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HEARING ON SECURITY UPDATES

SINCE SEPTEMBER 11, 2001

HEARING
BEFORE THE

COMMITTEE ON HOUSE
ADMINISTRATION
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
ONE HUNDRED SEVENTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION

HEARING HELD IN WASHINGTON, DC, SEPTEMBER 10, 2002

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COMMITTEE ON HOUSE ADMINISTRATION
BOB NEY, Chairman
VERNON J. EHLERS, Michigan STENY H. HOYER, Maryland
JOHN L. MICA, Florida Ranking Minority Member
JOHN LINDER, Georgia CHAKA FATTAH, Pennsylvania
JOHN T. DOOLITTLE, California JIM DAVIS, Florida
THOMAS M. REYNOLDS, New York

PROFESSIONAL STAFF
PAUL VINOVICH, Staff Director
BILL CABLE, Minority Staff Director

(II)

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SECURITY UPDATES SINCE SEPTEMBER 11

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2002

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON HOUSE ADMINISTRATION,
Washington, DC.
The committee met, pursuant to call, at 1:35 p.m., in Room 1310,
Longworth House Office Building, Hon. Robert W. Ney [chairman
of the committee] presiding.
Present: Representatives Ney, Ehlers, Mica, Doolittle, Hoyer and
Fattah.
Staff Present: Paul Vinovich, Staff Director; Channing Nuss,
Deputy Staff Director; Fred Hay, Counsel; Jeff Janas, Professional
Staff Member; William H. Cable, Minority Staff Director; Charles
Howell, Minority Chief Counsel; Sterling Spriggs, Minority Tech-
nology Director; Matt Pinkus, Minority Professional Staff Member;
and Michael Harrison, Minority Professional Staff Member.
The CHAIRMAN. The committee will come to order.
Today the Committee on House Administration is holding an
oversight hearing on the progress and direction of Capitol security,
emergency preparedness and infrastructure upgrades in the U.S.
House of Representatives since September 11, 2001.
I would also like to note, please, if you could turn off or put on
silent cell phones and BlackBerries and other electronic devices.
I also want to thank the House recording studio for setting up
the internal distribution of this through the House system today.
As we open today, I first want to thank all of our witnesses for
being here. I know this is a very busy time for everyone. I also
want to thank our audience for their interest as well. Ultimately
security and emergency preparedness depends on the diligence and
cooperation of everyone who serves, works or visits here to the Na-
tions Capital.
The purpose of this hearing today is to step back a moment from
the hurried pace that we have all been proceeding under the past
year to address the new security realities and the way the systems
operate here in the U.S. Capitol since September 11, 2001, and to
take measure of how far we have come and where we want to focus
our time and resources as we move forward beyond the first anni-
versary of that terrible day for our Nation.
We should all take a great deal of pride in what we have collec-
tively accomplished, everybody involved, all of the staffs, the offi-
cers, staff on a bipartisan basis of the U.S. House. I especially also
want to thank this committee, our Ranking Member, Steny Hoyer,
all of the Members, Republican and Democrat, of this committee
who is not one single instance since 9/11 has injected one bit of pol-
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itics in this. When decisions had to be made, it was done on a bi-


partisan, cooperative basis. I appreciate that, I know the Nation
does, in order to keep the peoples House in operation. So we
should have a great pride in what we have accomplished, again, ev-
erybody in attendance here today, but the dedicated staff who be-
hind the scenes have also done the work, and all of our professional
working men and women of the officers of the House, their staffs,
obviously including Capitol Hill Police.
The human tragedy that unfolded on September 11th stirred a
tremendous collective resolve amongst all Americans. It is with this
determined resolve that the committee and the witnesses before us
have marshaled their efforts. Make no mistake, we have a lot of
hard work ahead of us, and we are going to as we continue to en-
sure that the House of Representatives remains the peoples House,
an open house, but ultimately it must be a secure House.
Protecting the Capitol from the threats that face us in this post-
9/11 world has been and must continue to be the highest priority.
Let us also not forget that the attacks did not end for us on Sep-
tember the 11th, but continued the following month with the at-
tacks on anthrax through the mail system, forcing the evacuation
and relocation of the entire campus.
Continuity of government and disaster recovery no longer were
concepts to plan for in the future, but were the realities with which
we were faced for so many trying days last fall. We should also not
that there was a working group put together the very next day
after 9/11 and involved officers of the House, the staff, House Ad-
ministration, Appropriations, the leaders, Speaker Hasterts officer,
Leader Gephardt. And that was a good working group that has had
an ongoing process as we speak today.
As a result, however, I am convinced that we have shown the
world that we are resilient and more focused than ever to meet any
challenge. We are stronger, safer, wiser and even more determined
than before to secure our Capitol as an open venue forever to con-
duct the peoples business.
The Committee on House Administrations oversight role in-
cludes physical security, information security, and emergency pre-
paredness for the House and Capitol complex, as well as the over-
sight and coordination of the House officers as they perform their
duties related to these issues.
The committee has been actively and consistently engaged in
new security measures and the approval of the security-related de-
vices installed in the Capitol buildings and the surrounding House
office buildings. The committees efforts have focused attention on
life safety, emergency preparedness and Capitol security. As part
of these efforts, we have developed and explored new technologies
and accelerated efforts to ensure the continuity of legislative and
constituent service operations. In its oversight capacity, the Com-
mittee on House Administration has worked closely in planning
and coordinating the efforts of the Sergeant at Arms, Chief Admin-
istrative Officer and the Clerk of the House on all of these prior-
ities.
I look forward to hearing from each of our witnesses today, from
their perspective as how far we have come over the last 12 months,
receiving an update on where they feel we stand today, and what

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they see as the challenges they face in their capacity as we move


forward into the next year and beyond.
Campus security, emergency preparedness and disaster recovery
are all evolving objectives, works in progress, and with each pass-
ing day are hopefully more completely realized, but with the under-
standing that we will never meet a day where we can say that we
are going to be finished. This is why all of us have been forced to
think outside of the box that we have become so comfortable with
and operating within, and have had to think in new and creative
ways to address the challenges with which we are faced.
Toward that end I am convinced that we must take a thorough
look at the way we manage and meet all of our needs. There is no
question, tooand I want to just mention parking for a second.
Most of our requests come in the area of parking a lot. I think
there is also no question that the underground parking facilities in
the House office buildings, although convenient, pose some serious
challenges.
I think it is time to look seriously at options with which we can
allow the construction of alternative parking facilities to replace
the underground parking. Ultimately that would allow for the use
of space within our office buildings which we are currently pretty
well squeezed. These buildings were designed years ago, and I
think we could more efficiently utilize that space for needs that
benefit the campus in general. The committee will be taking action
to direct the House officers to report back to the committee with
a comprehensive plan to study the associated actions inherent to
such a review and supply it to the committee for consideration. I
would also encourage the Architect of the Capitol to include such
a discussion in their master planning process as they assess the
long-term needs of the Capitol.
I wont spend any more time on the point, expanding on my ideas
and concerns, as I am sure that we will have a great deal to say.
I welcome any comments the witnesses may have on these or any
other relevant concerns.
Additionally, as you know, you can all recall last fall I convened
a working group comprised of the House officers, the Architect, the
Capitol Police, representatives from House leadership and the Ap-
propriations Committee, I mentioned it earlier, to work together to
identify objectives and focus solutions in response to the attacks.
That working group worked, I think, in a very effective way to ad-
dress the immediate short-term concerns and to have long-term
planning. And you might want to comment on the progress of that
arrangement, because I think it worked quite well.
I also want to talk about, just for a second, the expectations and
the format of todays hearing. Due to the nature of todays subject
matter, I have decided that it is appropriate to conduct the first
part of the hearing in open format, but for the second portion of
our hearing, I would entertain a motion to close the meeting and
proceed in executive session in order to give the Members and wit-
nesses here today an opportunity to ask and answer as candidly as
they can certain questions which involve sensitive law enforcement
information. As such, I would ask for the understanding and the
cooperation of the press and all others in attendance in the audi-
ence at that time.

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Further, I would ask our Members and witnesses to be mindful


in the first portion of our hearing to reserve any comments or ques-
tions with respect to any specific process or procedure which may
involve sensitive law enforcement information. So if a question is
asked, and you feel it is sensitive, just, of course, feel free to speak
up on that.
I want to also point out historically in my time in public office,
I have always supported, you know, an open system, but there are
certain things I think that would hurt all of the visitors at the Cap-
itol, the media, the staff and everyone if, in fact, they were dis-
cussed in open venue. I think that is pretty well understood.
Also, I would like to, you know, proceed in a second here to ask
our Ranking Member and any other Members if they would like to
make an opening statement.
But just again let me just say that the purpose of this hearing
is to show the amount of progress we have made, to discuss ideas
that are out there. We have had, I think, a tremendous staff, and
that includes the House, personal office of the committee, officers
of the House, that also underwent quite a trauma here in the Na-
tions Capital, and they all chipped in and they kept the peoples
House going, and I think that they need tremendous credit for that.
Again, I just appreciate the Ranking Member, Congressman
Ehlers, and all of the other Members of the committee, you just did
a tremendous job in the last year of working. I commend the offi-
cers of the House and their staff. They have made it their charge
every single day to keep the peoples House open to the people and
to keep this Capitol running, and I commend you for it.
The CHAIRMAN. With that, I would like to turn to our Ranking
Member, Mr. Hoyer of Maryland.
Mr. HOYER. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. On Friday the
Members of the House and Senate and many staff went to Federal
Hall in New York, where 211 years ago this Congress met. We
have a great pride in the fact that this Congress is the oldest con-
tinuous democratic body in the world.
On September 11th of last year, terrorists struck at us to both
make a point and try to undermine that way of life and that Na-
tion. In that respect they failed. Obviously they succeeded in
changing our lives, they succeeded in costing us a lot of resources,
but they did not succeed in their basic objective.
I first want to thank Bob Ney. This committee is a pleasure to
serve on. It is a pleasure to serve on it because Bob Ney runs this
committee in a bipartisan, open fashion, so that every Member has
input, and every Member feels that their views are taken into con-
sideration.
In particular, as the Ranking Member, I find Chairman Ney, to
be someone with whom I have forged not only a very positive work-
ing relationship, but a deep friendship as well. His leadership of
this committee post-September 11, I think, was important for this
institution and important for this country, and I congratulate him
on that leadership.
We are here today to review the many initiatives which the com-
mittee, and the Capitol Police, and the security support staff of the
House have undertaken to ensure safety and facilitate communica-
tions in times of emergency.

