Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 722

TAC I/NET

Seven

Technical Reference Guide

I/NET Seven System

Front Cover

TCON30004/13
We at Schneider Electric have tried to make the information contained in this manual as
accurate and reliable as possible. Nevertheless, Schneider Electric disclaims any warranty of
any kind, whether express or implied, as to any matter whatsoever relating to this manual,
including without limitation the merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose.
Information in this document is based on specifications determined at the time of publica-
tion. As we introduce design enhancements, we reserve the right to make changes in speci-
fications and models without obligation to notify the purchaser. In no event shall Schneider
Electric be liable for any indirect, special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out
of purchase or use of this manual or the information contained herein.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license agreement or nondis-
closure agreement. The software may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms
of the agreement. It is against the law to copy Schneider Electric software onto magnetic
tape, disk, or any other medium for any purpose other than the purchaser's personal use.
Printed in the United States of America.
Document Number: TCON30004/13

Copyright 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.

On October 1st, 2009, TAC became the Buildings business of its parent company Schneider
Electric. This document reflects the visual identity of Schneider Electric; however, there
remains references to TAC as a corporate brand in the body copy. As each document is
updated, the body copy will be changed to reflect appropriate corporate brand changes.
Use of Third Party Software

Schneider Electric software is delivered for use on IBM and compatible PCs. While your PC
is capable of running other third-party software while running TAC I/NET Seven, trying to
do so may present general operational difficulties. This is particularly true if the third-party
software is memory-resident. When used as it is intended, the Schneider Electric software
is also memory-resident. The use of more than one memory-resident program at the same
time may impose unresolvable PC system parameter conflicts and may cause one or more
of the memory-resident programs to fail.
No computer system is immune to software viruses, and they can be extremely damaging
should they attack databases and/or operating programs. Such an attack on the TAC I/NET
system may be particularly damaging since its database output is directed toward control.
The only absolute safeguard against viral attack is to prevent any third-party software from
being installed on the same computer with the Schneider Electric software. An acceptable
safeguard is to allow only authorized operators to run third party software and to make sure
that all such software is original, direct from a reputable vendor, and that the software has
not been copied from some other machine: i.e., if the seal is broken, dont use it.
Schneider Electric makes no claims or commitments regarding the use of any third-party
software, other than MS-DOS and the Windows operating system in conjunction with
the PC programs supplied by Schneider Electric, and offers no support in accommodating
the use of same. Furthermore, Schneider Electric accepts no liability for system failures that
may result from the use of any third-party software with Schneider Electric software.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. v


TCON30004/13
Chapter 1 System Configuration
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
TAC I/NET Hardware . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
TAC I/NET Seven Software . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
TAC I/NET Seven Documentation . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Host Workstations . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Minimum System Requirements . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Software Components . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
System Communication . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
LAN Communication. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Ethernet LAN . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Host LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Controller LAN . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Link Support . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Distributed Link Architecture (DLA) Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
DLA Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Overview of TAC I/NET Seven Link Communications . . . . . . . . . 1-12
Benefits of Xenta 527/527-NPRs and DLA-enabled NPRs . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
DLA Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18
The Database Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18
User Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18
TAC I/NET Seven Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Database Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Filemaster Database Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Authentication Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Configuration Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-20
Serial Port Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-20
Link Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21
TCP/IP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22
Host Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. vii


TCON30004/13
Reference Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22
File Equalization . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-24
The Filemaster . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-24
Equalized Clients . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-25
Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-26
Promoting and Demoting Workstations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-27
Multiple Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-27
Client/Server Infrastructure . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-28
The Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-29
Remote Clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-31
Multiple Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-32
System Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-33
TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-34
Series 2000 NetPlus Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-34
Xenta 527/527-NPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-35
Xenta 527 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-35
Xenta 527-NPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-36
Distributed Control Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-36
7700 (Distributed Control Unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-36
7716 (Process Control Unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-37
7718 (Process Control Unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-37
7728 (I/SITE I/O) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-37
7740 (Distributed Control Unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-38
7750 (Building Manager) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-38
7760 (Unitary Controller Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-38
7770 ICI (MODBUS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-39
7780 (Distributed Lighting Control Unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-39
7791 (Door Processor Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-40
7792 (Micro Regulator Interface). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-41
7793 (Micro Control Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-41
7797 (Industrial Controller Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-42
7798 (I/SITE LAN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-42
7800 Tap Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-43
Hand-held Console (HHC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-43

