gro. grp. grq. grr. 4 grs.
86- 1 6 3 0 0 1 1 4 . 3
3
0
grt. gru. grv. grw. grx. 0 gry. grz. gsa. gsb. gsc. 4 gsd.
2 4 4 2 0 1 4 . 5

131
0
0
gse. gsf. gsg. gsh. gsi. 1 gsj. gsk. gsl. gsm. gsn. 4 gso.
3 6 3 0 0 1 4 . 1
5
0
gsp. gsq. gsr. gss. gst. 2 gsu. gsv. gsw. gsx. gsy. 4 gsz.
4 6 2 0 0 1 4 . 2
4
0
gta. gtb. gtc. gtd. gte. 4 gtf. gtg. gth. gti. gtj. 4 gtk.
5 5 1 0 0 1 4 . 4
1
0
gtl. gtm. gtn. gto. gtp. gtq. gtr. gts. gtt. gtu. T gtw.
o
t
a
l
:
gtv. 2
1
.
3
0
gtx. gty. gtz. gua. gub.0 guc. gud. gue. guf. gug.0 guh.
91 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gui. guj. guk. gul. gum. gun. guo. gup. guq. gur. 0 gus.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gut. guu. guv. guw. gux. 0 guy. guz. gva. gvb. gvc. 0 gvd.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gve. gvf. gvg. gvh. gvi. 0 gvj. gvk. gvl. gvm. gvn. 0 gvo.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gvp. gvq. gvr. gvs. gvt. 0 gvu. gvv. gvw. gvx. gvy. 0 gvz.
5 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gwa. gwb. gwc. gwd. gwe. gwf. gwg. gwh. gwi. gwj. T gwl.
o
t
a
l
:
gwk.
0.00
gwm.

132
gwn. Table 5.2 shows that still, majority of the answers fall under Always and

Sometimes. Only a single respondent with an average grade of 81-85 and 86-90

answered Never.

gwo. Furthermore, it shows that in Category B (School), most of the answers

coming from the students with the an average grade of 75-80 and 86-90 are both from

Item 3 (Does your school provide activities for students self-improvement?), and most of

the answers coming from the students with an average grade of 81-85 are from Item 4

(Does your school conduct activities that enhances your talents or skills?). On the

contrary, least of the answers coming from the students with an average grade of 75-80

are from Item 5 (Does the school provide activities that let your discover who you really

are?). Least of the answers of students with an average grade of 81-85 are Item 1

(Does the school provide motivational techniques towards you?), and lastly, least of the

answers coming from students with an average grade of 86-90 are from Item 2 (Do your

teachers manage to provide time to help you in your difficulties?).

gwp.

gwq.

gwr.

gws.

gwt.

gwu.

gwv.

133
gww.

gwx. TABLE 5.3: Distribution of the Responses in Category C

(Socialization) in Terms of Average Grade in 2nd Quarter

gwy. gwz. gxa. gxc. gxe. gxg. gxi. gxk. gxl. gxn. gxo.
Av I Al O Someti Sel N T T Wei R
me g
gxb. gxd. s gxh. gxj. gxm. h
(5) ( gxf. (3) (2) (1 W t
e
d

M
e
a
n
gxp. gxq. gxr. gxs. gxt. 0 gxu. gxv. gxw. gxx. gxy. 0 gxz.
74 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gya. gyb. gyc. gyd. gye. 0 gyf. gyg. gyh. gyi. gyj. 0 gyk.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gyl. gym. gyn. gyo. gyp. 0 gyq. gyr. gys. gyt. gyu. 0 gyv.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gyw. gyx. gyy. gyz. gza. 0 gzb. gzc. gzd. gze. gzf. 0 gzg.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
gzh. gzi. gzj. gzk. gzl. gzm. gzn. gzo. gzp. gzq. T gzs.
o
t
a
l
:
gzr. 0
.
0
0
gzt. gzu. gzv. gzw. gzx. 7 gzy. gzz. haa. hab. hac. 2 had.
75- 1 1 3 5 2 1 5 . 4
7
8
hae. haf. hag. hah. hai. 10 haj. hak. hal. ham. han.3 hao.
2 1 4 3 0 1 5 . 2
1
7

134
hap. haq. har. has. hat. 8 hau. hav. haw. hax. hay. 3 haz.
3 4 0 4 2 1 5 . 3
0
0
hba. hbb. hbc. hbd. hbe.7 hbf. hbg. hbh. hbi. hbj. 3 hbk.
4 3 5 1 2 1 6 . 1
3
3
hbl. hbm. hbn. hbo. hbp. hbq. hbr. hbs. hbt. hbu.T hbw.
o
t
a
l
:
hbv. 1
2
.
2
8
hbx. hby. hbz. hca. hcb. 6 hcc. hcd. hce. hcf. hcg. 3 hch.
81- 1 2 3 0 1 1 4 . 3
4
2
hci. hcj. hck. hcl. hcm. hcn. hco. hcp. hcq. hcr. 3 hcs.
2 3 3 6 0 0 1 4 . 1
7
5
hct. hcu. hcv. hcw. hcx. 3 hcy. hcz. hda. hdb. hdc. 3 hdd.
3 6 0 1 2 1 4 . 2
5
8
hde. hdf. hdg. hdh. hdi. 5 hdj. hdk. hdl. hdm. hdn.3 hdo.
4 2 3 1 1 1 4 . 4
3
3
hdp. hdq. hdr. hds. hdt. hdu. hdv. hdw. hdx. hdy. T hea.
o
t
a
l
:
hdz. 1
4
.
0
8
heb. hec. hed. hee. hef. 4 heg. heh. hei. hej. hek. 3 hel.
86- 1 2 3 0 1 1 3 . 2
5
0
hem. hen. heo. hep. heq.2 her. hes. het. heu. hev. 3 hew.
2 3 4 1 0 1 3 . 1
9
0
hex. hey. hez. hfa. hfb. 0 hfc. hfd. hfe. hff. hfg. 3 hfh.

135
3 5 0 2 3 1 3 . 3
2
0
hfi. hfj. hfk. hfl. hfm.2 hfn. hfo. hfp. hfq. hfr. 2 hfs.
4 1 2 2 3 1 2 . 4
6
0
hft. hfu. hfv. hfw. hfx. hfy. hfz. hga. hgb. hgc. T hge.
o
t
a
l
:
hgd.1
3
.
2
0
hgf. hgg. hgh. hgi. hgj. 0 hgk. hgl. hgm. hgn. hgo.0 hgp.
91 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
hgq. hgr. hgs. hgt. hgu.0 hgv. hgw. hgx. hgy. hgz. 0 hha.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
hhb. hhc. hhd. hhe. hhf. 0 hhg. hhh. hhi. hhj. hhk. 0 hhl.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
hhm. hhn. hho. hhp. hhq.0 hhr. hhs. hht. hhu. hhv. 0 hhw.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .
0
0
hhx. hhy. hhz. hia. hib. hic. hid. hie. hif. hig. T hii.
o
t
a
l
:
hih. 0
.
0
0
hij.

hik. Table 5.3 shows that most of the answers fall under Sometimes.

Compared to the previous two tables, the number of answers under Seldom and Never

greatly increased.