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Immediately after September 11th, a large number of our staff


performed extraordinary service to the House. While it was not
necessary for us to meet off campus, if you will, our staff working
around the clock after September 11th had ensured that we had
that ability if we were required to do so. And we all thank them
for not only the great talent that they have, but their patriotism
and willingness to go far beyond the call of duty to serve their
country and to serve this Congress.
We are here today to renew everyones understanding that Mem-
bers obviously bear the ultimate responsibility of what this institu-
tion does, and the policies that it adopts, the security measures
that it installs. We are responsible for that as Members, but we
look to our staff to carry out policies. So we are here today to again
review and consider the unfolding security initiatives in the wake
of September 11th. The barbarism of that day will not diminish our
resolve to address this Congress, this countrys and the worlds
evolving concerns.
While the culprits and their accomplices are rooted out and
brought to justice, the Congress will continue its important work
in furtherance of the Nation and the world based on democracy,
tolerance and mutual respect. It is our solemn duty to ensure that
terrorism never triumphs over freedom.
Our hearing today will highlight some of the things which we
have done and are doing to ensure that terrorism has no place to
strike and no place in the civilized world. We will do what we can
and what we must and will not be deterred by the threats of terror-
ists.
It is fitting today, as we reflect on the events of a year ago and
the actions we have taken in the interim, that we conduct the busi-
ness of this institution, Mr. Chairman, as you have said in public,
to the greatest extent practical and in a manner consistent with
the increased security concerns of our experts.
I might say in passing that I think that all of us are concerned
with the fact that the Capitol looks a little different, a little less
open, a little less hospitable to those who own this Capitol and who
glory in its role that it plays in their country. However, we are ac-
commodating reality not only to protect these buildings, but also to
protect the people who come to this building to participate in de-
mocracy here in their Capitol. Some information obviously, as the
Chairman has pointed out, we are going to have to take in execu-
tive session not to preclude the American public, but to preclude
those from having information which might facilitate their evil
work.
So, Mr. Chairman, I congratulate you. If there is a message in
todays hearing, it is that terrorism will not succeed in changing,
diluting or diminishing mankinds inevitable movement toward in-
dividual freedom and liberty, the very foundation of this Nation. I
thank you for convening this hearing, and I will reiterate at the
end, but I say at the beginning, to all of you who represent the
thousands of people who have worked so diligently, so selflessly, so
effectively since September 11th to ensure the integrity of our de-
mocracy and the safety of this Hill and of the people who visit and
work here, we thank them.
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

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The CHAIRMAN. Thank the Ranking Member for his thoughtful


comments.
Turn to Mr. Ehlers, who has been a diligent member of this com-
mittee and also is our quasi-scientific and technology advisor.
Mr. EHLERS. Well, that is correct except for the quasi..
Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Thank you for calling this hearing. I
think it is certainly essential that we do this and review what has
happened in the past year. I do not have a formal opening state-
ment, but I also want to express my appreciation to the staff. It
has been a tough year. Very tough year on all of us.
And I suspect, none of us have worked as hard as we have this
past year, because not only dealing with terrorism and the terrorist
acts and the increasing security and all of the things that this com-
mittee is concerned about, but every committee has dealt with leg-
islative initiatives necessary to deal with the terrorism, the dan-
gers we face and our response to them, and that continues to this
day and will likely continue for some time.
It has been a very busy, extremely stressful year for many, many
people, and I express my thanks to everyone in this institution that
has worked so hard to accomplish what we have accomplished. I
look forward to the testimony.
Obviously, we have not done as well as we could in many of the
things that we tried to do. It is important for us to pinpoint those,
not in the sense of seeking retribution or anything of that sort, but
rather so that we can learn from the mistakes and make the sys-
tem work even better than it has.
So I appreciate having this hearing called, and I look forward to
the testimony and discussion. With that, I will yield back.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank the gentleman for his comments.
We will begin with Jay Eagen, our CAO for the House.

STATEMENT OF JAMES M. EAGEN, III, CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE


OFFICER, U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Mr. EAGEN. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have submitted a full
statement for the written record.
Good afternoon. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Hoyer, members of the com-
mittee, I am pleased to be here today to provide you with informa-
tion, answer your questions concerning the business continuity and
disaster recovery program at the House of Representatives.
The House has made great strides in improving our disaster pre-
paredness and recovery capabilities, and I want to thank the nu-
merous House staffs that have work tirelessly to achieve all that
we have in the months that have passed since the events of last
fall, and who continue to do so to help us accomplish our future
goals.
I am also most grateful for your assistance, Mr. Chairman, in
support of our efforts, Mr. Hoyer, and that of the committee mem-
bers as well as the committee staff on both sides. We still have
many challenges ahead of us, and I look forward to working with
you and the committee in meeting them.
With my testimony I intend to cover three topics: an overview of
the business continuity and disaster recovery lessons learned, the
actions taken to date in response to those lessons learned, and fi-

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nally, planned capabilities that are scheduled for delivery over the
next year.
The impact of September 11th and the anthrax attack on the
Houses ability to conduct its business were carefully evaluated,
and the effectiveness of the immediate responses were assessed to
see how improvements could be made in the event of a similar cir-
cumstance. The challenges experienced as a result of September
11th and the anthrax attack were classified into three solution
areas: Continuity of operations, communications, and technology.
The following high-level lessons learned were developed: For con-
tinuity of operations, it is clear that we need to establish pre-
arranged office facilities with the necessary infrastructure to en-
able short setup time when Members, leadership, committees and
their staffs are unable to access current facilities.
Second, we need to create well-defined, coordinated, integrated
and expanded processes, and procedures that are documented and
regularly exercised.
And, third, establish an off-site mail facility capable of handling
mail and packages from the U.S. Postal Service as well as other
shippers.
For communications it is evident that we need to have multiple
methods of communication during and immediately following an
emergency event, and that we need to test each of these solutions
against the goal of providing Members, the leadership, committees
and their staffs with communications anywhere, anytime.
With regard to technology, we need to create a systemwide off-
site redundancy with automatic fail-over capabilities to ensure that
key systems and current data are available anytime there is a fail-
ure at the House campus; and finally, ensure that off-site capabili-
ties are available to Member offices to afford them protection when
their system fails or when they cannot access the system while
they are dislocated from their current offices.
Following September 11th, the House identified 27 initiatives to
address near-term, midterm and long-term business continuity in
disaster recovery needs. Following up on immediate responses to
the anthrax attacks, a formal Business Continuity and Disaster Re-
cover Program Management Office was established within the
Chief Administrative Officer. Through the efforts of this office, the
initial 27 initiatives were restructured into 19 projects with specific
goals and objectives that tied back to the lessons learned and their
associated deficiencies and continuity of operations, communica-
tions and technology. Further, the projects have a fully developed
charter as well as an integrated budget and milestone schedule
that focuses on delivering specific capabilities.
I am pleased to report that substantial and specific capabilities
have been added to the three identified solution areas. Under con-
tinuity of operations, emergency preparation guidelines have been
distributed to all offices, all emergency response personnel have
been identified, HORT, House Operations Recovery Team drills,
are being conducted, and lessons learned from each drill are being
implemented.
Second, complete office space assignments for the alternate
House offices have been made. Interim computer network and tele-
phone connectivity have been established, and notebook computers

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and printers have been preconfigured and are prestaged in storage


for immediate support.
Third, funding and staffing to support 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-
week operations have been approved, and hiring actions are under
way in order to maintain and monitor critical House information
systems as well as support the Emergency Communications Center.
In the communications area, BlackBerries were distributed to all
Members following September 11th. Government emergency tele-
communications services, or GETS, accounts have been established,
and the cards have been delivered to all Members.
The Emergency Communications Center has been integrated
with House Information Resources operations. Included in the cen-
ter is a direct line to the U.S. Capitol Police Command Head-
quarters as well as a BlackBerry Member emergency notification
capability and an automatic telephone dial-out emergency message
notification capability for Members.
Under technology, dial-in and broadband remote access services
capacity has been doubled. An inbound fax system pilot is under-
way to test the viability of receiving and distributing faxes elec-
tronically as a potential means of reducing paper mail. Preparation
for a digital mail pilot program is nearing completion.
A diverse Internet connection has been implemented to remove
single points of failure, and we have been actively working with the
Legislative Branch Task Force on selecting an alternative computer
facility and alternative business center site.
While considerable progress has been made to date, many addi-
tional business continuity and disaster recovery improvements are
anticipated. Over the next year, for continuity of operations we
plan to complete a business continuity/disaster recovery gap anal-
ysis and propose steps to close the gaps and to integrate and docu-
ment all emergency response procedures to include finalizing proce-
dures with the U.S. Capitol Police on near-term and long-term noti-
fication processes.
We plan to extend hours for the House Information Resources
Calls Center, Emergency Communications Center, and Network
Operations Center to 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
For communications we plan to procure and configure additional
computer and office equipment to support mobile emergency re-
sponse centers; plan to finalize recommendations on procuring
emergency communications vans and private cellular services to
help overcome the access problems experienced with public cellular
and dial-up service.
And for technology, we plan to upgrade the whip phone system
to provide automated emergency notification capability, implement
the alternative computer facility and alternative business center,
and conduct simulated outage tests; and finally, complete the dig-
ital mail pilot, implement the approved recommendations.
Significant progress has been made since the initial response to
September 11th and later to the anthrax attack, and the approved
budget is sufficient to carry out the remainder of the initiates
under the Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Program.
Again, I want to thank all of the members of the committee for
your support and assistance over the last year, and I look forward

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to continuing to work with you, and I thank you for the opportunity
to testify today.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank the gentleman for his testimony.
[The statement of Mr. Eagen follows:]
TESTIMONY OF HON. JAMES M. EAGEN III, CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER
Good afternoon, Chairman Ney, Mr. Hoyer, and Members of the Committee. I am
pleased to be here today to provide you with information and answer your questions
concerning the business continuity and disaster recovery program at the House. The
House has made great strides in improving our disaster preparedness and recovery
capabilities. I want to thank the numerous House staff who worked tirelessly to
achieve all that we have in the months that have passed since the events of last
falland who continue to do so to help us accomplish our future goals.
I am also grateful for your assistance and support of our efforts, Mr. Chairman,
and that of the Committee Members, and the staff. We still have many challenges
ahead of us and I look forward to working with you and the Committee on meeting
them.
With my testimony, I intend to cover the following topics:
1. An overview of the business continuity and disaster recovery lessons learned
in the aftermath of the evacuation of the Capitol and House office buildings on Sep-
tember 11 and subsequent anthrax attack in October 2001.
2. The actions taken to date in response to those lessons learned.
3. And finally, the planned capabilities that are scheduled for delivery over the
next year.
LESSONS LEARNED POST SEPTEMBER 11 AND ANTHRAX ATTACK

The impact of September 11 and the anthrax attack on the Houses ability to con-
duct its business were carefully evaluated. And the effectiveness of the immediate
responses was assessed to see how improvements could be made in the event of a
similar circumstance. The challenges experienced as a result of September 11 and
the anthrax attack were classified into three solution areas (continuity of operations,
communications, and technology), and the following high-level lessons learned were
developed:
For continuity of operations, it was clear that we need to:
Establish pre-arranged office facilities with the necessary infrastructure to
enable short set-up time when Members, Leadership, Committees, and their
staffs are unable to access their current facilities;
Broaden the responsibilities of the House Operations Recovery Team
(HORT) to include full continuity of operations (COOP);
Create well defined, coordinated, integrated, and expanded processes and
procedures that are documented and regularly exercised;
Have a continuous improvement process to capture and pursue near-term,
mid-term, and long-term business continuity and disaster recovery enhance-
ments;
Ensure that the enhancements and solutions are mobile as much as pos-
sible to facilitate a flexible response capability; and
Establish an off-site mail facility capable of handling mail and packages
from the U.S. Postal Service as well as other shippers.
For communications, it was evident that we need:
Multiple methods of communications during and immediately following an
emergency event;
Communications solutions to include multiple means to reach targeted peo-
ple, and effective ways for those people to reach out to others; and
And finally, testing of each solution against the goal of providing Members,
the Leadership, Committees, and their staffs with communications anywhere,
anytime.
For technology, it was very evident we need to:
Create a system-wide, off-site redundancy with automatic fail over capa-
bility to ensure that key systems and current data are available anytime there
is a failure at the house campus; and
Ensure that the off-site capabilities are available to Member offices to af-
ford them protection when their system fails or when they cannot access the
system while they are dislocated from their current offices.