viii 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
I/STAT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-43
System Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-44
Building an Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-44
UC, DPU, SCU, and MR Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-45
OP5 Arming Terminal Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-45
User-defined Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-46
The Shortcut Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-46
The Event Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-46
Running User-defined Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-47

Chapter 2 Communication
7800 Tap Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Host Taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Link Taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Site Taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Printer Taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Tap Configuration Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Tap Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Direct-Connect Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Host Workstation Setup for Direct-Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Direct Connection to a Host LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Direct Connection to a Controller LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Integrated Dial Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Host Workstation Setup for Integrated Dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Modem Setup for Integrated Dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Call Initiating (Host) End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Call Receiving (78010 Tap) End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Embedded 4x Dial Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Adding a Modem to Windows 7 Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. ix


TCON30004/13
Modem Setup Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
Synchronous Modem Settings .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
Asynchronous Modem Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
7806x Tap Parameters . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Telephone Number . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Time-out . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Type . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Link . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Dial Mask . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
Non-Volatile . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
7806x Tap Pager Operation . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
7806x Tap Beeper Operation . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23
7806x Tap Save and Restore . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
Site Tap Save . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
Site Tap Restore . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
Multiple Site Dial Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25
Multi-link Dial Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25
NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-26
Communication to TAC I/NET Seven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27
Downloadable Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-28
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-28
Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-29
Managing Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33
Diagnostics (NPR only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34
IP Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34
Filter Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34
Filter Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-35

Chapter 3 System Messages


Routing Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Masking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

x 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Priorities .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
. .
Reliable Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Message Queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Buffer Capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Reliable Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Defining a Reliable Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Storing Messages During a Communication Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Retaining Messages During a Power Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
AMT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
File Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
AMT Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
User Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Window Options Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Alarm Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Alarm Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
Alarm Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
Event Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21
Message Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21
Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Transactions and Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
Transaction Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47
Text Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48
Image Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49
Image Verification Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50
Image Verification Door Filter Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50
CCTV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51
Archives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xi


TCON30004/13
.
Archive Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-53
.
Archive Confirmation Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-56
Database Wrap-Around . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-57
Archive Window . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-58
DCU Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-58

Chapter 4 Host Functions


Host Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Main Window Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
SevenTrends Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Group 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Distribution Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Refresh Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Auto AMT startup/shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Default System Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Operator Timeout Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Operator Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Do Not Notify on Operator Time-out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
I/NET Logoff Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Size/Move . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Close All Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
DCU Save File Encryption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Password Encryption Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Host Passwords . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Function Selection . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Station Selection . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Tenant/Group Selection . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Individual Field Selection . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
DCU Password Preassignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Password Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
Limited-access Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17

xii 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Pages (Graphics Editor) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
File Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
References to Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
Alternate Graphic Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20
Network Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20
Summary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Link Configuration Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22
Site Configuration Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23
Station Configuration Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23
MCU Configuration Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Door Configuration Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Network Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
DCU Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
DCU Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
Daylight Savings Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Automatic DCU Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Special Day Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Setup (Day Format) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
Broadcast Failure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
Broadcast Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
Off-normal Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
Disabled Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30
Database Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30
Configuration Summaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
Software Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
Host Trend Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-33
Host ATS (Automatic Time Schedule) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35
Phone Numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-36