136
hil. Furthermore, it shows that in Category C (Socialization), most of the

answers coming from students with an average grade of 81-85 and 86-90 are both from

Item 2 (Does your classmate help you when you have problems at home or in school?),

and most of the answers of students with an average grade of 75-80 are from Item 4

(Do peer pressure and relationships do not inter free with your studies?). On the

contrary, least of the answers coming from the students with an average grade of 75-80

are from Item 1 (Are you preferring to be with your friends over your family?), and those

with an average grade of 81-85 and 86-90 item are from Item 4.

him. TABLE 5.4: Distribution of the Responses in Category D (Learning

Process) in Terms of Average Grade in 2nd Quarter

hin. hio. hip. hir. hit. So hiv. hix. hiz. hja. hjb. hjc.
Ave I Alw O me Sel N T T Wei R
tim
hiq. his. es hiw. hiy.
(5) (4 hiu. (3) (2) (1)

hjd. hje. hjf. hjg. hjh. 0 hji. hjj. hjk. hjl. hjm. hjn.
74 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hjo. hjp. hjq. hjr. hjs. 0 hjt. hju. hjv. hjw. hjx. hjy.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hjz. hka. hkb. hkc. hkd. 0 hke. hkf. hkg. hkh. hki. hkj.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hkk. hkl. hkm. hkn. hko. 0 hkp. hkq. hkr. hks. hkt. hku.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hkv. hkw. hkx. hky. hkz. 0 hla. hlb. hlc. hld. hle. hlf.
5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hlg. hlh. hli. hlj. hlk. hll. hlm. hln. hlo. hlp. hlr.
Tot

hlq.
0.0

hls. hlt. hlu. hlv. hlw. 8 hlx. hly. hlz. hma. hmb. hmc.
75- 1 3 6 0 1 1 6 3.5 2

hmd. hme. hmf. hmg. hmh.8 hmi. hmj. hmk. hml. hmm. hmn.
2 3 2 4 1 1 5 3.1 4

hmo. hmp. hmq. hmr. hms.8 hmt. hmu. hmv. hmw. hmx. hmy.

137
3 2 2 2 4 1 5 2.7 5

hmz. hna. hnb. hnc. hnd. 7 hne. hnf. hng. hnh. hni. hnj.
4 3 5 3 0 1 6 3.4 3

hnk. hnl. hnm. hnn. hno. 11 hnp. hnq. hnr. hns. hnt. hnu.
5 2 4 1 0 1 6 3.8 1

hnv. hnw. hnx. hny. hnz. hoa. hob. hoc. hod. hoe. hog.
Tot

hof.
16.

hoh. hoi. hoj. hok. hol. 5 hom. hon. hoo. hop. hoq. hor.
81- 1 4 2 0 1 1 4 3.6 3

hos. hot. hou. hov. how. 3 hox. hoy. hoz. hpa. hpb. hpc.
2 5 3 1 0 1 4 4.0 2

hpd. hpe. hpf. hpg. hph. 6 hpi. hpj. hpk. hpl. hpm. hpn.
3 0 2 3 1 1 3 2.7 5

hpo. hpp. hpq. hpr. hps. 4 hpt. hpu. hpv. hpw. hpx. hpy.
4 5 3 0 0 1 4 4.0 1

hpz. hqa. hqb. hqc. hqd. 6 hqe. hqf. hqg. hqh. hqi. hqj.
5 2 3 1 0 1 4 3.5 4

hqk. hql. hqm. hqn. hqo. hqp. hqq. hqr. hqs. hqt. hqv.
Tot

hqu.
18.

hqw. hqx. hqy. hqz. hra. 0 hrb. hrc. hrd. hre. hrf. hrg.
86- 1 7 2 1 0 1 4 4.5 1

hrh. hri. hrj. hrk. hrl. 1 hrm. hrn. hro. hrp. hrq. hrr.
2 4 3 2 0 1 3 3.9 3

hrs. hrt. hru. hrv. hrw. 4 hrx. hry. hrz. hsa. hsb. hsc.
3 1 2 0 3 1 2 2.8 5

hsd. hse. hsf. hsg. hsh. 1 hsi. hsj. hsk. hsl. hsm. hsn.
4 7 1 1 0 1 4 4.4 2

hso. hsp. hsq. hsr. hss. 3 hst. hsu. hsv. hsw. hsx. hsy.
5 4 1 1 1 1 3 3.6 4

hsz. hta. htb. htc. htd. hte. htf. htg. hth. hti. htk.
Tot

htj.
19.

htl. htm. htn. hto. htp. 0 htq. htr. hts. htt. htu. htv.
91 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

htw. htx. hty. htz. hua. 0 hub. huc. hud. hue. huf. hug.
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

138
huh. hui. huj. huk. hul. 0 hum. hun. huo. hup. huq. hur.
3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hus. hut. huu. huv. huw. 0 hux. huy. huz. hva. hvb. hvc.
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hvd. hve. hvf. hvg. hvh. 0 hvi. hvj. hvk. hvl. hvm. hvn.
5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0

hvo. hvp. hvq. hvr. hvs. hvt. hvu. hvv. hvw. hvx. hvz.
Tot

hvy.
0.0

hwa.

hwb. Table 5.4 shows that most of the answers again fall under Sometimes and

answers under Never increased to a range of one to four.

hwc. Furthermore, it goes to show that in Category D (Learning Process), most

of the answers coming from the students with an average grade of 75-80 are from Item

5 [Do you show control over your anxieties (being relaxed in performing organized

tasks?)]. Most of the answers coming from those with an average grade of 81-85 are

from Item 4 (Do you give priority to your academic goals?), and those with an average

grade of 86-90 are from Item 1 (Do you show optimism in learning your lessons?). On

the contrary, least of the answers coming all students regardless of their average grade

are all from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your lessons?).

hwd. TABLE 6: Total Weight of the Responses in All Categories in Terms of

Gender

hwe. hwf. hwg. hwh. hwi. hwj.


Gender Categor Categor Categor Categor Total
yA yB yC yD
hwk. hwl. hwm. hwn. hwo. hwp.
Male 21.11 20.39 13.12 17.56 72.18
hwq. hwr. hws. hwt. hwu. hwv.

139
Female 21.55 21.31 12.96 17.77 73.59
hww. hwx. hwy. hwz. hxa. hxb.
Total 42.66 41.70 26.08 35.33 145.77
hxc.

hxd. Table 6 shows the total weighted means in all categories in terms of

gender. It shows that female respondents with a weight of 73.59 weighed higher than

male respondents with 72.18. By categories, Category A (Communication) weighed the

highest with a weight of 42.06 among other categories and Category C (Socialization)

weighed the lowest among the categories with a weight of 26.08. Getting the sum of all

weighted means in all the categories in terms of gender, the total weighted mean all-in-

all is equal to 145.77.

hxe. TABLE 6.1: Relationship of the Factors Affecting the Academic

Performance of OFW Children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012

2013 and Gender

hxf. hxh. hxj. hxk. hxl.


O E O-E (O-E)2 (O-E)2/ E
hxg. hxi. hxm.
Weighte Expecte
d d
Mea Mea
n n
hxn. hxo. hxp. hxq. hxr.
21.11 21.12 -0.01 0.0001 0.00000
hxs. hxt. hxu. hxv. hxw.
21.55 21.54 0.01 0.0001 0.00000
hxx. hxy. hxz. hya. hyb.
20.39 20.65 -0.26 0.0676 0.00327
hyc. hyd. hye. hyf. hyg.
21.31 21.05 0.26 0.0676 0.00321
hyh. hyi. hyj. hyk. hyl.
13.12 12.91 0.21 0.0441 0.00342

140
hym. hyn. hyo. hyp. hyq.
12.96 13.17 -0.21 0.0441 0.00335
hyr. hys. hyt. hyu. hyv.
17.56 17.49 0.07 0.0049 0.00028
hyw. hyx. hyy. hyz. hza.
17.77 17.84 -0.07 0.0049 0.00027
hzb. hzc. hzd. hze. hzf. Total:
hzg.
0.01380
hzh. CALCULATED VALUE: 0.01380

hzi. TABULATED VALUE: 7.8147

hzj. 0.01380 < 7.8147

hzk. Referring to the table above, calculated value (0.01380) is less than the

tabulated value (7.8147) proving that there is no significant relationship between the

gender and the factors affecting the academic performance of OFW children in Child

Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

hzl. TABLE 7: Total Weight of the Responses in All Categories in Terms of

Year Level

hzm. hzn. hzo. hzp. hzq. hzr.