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ACTIONS TAKEN IN RESPONSE TO THE LESSONS LEARNED

Following September 11, the House identified 27 initiatives to address near-term,


mid-term, and long-term business continuity and disaster recovery needs. Following
up on immediate responses to the anthrax attack, a formal Business Continuity and
Disaster Recovery (BC/DR) Program Management Office (PMO) was established.
Through the efforts of the CB/DR PMO, the initial 27 initiatives were restruc-
tured into 19 projects with specific goals and objectives that tie back to the lessons
learned and their associated deficiencies in continuity of operations, communica-
tions, and technology. Further, the projects have a fully developed charter as well
as an integrated budget and milestone schedule that focuses on delivery specific ca-
pabilities.
Additionally, the PMO has implemented processes and tools to support regular
status reporting on work progress against plan, status of resources against plan,
issues and risks that pose a potential threat to the project, and decisions and issues
that require management intervention to avoid project delays. Under the PMO, the
projects continue to operate within the origin approved budgetary limits, and with
the help of the PMO, project status and progress can be continually monitored.
Im pleased to report that substantial and specific capabilities have been added
in the three identified solution areas:
Under continuity of operations, the following has been accomplished:
Emergency preparation guidelines have been distributed to all offices, all
emergency response personnel have been identified, and HORT drills are being
conducted and lessons learned from each drill are being implemented;
Complete office space assignments for the Alternate House Offices have
been made, interim computer network and telephone connectivity have been es-
tablished, and notebook computers and printers have been pre-configured and
are pre-staged in storage for immediate support;
A new automated call-out system has been implemented to support the
Child Care Center to ensure that staff and parents are well informed on what
is happening and what is expected;
Funding and staffing to support 24 hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week operations
have been approved and hiring actions are under way in order to maintain and
monitor critical House information systems as well as support the Emergency
Communications Center (ECC); and
An off-site mail facility has been secured and built-out, and a facility for
processing packages is under construction.
Under communications, the following has been accomplished:
BlackBerries were distributed to all Members following September 11;
The infrastructure requirements of the Member Briefing Center are in
place for video teleconferencing;
Government emergency telecommunications services (GETS) accounts have
been established and the cards have been delivered to all Members;
BlackBerry system monitoring tools have been implemented to proactively
identify message delivery issues;
The Emergency Communication Center (ECC) has been integrated with
House Information Resources (HIR) operations. Included in the ECC is a direct
line to the U.S. Capitol Police Command Headquarters as well as a BlackBerry
Member emergency notification capability and an automatic telephone dial out
emergency message notification capability for Members;
Notebook computers have been pre-configured and pre-staged for support
activation of an Emergency Response Center; and
And finally, the initial Member Paging System upgrade has been completed
to include installation of a primary and a back-up system.
Under technology, the following has been accomplished:
The House voice system and phone exchange and voice mail system backup
have been upgraded to reduce the threat of failure;
Dial-in and broadband remote access services capacity has been doubled;
An in-bound fax system pilot is under way to test the viability of receiving
and distributing faxes electronically as a potential means of reducing paper
mail;
Preparation for a digital mail pilot program is nearing completion;
A diverse Internet connection has been implemented to remove single
points of failure;
We have been actively working with the Legislative Branch Task Force on
selecting an Alternative Computer Facility and Alternate Business Center site;
The ability to run the Legislative Information Management System (LIMS)
and Staff Payroll systems at an interim alternate site has been put in place;

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A data backup and restore system was piloted and the procedures were im-
plemented to support multi-site backup;
An agreement was reached with another legislative branch agency for data
center space to support interim off-site data storage; and
And finally, an architecture has been designed to implement an automatic
fail-over backup system to ensure continuity of House operations.
PLANNED CAPABILITIES SCHEDULED FOR DELIVERY

While considerable progress has been made to date, many additional business con-
tinuity and disaster recovery improvements are anticipated. Over the next year:
For continuity of operations, the plan is to:
Complete a Business Continuity/Disaster Recovery gap analysis and pro-
pose steps to close the gaps and to integrate and document all emergency re-
sponse procedures to include finalizing procedures with the U.S. Capitol Police
on near-term and long-term notification processes;
Finalize the House Relocation Plan for the Alternate House Offices and
complete installation and testing of computer and telephone networks;
Extend hours for the HIR Call Center, Emergency Communications Center,
and Network Operations Center to 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; and
Complete the build-out of the off-site package delivery facility.
For communications, the plan is to:
Complete the infrastructure for the Member Briefing Center and establish
secure video teleconference calling;
Procure and configure additional computer and office equipment to support
deployable Emergency Response Centers;
Finalize recommendations on procuring emergency communications vans
and private cellular services to help overcome the access problems experienced
with public cellular and dial-up service;
Implement the second phase of the Member Paging upgrade to provide ad-
ditional redundancy and to extend the area of coverage; and
Install a backup Voice Mail System (VMS) capability at the Alternate Com-
puter Facility.
For technology, the plan is to:
Change the voice switching architecture to remove single points of failure
and ensure a minimal level of service for a building that suffers a failure;
Upgrade the Whip Phone System to provide automated emergency notifica-
tion capability;
Implement diverse on-campus data lines to remove all single points of fail-
ure;
Implement direct data connections to Government Printing Office, General
Accounting Office, Library of Congress, and alternate sites;
Implement the Alternate Computer Facility and Alternate Business Center
and conduct simulated outage tests; and
Complete the digital mail pilot and implement the approved recommenda-
tions.
CONCLUSIONS

A well-documented set of lessons learned has helped shape the business con-
tinuity and disaster recovery program, and a viable plan for responding to the les-
sons learned has been developedall thanks to the outstanding efforts of numerous
individuals. Our program includes the management oversight and structure needed
to ensure we will deliver cost- and performance-effective emergency response capa-
bilities for the House. Significant progress has been made since the initial response
to September 11 and later to the anthrax attack, and the approved budget is suffi-
cient to carry out the remainder of the initiatives under the business continuity and
disaster recovery program.
Again, I want to thank all the Members of the Committee for your support and
assistance over the last year and I look forward to continuing to work with you.
Thank you for providing me with this opportunity to address the Committee.
The CHAIRMAN. And we will move on to the Clerk of the House,
Jeff Trandahl, who had his early days working with House Admin-
istration. I dont know if that is positive or negative.

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STATEMENT OF JEFF TRANDAHL, CLERK OF THE U.S. HOUSE
OF REPRESENTATIVES
Mr. TRANDAHL. Very positive.
Chairman Ney, Mr. Hoyer, and other distinguished members of
the committee, I appreciate having this opportunity to provide the
following testimony related to our preparedness activities following
the terrorist attacks of September 11th and the anthrax emergency
of October 2001.
The events of September and October 2001 profoundly affected
all Americans. For those of us who serve our Nations lawmakers
in the U.S. House of Representatives, the terrorist actions of 2001
directly challenged our ability to discharge our duties and caused
us to confirm our resolve to defend and protect this beloved institu-
tion.
Since much of the remainder of that year was focused on the
events and aftermath of September 11th and the October anthrax
crises, my statement would not be complete without such recogni-
tion. Clearly most of the operational activities and initiatives in
which we were engaged are all well known to the Committee on
House Administration and cannot properly be recounted in detail
in this forum because the of the obvious security reasons.
I would, however, like to take this opportunity to acknowledge
and honor the dedication of my staff, compliment and thank my fel-
low officers of the House, and recognize the unfailing support of the
Committee on House Administration and the bipartisan House
leadership, along with the Architect of the Capitol and the U.S.
Capitol Police. Since my first association with this office in 1995,
and through my subsequent election as Clerk, I have been privi-
leged to both work with and lead a most exceptional group of peo-
ple. The extent of that individual and corporate character was
clearly revealed in the days following September 11th and through-
out the October anthrax crises. Working side by side for hours on
end with talented staffs of the Sergeant at Arms, CAO, Architect,
police and all of the employees of the House, we put aside many
distractions of that period to focus on the complex work at hand.
With the support and encouragement of this committee, we found
innovative ways to share our talents and knowledge with one an-
other to ensure the continued operations of the House.
What then were the lessons learned from the events of last year?
Particularly following the evacuation of the Capitol complex, we
learned then that we could provide the infrastructure to accommo-
date the House floor proceedings at an off-site location if it had
been required, and we were able to provide interim office oper-
ations to the many displaced Members and committees of the
House. That ability was made possible owing to a planning protocol
my fellow officers and I instituted a year earlier through the sup-
port and guidance of this committee. We had a plan, and we prac-
ticed it. We learned through those difficult events that our basic
plan was sound. Unfortunately, it is real-world experience that is
often the best guide and teacher.
We learned what worked, we learned what did not and what
more we needed to plan for. Now, one day short of the first anni-
versary of that terribly tragic day, I can report to you, Mr. Chair-
man, that we are very prepared to respond decisively and effec-

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tively should the operations of the House of Representatives be


threatened again with serious disruption. Through the experience
of those events and countless hours of planning and drilling, we
can assure that the House can convene, meet, and conduct House
business under a variety of scenarios. More importantly, the House
of Representatives for the first time now has a core professional
group dedicated to ensuring the continued operations of the House.
Through legislation enacted earlier this year, the House Office of
Emergency Planning, Preparedness and Operations was estab-
lished to coordinate such continuity of operation requirements and
better assist the House and the House officers in the planning and
execution of their tasks in the event of an emergency. I appreciate
the confidence this committee placed in me and my fellow officers
to help lay the groundwork for the eventual establishment of this
office.
On behalf of the House, Bill Livingood, Jay Eagen and I vetted
numerous candidates for the Director of this office, which resulted
in the selection of Curt Coughlin, formerly of the Department of
Energy. Since his appointment earlier this year, Curt has estab-
lished a top-notch team of professionals who have already made
significant contributions to our overall preparedness.
Mr. Chairman, I know we all hope and pray that we will never
again have to implement our emergency plan. If, however, we do,
I can tell this committee now that the House of Representatives
will not be prevented from conducting its business for the Amer-
ican people.
I appreciate the attention of the Chairman and the committee
and would be pleased to answer any questions.
The CHAIRMAN. Appreciate the testimony of the Clerk.
[The statement of Mr. Trandahl follows:]
STATEMENT OF HON. JEFF TRANDAHL, CLERK OF THE HOUSE
Chairman Ney, Mr. Hoyer and other distinguished Members of the Committee, I
appreciate having this opportunity to provide the following testimony related to our
preparedness activities following the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the an-
thrax emergency of October 2001.
The events of September and October 2001 profoundly affected all Americans. For
those of us who serve our nations lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives,
the terrorist actions of 2001 directly challenged our ability to discharge our duties
and caused us to confirm our resolve to defend and protect this beloved Institution.
Since much of the remainder of that year was focused on the events and after-
math of September 11 and the October anthrax crisis, my statement would not be
complete without such recognition. Clearly, most of the operational activities and
initiatives in which we were engaged are well known to the Committee on House
Administration and cannot properly be recounted in detail in this forum because of
obvious security reasons.
I would, however, like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and honor the
dedication of my staff, compliment and thank my fellow officers of the House, and
recognize the unfailing support of the Committee on House Administration and the
bipartisan House Leadership. Since my first association with this Office in 1995 and
through to my subsequent election as Clerk, I have been privileged to both work
with and lead a most exceptional group of people. The extent of their individual and
corporate character was clearly revealed in the days following September 11 and
throughout the October anthrax crisis. Working side by side for hours on end with
the talented staffs of the Sergeant at Arms and Chief Administrative Officer, all of
our employees put aside the many distractions of that period to focus on the com-
plex work at hand. With the support and encouragement of this Committee, we
found innovative ways to share our talents and knowledge with one another to en-
sure the continued operations of the House.