Chapter 5 Controller Functions


Controller Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xiii


TCON30004/13
Configuration and Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Control Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Memory Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Database Last Changed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Loading Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Firmware Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Controller Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Distribution Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Masking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Reliable Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Sunrise/Sunset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Daylight Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Program Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Time Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Temperature Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Demand Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
All Lights On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Editing the Database while Offline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Connecting Offline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Station Save and Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Station Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Station Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Station Restore on a DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Station Restore on a DPU or SCU1284 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Automatic DPU Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Recording Offline Door Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Restore from Local Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Restore Host Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
How TAC I/NET Seven Performs the Automatic DPU Restore . . . . . . 5-14
The Memory Interface Processor Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14

xiv 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Software Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Dynamic Data Upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
Station Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Control Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Control Descriptions for Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18
State Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18
Conversion Coefficients Tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19
Pop-up Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19
Calculating Coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20
Engineering Units Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24
Lookup Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24
Lookup Table Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24
7728 Lookup Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28
7756 Thermistor Lookup Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-29
LCD Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-30
Points and Point Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-31
Test and Manual Point Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-31
Test Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-31
Manual Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-32
Special Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-32
Event Sequences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-35
Event Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-40
Message Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-40
Report Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41
DIF Conversion Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41
Trend Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41
Multi-Point Trend Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-42
Trend Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-42
Trend Report Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-43

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xv


TCON30004/13
Plot Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-43
Point Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-45
Trend Plot Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-46
Axis Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-47
Plot Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-47

Chapter 6 Input and Output Points


Resident Input/Output Point Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Discrete Input (DI) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Digital Input (GI) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Discrete Alarm (DA) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Analog Input (AI) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Pulsed Input (PI) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Analog Output (AO) and Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) Output Points . . . . 6-5
Digital Output (GO) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
Discrete Output (DO) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
Discrete Monitor (DM) and Discrete Control (DC) Points . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
Global and Indirect Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
Sending Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
Old Data State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Indirect Points in subLAN Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Input and Output Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Point Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Point Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Point Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Scan Interval. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Global Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
Alarm Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
Distribution Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
Message Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-17
Cell Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-17
State Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-18

xvi 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Number of Bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-18
1-bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
2-bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
3-bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Normal State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
Alarm Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
Control Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
Momentary Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-21
Expected State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-21
Restart Control Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22
Minimum Trip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22
Minimum Close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22
Time To State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23
Three-State Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23
Monitor Point Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23
Conversion Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23
Engineering Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
Conversion Coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
Low Sensor Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
High Sensor Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
Low Alarm Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
High Alarm Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
Broadcast Change Counts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
Non-linear Lookup Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-26
Accumulator Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27
Scans Between Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27
Supervised . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-28

Chapter 7 Point Extensions


Alarm Inhibit (AI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
Calculations (C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Selecting a Calculated Point Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xvii


TCON30004/13
Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Boolean Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
Relational Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9
Arithmetic Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10
Function Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11
Thermodynamic Function Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14
Helpful Hints for Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15
Consumption (CN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-17
Demand Control (DC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-18
Demand Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-18
Demand Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-23
Elevator (EL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-24
Event Definition (EV). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-26
Lighting Control (LC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-29
Lighting Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-29
Lighting Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-31
Override Billing (OB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-33
Some Important Information Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-34
Access Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-35
Equipment Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36
Override Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36
Runtime (RT) . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-38
Temperature Control (TC) .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-39
Trend Sampling (TR) . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-44
Time Scheduling (TS). . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-47
Independent and Master Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-47
Slave Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-50

Chapter 8 Dynamic Control


Time Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2

xviii 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Time Scheduling Editor . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Normal Schedules . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Temporary Schedules .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
.
Special Day Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Special Days Editor . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Processing . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Temperature Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Temperature Control Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Mode Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Optimized Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Optimized Start and Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
Demand Control Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Demand Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
Monitoring Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Daily Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16
Monthly Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16
Calculating Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
Projected Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
Current Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
Shedding Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
Selecting Loads to Shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21
Load Shedding Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-22
Restoring Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-22
Measurement and Forecasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-23

Chapter 9 Access Control


Access Control Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
Firmware-specific Parameters and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Key/Card Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xix