Year Categor Categor Categor Categor Total
Leve yA yB yC yD
l
hzs. hzt. hzu. hzv. hzw. hzx.
First 23.10 22.60 14.40 19.80 79.90
Year
hzy. hzz. iaa. iab. iac. iad.
Second 21.00 21.80 13.50 18.80 75.10
Year
iae. iaf. 22.00 iag. iah. iai. 17.70 iaj. 75.2
Third 21.50 14.00 0
Year
iak. ial. 19.30 iam. ian. iao. iap.

141
Fourth 18.00 10.70 15.20 63.20
Year
iaq. iar. 85.40 ias. iat. 52.60 iau. iav.293.
Total 83.90 71.50 40
iaw.

iax. Table 7 shows the total weighted means in all categories in terms of year

level. It shows that first year respondents with a weight of 79.90 weighed the highest

among the other year levels, and the fourth year respondents weighed the least with a

weight of 63.20. By categories, Category A (Communication) weighed the highest with a

weight of 85.40 among other categories and Category C (Socialization) weighed the

lowest among the categories with a weight of 52.60. Getting the sum of all weighted

means in all the categories in terms of year level, the total weighted mean all-in-all is

equal to 293.40.

iay. TABLE 7.1: Relationship of the Factors Affecting the Academic

Performance of OFW Children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012

2013 and Year Level

iaz. O ibb.E ibd.O-E ibe.(O-E)2 ibf. (O-E)2/


iba. Weigh ibc. Expec E
ted ted ibg.
Mean Mean
ibh. 23.10 ibi. 23.26 ibj. - ibk. 0.0256 ibl. 0.0011
0.1600 0
ibm. ibn. 21.86 ibo. - ibp. 0.7396 ibq. 0.0338
21.00 0.8600 3
ibr. 22.00 ibs. 21.89 ibt. 0.1100 ibu. 0.0121 ibv. 0.0005
5
ibw.19.30 ibx. 18.40 iby. 0.9000 ibz. 0.8100 ica. 0.0440
2
icb. 22.60 icc. 22.85 icd. - ice. 0.0625 icf. 0.0027
0.2500 4
icg. 21.80 ich. 21.48 ici. 0.3200 icj. 0.1024 ick. 0.0047
7
icl. 21.50 icm. icn. 0.0000 ico. 0.0000 icp. 0.0000

142
21.50 0
icq. 18.00 icr. 18.07 ics. - ict. 0.0049 icu. 0.0002
0.0700 7
icv. 14.40 icw. 14.32 icx. 0.0800 icy. 0.0064 icz. 0.0004
5
ida. 13.50 idb. 13.46 idc. 0.0400 idd. 0.0016 ide. 0.0001
2
idf. 14.00 idg. 13.48 idh. 0.5200 idi. 0.2704 idj. 0.0200
6
idk. 10.70 idl. 11.33 idm. idn. 0.3969 ido. 0.0350
-0.6300 3
idp. 19.80 idq. 19.47 idr. 0.3300 ids. 0.1089 idt. 0.0055
9
idu. 18.80 idv. 18.30 idw.0.5000 idx. 0.2500 idy. 0.0136
6
idz. 17.70 iea. 18.33 ieb. - iec. 0.3969 ied. 0.0216
0.6300 5
iee. 15.20 ief. 15.40 ieg. - ieh. 0.0400 iei. 0.0026
0.2000 0
iej. iek. iel. iem. ien. Total:
ieo. 0.1864
4
iep. CALCULATED VALUE: 0.18644

ieq. TABULATED VALUE: 16.9190

ier.0.18644 < 16.9190

ies. Referring to the table above, calculated value (0.18644) is less than the

tabulated value (16.9190) proving that there is no significant relationship between the

year level and the factors affecting the academic performance of OFW children in Child

Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

iet.Table 8: Total Weight of the Responses in All Categories in Terms of

Nature of Parents Profession Abroad

ieu.Natur iev. Categ iew. iex. Categ iey. Categ iez. Total
e of ory A Category ory C ory D
Parent B
s
Profes

143
sion
Abroa
d
ifa. Engin ifb. 21.80 ifc. 20.80 ifd. 12.95 ife. 17.50 iff. 73.05
eer-
relate
d
ifg. Medici ifh. 17.00 ifi. 19.00 ifj. 12.00 ifk. 15.00 ifl. 63.00
ne-
relate
d
ifm.Busin ifn. 20.58 ifo. 21.29 ifp. 12.14 ifq. 17.00 ifr. 71.01
ess-
relate
d
ifs. Servic ift. 21.58 ifu. 21.51 ifv. 14.75 ifw.19.51 ifx. 77.35
e-
relate
d
ify. Total ifz. 80.96 iga. igb. igc. igd.
82.60 51.84 69.01 284.41
ige.

igf. Table 8 shows the total weighted means in all categories in terms of the

nature of parents profession abroad. It shows that those respondents with parents

whose work is service-related with a weight of 77.35 weighed the highest among other

profession that parents are engaged into. For the least, the student with a parent whose

work is medicine related weighed a total of 63.00. By categories, Category B (School)

weighed the highest with a weight of 82.60 among other categories and Category C

(Socialization) weighed the lowest among the categories with a weight of 51.84. Getting

the sum of all weighted means in all the categories in terms of the nature of parents

profession abroad, the total weighted mean all-in-all is equal to 284.41.

igg. Table 8.1: Relationship of the Factors Affecting the Academic

Performance of OFW Children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012

2013 and Nature of Parents Profession Abroad

144
igh. igj.E igl.O- igm. ign.
O igk. E (O-E)2 (O-E)2/ E
igi.Weig Expecte igo.
hted d
Mea Mea
n n
igp. igq. igr. 1.010 igs. igt. 0.049
21.80 20.79 0 1.0201 07
igu. igv.17.93 igw. igx. igy.0.048
17.00 -0.9300 0.8649 24
igz. iha. ihb. ihc. ihd.
20.58 20.21 0.3700 0.1369 0.00677
ihe. ihf. 22.02 ihg. ihh. ihi. 0.008
21.58 -0.4400 0.1936 79
ihj. 20.80 ihk. ihl. - ihm. ihn.
21.22 0.420 0.1764 0.00831
0
iho. ihp. ihq. ihr. 0.490 ihs.
19.00 18.30 0.7000 0 0.02678
iht. 21.29 ihu. ihv.0.670 ihw. ihx.
20.62 0 0.4489 0.02177
ihy.21.51 ihz. iia. - iib. 0.902 iic. 0.040
22.46 0.950 5 18
0
iid. 12.95 iie. 13.31 iif. - iig. 0.129 iih. 0.009
0.360 6 74
0
iii. 12.00 iij. 11.48 iik. 0.520 iil. 0.270 iim.
0 4 0.02355
iin. 12.14 iio. 12.94 iip. - iiq. 0.640 iir. 0.049
0.800 0 46
0
iis. 14.75 iit. 14.10 iiu. 0.650 iiv. 0.422 iiw.0.029
0 5 96
iix. 17.50 iiy. 17.73 iiz. - ija. 0.052 ijb. 0.002
0.230 9 98
0
ijc. 15.00 ijd. 15.29 ije. - ijf. 0.084 ijg. 0.005
0.290 1 50
0
ijh. 17.00 iji. 17.23 ijj. - ijk. 0.052 ijl. 0.003
0.230 9 07

145
0
ijm. ijn. 18.77 ijo. 0.740 ijp. 0.547 ijq. 0.029
19.51 0 6 17
ijr. ijs. ijt. iju. ijv. Total
ijw.0.363
34
ijx. CALCULATED VALUE: 0.36334

ijy. TABULATED VALUE: 16.9190

ijz. 0.36334 < 16.9190

ika. Referring to the table above, calculated value (0.36334) is less than the

tabulated value (16.9190) proving that there is no significant relationship between the

nature of parents profession abroad and the factors affecting the academic

performance of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

ikb. Table 9: Total Weight of the Responses in All Categories in Terms of

Years Spend by Parent(s) Abroad

ikc. Year(s ikd.Categ ike. Categ ikf. Categ ikg.Categ ikh.Total


) ory A ory B ory C ory D
spent
by
parent
(s)
abroa
d
iki. Less ikj. 22.00 ikk. ikl. 14.00 ikm. ikn.
than a 22.00 15.00 73.00
year
iko.1-2 ikp. ikq. ikr. 14.45 iks. ikt. 76.55
years 21.78 21.10 19.22
iku.3-5 ikv.22.43 ikw. ikx. iky.17.49 ikz.
years 21.25 13.17 74.34
ila. 6-10 ilb. 20.90 ilc. 19.90 ild. 12.00 ile. 17.30 ilf. 70.10
years
ilg. 11 ilh. 20.58 ili. 21.57 ilj. 13.14 ilk. 18.58 ill. 73.87
years