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14
What then were the lessons learned from the events of last year? Particularly fol-
lowing the evacuation of the Capitol complex, we learned then that we could provide
the infrastructure to accommodate the House floor proceedings at an off-site location
if it had been required, and we were able to provide interim office operations to
many displaced Members and Committees of the House. That ability was made pos-
sible owing to a planning protocol my fellow Officers and I instituted a year earlier
through the support and guidance of this Committee. We had a plan and we had
practiced it. We learned through those difficult events that our basic plan was
sound. Unfortunately, its real world experience that is often the best guide and
teacher. We learned what worked, what did not, and what more we needed to plan
for.
Now, one day short of the first anniversary of that terrible, tragic day, I can re-
port to you, Mr. Chairman, that we are very prepared to respond decisively and ef-
fectively should the operations of the House of Representatives be threatened again
with serious disruption. Through the experience of those events and countless hours
of planning and drilling, we can ensure the House of Representatives can convene,
meet, and conduct the Houses business under a variety of scenarios. More impor-
tantly, the House of Representatives for the first time now has a core professional
group dedicated to ensuring the continuity of House operations. Through legislation
enacted earlier this year, the House Office of Emergency Planning, Preparedness
and Operations (OEPPO) was established to coordinate such continuity of operations
requirements and better assist the House and the House Officers in the planning
and execution of their tasks in the event of an emergency. I appreciate the con-
fidence this Committee placed in me and my fellow officers to help lay the ground-
work for the eventual establishment of this Office. On behalf of the House, Bill
Livingood, Jay Eagen, and I vetted numerous candidates for the job of OEPPO di-
rector which resulted in the selection of Curt Coughlin, formerly of the Department
of Energy. Since his appointment earlier this year, Curt has assembled a top-notch
team of professionals who have already made a significant contribution to our over-
all preparedness.
Mr. Chairman, I know we all hope and pray that we will never have to again im-
plement our emergency plans. If, however, we do, I can tell this Committee now that
the House of Representatives will not be prevented from conducting the business of
the American people.
I appreciate your attention Mr. Chairman, and would be pleased to answer any
questions of the Committee.
The CHAIRMAN. And now we will move on to our Architect of the
Capitol, Alan Hantman.
STATEMENT OF ALAN M. HANTMAN, FAIA, ARCHITECT OF THE
CAPITOL
Mr. HANTMAN. Thank you.
Good afternoon, Chairman Ney, Congressman Hoyer, Congress-
man Ehlers and members of the committee. I want to thank you
for giving me the opportunity to join with the House officers, and
with Chief Howe to come before your committee to share with you
some of significant efforts that have been made since September
11th in the areas of security and emergency preparedness.
It is really hard to believe that virtually a full year has passed
since the tragic events of September 11th. Those events, that were
followed by the anthrax contamination in October, certainly were
compounded to change our lives forever.
Since then security and emergency preparedness certainly be-
came even higher priorities in the work of my office. In line with
some of the comments that Congressman Hoyer and Congressman
Ehlers made earlier, hundreds of employees worked around the
clock to make sure that we worked through any recovered from
that time.
The remediation and the evaluation of the anthrax contamina-
tion in Longworth and Ford took hundreds and hundreds of hours,
as well as the Hart Senate Office Building. People worked around

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15

the clock, 7 days a week. Among some of the things that the AOC
personnel were involved with was establishing the command center
at the Botanic Gardens. This was virtually the only building that
had not received mail on Capitol Hill, and therefore it was clean
for the command center; manned the Incident Command Center at
the D Street operations; provided keys, access information, escorts,
building floor plans, ventilation system information; and assisted in
the development of anthrax sampling plans with NIOSH. We also
supplied logistical support such as food, office supplies, equipment,
whatever else was needed to support the Environmental Protection
Agency in their efforts here as well.
Among the small lessons learned, a lot of our building plans were
locked up in the Ford House Office Building, which was contami-
nated. So we now have multiple sets of plans at various locations
so that we can have access to them in the event of an emergency
at any particular location.
Also over the last year, as any Member can see as they come to
vote at the Capitol, we have made tremendous progress on the
Capitol Square perimeter security program, which, as you know,
was started before September 11th. The Southwest Drive has been
completed and reopened. Work on the Southwest Drive began in
May, and it reopened yesterday. While the south entrance is still
under construction, the structural components are in place, and we
are waiting to install the finished stonework in a manner that will
not disrupt congressional operations.
The Library of Congress perimeter security improvements for the
Thomas Jefferson and James Madison Memorial Buildings are
under construction. The installation of the vehicle barriers as part
of our outer perimeter on Independence Avenue near First Street
SW and near Second Street SE is under way and is very close to
completion now.
You are also, of course, very well aware of the construction of the
Capitol Visitors Center, although the CVC is not a direct result of
9/11, it was being planned well before that day. The visitors center
will add significant additional security to the complex by screening
visitors a distance away from the building.
As you all know, we have already constructed temporary screen-
ing facilities outside of the north and south entrances to the Cap-
itol as a threat reduction measure. In addition, the CVC will great-
ly improve the ability of the Capitol Police and the Capitol Guide
Service to regulate and to respectfully manage the large flow of
visitors to the Capitol, which will improve both security and safety
for all. Further, the CVC also will facilitate evacuation out of the
Capitol Building if necessary.
However, Mr. Chairman, there are many things that are not
quite as visible as the Capitol Visitors Center or the perimeter se-
curity projects. I would like to just list a few of them for the com-
mittee now. Emergency evacuation brochures were redesigned in
conjunction with the security task force to better have evacuation
instructions and diagrams for all. They were printed by GPO and
distributed by the Capitol Police. And there have been training ses-
sions on building evacuation procedures and two drills as well since
then.

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In the Capitol we added the capabilities of a public address sys-


tem for voice notification during any emergency evacuations, and
the House office building systems already existed but were tested.
We are doing a study to identify design and construction costs to
further upgrade it.
We have purchased and installed replacements for both anti-
quated emergency generators, which were over 50 years old. They
now have new state-of-the-art generators for better reliability dur-
ing emergencies. A portable emergency generator was also pur-
chased to provide emergency power on an as-needed basis. We have
also purchased high-efficiency particulate air filter vacuums, HEPA
vacuums, for our cleaning staff.
My organization has also been an active participant in numerous
HORT, which is House Office Recovery Team, drills to support
planning for responses to emergency relocations of the House
Chamber or other facilities.
Continued assistance to the Capitol Police in security upgrades
throughout the complex has also been provided for installation of
permanent police podiums at building entrances, tunnels to the
Capitol; installation of infrastructure for the interior access control
systems, other security systems; buildig perimeter alarm installa-
tions; security camera installations. All of these issues have been
addressed as well as the shatter-resistant window film that has
been installed in all of our buildings.
As the committee can see, Mr. Chairman, my office, in conjunc-
tion with all of the witnesses sitting before you today, has made
significant advances since September 11th. I cant say enough
about the work of all of these folks and of the staff that I have the
honor to lead. They have accomplished all of these things while
continuing to maintain their normal day-to-day operations that ex-
isted before 9/11. And we still have a lot of work to do, including
continuing to secure the Capitol Hill perimeter in a sensitive and
respectful way, to continue our master planning efforts regarding
parking and other issues that we can talk about later as well.
A lot of work remains to be done, but I am confident that we will
continue to work cooperatively, with pride and with diligence, to-
wards achieving these goals.
I look forward to a further discussion on these and other sub-
jects. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank the Architect of the Capitol for your state-
ment.
[The statement of Mr. Hantman follows:]
STATEMENT OF ALAN M. HANTMAN, FAIA, ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL
Good afternoon Chairman Ney, Congressman Hoyer and the members of the Com-
mittee. I want to thank you for giving me the opportunity to come before your Com-
mittee to share with you some of the significant efforts that my office has made
since September 11, in the areas of security and emergency preparedness.
It is hard to believe that it has already been one year since the tragic events of
September 11. Those events along with the Anthrax contamination in October have
changed our lives forever. Security and Emergency Preparedness became even high-
er priorities in the work of my office.
In October, hundreds of AOC employees contributed countless hours in support
of anthrax evaluation and remediation in the Longworth and Ford House Office
Buildings as well as in the Hart Senate Office Building. Working around the clock,
seven days a week, AOC personnel support included: establishing the Command
Center at the Botanic Garden, manning the Incident Command Center and the D

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Street Operations Center, providing keys, access information, escorts, building floor
plans, ventilation system information, equipment location and operation informa-
tion, and assisted in the development of sampling plans in conjunction with NIOSH.
My staff also provided logistical support such as food, office supplies, and equip-
ment. AOC provided people to do whatever was needed to support the EPA led ef-
fort.
Also, over the last year, as any Member can see as they walk to a vote, we have
made tremendous progress on the Capitol Square perimeter security. The SW Drive
has been completed and re-opened. Work on the SE Drive began in May and re-
opened yesterday. While the South entrance is still under construction, the struc-
tural components are in place and we are waiting to install the finished work in
a manner that will not disrupt Congressional business. The Library of Congress pe-
rimeter security improvements for the Thomas Jefferson and James Madison Memo-
rial Buildings are under construction, and the installation of the vehicle barriers as
part of the outer perimeter on Independence Avenue near First St, SW and near
Second St, SE is underway and is very close to completion.
You also of course, are well aware that the construction on the Capitol Visitors
Center has begun. Although the CVC is not a result of 9/11, it was being planned
well before that day, the Visitors Center will add security measures to the complex
by screening visitors a distance away from the building. As you all know we have
already constructed a temporary screening facilities outside the North and South
entrances to the Capitol as a threat reduction measure. In addition, the CVC will
greatly improve the ability of the Capitol Police and the Capitol Guide Service to
regulate and respectfully manage the large flow of visitors to the Capitol, which will
improve both security and safety. Further, the CVC also will facilitate evacuation
out of the Capitol Building if necessary.
However Mr. Chairman, there are many things that are not quite as visible as
the CVC or Perimeter Security that my staff and I have been working on to make
it safer for Members, staff, and visitors to our buildings and I would like to list some
of them for you and the Committee now.
1. Emergency evacuation brochures were redesigned in conjunction with the Secu-
rity Task Team to provide better evacuation instructions and diagrams. They were
printed by GPO and distributed to building occupants by the USCP. Since then
there have been training sessions on building evacuation procedures and two drills
have been conducted.
2. In the Capitol we added the capabilities of a Public Address (PA) system for
voice notification during any emergency evacuations. In the House Office Buildings,
systems already existed, but were tested.
3. We have purchased and installed replacements for both antiquated (over 50
years old) emergency generators with new state-of-the-art generators for better reli-
ability during emergencies. Also, a portable emergency generator was purchased by
the Electrical Engineering Branch to provide emergency power on an as needed
basis.
4. We have purchased High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter (HEPA) vacuums for
cleaning staff.
5. My organization has been an active participant in numerous HORT (House Of-
fice Recovery Team) drills to support planning for responses to emergency relocation
of the House Chamber or other facilities.
6. We have provided continued assistance to the USCP in security upgrades
throughout the complex such as installation of permanent police podiums at build-
ing entrances and tunnels to the Capitol, installation of infrastructure for the inte-
rior access control system and other security systems, building perimeter alarm in-
stallations, security camera installations and in positioning temporary hydraulic
barricades where necessary.
As the Committee can see Mr. Chairman, my office in conjunction with all the
witnesses sitting before you today, has made significant advances since September
11. I can not say enough about the work by my staff. They have accomplished all
these things, while continuing to maintain their normal day to day operations that
existed before 9/11. We still have much work to do, but I am confident that my staff
will continue to work with pride and diligence towards achieving those goals. I look
forward to sharing more information with the Committee during the closed session,
and thank you for this opportunity to come before you.
The CHAIRMAN. And we have Kerri Hanley, Deputy Sergeant at
Arms, is here. Mr. Livingood has arrived. The Sergeant at Arms is
here.