TCON30004/13
Large Number Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Advantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Large Number Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Hexidecimal Number Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Key/Card Data Formats and Conversions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Conversions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
26-bit Wiegand Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
32-bit Wiegand Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Database Caching in the Door Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
SLI Storage Capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
SLI and Door Controller Cache Interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Managing Cache Space in the Door Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13
Access Control Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15
Order of Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Audit Trail Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Deleting a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Deleting an Individual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
Deleting a Tenant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
Restoring Records from the Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
Purging Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
DPU Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-20
Reader and Door Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-21
Reader Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-21
PIN Pad or PIN Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-22
PIN Message Enable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
PIN Retry Count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
Exit Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-24
User Defined Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25
Intercard Interval (sec) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25
LED Polarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25
Elevator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25

xx 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Card Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26
Anti-passback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26
Anti-tailgate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26
Entry and Exit Zone Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-27
Anti-passback Reset Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-30
Door Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-30
Door Strike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-31
Strike Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-31
Door Open Too Long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-31
Door Sense Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-32
Door Release Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-32
Re-lock Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-32
Shunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-32
First Key Auto-unlock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-33
Door Closed Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-33
Mode Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-33
Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-34
First Key Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-36
User-definable Door Attributes and PIN Pad Functions .. . . . . . . . . . 9-37
Assigning Points to PIN Pad Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-37
Assigning Points in an SCU1284 Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-38
Intruder Alarm System Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-38
Using PIN Pad Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-39
Using Door Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-44
Resetting the Anti-Passback Flag . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 9-45
Automatic (Timed) Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-45
Manual Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-46
Elevators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47
Elevator Control Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47
Traditional Elevator Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47
Extended Elevator Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49
Implementing Elevator Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49
Implementation Sequence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49
Combining Traditional and Extended Elevator Control . . . . . . . . . 9-51

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xxi


TCON30004/13
Elevator Processing . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-51
Elevator Extension . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-52
Floor Selection time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-52
Floors . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-52
Personnel Schedules and Shift Rotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-53
Personnel Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54
Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54
End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54
Days of the Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54
Special Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54
Temporary Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-55
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-55
Shift Rotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-56
Rotation List and Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-56
Rotation Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-56
Rotation Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-56
Access Initiated Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-57
Control Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-58
Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-58
Individual Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-58
Key/Card Translations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-59
Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-60
Target . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-60
Count. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-60
Tenant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-60
Tenants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-61
Tenant Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-61
Tenant Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-61
Tenant Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-62
First Individual Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-62
Number of Individuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-62
Disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-63
Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-63
xxii 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.
TCON30004/13
Group Parameters . .
. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-64
Record Type . . .
. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-64
Begin Date/Time .
. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-65
End Date/Time . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-65
Door Selection . . . .
. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-65
Individuals . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-65
Individual Parameters . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-66
New Individual Number .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-66
Card Number . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-67
Group Name . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-67
Last Name . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-67
First Name . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-68
Fields 3-18 . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-68
Card . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-68
Image . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-69
Record Type . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-70
Temporary Schedule . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-71
APB . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-72
PIN . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-72
Issue Number . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-73
Door Selection . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-73
Selectively Assigning Doors to the Individual . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-74
Assigning Group Doors to the Individual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-74
Assigning Secondary Group Doors to the Individual . . . . . . . . . . 9-74
GOTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-75
Allocate Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-75
Field Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77
Display Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77
Permanent Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77
Temporary Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77
Disabled Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77
Display Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-78
Low/High Individual Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-78
ASCII Text Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-78

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xxiii


TCON30004/13
Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-78
Entering Your PIN at a Door. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-79
Pressing # to Complete the PIN Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-80
Omitting Leading Zeros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-80
Door Controller Firmware Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-80
User-defined PINs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-80
Six-digit PINs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-81
Generating PINs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-81
Combining Individual and Group Record Types. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-82
Group Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-83
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-85
Supply Card Number from Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-85
Second Password Required for Individuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-85
Audit Trail Distribution Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-86
Audit Trail Distribution Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-86
Audit Trail Cell Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-87
DPU Dial Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-87
DPU Dial Delay/Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-87
User-defined PIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-88
PIN Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-88
Recycle Bin Enable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-89
Recycle Bin Autopurge Age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-89
Empty Recycle Bin at Log Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-89
Unique User Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-89
Individual Activity Manager - Configure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-90
Individual Activity Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-90
Monitoring Door Controller Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-91
Per Individual Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-91
Dial After Edit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-92
Two-man Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-92
Configuring TAC I/NET to Use the Two-man Rule.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-93
Sequence of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-94