146
above
ilm.Total iln. 107.6 ilo. 105.8 ilp. 66.76 ilq. 87.59 ilr. 367.8
9 2 6
ils.

ilt. Table 9 shows the total weighted means in all categories in terms of the

years spent by parents abroad. It shows that those respondents with parents working

for 1-2 years with a weight of 76.55 weighed the highest among other working years of

parents. For the least, respondents with parents working for 6-10 years weighed a total

of 70.10. By categories, Category A (Communication) weighed the highest with a weight

of 107.69 among other categories and Category C (Socialization) weighed the lowest

among the categories with a weight of 66.76. Getting the sum of all weighted means in

all the categories in terms of the nature of parents profession abroad, the total weighted

mean all-in-all is equal to 367.86

ilu.

ilv.

ilw.

ilx. Table 9.1: Relationship of the Factors Affecting the Academic Performance

of OFW Children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012 2013 and

Years Spent by Parent(s) Abroad

ily. O ima. imc. imd. ime.


ilz. Weig E O-E (O-E)2 (O-E)2/ E
hted imb. imf.
Mean Expecte
d
Mean
img. imh. imi.0.630 imj.0.396 imk.

147
22.00 21.37 0 9 0.01857
iml.21.78 imm. imn. imo. imp.
22.41 -0.6300 0.3969 0.01771
imq. imr.21.76 ims. imt.0.448 imu.
22.43 0.6700 9 0.02063
imv. imw. imx. imy. imz.
20.90 20.52 0.3800 0.1444 0.00704
ina.20.58 inb.21.63 inc.- ind.1.102 ine.0.050
1.050 5 97
0
inf. 22.00 ing.21.00 inh.1.000 ini. 1.000 inj. 0.047
0 0 62
ink.21.10 inl. 22.02 inm. inn.0.846 ino.0.038
-0.9200 4 44
inp.21.25 inq.21.38 inr. - ins.0.016 int. 0.000
0.130 9 79
0
inu.19.90 inv. 20.17 inw. inx.0.072 iny. 0.003
-0.2700 9 61
inz.21.57 ioa.21.25 iob.0.320 ioc.0.102 iod.0.004
0 4 82
ioe.14.00 iof. 13.25 iog.0.750 ioh.0.562 ioi. 0.042
0 5 45
ioj. 14.45 iok.13.89 iol. 0.560 iom. ion.0.022
0 0.3136 58
ioo.13.17 iop.13.49 ioq.- ior. 0.102 ios.0.007
0.320 4 59
0
iot. 12.00 iou.12.72 iov. - iow. iox.0.040
0.720 0.5184 75
0
ioy. 13.14 ioz.13.41 ipa.- ipb.0.072 ipc.0.005
0.270 9 44
0
ipd.15.00 ipe.17.38 ipf. - ipg.5.664 iph.0.325
2.380 4 91
0
ipi. 19.22 ipj. 18.23 ipk.0.990 ipl. 0.980 ipm.
0 1 0.05376
ipn.17.49 ipo.17.70 ipp.- ipq.0.044 ipr. 0.002
0.210 1 49
0
ips.17.30 ipt. 16.69 ipu.0.610 ipv. 0.372 ipw.
0 1 0.02229
ipx.18.58 ipy. 17.59 ipz.0.990 iqa.0.980 iqb.0.055
0 1 72

148
iqc. iqd. iqe. iqf. iqg.Total:
iqh.0.789
18
iqi. CALCULATED VALUE: 0.78918

iqj. TABULATED VALUE: 21.026

iqk. 0.78918 < 21.026

iql. Referring to the table above, calculated value (0.78918) is less than the

tabulated value (16.9190) proving that there is no significant relationship between the

nature of parents profession abroad and the factors affecting the academic

performance of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

iqm. TABLE 10: Total Weight of the Responses in All Categories in Terms

of Average Grade in 2nd Quarter

iqn. iqo. iqp. iqq. iqr. iqs.


Average Categor Categor Categor Categor Total
Grad yA yB yC yD
e in
2nd
Quart
er
iqt. iqu. iqv.0.00 iqw. iqx. iqy.0.00
74 and 0.00 0.00 0.00
belo
w
iqz. ira. 21.12 irb. 20.83 irc. 12.28 ird. 16.78 ire. 71.0
75-80 1
irf. 81- irg. 21.68 irh. 20.59 iri. 14.08 irj. 18.00 irk. 74.3
85 5
irl. 86- irm. irn. 21.30 iro. 13.20 irp. 19.20 irq. 75.5
90 21.80 0
irr. 91 irs. 0.00 irt. 0.00 iru. 0.00 irv. 0.00 irw.
and 0.00
abov

149
e
irx. iry. 64.60 irz. 62.72 isa. isb. isc.
Total 39.56 53.98 220.86
isd.

ise. Table 10 shows the total weighted means in all categories in terms of the

average grade in the 2nd quarter. It shows that those respondents with an average grade

of 86-90 with a weight of 75.50 weighed the highest among other average grades in the

2nd quarter. For the least disregarding the average grades of 74 and below and 91 and

above without any weight, respondents with an average grade of 75-80 weighed a total

of 71.01. By categories, Category A (Communication) weighed the highest with a weight

of 64.60 among other categories and Category C (Socialization) weighed the lowest

among the categories with a weight of 39.56. Getting the sum of all weighted means in

all the categories in terms of the nature of parents profession abroad, the total weighted

mean all-in-all is equal to 220.86

isf.

isg.

ish. TABLE 10.1: Relationship of the Factors Affecting the Academic

Performance of OFW Children in Child Jesus of Prague School and Years

Spent by Parent(s) Abroad

isi. O isk. ism. isn. iso.


isj. Weig E O-E (O-E)2 (O-E)2/ E
hted isl. Expe isp.
Mea cted
n Mea
n
isq.0.00 isr. 0.00 iss. 0.000 ist. 0.000 isu.0.000

150
0 0 00
isv. 21.12 isw. isx. 0.350 isy. 0.000 isz. 0.000
20.77 0 0 00
ita. 21.68 itb. 21.75 itc. - itd. 0.004 ite. 0.000
0.070 9 23
0
itf. 21.80 itg. 22.08 ith. - iti. 0.078 itj. 0.003
0.280 4 55
0
itk. 0.00 itl. 0.00 itm.0.000 itn. 0.000 ito. 0.000
0 0 00
itp. 0.00 itq. 0.00 itr. 0.000 its. 0.000 itt. 0.000
0 0 00
itu. 20.83 itv. 20.17 itw. 0.660 itx. 0.435 ity. 0.021
0 6 60
itz. 20.59 iua.21.11 iub.- iuc.0.270 iud.0.012
0.520 4 81
0
iue.21.30 iuf. 21.44 iug.- iuh.0.019 iui. 0.000
0.140 6 91
0
iuj. 0.00 iuk.0.00 iul. 0.000 ium. iun.0.000
0 0.0000 00
iuo.0.00 iup.0.00 iuq.0.000 iur. 0.000 ius.0.000
0 0 00
iut. 12.28 iuu.12.72 iuv. - iuw. iux.0.015
0.440 0.1936 22
0
iuy. 14.08 iuz.13.32 iva.0.760 ivb.0.577 ivc. 0.043
0 6 36
ivd.13.20 ive.13.52 ivf. - ivg.0.102 ivh.0.007
0.320 4 57
0
ivi. 0.00 ivj. 0.00 ivk. 0.000 ivl. 0.000 ivm.
0 0 0.00000
ivn.0.00 ivo.0.00 ivp.0.000 ivq.0.000 ivr. 0.000
0 0 00
ivs. 16.78 ivt. 17.36 ivu.- ivv. 0.336 ivw.
0.580 4 0.01938
0
ivx. 18.00 ivy. 18.17 ivz. - iwa. iwb.
0.170 0.0289 0.00159
0
iwc. iwd. iwe. iwf. 0.562 iwg.
19.20 18.45 0.7500 5 0.03049
iwh. iwi. 0.00 iwj. 0.000 iwk. iwl. 0.000