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I should also note that Terry is a new mom. We congratulate you


on that.
We will move on now with Mr. Livingood, our Sergeant at Arms.
Bill.
STATEMENT OF WILSON LIVINGOOD, SERGEANT AT ARMS, U.S.
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Mr. LIVINGOOD. Mr. Chairman, Ranking Member, Members, I am
pleased to appear before you today to discuss the enhancements
that have been made to security within the Capitol complex fol-
lowing the terrorist attack of September 11th, 2001.
No single event has impacted security of the Capitol and the
House and office buildings more than the events of September
11th. We have been challenged many times in the past: the bomb-
ings that occurred in the Capitol in 1915, 1971, and 1983; the
shootings that occurred in 1954 and 1998; and the bioterrorism at-
tack that occurred in October of 2001. All had lasting effects on the
level of security needed to protect the legislative branch of the gov-
ernment. Likewise, terrorist events that occur outside the Capitol
complex also cause us to review our security posture and apply les-
sons learned so that we may deter similar attacks at the Capitol.
It is clear from our history that the Capitol is a tempting target
for terrorists and those who seek to disrupt the legislative process
or strike a symbolic blow against the United States. We have long
believed that the ultimate destination of Flight 93, whose heroic
passengers, and I say heroic passengers, forced down in
Shanksville, Pennsylvania, that plane, the destination we feel was
the United States Capitol, and recent reports are supporting that
premise. We do know that the terrorists who hijacked the plane
asked for clearance into Reagan National Airport. We also know
that terrorists choose targets based on certain criteria, such as
symbolism, mass casualties, and high likelihood of success.
It is our responsibility to take every reasonable and prudent pre-
caution that we can to remove the terrorists likelihood of success
with regard to the Capitol, the House and Senate office buildings,
and those that work and visit within the Capitol complex. To that
end, immediately following the September attacks, the United
States Capitol Police Board directed that a comprehensive security
survey of the Capitol complex be conducted by the Defense Threat
Reduction Agency, DTRA.
The resulting DTRA report, combined with the earlier U.S. Cap-
itol/U.S. Secret Service and other security and law enforcement
agencies in this country security survey, provided us with a road
map to enhance security and address vulnerabilities.
We did that, and have been doing it all along. The following secu-
rity enhancements have been made in the aftermath of the Sep-
tember 11, 2001 attacks: We have amended traffic regulations for
the Capitol complex; rerouted trucks around the Capitol complex;
installed additional vehicular barriers around Capitol Square and
the House office buildings; closed streets around the House office
buildings; denied pedestrian access to our building office garages;
continued our Critical Incident Command Group evacuations for
the year, which consisted of a minimum of three drills per building.
The evacuation drills were both announced and unannounced; up-

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dated the Capitol and House office building emergency prepared-


ness plan.
We have conducted tabletop exercises on evacuation of the build-
ings and Chamber. We developed new and additional evacuation
plans. We developed new and additional evacuation plans. We have
developed and are implementing fire drills on a regularly scheduled
and unscheduled basis.
We restricted bicycle traffic on Capitol Square. We have exam-
ined the needs and recommended what to have in safe kits and use
of escape masks. We have procured additional escape masks. We
have trained over 6,000 House Members and staff on the escape
masks. We developed and implemented new mail screening proce-
dures with the Chief Administrative Officer.
We have developed new guidelines for tours of the Capitol. We
have also increased the size of tour groups, after we had stopped
tours while still maintaining security, and good security. We have
developed guidelines for staff-led tours.
We have deployed blocking vehicles and devices around the Cap-
itol Square and the House office buildings. We have replacedall
of the inadequate concrete planters that were around Capitol
Square and were crackingwith the Architect.
We have utilized the D.C. National Guard for supplemental secu-
rity staffing. We have staffed the Critical Incident Command Cen-
ter for 6 months after the anthrax attack. We have developed and
implemented a tactical training program. We now have, thanks to
the Congress of the United States, a training academy and facility
at Cheltenham, Maryland, which for the Capitol Police will be
operational this October 1st and will accommodate all police recruit
academy training, as well as Capitol Police in-serve training pro-
grams for Capitol Police employees. In addition, we plan on having
tactical training at that location. Cheltenham will have three full-
sized classrooms, one 54-person auditorium-style classroom, and
two 24-person classrooms. The facility will House the staff offices
of the Training Services Bureau of the Capitol Police, a fitness cen-
ter for the students and officers, a defensive tactics mat room and
a computer lab.
We have designed an initial security plan for the Capitol Visitors
Center. We have developed a construction security program and se-
curity system for the CVC construction site that is ongoing now.
Since 9/11 we have hired approximately 210 officers, which Chief
Howe will talk to. An additional 14 are scheduled for appointment
in September. While we have made significant physical and oper-
ational improvements, as we all know, the backbone of our security
is the men and women of the United States Capitol Police. Nothing
in the history of Congress has challenged our police personnel more
than the September 11th attacks and the subsequent anthrax at-
tack. Security was raised to an unprecedented level in order to pro-
tect the Capitol, the Congress, and the national legislative process.
Our personnel were required to work additional duty hours for an
extended period of time under stressful conditions. They, the Cap-
itol Police officers, put their personal lives on hold in order to meet
their professional responsibilities. They proved once again that
they are the thin blue line which protects us all from harm and al-
lows the Capitol to function in a safe and secure environment. I

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thank them personally, and for all of us, for their dedication, serv-
ice, and sacrifice. I am proud to be associated with such a fine
group of men and women, and I am honored to serve you, and to
serve with them.
Thank you for the opportunity appear before you today, and I
thank you for all of your help and assistance to this complex, to
the Capitol, to my office, to the Capitol Police. You made all of our
work possible. And I thank each and every one of you for that.
I will be happy to answer questions at any time.
The CHAIRMAN. I want to thank the Sergeant at Arms for his tes-
timony.
[The statement of Mr. Livingood follows:]
TESTIMONY OF HON. WILSON LIVINGOOD, SERGEANT AT ARMS, U.S. HOUSE OF
REPRESENTATIVES
Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to appear before you today to discuss the enhance-
ments that have been made to the security within the Capitol Complex following
the terrorists attacks of September 11, 2001.
No single event has impacted security of the Capitol and the House and Senate
office buildings more than the events of September 11th. We have been challenged
many times in the past. The bombings of the Capitol that occurred in 1915, 1971,
and 1983, the shooting that occurred in 1954 and 1998, and the bio-terrorism attack
that occurred in October 2001, all had lasting effects on the level of security needed
to protect the Legislative Branch of the government. Likewise, terrorist events that
occur outside the Capitol Complex also cause us to review our security posture and
apply lessons learned so that we may deter similar attacks at the Capitol.
It is clear from our history that the Capitol is a tempting target for terrorists and
those who seek to disrupt the national legislative process or strike a symbolic blow
against the United States. We have long believed that the ultimate destination of
United Flight 93, which heroic passengers forced down in Shanksville, Pennsyl-
vania, was the United States Capitol and recent reports are supporting that
premise. We do know that the terrorists who hijacked the plane asked for clearance
into Reagan Washington National Airport. We also know that terrorists choose tar-
gets based on certain criteria: such as symbolism, mass casualty, and the high likeli-
hood of success. It is our responsibility to take every reasonable and prudent pre-
caution that we can to remove the terrorists likelihood of success with regard to the
Capitol, the House and Senate office buildings, and those that work and visit within
the Capitol Complex.
To that end, immediately following the September attacks, the United States Cap-
itol Police Board directed that a comprehensive security survey of the Capitol Com-
plex be conducted by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The resulting
DTRA report, combined with the earlier U.S. Capitol Police/U.S. Secret Service secu-
rity survey, provided us with a road map to enhance security and address
vulnerabilities. The following security enhancements have been made in the after-
math of the September 11, 2001 attacks:
Amended the traffic regulations for the Capitol Complex.
Rerouted trucks around the Capitol Complex.
Installed additional vehicular barriers around Capitol Square and the House
Office Buildings.
Street closings around the House Office Buildings: 1st Street SE, C Street SE,
New Jersey Avenue SE, South Capitol Street SE, and 1st Street SW.
Denied pedestrian access to the office building garages.
Continued our Critical Incident Command Group Evacuations for the year
which consisted of a minimum of three drills per building. The evacuations drills
were both announced and unannounced.
Completed numerous walk thrus for Chamber Relocation to the Member Brief-
ing Centers.
Updated the Capital and House Office Buildings Emergency Preparedness
Plans.
Conducted Tabletop Exercises on Evacuation of the Buildings and Chamber.
Developed new evacuation plan.
Developed and are implementing fire drills on a scheduled basis.
Restricted bicycle traffic on Capitol Square.
Examined all safe kits and escape masks.