xxiv 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Chapter 10 Intrusion Alarm System
Overview of Setting Up an Intrusion Alarm System . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
Setting Up OP5 Arming Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
Creating IAS Access Level Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5
Setting Up IAS Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6
Assigning a User ID to IAS Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6
Assigning Terminals and Access Levels to Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7
Direct Assignments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7
Group Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7
Setting the MCU Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8
Creating State Descriptions for IAS Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8
Creating IAS Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10
Creating Points for Monitoring IAS Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10
Creating Points for Warning Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-12
Creating SCUEXP1 Expansion Board Points. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-12
Creating Zone Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-14
Creating Sensor Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-16
Using Intrusion Alarm System Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-17
IAS Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-17

Chapter 11 Direct Digital Control


Input and Output Designations . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
DDC Modules . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
Two-Position Module (Two-Pos) . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
Proportional, Integral, Derivative Module (PID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4
PID Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5
P-only Mode of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-7

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xxv


TCON30004/13
PID Tuning Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8
PID Equation Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8
Proportional Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8
Integral Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-12
Derivative Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-15
Floating Module (FLOAT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-19
Floating Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-19
Floating Module Tuning Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-21
Reset Module (RESET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-21
HiLo Module (HILO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-22
Relay Module (RELAY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-23
Calculation Module (CALC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-24
DDC Module Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-26
Module Number and Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-26
Sample Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-26
Setpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-27
Setpoint Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-27
Setpoint Differential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-28
Setpoint Low Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-28
Setpoint High Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-29
Process Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-30
Process Variable Filter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-30
Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-31
Increase Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-32
Decrease Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-33
High Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-34
Low Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-34
Output Ramp Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-34
Output Low Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-35
Output High Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-35
Output Control Point (Failsafe) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-36
Output Throttling Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-36
Output Turn-around Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-37
Output Proportional Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-37

xxvi 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Output Reset Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-39
Output Rate Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-39
Failsafe Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-40
Output Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-41
Adaptive Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-42
Maximum Bump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-43
Settling Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-43
Maximum Overshoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-44
Target Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-44
Noise Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-45
Primary Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-45
Primary Inputs 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-45
Primary Outputs 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-46
Secondary Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-46
Secondary Inputs 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-47
Secondary Outputs 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-47
Inputs 1 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-48
DI = 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-48
DI = 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-48
Settings (Relay Types) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-48
Time Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-49
DI Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-50
History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-50
Tuning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-50
Manual Tune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-51
Setpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-51
Proportional Band (percent) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-51
Reset interval (seconds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-51
Rate Interval (seconds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-51
Input/Output Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-51
Automatic Tune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-52
Automatic Tuning Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-52
Automatic Tuning Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-52
Adaptive Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-55

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xxvii


TCON30004/13
Adaptive Tuning Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-55
Adaptive Tuning Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-55

Chapter 12 Unitary Control


The Parent Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
Configuring the Unitary Controller Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
UC/UCI Editor Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4
UCI Resident Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4
UC Resident Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-5
UC Editor Theory of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-5
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-5
UC Damper/Valve Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-7
VAV Box Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-8
AHU Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-13
Heat Pump (HPMP) Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-16
AHU and HPMP Damper Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-19
Other Control Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-20
Remote Setpoint Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-20
Remote Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-21
Conversion of Velocity Pressure to CFM (VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . 12-23
Lini-Temp Temperature Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-25
Warmup/Cooldown (AHU and HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-26
Interlocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-26
Creating the UC/UCI Database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-28
Unitary Control Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-29
Setpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-30
Cooling Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-30
Cooling Economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-30
Cooling Normal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-30
Heating Normal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-31
Heating Economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-31
Heating Setback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-31