151
0.00 0 0.0000 00
iwm. iwn. iwo. iwp. iwq.
Total:
iwr. 0.156
71
iws. CALCULATED VALUE: 0.15671

iwt. TABULATED VALUE: 21.026

iwu. 0.15671 < 21.026

iwv. Referring to the table above, calculated value (0.15671) is less than the

tabulated value (21.026) proving that there is no significant relationship between the

average grade in the 2nd quarter and the factors affecting the academic performance of

OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

iww. Chapter 5

iwx. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

iwy. This chapter deals with the over-all findings of the researchers supported

and reflected on Chapter 4 which deals with the presentation, analysis and

interpretation of data. In this chapter also, the researchers will provide credible

conclusions regarding the data gathered through tabulation. Lastly, this chapter

presents different recommendations for those people who would benefit from the study

of the researchers.

iwz. Findings

152
ixa. The study of the researchers aims to know the factors that may affect the

academic performance of the children whose parents are working abroad in Child Jesus

of Prague School for S.Y 2012-2013. When the researchers conducted a survey, the

researchers first, asked for students with parents working abroad randomly. In choosing

the respondents, the researchers divided equally the expected 40 respondents in all

year levels, acquiring ten per year level. These selected students served as the subject

of the study. The following findings are reflected on the interpretation on the previous

chapter.

ixb. The researchers found out that there are more females used as

respondents with a number of 22 (55%) than males with a count of 18 (45%); the

number of respondents is equally divided in the four year levels so there are forty

respondents with ten per year level (25% each); that half of the respondents have a

parent whose work is related to engineering (50%), twelve are respondents who have a

parent whose work is related to giving service (30%) such as care giving, seven are

respondents who have a parent abroad whose work is related to business (17.50%) and

only one among the respondents who has a parent whose work is related to business

(2.50%); that most of the respondents have a parent/parents working abroad in a range

of 3-5 years (30%) of the total respondents followed by those respondents with a

parent/parents working abroad for 6-10 years (25%), then by 1-2 years (22.50%), next

is 11 years and above (17.50%) and the least is less than a year (5%); and that there

are no respondents who have an average grade of 74 and below and 91 and above,

majority of the respondents have a range of average grade of 75-80 (45%) followed by

153
those students with an average grade of 81-85 (30%) and lastly are the respondents

with an average grade of 91 and above (25%)

Results vs. Gender:

ixc. Using Table 1.1, the researchers found out that in Category A

(Communication), majority of the respondents, both male and female answered Always.

Few only answered Seldom and none answered Never. Also, they found out that most

of the respondents in terms of gender are having a regular communication with their

parent(s). Furthermore in Category A (Communication), most answers from the male

are from Item 3 (Do they check-up on you on a regular basis?) and most answers from

the female are from Item 1 (Do you have a regular communication with your

parents?).In this category also, it shows that the least answers of male are from Item 2

(Is there the presence of your means in communicating with your parents abroad?), and

the least answers from the female are from Item 3.

ixd. Using Table 1.2, the researchers found out that in Category B (School),

still, majority of the respondents, both male and female, answered Always. For the least,

three answered Never from the male and only one answered Never from the female.

Furthermore, in Category B (School), most of the answers coming from the male are

from Item 4 (Does your school conduct activities that enhances your talents/skills?)

while most of the answers coming from the female are equally from Item 3 (Does your

school provide activities for students self-improvement?) and also Item 4. On the

contrary, least of the answers coming from the male are from Item 1 (Does the school

provide motivational techniques toward you?) while least of the answers coming from

154
the female are from Item 5 (Does the school provide activities that let you discover who

you really are?).

ixe. Using Table 1.3, the researchers found out that in Category C

(Socialization), this time majority of the respondents answered Sometimes both for male

and male, and the number of respondents who answered Never increased.

Furthermore, it shows that most of the answers coming from the male are equally from

Item 3 (Are you not seeking love coming from having a boyfriend/girlfriend) and Item 4

(Do peer pressure and relationships do not interfere with your studies?) while most of

the answers coming from the female are from Item 2 (Does your classmate help you

when you have a problems at home or in school?). On the contrary, least of the answers

coming from the male are from Item 1 (Are you not preferring to be with your friends

over your family?) while least of the answers coming from the female are from Item 4.

ixf. Using Table 1.4, the researchers found out that in Category D (Learning

Process), female respondents regard their studies highly than off the male respondents.

Generalizing, most of the answers for both genders fall under Sometimes and few only

answered Never. Furthermore, it shows that most of the answers coming from the male

are equally from Item 2 (Do you show total focus in your studies?) and Item 4 (Do you

give priority to your academic goals?) while most of the answers from the female are

from Item 1 (Do you show optimism in learning your lessons?). On the contrary, least of

the answers coming from both male and female are from Item 3 (Do you study in

advance for your lessons?).

Results vs. Year Level:

155
ixg. Using Table 2.1, the researchers found out that in Category A

(Communication) in terms of year level, there is regular communication between the

parents and their children for having the highest number of answers under Always. Few

only answered under Often and Sometimes. Comparing the number of answers in

Seldom among the four year levels, more of it came from the fourth year. Furthermore, it

shows that most of the answers coming from the first year are equally from Item 1 (Do

you have a regular communication with your parents?) and Item 4 (Are you open in

communicating with your parents?). Most of the answers coming from the second year

and fourth year are both from Item 5 (Do your parents give you a sense of

encouragement even theyre not with you?), and most of the answers coming from the

third year are from Item 1. On the contrary, least of the answers coming from the first

year are from Item 2 (Is there the presence of means in communicating with your

parents?). Least of the answers coming from the second year and third year are both

from Item 3 (Do they check up on you on a regular basis?). Lastly, least of the answers

coming from the fourth year are from Item 4.

ixh. Using Table 2.2, the researchers found out that in Category B (School) the

respondents coming from the first year and second year regard the school to be of great

help for their development rather than the respondents coming from the third year and

fourth year level. Always, corresponding for the positive answer, ranges from minimum

of two and a maximum of six. Four from the fourth year answered Seldom and no one

answered Never for this category. Furthermore, it goes to show that in Category B

(School), most of the answers coming from the first year are equally from Item 2 (Do

your teachers manage to provide time to help you in your difficulties?) and Item 3 (Does

156
your school provide activities for students self-improvement?). Most of the answers

coming from the second year and third year are from Item 4 (Does your school conduct

activities that enhances your talents/skills?) and Item 3 respectively. Lastly, most of the

answers coming from the fourth year are equally from Items 3 and 4. On the contrary,

least of the answers coming from the first year are equally from Item 1 (Does the school

provide motivational techniques toward you?) and Item 5 (Does the school provide

activities that let you discover who you really are?). Least of the answers coming from

the second year and third year are from Item 5, and least of the answers coming from

the fourth year are from Item 2.

ixi. Using Table 2.3, the researchers found out that in Category C

(Socialization) answers for all year levels, majority of the respondents answered

Sometimes. With a great difference, most of the answers under Never came from the

fourth year level and there are also three coming from the first year level. Also, they

found out that first year respondents are more attached to their family than the

succeeding year levels. Furthermore in Category C (Socialization), it shows that most of

the answers coming from the first year are equally from Item 1 (Are you not preferring to

be with your friends over your family?) and Item 3 (Are you not seeking for love coming

from having a boyfriend/girlfriend?). Most of the answers coming from the second year

and fourth year are both from Item 2 (Does your classmate help you when you have

problems at home or in school?) while most answers from the third year are from Item 4

(Do peer pressure and relationships interfere with your studies?). On the contrary, least

of the answers from the first year and fourth year are both from Item 4, while least

answers coming from the second year and third year are from Item 1.