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Procured an additional 25,000 escape masks.
Trained 6,410 House Members and Staff on the escape masks.
Developed and implemented new mail screening procedures.
Developed new guidelines for tours of the Capitol.
Increased the size of tour groups while maintaining security.
Developed guidelines for staff-led tours.
Deployment of blocking vehicles around Capitol Squares and the House Office
Buildings.
Replaced inadequate concrete planters that were cracking around Capitol
Square.
Utilized the D.C. National Guard for supplemental security staffing.
Staffed the Critical Incident Command Center for six months for the Anthrax
Attack.
Developed and implemented a tactical training program.
Cheltenham will be operational by October 1, 2002, and will accommodate all
USCP Recruit Academy Training, as well as in-service training programs for USCP
employees.
Cheltenham will have three full-size classrooms (1 54-person auditorium-style
classroom and 2 24-person classrooms), the facility will house the staff offices of the
Training Services Bureau, a fitness center, a defensive tactics mat room, and a com-
puter lab.
Designed an initial security plan for the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC).
Developed a construction security program and security system for the CVC
Construction Site.
Since 9/11 we have hired 210 Officers, an additional 14 are scheduled for ap-
pointment in September.
While we have made significant physical and operational improvements, as we all
know, the backbone of our security is the men and women of the United States Cap-
itol Police. Nothing in the history of Congress has challenged our police personnel
more than the September 11th attacks and the subsequent anthrax attack. Security
was raised to an unprecedented level in order to protect the Capitol, the Congress,
and the national legislative process. Our personnel were required to work additional
duty hours for an extended period of time under arduous conditions. They put their
personal lives on hold in order to meet their professional responsibilities. They
proved, once again, that they are the thin blue line which protects us from harm
and allows the Congress to function in a safe and secure environment. I thank them
for their dedication, service, and sacrifice. I am proud to be associated with such
a fine group of men and women.
Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you this afternoon. I will be happy
to answer any questions that you may have.
The CHAIRMAN. I also would point out that we have been joined
by Congressmen Fattah and Doolittle, two tremendous members of
this committee, who along with their staffs have made this past
difficult year a working good relationship. We appreciate both of
you for that.
We will move on to the last witness. If either gentleman has a
statement, we will entertain it at that time. We have now Robert
Howe, the Assistant Chief of Police, United States Capitol Police.
STATEMENT OF ROBERT HOWE, ASSISTANT CHIEF OF POLICE,
UNITED STATES CAPITOL POLICE
Mr. HOWE. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Mr. Chairman, Members of the committee, I am pleased to ap-
pear before you today to discuss the impact the terrorist attacks on
September 11th had on operational personnel of the U.S. Capitol
Police.
On September 11th, 2001, the United States Capitol Police evac-
uated the Capitol and all of the House and Senate office buildings
simultaneously for the first time in history. From that point for-
ward, the Department was placed at the highest level of alert.
The response required to protect the Capitol, the Congress, those
who work and visit within the Capitol complex in the legislative

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process in the wake of the attacks placed a strain on all of our per-
sonnel. All of our officers and civilian support personnel worked ex-
tended duty hours and made personal sacrifices in order to meet
the challenges before us.
Officers were working 12- to 16-hour tours of duty with no or few
off days. Leave was suspended, and many officers canceled their
scheduled vacations. This level of effort continued through the an-
thrax attacks and into April of 2002.
Under extremely difficult circumstances, our personnel once
again answered the call to duty and took extraordinary efforts to
protect our community. They do this day in and day out with the
knowledge that protecting Congress, its staff, visitors, and these
buildings against those who are intent on committing acts of vio-
lence is in the interest of our Nation.
However, the attacks of 9/11 and subsequent anthrax attacks un-
derscored the fact that the United States Capitol Police is under-
staffed, given the importance and diversity of our mission. Securing
the Capitol complex and ensuring that the national legislative proc-
ess can proceed unhindered is a daunting task. It is also very
labor-intensive.
Following 9/11, we conducted an extensive review of our staffing
requirements. We determined that in order to meet all of our re-
sponsibilities and allow for the required training of our personnel,
an optimum staffing level of 1,981 officers was required. This fig-
ure is a goal we hope to reach by fiscal year 2004. It should be
noted that we are losing officers to other agencies at an increasing
rate. Likewise, we are competing against those same agencies to at-
tract qualified applicants in order to increase our staffing level and
overcome attrition. Attrition, primarily driven by losses to the
Transportation Security Administration and other law enforcement
agencies, is expected to continue at a high rate for the near term.
The Department is projecting a fiscal year 2003 attrition rate of ap-
proximately 12.5 percent, and a fiscal year 2004 attrition rate of
approximately 712 percent.
We have set aggressive recruiting goals over the next 2 years. I
am confident that the recent pay adjustments supported by this
committee, combined with recruiting and retention incentives, will
help us to remain competitive in the market and allow us to attract
and retain highly qualified personnel.
The current staffing level has also had a detrimental effect on
our training initiatives. The capability of any organization is de-
pendent on the level of training, knowledge and skill of its per-
sonnel. This is why we have made training a priority in the coming
year, especially in light of September 11th and the October 15th at-
tacks.
Our personnel at all levels must receive intensive, realistic and
demanding training that supports our mission. Because we have
public safety responsibilities, we must ensure our sworn and civil-
ian personnel are capable of performing their duties at peak effec-
tiveness. The training facility at the Federal Law Enforcement
Training Center in Cheltenham, Maryland, will significantly im-
prove our training and education program. We will be able to con-
duct all of our training functions, including counterassault, emer-

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gency vehicle operations, firearms and general classroom instruc-


tions at that state-of-the-art facility.
Moreover, as we increase our staffing levels, we will be able to
pull officers off the line to receive the level of training required to
operate in this new threat environment.
I want to thank the committee for the support and guidance you
have provided to the United States Capitol Police, especially over
the past year. We have met and discussed the concerns of the com-
mittees of jurisdiction regarding how to best protect against the
varied threats and security concerns we face. We will continue to
build upon those initiatives we have begun concerning risk man-
agement, security and law enforcement.
Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I would be happy to answer any ques-
tion you may have.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank you, Chief Howe, and also thank you, the
management, and also the rank-and-file of the Capitol Police.
[The statement of Mr. Howe follows:]
TESTIMONY OF ASSISTANT CHIEF ROBERT R. HOWE, UNITED STATES CAPITOL POLICE
Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee, I am pleased to appear before you
today to discuss the impact the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, had on the
operations and personnel of the United States Capitol Police.
On September 11, 2001, the United States Capitol Police evacuated the Capitol
and all of the House and Senate Office Buildings. This was the first time in our
history that an event had necessitated all of our buildings be evacuated simulta-
neously. From that point forward, the Department was placed at our highest level
of alert.
The response required to protect the Capitol, the Congress, those who work and
visit within the Capitol Complex, and the Legislative process in the wake of the at-
tacks placed a strain on our personnel. All of our officers and civilian support per-
sonnel worked extended duty hours and made personal sacrifices in order to meet
the challenges before us. Officers were working twelve to sixteen hour tours of duty
with no or few days off. Leave was suspended and many officers canceled their
scheduled vacations. This level of effort continued through the anthrax attack and
into April 2002. Under extremely difficult circumstances, our personnel once again
answered the call to duty and took extraordinary efforts to protect our community.
They do this day in and day out with the knowledge that protecting Congress, its
staff, visitors, and these buildings against those who are intent on committing acts
of violence is in the interest of our nation.
However, the attacks of 9/11 and the subsequent anthrax attack underscored the
fact that the United States Capitol Police is understaffed given the importance and
diversity of our mission. Securing the Capitol Complex and ensuring the national
legislative process can proceed unhindered is a daunting task. It is also labor inten-
sive. Following 9/11, we conducted an extensive review of our staffing requirements.
We determined that in order to meet all of our responsibilities and allow for re-
quired training of our personnel, the optimum staffing level was 1,981 FTEs. That
figure is a goal we hope to reach by FY04.
It should be noted that we are losing officers to other agencies at an increasing
rate. Likewise, we are competing against those same agencies to attract qualified
applicants in order to increase our staffing level and overcome attrition. Attrition,
primarily driven by losses to the Transportation Security Administration and other
law enforcement agencies, is expected to continue at a high rate. The Department
is projecting an FY03 attrition rate of 12.5 percent and an FY04 rate of 7.5 percent.
We have set aggressive recruiting goals over the next two years. I am confident that
the recent pay adjustments combined with recruiting and retention incentives will
help us remain competitive in the market and allow us to attract and retain highly-
qualified personnel.
The current staffing level has also had a detrimental affect on our training initia-
tives. The capability of any organization is dependent upon the level of training,
knowledge, and skills of its personnel. That is why we have made training a priority
in the coming year, especially in light of the September 11th and October 15th at-
tacks. Our personnel, at all levels, must receive intensive, realistic, and demanding
training that supports our mission. Because we have public safety responsibilities,

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24
we must ensure our sworn and civilian personnel are capable of performing their
duties at peak effectiveness. The training facility at the Federal Law Enforcement
Training Center in Cheltenham, Maryland, will significantly improve our training
and education program. We will be able to conduct all of our training functions in-
cluding counter-assault, emergency vehicle operations, firearms, and general class-
room instruction at that state-of-the-art facility. Moreover, as we increase our staff-
ing levels, we will have the ability to pull officers off-line to receive the level of
training required to operate in this new threat environment.
I want to thank the Committee for the support and guidance you have provided
to the United States Capitol Police, especially over the past year. We have met with
and discussed the concerns of the committees of jurisdiction regarding how best to
protect against the varied threats and security concerns we face. We will continue
to build upon our initiatives concerning risk management, security, and law enforce-
ment.
The CHAIRMAN. With that, I would entertain if Mr. Doolittle has
a statement.
Mr. DOOLITTLE. I have no statement, Mr. Chairman, except to
thank the officers and officials before us for the outstanding serv-
ice.
Mr. FATTAH. I have no statement at this time. I join in my col-
leagues statement.
The CHAIRMAN. And with that we will open up to questions. I
yield my question time to Mr. Hoyer.
Mr. HOYER. Mr. Eagen, as I understand it, you have notebook
computers stored and preconfigured for use in the event of another
anthrax attack, where members could be out of their offices, not
have access to their computers. What is the plan for maintaining
the current equipment and how will you replace this equipment
and what will happen to the old equipment?
Mr. EAGEN. We have a phasing plan, where at different periods
of time on a 3- to 5-year schedule, we will take PCs and cycle them
out. In those cases where we can put them into House inventory,
whether within the officers structures or into Members offices, we
will do so.
Mr. HOYER. So for the most part we will have an inventory that
is fairly up to date?
Mr. EAGEN. That is the objective, yes.
Mr. HOYER. Now, BlackBerries, as all of us know, are the pre-
ferred mode of communicating with Members in the event of an
emergency, and I might say right now the chairman refers toI
dont want to bring levity into a hearing that is very serious, but
the chairman refers to his BlackBerry as CrackBerry, because he
is addicted to it. I see the chairman with his BlackBerry all the
time, and he obviously has found it useful, but the chairmans ini-
tiative, which I obviously supported strongly, but Members have
found that to be extraordinarily helpful. And in light of what hap-
pened on September 11th where Members felt disconnected, they
went out on the street, they didnt know where to go, their staffs
didnt know where to go, everybody was disconnected, and Mem-
bers of course felt a responsibility to be ready to respond to what-
ever the emergency required, but they felt out of touch.
The BlackBerries, which the chairman and this committee pro-
vided to Members without cost of their Members representational
allowance, have proved very, very helpful. The question is this:
With the end of the service contract arriving for BlackBerry in Oc-

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25

tober, what is your plans for the renewal of service for the Mem-
bers distributed units?
Mr. EAGEN. The original commitment for the program had been
that it would be a 1-year House-funded undertaking, but with the
popularity and the success that has been accompanying their
deplayment, as you recognized, we are looking at finding the funds
to fund it for a second year, to continue the program as an enter-
prise undertaking.
Mr. HOYER. Great. I think that is an institutional responsibility
and critical for the institution to function in the times of an emer-
gency.
Mr. EAGEN. I think just to add on to that, I think we would dur-
ing the next year also start to look at the next generation of succes-
sors. We had an opportunity to have a demonstration of a new
technology called Tablet PC that is coming down the line this fall,
and if people were impressed with BlackBerries their socks are
going to be knocked off when they see this particular undertaking.
So I think to use the next year as an opportunity both for normal
business purposes and in an emergency, it will be a good time for
us to evaluate what is the next generation for the House.
Mr. HOYER. If it is more riveting than the BlackBerry, perhaps
we can keep it away from the chairman.
One last questionI have got a lot of questions, but this is the
last question I will ask on this round. The House has a system
called Dialogic which will automatically call designated numbers
during an emergency and broadcast a recorded message. The Chief
Administrative Officer has not developed a plan, however, as I un-
derstand it, for calling Members on cell phones or home phones.
What is the strategy to get that going?
Mr. EAGEN. Actually, no. The Dialogic system is a system that
is being installed right now as a replacement for the current whip
system. The whip system is probably about 10 to 15 years old. We
did a survey of Members offices to find out the usage and found
out that it was fairly weak on both sides of the aisle and proposed
and have had funded a replacement called the Dialogic. The
Dialogic that exists today is actually under the Capitol Police con-
trol, but relatively speaking, it is a very small system. The Dialogic
that the House has acquired has the ability to simultaneously dial
644 telephone calls at the same time, and it has the memory capa-
bility to recognize multiple contact numbers for Members or others
that are put on the list.
And the way the system works is it starts with the first number
and goes to the second until it gets a positive solution. So when I
talked about in our lessons learned that we needed to have mul-
tiple means of communication, what I meant by that was we need
to have ways where we can reach you because you are carrying a
device like a BlackBerry or your pager or alternatively call you
somehow or alternatively have a way where you can reach us via
the telephone system like the GETS card. So the Dialogic is one of
those range of solutions, and it does have the capability to dial
multiple numbers.
Mr. HOYER. Thank you. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank you. I would note on these BlackBerries,
we want to thank Mr. Eagen. We usurped his budget with his per-