xxviii 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-32
Setpoint Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-32
Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-32
Timed Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-32
Timed Override Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-33
Timed Override Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-33
Economy Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-33
Damper Override (VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-34
Warmup/Cooldown (AHU, HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-34
Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-34
Space Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-35
Central Plant Heat (VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-35
Temperature Setpoint (VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-35
Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-35
Cooling Fan Control (VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-36
Heating Fan Control (VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-36
Stage 1 Heating (VAV and AHU only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-36
Activation Delay (VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-36
Stage 2 Heating (VAV and AHU only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-36
Stage 2 Heating Setpoint Offset (VAV and AHU only) . . . . . . . . . 12-37
Stage 3 Heating (VAV and AHU only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-37
Stage 3 Heating Setpoint Offset (VAV and AHU only) . . . . . . . . . 12-37
Fan Control (AHU and HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-37
Stage 1 Cooling (AHU only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-37
Interstage Delay (AHU and HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-37
Stage 2 Cooling (AHU only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-38
Stage 2 Cooling Setpoint Offset (AHU only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-38
Stage 3 Cooling (AHU only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-38
Stage 3 Cooling Setpoint Offset (AHU only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-38
Reversing Valve (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-38
Compressor #1 (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-39
Compressor #2 (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-39
Compressor #2 Setpoint Offset (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-39
Compressor #3 (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-39
Compressor #3 Setpoint Offset (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xxix
TCON30004/13
Heater Strip #1 (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
Heater Strip #1 Setpoint Offset (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
Heater Strip #2 (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
Heater Strip #2 Setpoint Offset (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
Heater Strip #3 (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
Heater Strip #3 Setpoint Offset (HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Damper Control (AHU and HPMP only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
PID Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Setpoint (DO-PID only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Input (Process Variable). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Input Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Input Low Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-42
Input High Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-42
Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-42
Output Control Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-42
Output Ramp Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-42
Output Low Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-43
Output High Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-43
Proportional Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-43
Reset Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-43
Rate Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-43
Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-43
FLT Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-44
Setpoint (DO-FLT only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-44
Input (Process Variable). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-44
Input Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-44
Input Low Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-44
Input High Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-44
Output (Increase) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-45
Output (Decrease) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-45
Throttling Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-45
Turn-Around Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-45
Proportional Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-45
Reset Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-45
Rate Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-46
xxx 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.
TCON30004/13
Mode .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-46
General (Universal)Unitary Controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-46

Chapter 13 Micro Regulator Control


Micro Regulator Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1
Creating the MRI Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-3
MR Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-4
Entry Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-5
LED Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-5
Hardware Coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-7
Lookup Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-7
MR88, MR632, MR160, and MR88R Lookup Tables . . . . . . . . . . 13-7
MR55X Lookup Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-8
Standalone ATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-9
Direct Digital Control Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-10
Calculation Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-11
MR-to-MR Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-11
Micro Regulator Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-11
MCI, MRI, or I/SITE LAN Resident Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-12
MR-Resident Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-12

Chapter 14 Application Specific Controllers


Displaying ASC Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
System Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
Setpoint Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-4
Air Status (MR-VAV only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-4
Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-5
Modifying Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-5
Modifying ASC Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-6
Copying ASC Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-6

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xxxi


TCON30004/13
Saving and Restoring ASC Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-7
Updating the Interface Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-7
Removing ASC Points from the Interface Controller . . . . . . . . . 14-8
Updating the ASC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9
Order of Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9
Free Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-10
ASC Related Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-11

Chapter 15 7771 Industrial Controller Interface


Assigning a Station Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-1
Configuring the 7771 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Points and Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
MODBUS Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
MODBUS PLC Point Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Input Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Holding Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-5
Point and Database Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-5
Mapping the ICI on the Controller LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-5
Mapping the ICI on the MODBUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
ICI Mapping Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
Point Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-7
Point Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-7
Scan Interval. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-8