157
ixj. Using Table 2.4, the researchers found out that in Category D (Learning

Process), the first year respondents regard highly their studies more than the

succeeding year levels. From the second year level, there are respondents who

answered more in Seldom and two respondents from the third year answered Never.

Lastly, answers under Seldom and Never greatly increased for the fourth year students.

Furthermore, it shows that in Category D (Learning Process), most of the answers

coming from the first year are from Item 1 (Do you show optimism in learning your

lessons?). Most answers coming from the second year are equally from Item 4 (Do you

give priority to your academic goals?) and Item 5 [Do you show control over your

anxieties (being relaxed in performing organized tasks)?]. Most answers coming from

the third year students are equally from Items 1 and 4. Most answers coming from the

fourth year are from Item 4. On the contrary, least answers coming from all year levels

are all coming from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your lessons?).

Results vs. Parents Profession Abroad:

ixk. Using Table 3.1, the researchers found out that in Category A

(Communication) in terms of the nature of parents profession abroad, most of the

respondents have a parent/parents whose work is related to engineering and for the

least, there is only one who has a parent whose work is related to medicine. It goes to

show that there is a greater chance of communication to those parents whose work is

engineering-related than the others. In this table, a few only answered Seldom and no

one answered Never. Furthermore, it shows that in Category A (Communication), most

of the answers of those with a parent/parents whose work is related in engineering are

158
from Item 1 (Do you have a regular communication with your parents?). One with a

parent whose work is related to medicines answer weighed most equally from Items 3

(Do they check up on you on a regular basis?) and 4 (Are you open in communicating

with your parents?). Those with a parent/parents whose work is related to business are

from Item 5 (Do your parents give you a sense of encouragement even theyre not with

you?), and those with a parent/parents whose work is related to service are from Item 4.

On the contrary, least answers of those with a parent/ parents whose work is related to

engineering and service are both equally from Items 2 (Is there the presence of your

means in communicating with your parents?) and 3. One with a parent whose work is

related to medicines answer weighed the least equally from Items 1, 2 and 5.

ixl. Using Table 3.2, the researchers found out that in Category B (School)

majority of the responses coming from respondents in terms of their parents profession

abroad fall under Always. Answers under Seldom ranges from the minimum of one to

the maximum of two, and no one answered Never in this category. Furthermore, it

shows that in Category B (School), most of the answers of those with a parent/ parents

whose work is related in engineering and business are both from Item 3 (Does your

school provide activities for students self-improvement?). One with a parent whose

work is related to medicines answer weighed most from Item 4 (Does your school

conduct activities that enhance your talents/skills?), and those with a parent/ parents

whose work is related to service are from Item 2 (Do your teachers manage to provide

time to help you in your difficulties?). On the contrary, least answers of those with a

parent/ parents whose work is related to engineering are from Item 2. One with a parent

whose work is related to medicines answer weighed the least equally from Items 1

159
(Does the school provide motivational techniques toward you?) and 5 (Does the school

provide activities that let you discover who you really are?). Least answers of those with

a parent/ parents whose work is related to business are from Item 5, and those with a

parent/ parents whose work is related to service are equally from Items 3 (Does your

school provide activities for students self-improvement?) and 5.

ixm. Using Table 3.3, the researchers found out that majority of the answers in

Category C (Socialization) in terms of the nature of profession of parents abroad fall

under Sometimes. Also, they found out that most of the answers under Never were

answered by respondents with parents whose work is related to engineering compared

to the other three. Furthermore, it shows that in Category C (Socialization), most of the

answers coming from students with parents whose work is engineer-related are from

Item 3 (Are you not seeking for love coming from having boyfriend or girlfriend?). One

with a parent whose work is related to medicines answer weighed most from Item 1

(Are you not preferring to be with your friends over your family?). Most of the answers

coming from students with parents whose work is businessrelated are from Item 4 (Do

peer pressure and relationships do not interfere with your studies?), and lastly, most of

the answers coming from students with parents whose work is servicerelated are from

Item 2 (Does your classmate help you when you have problems at home or in school?).

On the contrary, least of the answers coming from students with parents whose work is

engineer-related and business-related are both from Item 1. Least of the answers

coming from students with parents whose work is medicine-related and service-related

are both from Item 4 (Do peer pressure and relationships do not interfere with your

studies?)

160
ixn. Using Table 3.4, the researchers found out that in Category D (Learning

Process) most of the respondents with parents whose work is related to engineering

answered Sometimes and most of the respondents with parents whose work is related

to giving service answered Always. Answers under Never were only filled by two

respondents with parents whose work is related to business and five from those who

have parents whose work is related to engineering. Furthermore, It shows that Category

D (Learning Process), most of the answers coming from students with parents whose

work is engineer-related is from Item 4 (Do you give priority to your academic goals?).

Most of the answers coming from students with parents whose work is medicine-related

are from Item 5 (Do you show control over your anxieties (being relaxed in performing

organized tasks)?). Most of the answers coming from students with parents whose work

is business-related are from Item 1 (Do you show optimism in learning your lessons?).

Most of the answers coming from students with parents whose work is service-related

are from Items 2 and 4 (Do you show total focus in your studies?) (Do you give priority

to your academic goals?), respectively. On the contrary, least of the answers coming

from students with parents whose work is engineer-related, medicine-related, business-

related and service-related are from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your lessons?).

Results vs. Years Spent by Parent(s) Abroad:

ixo. Using Table 4.1, the researchers found out that in Category A

(Communication) most of the respondents with parents working abroad regardless of

the years of work answered Always. Answers under Sometimes only ranged from one to

four and answers under Seldom ranged from one to two. No one answered Never.

Furthermore, it shows that in Category A (Communication), most of the answers coming

161
from the students with parents working abroad for 1-2 and 3-5 years are both Item 1 (Do

you have a regular communication with your parents?). Those with parents working

abroad for 6-10 years are from Item 5 (Do your parents give you a sense

encouragement even theyre not with you?). Lastly, those with parents working for more

than 11 years are from equally from Items 3 (Do they check up on you on a regular

basis?) and 5. On the contrary, least of the answers coming from the students with

parents working less than a year and 1-2 years abroad are from Item 3. Those with

parents working for 3-5 years are from equally distributed in Items 2 (Is there the

presence of your means in communicating with your parents?), 3 and 4 (Are you open

in communicating with your parents?). Lastly, those with parents working for 6-10 years

are from Item 2.

ixp. Using Table 4.2, the researchers found out that in Category B (School),

most of the answers of those respondents answered Always. Answers under Seldom

range from a count of one to two. Answers under Never are only filled by a single

respondent from all year ranges except from those whose parents work within less than

a year and in a range of 3-5 years. Furthermore, it goes to show that in Category B

(School), most of the answers coming from students with parents working abroad for

less than a year are equally from Items 1 (Does the school provide motivational

techniques toward you) and 3 (Does your school provide activities for students self-

improvement?). Those with 1-2 years are from Item 3. Those with 3-5 and 6-10 years

are both from Item 4 (Does your school conduct activities that enhance your skills and

talents?). Lastly, those with parents working abroad for more than 11 years are from

equally from Items 3 and 5 (Does the school provide activities that let you discover who

162
you really are?). On the contrary, least answers coming from those with parents working

abroad for less than a year are distributed evenly on Items 2, 4 and 5. Those with 1-2

years are from Item 2. Those with 3-5 and 6-10 years are both from Item 4. Lastly those

with parents working abroad for more than 11 years are from Items 3 and 5.

ixq. Using Table 4.3, the researchers found out that the rate of answers under

Always decreases as it the range of years spent by parents abroad increases. Under

the range of 3-5 years, there is an increase under those who answered Never ranging a

count from one to three. Furthermore, it shows that in category C (Socialization), most

of the answers coming from the students with parents working abroad for 1-2 and 6-10

years are from Item 2 (Does your classmate help you when you have problems at home

or in school?). Those with parents working for less than a year are equally from Items 3

(Are you not seeking love coming from having a boyfriend/girlfriend?) and 4 (Do peer

pressure and relationships do not interfere with your studies?). Most of the answers

coming from the students with parents working abroad for 3-5 years are from Item 1

(Are you not preferring to be with your friends over your family?). Lastly, most of the

answers of those with parents working abroad for more than 11 years are from Item 3.