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mission to pay for it. My wife is personally happy they dont work
in St. Clairsville, where we live. And the reason I am so sold on
them, Mr. Hoyer, is it is the only thing they have ever been able
to teach me to run technologically in the last 8 years.
We have joined also by Mr. Mica. Mr. Ehlers.
Mr. EHLERS. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Continuing on the
BlackBerry issue, there is one problem with it, and the chairman
just alluded to that. We have great difficulty receiving messages in
our home districts, and I hope you will investigate ways of han-
dling that problem in some way.
Also one comment that it takes a lot to knock my socks off, and
I dont think the Tablet PDA will do it. What would probably come
close to it, however, is something that is in the pipeline, and I dont
know when it will get here, but I hope we can implement that,
which basically combines the BlackBerry, in other words, an e-mail
facility, paging and cell phone, and that would be marvelous since
right now I am carrying three pieces of electronics on my belt. I
feel like a police officer walking around with all that equipment
hanging on.
We will either have to come up with something that is combined,
or you are going to have to requisition stronger belts to be able to
carry all this. So I hope you will keep on top of that andbut the
BlackBerry reception away from Washington is a real problem, and
I miss a lot of notices as a result of that.
The other issue of communications which still bothers me tre-
mendously, and that has nothing to do with emergency communica-
tions, but it has a great deal to do with the ongoing operation of
the Congress, and that is mail. We still have not solved our mail
problems. I know that ismuch of that is out of your control, but
steadily improving, but it still leaves much to be desired. And it is
very frustrating to receive invitations to meetings after the meeting
is over. And that is just one example. So I hope we collectively can
work on that problem, come up with some solutions, too.
Mr. Chairman, I would also like to question some of the other
members. Mr. Livingood, most of your testimony you discuss
changes made to the security involving the Capitol Police. I didnt
catch anything that you had done involving your specific respon-
sibilities that only you have, and that is your Sergeant at Arms
employees. Could you give a brief review?
Mr. LIVINGOOD. I will be glad to do that in a closed hearing, sir.
Mr. EHLERS. All right. Fine. And Mr. Howe, I noticed that you
said that we are supposed to have 1,981 FTEs by fiscal year 2004.
Have those been approved and if so, by whom? I thought this was
the authorizing committee for that, and that is news to me.
Mr. HOWE. Mr. Ehlers, I believe the committee has a bill that
has cleared the committee. It cleared the House. It is presently
pending before the Senate that authorizes that level.
Mr. EHLERS. At that level?
Mr. HOWE. Yes, sir.
Mr. EHLERS. I am sorry. I missed that one, and I shouldnt have.
What are you doing for training your staff, your officers, in deal-
ing with bioterrorism? I know a lot of mistakes were made dealing
with the anthrax, but we can expect that to be repeated or alter-
native biological agents being distributed. What about chemical,

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and what about nuclear? Do you have any means of detecting radi-
ation in case someone decides to disperse radioactive materials
around the Capitol?
Mr. HOWE. We do have those capabilities, Mr. Ehlers, and I can
get into those in more detail with you in the executive session. But
late last year in the emergency supplemental, the Congress author-
ized the establishment of a chemical-biological strike team on the
Capitol Police. We currently have applications under review to hire
60 individuals to staff this strike team. We expect it to be online
by early November. It will be 60 individuals specifically dedicated
to the detection, mitigation and cleanup of chemical-biological inci-
dents. They are well trained. I am told that many of our applicants
are currently members of the Marine Corps chemical-biological in-
cident response force who are leaving the military. So I think we
will be able to put together an excellent team of individuals to han-
dle just exactly that concern.
Mr. EHLERS. I am primarily concerned about the first responders
and that they handle it properly, which means training all of your
officers in what to do in a first response to avoid tracking
biologicals around, to knowing when to evacuate employees, when
to seal off offices, turn off ventilation systems and so forth.
Mr. HOWE. We have learned a considerable amount, especially
from the October 16th attack. Prior to that, we had been training
all of our officers in what we call within the organization Alert 1,
which is a familiarity level with chemical and biological materials
and some nuclear materials. An additional cadre of probably 200,
250 officers of ours were trained to what we call an Alert 2 level.
Alert 2 was how to evacuate other people, decontaminate individ-
uals and that sort of thing. Each of our officers receives a min-
imumeach of our employees, including civilian employees, excuse
me, receives a minimum awareness-level training on an annual
basis.
Mr. EHLERS. All right. I yield back the balance of my time.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank you. Mr. Fattah.
Mr. FATTAH. Mr. Chairman, let me askI probably prefer to
wait till we go into closed session.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank you. Mr. Mica.
Mr. MICA. Thank you. I appreciate your holding this important
hearing, Mr. Chairman. A couple of things just from a practical
standpoint. You said you have a system in place that will dial auto-
matically 644 numbers. One of the problems I haveand I have
got my cell phone with me. I used to be in the cell business, and
I travel around the Capitol grounds here and I still cant get recep-
tion in certain areas. It is not very difficult to get these antennas
out. I mean, today we should be able to have antennas throughout
the place and be able towe can get it in this room, but I can show
you a lot of places where there are dead zones here. It is not tech-
nically that difficult, but it is nice to dial 644 numbers, but if no-
body can get a response at the other end, I think we need to make
sure that that is in place.
I have spoken to the Architect, too, aboutwell, first of all, I be-
lieve that the United States Capitol building is still a target. I
think that terroristsif they took 8 years tofrom 1993 to Sep-
tember of 2001 to go after the World Trade Center, I feel that the

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most enduring symbol of our whole Nation is the Capitol building.


I think they didnt get it last time. I believe that they will come
back after us. That is unfortunate but, folks, we just have to learn
by our experience, and that was a very tough lesson which we will
remember tomorrow.
In that regard, I think we have a responsibility to safeguard and
save as much of the Capitol as we can if it is hit, and I dont know
if a study has been done yet to see whatI know some studies
have been doneI should correct thatto see what certain explo-
sive devices will do, and I know some of those protections have
been incorporated into the Visitor Center, but I think that we need
to look even further than that. One of the things I have asked the
Architects office to do, and I will ask on the record again, as Chair-
man of Aviation I have seen equipment that will disperse an in-
credible volume of foam.
Most of the millions oftens of millions of dollars we are putting
into fire extinguisher systems, which needs to be done for fire pur-
poses throughout the Capitol, most of that equipment will not do
anything with the kind of terrorist attack that we have already
seen. I want a report back on the specific equipment that will dis-
perse a protective substance and save as much of the Capitol build-
ing as possible if we are hit with an explosive device or we are hit
with a plane that is loaded with fuel. So I have asked for that. I
havent received it, and I expect a response on that at some point.
And while we have got the plaza dug up it is perfect time to fill
one of those extra holes and spaces with that equipment. And I
think it will work. I am not positive. I have been involved with
some construction projects and development projects on the outside,
but I have very reason to believe that it would offer us some
backup protection at very little expense to save as much of the na-
tional treasures in the building as possible.
The other thing, a simple thing, is evacuation route. I come from
Florida, and we have hurricanes down there, and that is our
threats. We have also had wildfires and other types of natural dis-
asters. We do have posted evacuation routes. I have not seen nor
would I even know how we would get out of this place again. I re-
member 1 year ago tomorrow the chaos that ensued, cars backed
up, people getting out of here. Now, we should at least have a post-
ed evacuation route on the routes leaving the Capitol building, and
that is going to be very difficult now that we have got these con-
crete barriers if we have to get out of hereyou know, I am not
talking about the Members, but the staff and others. But there
should be posted in the District, at least from the Federal build-
ingsreturn that traffic all into one-way or some plan, and I have
not seen that. I think we need that. Again, just a practical system.
The other thing that disturbs me, and I can go into it in the
closed session, is I dont see the deployment of what I consider the
latest technology of explosive detection devices and equipment. We
can talk about that more in closed session, but I think we are still
at risk in people bringingI was told, you know, that the explosive
material that Richard Reid had in his shoe would have taken out
the side of that plane. It is not easyit is not that easy or difficult
to still get explosives the size of a backpack or a significant size
of a package into the Capitol in strategic locations to do an incred-

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ible amount of damage, and I still dont see in place the equipment
that I believe we should have in place for some screening on the
at least on the perimeters. So those are some of my concerns. The
explosive detection portion we might want to talk about in closed
session.
Does anyone care to respond?
Mr. HANTMAN. We will certainly get back to you on those items,
Congressman. Certainly with respect to the foam and the evacu-
ation issues, we will certainly address that in closed session, talk
about the explosive detective systems.
Mr. LIVINGOOD. On the traffic evacuation routes, we have notices
the same. You are exactly correct. We have been working just re-
cently with the D.C. Government on this for us and for others, and
we will be posting in each office traffic evacuation routes.
Mr. MICA. It is not just posting in the officeand I think that
is important. That is our responsibility, and shame on us if we
havent done that. But also, I mean, it doesnt take that much to
get a sign that this is the evacuation route notice. My God, if you
go around the District of Columbiawe looked at some signs the
other daythey have got 42 different instructions for every day of
the week, but evacuation to me is very important. I am sorry. I still
believe the United States Capitol and the Federal buildings are a
target that these folks are not taking out. They will come back
after it. It may be a week. It may be 8 years, but we need to at
least say we put in place these measures, and the evacuation route
is a very minimal
Mr. LIVINGOOD. And they will be in the near future.
Mr. MICA. Thank you.
The CHAIRMAN. Also one thing for the Sergeant at Arms, and the
Architect of the Capitol is involved with this to an extent because
of how things are done around the Capitol and how they are
placed, and everybody knows this. You can see the construction
down one of the streets. I think it is South Capitol. But the elec-
tronic drop barriers are put in, and at some point in time that
eventually eliminates some of the Jersey barriers. If we have some
type of incident, we will be able to get people out in a very, very
quick manner. Right now you are seeing the barricadesas you
have noticed this week, the Jersey barriers are gone. We have got
fortification with the balusters. So some of that we will be able to
have quicker evacuation routes. I thought maybe you would want
to mention that.
Mr. MICA. The other thing, too, Mr. Chairman, and this is just
simple, I mean they have come after us. More than likely that
plane that crashed in Pennsylvania was headed for the Capitol or
the White House. it could be either, but a Federal building. Then
we put all the barriers up and things we have done, Jersey barriers
and all of those things, and they came after us with the mail. I
mean, here I dont know if our staff is looking at simple things like
our water supply into the Capitol, other avenues that they could
come at us at with very small amounts ofyou know, just a capful
of some substance could take out a lot of people here.
So I think we need to be one step ahead of the game. I would
hope that our staff is looking at all of these things. And again, in
closed session maybe we can talk about those. But we dont know