Chapter 16 SevenTrends
SevenTrends Data Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-3
Collecting Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-3
Data Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4

xxxii 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Simple TAC I/NET Seven Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
Complex TAC I/NET Seven Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6
Dial Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6
Data Transfer Schedules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-8
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-9
SevenTrends Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-9
Defining Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-10
SevenTrends Parameters Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-11
Point Selection Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-13
Modifying and Deleting Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-14
Using Cells to Generate Trend Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-14
Modifying Cell Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
DCU Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
SevenTrends Inquiry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-19
Inquiry Date Range. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-19
SevenTrends Data Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-20
Modifying SevenTrends Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-22
Deleting SevenTrends Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-22
SevenTrends Data Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-22
Database Size Limit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-22
Sample Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-23
SevenTrends Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-24
SevenTrends Transfer Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-25
Archiving SevenTrends Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-28

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. xxxiii


TCON30004/13
Appendix A DCU Control Hierarchy
Appendix B Time Zone Map
Appendix C Controller Point Addressing
Glossary
Index

xxxiv 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
CHAPTER

1
48
System Configuration

Overview
TAC I/NET Seven is an integrated solution for building manage-
ment that combines environmental control, access control, and
energy management. TAC I/NET Seven can be customized for any
building management application including small office buildings,
skyscrapers, office and school campuses, buildings with specialized
environmental control requirements, and remote sites. The TAC
I/NET system includes both hardware and software solutions.

TAC I/NET Hardware


The hardware solutions are:
Sensing and controlling devices such as sensors, actuators,
transducers, signal converters, door sensors, and door strikes.
Controllers which provide the ability to monitor and control
environmental and access devices. Information may be shared
with multiple controllers by linking them together on a
controller LAN.
Host workstations run the TAC I/NET Seven software to
monitor, control, and report on all aspects of the building
management system. Host workstations may be linked
together on a host LAN or commercial Ethernet LAN.
Taps and NetPlus Routers provide communication links
between the various network levels of the TAC I/NET system.

TAC I/NET Seven Software


TAC I/NET Seven software is a 32-bit open-architecture platform
which provides a friendly, comprehensive, and customizable set of
tools that control and monitor the TAC I/NET network.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-1


TCON30004/13
Host Workstations System Configuration

The software includes a specialized graphics editor for creating


graphical displays of your TAC I/NET system, reporting utilities for
creating custom reports and exporting data, and an interface for
viewing and managing incoming alarms, messages, and access
control transactions.
TAC I/NET Seven stores data using a non-propriety open SQL
database engine that operates as a Windows service. The SQL data-
base engine can reside on the local PC, or it can be located on a
remote PC. The SQL database engine must be running anytime
TAC I/NET Seven software is running. TCON301, TAC I/NET
Seven Database Connectivity and Reporting, provides more infor-
mation about TAC I/NET Sevens use of SQL database services.

TAC I/NET Seven Documentation


TAC I/NET Seven documentation is composed of the following
guides:
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started
TCON299, TAC I/NET Seven Operator Guide
TCON300, TAC I/NET Seven Technical Reference Guide
TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database Connectivity and
Reporting
In addition to the printed documentation listed above, a compre-
hensive, context sensitive on-line help system is available in the
TAC I/NET Seven software.
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started, and TCON299, TAC
I/NET Seven Operator Guide, provide step-by step guidance on how
to configure and use the TAC I/NET Seven software. This Technical
Reference Guide provides supplementary technical information on
how TAC I/NET Seven actually works.

Host Workstations
TAC I/NET Seven uses one or more workstations to run host soft-
ware, allowing you to perform programming, record keeping, and
system communication with the controllers, and ultimately, your
environmental or access control equipment.

1-2 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration Host Workstations

Minimum System Requirements


The minimum recommended configuration for a host workstation
running TAC I/NET Seven is:
Pentium III (500 MHz).
256 MB RAM for a standalone workstation or equalized
client.
512 MB RAM for a filemaster.
2 GB RAM if using any version of SQL Server other than
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine.
3 GB of available hard drive space.
Note: The use of Image Verification, AMT Archiving, and
Microsoft SQL Server will require additional disk space.
CD-ROM drive.
Video display of 800 600.
Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Windows XP Professional,
Windows 7 Professional (32-/64-bit), Windows 8 Professional
64-bit, or Windows Server 2008 R2 (64-bit).
Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database Connectivity
and Reporting, for more information about the Windows OS.