On the contrary, least of the answers from those with parents working for less than a

year are equally from Items 1 and 2. Least of the answers coming from the students

with parents working abroad for 1-2 and more than 11 years are from Item 1. Those with

parents working for 3-5 years are from Item 3, and those with parents working for 6-10

years are from Item 4.

ixr. Using Table 4.4, the researchers found out that in Category D (Learning

Process) majority of the respondents answered Always and answers both under

163
Seldom and Never ranges from one to two. Furthermore, it goes to show that in

Category D (Learning Process), most of the answers from students with parents

working abroad for 1-2, 6-10 and more than 11 years are all from Item 4 (Do you give

priority to your academic goals?). Those with parents working for less than a year are

from Item 5 [Do you show control over your anxieties? (being relaxed in performing

organized tasks?)], and those with parents working for 3-5 years are equally from Items

2 (Do you show total focus in your studies?) and 4. On the contrary, least of the

answers of all the respondents regardless of the working years of parents abroad are

from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your lessons?).

ixs.

Results vs. Average Grade in the 2nd Quarter:

ixt. Using Table 5.1, the researchers found out that in Category A

(Communication) when it comes to communication, the frequency of answers range

only from Always up to Sometimes. No one answered Never in this category.

Furthermore, it shows that in Category A (Communication), most of the answers coming

from students with average grade of 75-80 are from Item 1 (Do you have a regular

communication with your parents?). Most of the answers coming from the students with

an average grade of 81-85 are equally distributed from Items 1, 4 (Are you open in

communicating with your parents?) and 5 (Do your parents give you a sense of

encouragement even theyre not with you?). Lastly, most of the answers coming from

students with an average grade of 86-90 are from Item 2 (Is there presence of your

means in communication with your parents abroad?). On the contrary, least of the

164
answers coming from the students with an average grade of 76-80 and 81-85 are both

from Item 2, and least of the answers from students with an average grade of 86-90 are

equally from Item 3 (Do they check up on you on a regular basis?) and Item 4.

ixu. Using Table 5.2, the researchers found out that in Category B (School)

still, majority of the answers fall under Always and Sometimes. Only a single respondent

with an average grade of 81-85 and 86-90 answered Never. Furthermore, it shows that

in Category B (School), most of the answers coming from the students with the an

average grade of 75-80 and 86-90 are both from Item 3 (Does your school provide

activities for students self-improvement?), and most of the answers coming from the

students with an average grade of 81-85 are from Item 4 (Does your school conduct

activities that enhances your talents or skills?). On the contrary, least of the answers

coming from the students with an average grade of 75-80 are from Item 5 (Does the

school provide activities that let your discover who you really are?). Least of the

answers of students with an average grade of 81-85 are Item 1 (Does the school

provide motivational techniques towards you?), and lastly, least of the answers coming

from students with an average grade of 86-90 are from Item 2 (Do your teachers

manage to provide time to help you in your difficulties?).

ixv. Using Table 5.3, the researchers found out that in Category C

(Socialization) most of the answers fall under Sometimes. Compared to the previous

two tables, the number of answers under Seldom and Never greatly increased.

Furthermore, it shows that in Category C (Socialization), most of the answers coming

from students with an average grade of 81-85 and 86-90 are both from Item 2 (Does

your classmate help you when you have problems at home or in school?), and most of

165
the answers of students with an average grade of 75-80 are from Item 4 (Do peer

pressure and relationships do not inter free with your studies?). On the contrary, least of

the answers coming from the students with an average grade of 75-80 are from Item 1

(Are you preferring to be with your friends over your family?), and those with an average

grade of 81-85 and 86-90 item are from Item 4.

ixw. Using Table 5.4, the researchers found out that in Category D (Learning

Process) most of the answers again fall under Sometimes and answers under Never

increased to a range of one to four. Furthermore, it goes to show that in Category D

(Learning Process), most of the answers coming from the students with an average

grade of 75-80 are from Item 5 [Do you show control over your anxieties (being relaxed

in performing organized tasks?)]. Most of the answers coming from those with an

average grade of 81-85 are from Item 4 (Do you give priority to your academic goals?),

and those with an average grade of 86-90 are from Item 1 (Do you show optimism in

learning your lessons?). On the contrary, least of the answers coming all students

regardless of their average grade are all from Item 3 (Do you study in advance for your

lessons?

Results vs. Total Weight in All Categories

ixx. Using Table 6, the researchers found out that the total of weighted means

in all categories in terms of gender, female respondents with a weight of 73.59 weighed

higher than male respondents with 72.18. By categories, Category A (Communication)

weighed the highest with a weight of 42.06 among other categories and Category C

(Socialization) weighed the lowest among the categories with a weight of 26.08. Getting

166
the sum of all weighted means in all the categories in terms of gender, the total

weighted mean all-in-all is equal to 145.77.

ixy. Using Table 7, the researchers found out that the total of weighted means

in all categories in terms of year level shows that first year respondents with a weight of

79.90 weighed the highest among the other year levels, and the fourth year

respondents weighed the least with a weight of 63.20. By categories, Category A

(Communication) weighed the highest with a weight of 85.40 among other categories

and Category C (Socialization) weighed the lowest among the categories with a weight

of 52.60. Getting the sum of all weighted means in all the categories in terms of year

level, the total weighted mean all-in-all is equal to 293.40.

ixz. Using Table 8, the researchers found out that the total of weighted means

in all categories in terms of the nature of parents profession abroad shows that those

respondents with parents whose work is service-related with a weight of 77.35 weighed

the highest among other profession that parents are engaged into. For the least, the

student with a parent whose work is medicine related weighed a total of 63.00. By

categories, Category B (School) weighed the highest with a weight of 82.60 among

other categories and Category C (Socialization) weighed the lowest among the

categories with a weight of 51.84. Getting the sum of all weighted means in all the

categories in terms of the nature of parents profession abroad, the total weighted mean

all-in-all is equal to 284.41.

iya. Using Table 9, the researchers found out that the total of weighted means

in all categories in terms of the years spent by parents abroad shows that those

167
respondents with parents working for 1-2 years with a weight of 76.55 weighed the

highest among other working years of parents. For the least, respondents with parents

working for 6-10 years weighed a total of 70.10. By categories, Category A

(Communication) weighed the highest with a weight of 107.69 among other categories

and Category C (Socialization) weighed the lowest among the categories with a weight

of 66.76. Getting the sum of all weighted means in all the categories in terms of the

nature of parents profession abroad, the total weighted mean all-in-all is equal to

367.86.

iyb. Using Table 10, the researchers found out that the total of weighted

means in all categories in terms of the average grade in the 2 nd quarter shows that

those respondents with an average grade of 86-90 with a weight of 75.50 weighed the

highest among other average grades in the 2 nd quarter. For the least disregarding the

average grades of 74 and below and 91 and above without any weight, respondents

with an average grade of 75-80 weighed a total of 71.01. By categories, Category A

(Communication) weighed the highest with a weight of 64.60 among other categories

and Category C (Socialization) weighed the lowest among the categories with a weight

of 39.56. Getting the sum of all weighted means in all the categories in terms of the

nature of parents profession abroad, the total weighted mean all-in-all is equal to

220.86.