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how we are going to get hit. We just need to say we have done the
best job. We can protect the thousands of people that work and
serve here.
Mr. LIVINGOOD. And in closed session I can answer those specifi-
cally.
Mr. MICA. Thank you.
The CHAIRMAN. Mr. Doolittle.
Mr. DOOLITTLE. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Chief Howe, you indi-
cated that we are losing officers to other agencies. Is that because
the conditions in those other agencies are better than what we
have here in the Capitol Police?
Mr. HOWE. It is a combination of things, Congressman. I think
additionallyoriginally our pay was a bit lower than theirs, and I
think originally the Transportation Security Administration was
you know, at the risk of criticizing a sister agency, was sort of gold-
plating some of the jobs that they were handing out. It think they
have ceased doing that. We are seeing the attrition level slow
down. The committees have authorized a 5 percent pay increase for
our officers this coming year. Coupled with the cost of living in-
crease I think we will be very competitive with similarly situated
agencies.
Mr. DOOLITTLE. What about the hours? I know talking to some
of the officers, they were working sometimes like 6 days a week for
14 hours a day or something. It was pretty bad. Has that im-
proved?
Mr. HOWE. That has decreased as well. Beginning in April, we
started bringing in officers as best as we could back to a 5-day
week. Some of them are still working pretty long hours, some 12-
hour days and things of that nature, but as we hire people and get
those people on the line, that decreases for everybody. So that
is
Mr. DOOLITTLE. So things are improving, in your opinion?
Mr. HOWE. Rapidly, as a matter of fact. I think things will be a
lot better in just a few short months. We expect to graduate an-
other 122 officers before the end of this calendar year. I think
things will get better quite quickly.
Mr. DOOLITTLE. Thank you. And, Mr. Eagen I join with my col-
leagues in my enthusiasm for the BlackBerry. However, I am also
glad you are monitoring the new technologies, because there is al-
ways something better coming along. One thing that I have learned
about that sounds pretty good is the Handspring, which apparently
combines at least the e-mail function and the cellular telephone
function. I dont know about the pager function. Maybe that is in
there, too, but, you know, I would appreciate yourbecause that is
a nice small thing. I dont know how big this Tablet thing is you
are talking about. Is that about the same size as the BlackBerry?
Mr. EAGEN. No. The Tablet PC is more about the size of this
piece of paper.
Mr. DOOLITTLE. Well, I have heard of those, and those sound
very interesting, but one of the great features of the BlackBerry is
the size.
Mr. EAGEN. We did see demonstrations of the next generation of
both cellular phones that are integrated with Palm and BlackBerry
and Handspring kind of technology, and then we also saw Black-

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berries and those kinds of devices that had a phone integrated.


They dont seem to be all the way there to the ideal thing. For ex-
ample, in the one we saw, a BlackBerry-type device, it is kind of
a flip-up phone, but of course as soon as you start talking on the
phone, you cant see the BlackBerry anymore.
And then conversely, we saw ones that didnt use the flip-open
phone, but the way to connect to it is an ear plug, and that seems
to be something that people either really like or they really hate.
So it looks like they are getting close, but they havent quite hit
the home run yet.
Mr. DOOLITTLE. Okay. Thank you. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Mr. MICA. I asked some critical questions. I didnt mean to be
critical, but I just want to say one thing to our Sergeant at Arms
and Acting Chief. I participated in some memorial services at home
this weekend. One of things that I remembered and I told the
crowd was when I left hereI came back from the Pentagon. I was
at a meeting at the Pentagon and just missed by a few minutes
being at the Pentagon to get here in time to see the Pentagon actu-
ally hit, but I told the crowd I will never forget an officer coming
down the hall saying, Mr. Micamy wife was with meMrs. Mica,
you have got to leave. We think another plane is headed for the
Capitol building, and I remember those people, I want you to know.
And then we started out and we got out in our car and we tried
to go up Pennsylvania Avenue, which was the closest route, and
there was a female officer, and she stood there and said, Mr. Mica,
Congressman, dont go up that way because we are convinced a
plane is headed here and you will be at risk. When my wife and
I got back, we thought, oh, my God, those people are back there
andyou know, one thing we havent doneI dont know if we did
it. We should have a resolution to commend those people who acted
so heroically that day. They stayed behind when they provided es-
cape and tried to help us get away from here, because everyone
knows it was disorganized, confusion, but you go back and tell
those folks we appreciate it. Maybe we could do a resolution to
commend them, because they were here knowing that they were
standing in what might have been a target except for a few brave
people on an aircraft in Pennsylvania.
Mr. LIVINGOOD. We will tell them that, Mr. Mica. If I couldand
I have talked about it before, and it is a subject that is very close
to my heart and an emotional subjectthat day on the 11th after
the Capitol Police had cleared the Capitol building, I was in the
Capitol. And we did a last-minute walk-through. They were at the
doorsthere were three of them there, a lieutenant and two offi-
cersand they said to me, Mr. Livingood, we will man these doors
no matter what unless you tell us not to, and they knewat that
time they thought a plane was coming, but they were willing to
stay at that door no matter what. I think that speaks volumes.
The CHAIRMAN. Any other question? One thing I would want to
comment on, the communications after 9/11 occurred and the Cap-
itol was evacuated. As you know, the Congress went back to do its
business. The one overwhelming theme I have heard, and it has
been raised today, but it is communications. Members of the House
were worried about to make sure proper security was here for staff,
to make sure the Capitol remained open, to be cautious but calm,

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have security but have the peoples House open. I believe we have
all accomplished that, but the communications was the one item,
and I dont know what technologically comes down the pike soon
to have, you know, a system that will be good, that will work ex-
tensively. But communication was the one part, and that is why I
supported Congressman Langevins study that looks atdoes a
proper study to look at the communications and how we can func-
tion as a Congress, because if people have elected Members, then
during a crisis they want those Members to be able to commu-
nicate, and the government extends beyond one, two or eight peo-
ple. So I think that was another lesson we learned was the commu-
nications. I know we have gotideas are out there, and we have
to continue on that very diligently, as much as we can, so that the
Members during a crisis will be able to communicate no matter
where we are at and be available for votes or whatever official
business we have to do. So I think that is going to be something
we have got to press to the wall to continue.
Are there further questions?
Mr. HOYER. Mr. Chairman, I presume we are about to go into
Executive Session, but before we do I want to thank you. I have
worked with the Assistant Chief and the Chief and his predecessor
over the last, I guess, 3 or 4 years, because I have been very con-
cerned about the FTE level of our police officers. Both before and
certainly after Officer Chestnut and Officer Gibson lost their lives,
I was very concerned about the number of people that we had on
doors from which hundreds of people come, mostly tourists, mostly
somewhat disorganized and sort of interested in seeing, which is
what we want them to be, but very difficult for the officers to deal
with in a secure way. You were critical, and this committee was
critical, in supporting efforts and giving us a consensus on the Leg-
islative Appropriations Committee to fund the level that the Chief,
the Acting Chief has said was necessary, somewhere in the neigh-
borhood of between 1,902 officers, which are I guess aboutChief,
what, about 1,650 uniformed and about 350 nonuniformed per-
sonnel?
Mr. HOWE. That is very close, Mr. Hoyer.
Mr. HOYER. But your reference on that was critical, and we had
difficulty, but I think everybody now in the Congress understands
that it is easy to make some sort of analysis that, well, a city of
X thousands has only a police force of 500 people or 400 people, but
I think Mr. Mica is absolutely correct. I cant believe that there is
a higher priority target than the Capitol of the United States, and
there is no doubt in my mind that the plane that went down in
Pennsylvania was going for the dome. The White House is down in
the trees. It is hard to see. It would be difficult to frankly get into,
but had they been able to take off the dome of the Capitol, that
would have been a stark picture in the minds of every citizen of
the world, because that is a symbol of the freest Nation and the
symbol of democracy in the world, not just in this country. And
therefore, Chief, Mr. Ney, as you know, was critically important in
getting the kind of support we needed to make sure we have the
complement, and we need to get you up to that FTE level as quick-
ly as we can, as quickly as we can get recruits through.

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I have expressed concern, others have expressed concern, about


the TSAs competition because of the disparity of pay and other as-
pects of the job, including hours. I think you are right. I think that
is evening out somewhat now, but I think it is critically important
that this committee was supportive of the levels that we need given
the complexity of the job of protecting the physical being of the
Capitol and then not just the thousands of people who work here
but the millions of people from this country, citizens and also hun-
dreds of thousands of people from other countries who visit this
Capitol.
So thank you, Mr. Chairman.
The CHAIRMAN. Any other questions or comments? Let me just
say in conclusion before we entertain a motion. I just want to
thank all of you today for your time that you made available to the
committee. I want to thank all of you personally. We watched you
behind closed doors. You had the integrity we needed, truly cared
about all the people that work in this complex. We saw that. It was
honest emotion and concern for the lives of thousands of people.
And also your desire to keep pushing on to keep the peoples House
open and all of your staff and all of the staff of the House and the
Senate. You know, people talk about lack of heroes today, but in
my mind, the people I saw, staff and personnel, offices, committees,
yourself, the officers of the House staff, they had a desire and dedi-
cation to make sure that this system continued, which the evil that
has been after this country wants it to stop, and I just want to
commend everybody for a tremendous job. I think that there are
many, many heroes in this building, and we remember today all
the people that have lost their lives, and we appreciate and I think
that their families want our system to continue versus the alter-
native that has tried to stop our way of life. So I commend all of
you and your staff for doing that.
All right. We have now reached a point in the hearing where we
would like to give both Members and witnesses an opportunity to
discuss issues with sensitive security implications. As a result I
will entertain a motion to close and proceed in Executive Session.
Mr. FATTAH. So moved.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank you. I just want to note it is rare a com-
mittee proceeds in this manner, so I appreciate it, but it has been
moved by Mr. Fattah, and at that point, we will ask for a recorded
vote on the motion. The Clerk will call the roll.
The CLERK. Mr. Ehlers.
Mr. EHLERS. Yes.
The CLERK. Mr. Ehlers votes aye.
Mr. MICA. Aye.
The CLERK. Mr. Mica votes aye.
Mr. Linder.
[No response.]
The CLERK. Mr. Doolittle.
Mr. DOOLITTLE. Aye.
The CLERK. Mr. Doolittle votes aye.
Mr. Reynolds.
[No response]
The CLERK. Mr. Hoyer.
Mr. HOYER. Aye.

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The CLERK. Mr. Hoyer votes aye.


Mr. Fattah.
Mr. FATTAH. Aye.
The CLERK. Mr. Fattah votes aye.
Mr. Davis.
[No response]
The CLERK. And Chairman Ney.
The CHAIRMAN. Aye.
The CLERK. Chairman Ney votes aye.
The CHAIRMAN. We have 6 ayes and no nays. The motion is
agreed to.
The committee now stands in Executive Session. Only members,
officers and predesignated committee staff shall remain present for
that portion of the committee meeting. The committee will now
stand in recess for 5 minutes. Thank you.
[Whereupon, at 3:00 p.m., the committee proceeded in Executive
Session.]

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