Factors vs. Profile (The Chi-square):

iyc. Using Table 6.1, in terms of gender, the researchers found out that the

calculated value (0.01380) is less than the tabulated value (7.8147) proving that there is

168
no significant relationship between the gender and the factors affecting the academic

performance of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

iyd. Using Table 7.1, in terms of year level, the researchers found out that the

calculated value (0.18644) is less than the tabulated value (16.9190) proving that there

is no significant relationship between the year level and the factors affecting the

academic performance of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-

2013.

iye. Using Table 8.1, in terms of the nature of parents profession abroad, the

researchers found out that the calculated value (0.36334) is less than the tabulated

value (16.9190) proving that there is no significant relationship between the nature of

parents profession abroad and the factors affecting the academic performance of OFW

children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

iyf. Using Table 9.1, in terms of the years spent by parents abroad, calculated

value (0.78918) is less than the tabulated value (16.9190) proving that there is no

significant relationship between the nature of parents profession abroad and the factors

affecting the academic performance of OFW children in Child Jesus of Prague School

S.Y. 2012-2013.

iyg. Using Table 10.1, in terms of the average grade in 2 nd quarter, the

researchers found out that the calculated value (0.15671) is less than the tabulated

value (21.026) proving that there is no significant relationship between the average

grade in the 2nd quarter and the factors affecting the academic performance of OFW

children in Child Jesus of Prague School S.Y. 2012-2013.

169
iyh. Conclusions

iyi. Based on the findings, the researchers were able to create the following

conclusions:

iyj. The researchers conclude that there are more female respondents than male

respondents because due to the limited population in the four sections chosen, each

class is really dominated by female students. They conclude that also in terms of year

level, there is no accurate reason on why they have parents working abroad simply

because the number of students each year level were really measured unlike the

gender. In terms of job, they conclude that there are more engineering-related and

service-related jobs of parents abroad maybe because the opportunity really here in the

Philippines in terms of manpower, the pay is really small to sustain the needs of their

family and other countries are in need of manpower coming from our country. There are

fewer parents with business-related and medicine-related jobs because professional

jobs abroad are in the hands of their own citizens and what they need there is

manpower than professional white collar job workers. For the grades, the researchers

conclude that the range of the average grades of students were only from 75-90 and

they cannot exceed beyond 91 and less than 74 because they are having their focus on

their studies yet at the same time, they are in emotional struggle for their parents who

are not with them to guide them.

iyk. The researchers identified that the factors affecting the academic

performance of OFW children in CJPS are gadgets (for communication

purposes), preference of peers, motivation and attitude toward learning,

170
advance studying and control. They include gadgets simply because it is the

bridge that helps both parents and their children get in touch with each other;

preference of peers because nowadays, teenagers prefer the company of peers

as a source of love they cannot feel with their parents away; motivation,

because it pushes them to do better in school; attitude toward learning because

others give priority on their academic goals rather than the negative emotions

that they feel; advance studying because most of them answered never, it

affects their studies in a negative sense; and lastly, control because it is already

in them on how are they going to manage themselves through problems faced

between systems including their family and school.

iyl. The researchers conclude that there is no significant relationship between

the factors and the gender exposed to the same social and academic

environment. They are examined using the same standards so the response to

their performance is similar. They conclude that there is no significant

relationship between the factors and year level because according to Piagets

Theory, at adolescence, the individuals brain is fully developed and can get

involved in complex as well as abstract thinking. The younger students tend to

be more focused on their academic pursuits than the older ones. This could be

because the older ones are burdened with other nonacademic demands that

need their attention. The younger students though concentrate on their

academic work may not have experience to effectively meet the challenges

required for enhanced academic work; therefore, they go to the same level with

their older counterparts who may have the experience but do not have the time

171
to pursue academic activities well for a better academic performance. They

conclude that there is no significant relationship between the factors and the job

parents have abroad because the parents sole reason for going overseas is to

provide more for their child so they would experience conducive learning. It

becomes neutral since they are not actually present but through communication,

they are having a worthwhile time to discuss different matters with each other.

They also conclude that there is no significant relationship between the factors

and the number of years spent by parents abroad because adolescents are

already aware of their parents sacrifices oversees and according to Castro,

communication is not that hard because of the present gadgets to make

communication easier. Their indirect contact serves as a temporary guidance for

their child. Lastly, there is no significant relationship between the factors and the

average grade in the second quarter because maybe even if their parents are

overseas, they still tend to create a supportive relationship with each other that

boost the students self-esteem to perform well in class; however, they cannot

go beyond extremes such as grades lower than 74 and higher than 91.

iym.

iyn. Recommendations

iyo. After a careful analysis of data, these are the recommendations

that the researchers created for the following groups that will benefit the study of

the researchers:

Respondents

172
iyp. For the respondents, the researchers recommend that they should

have the PACH Time Table posted in areas they visit the most so they wont forget

that they will be having at least an hour each day to communicate with their parents

through video chat instead of simple text messages.

iyq.

Students

iyr. The students, if ever they know a child or schoolmate who has a

problem regarding having parents working abroad, they should help these people

by giving them advises that can enlighten their minds to study and strive more and

not to rebel against their parents like having friends that influencing them to drink,

to smoke and etc. This type of advice is different than the usual thing that happens.

This would be done in groups. Each class has the H.A.P coming from the first

period which can be used to have an open forum.

iys.

Parents

iyt. If going overseas would be their only option to earn a better living,

instead of just going to stay here in the country with their child/children, they could

spend quality time like also an open-up conversation by the time they get home.

Also, if they cannot really stay for long, parents should already decide to finish

documents for their child so that it would be easy for them to take their child to other

countries if that is what they really want. They should also prefer countries which

are not really that far from the Philippines, in which jobs could be stable such as

Singapore. With these ideas, it wont be hard for their child/children to be

173
emotionally unwell for their longing. As much as possible, instead of only cellular

phone communications, have a video chat/call to make it much more realistic.

Teachers

iyu. As second parents, the researchers recommend that they

should act one. Students are aware that teachers in Child Jesus of Prague School

are married and living with children at their care. With this fact, they could at least be

a supporting brother, sister or even a friend but of course, knowing the limits that

they are still in authority, and that they are the teachers. By these, teachers would

benefit to avoid having problems seriously when it comes to emotions by students

simply because the school has a large population and it cannot be monitored well.

Consultation hours should be done at least twice a week because an hour each day

is not enough to help students in need because not only one needs help coming

from their teachers.

iyv.

Researchers

iyw. As the individuals making the study, and even for those who want to

further study about the factors affecting the academic performance of students with

parents abroad, the current researchers recommend to consult different hypotheses

and opinions coming from their actual parents and teachers so that they would

actually feel the gap that is happening between children and their parents. For this,

they could also use research tools such as books about psychology during the

1970s to 1980s because they contain so much information about the psychological

growth of individuals if they would be permitted. For this also, the current

174
researchers would benefit because they have studied enough and understood a lot

of things regarding the complex stage of adolescence so they could avoid the wrong

path taken by teenagers also.

iyx.

Administration

iyy. They should conduct some activities for parents and their

child/children. A different sort of family day would be very effective. The common

connotation on Family Day would only be only involving the usual sack race, relays

and other games with a parent and a child as partners. Maybe involving how well

they know each other would help because for games, no one intends to lose at all.

So they would try their best to get along with each other much more along the

process. By these activities, they can help those parents to be close and to have an

open communication with their child. The researchers thought that these activities

would be a big help to parents and especially to the students to have better

performance here in school because they can freely tell their problems to their

parents without hesitations or not being shy. Also, the researchers recommend the

administration to let the teachers and students to feel free on settling personal

problems especially at home than doing it when they already see something wrong

with a student because when problems get bigger, it would be much harder to

handle. Lastly, researchers recommend the administration to conduct another

seminar or symposium about parent-child interactions which would be entitled

Ceasing the Gaps. For the previous years, the school already conducted one

which focused on the RH Bill and relationships.

175
iyz.

176