Notes: TAC I/NET Seven will not run on a Windows workstation that is
configured as a Domain Controller.
You must have administrative privileges in order to install programs
on a Windows workstation.
Your Windows system must be configured to use NTFS in order to
support electronic file encryption (EFS).
For any version of Windows after Windows XP, the online help for
TAC I/NET Seven requires that you manually install the necessary
WinHelp executable. On the internet, search Microsoft for the
keyword KB917607.

Any of the following SQL servers:


Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Standard or Enterprise
(purchased seperately)
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine
(included on the TAC I/NET Seven CD)

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-3


TCON30004/13
Host Workstations System Configuration

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Standard and Enterprise


(purchased seperately)
Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express
(included on the TAC I/NET Seven CD)
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Standard
(purchased seperately)
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Express
(included on the TAC I/NET Seven CD)
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Standard (64-bit) or
Enterprise (64-bit)
(purchased seperately)
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Express (64-bit)
(free, downloaded seperately)
Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database Connectivity
and Reporting, for more information about the SQL server.
Sound card and speakers (required for AMT audible alarms)
While not required, an uninterruptable power supply (UPS)
is highly recommended.
If you plan to use TAC I/NET with an Ethernet LAN, you must also
have a valid LAN connection that includes the following:
Microsoft TCP/IP
Properly assigned static IP address
IP Mask
Gateway IP address
If you plan to print event action messages from your workstation,
you must also have the following:
A printer capable of printing single lines of text without
ejecting the page between each line. Dot-matrix printers typi-
cally support this single line feed capability and are recom-
mended for use as the event printer.
Please contact your network system administrator if you have any
questions on these requirements.

1-4 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration Host Workstations

Caution: The database server should not be shut down while TAC I/NET is
running. Shutting down the database server drops all existing
connections to the database, and can result in corrupted data
displays. (Only users with administrative privileges on the worksta-
tion can stop or start the database server.)

Software Components
The TAC I/NET Seven software consists not only of the main host
software, but also includes several companion programs that
perform specialized functions. Table 1-1 contains a list of the
primary software components and a brief description of their
specific function.

Table 1-1. TAC I/NET Seven Software Components


Component Description
TAC I/NET Seven Host
Primary host workstation software.
Software (INETW)
Handles all required functions for receiving and acknowledging
Alarms, Messages,
alarms, messages, and transactions. AMT is started by INETW and
Transactions (AMT)
cannot be run independently.
A utility program that specifies system and communication
Configure
parameters. Configure is also used for NetPlus Router configuration.
A companion program that performs the majority of the host
workstation communication functions. I/O Server is launched
I/O Server
automatically by INETW. It should be configured to run as a
background task when TAC I/NET Seven is shut down.
This programs primary functions is to transfer TAC I/NET Seven
system messages to the database file. SQL Server is launched
automatically by INETW and will run as a background task, along
with I/O Server, when TAC I/NET Seven is shut down.

SQL Server Caution: The database server should not be shut down while TAC
I/NET Seven is running. Shutting down the database
server drops all existing connections to the database, and
can result in corrupted data displays. (Only users with
administrative privileges on the workstation can stop or
start the database server.)
A utility program that specifies the parameters for archiving system
Archive Configure
events (alarms, messages, and transactions).

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-5


TCON30004/13
System Communication System Configuration

System Communication
Your TAC I/NET Seven host workstation needs to communicate
with many external devices, including other host workstations,
NPRs, Xenta 527/527-NPRs, Taps, and controllers. TAC I/NET
Seven uses a companion program, I/O Server, to facilitate efficient
communication functions.
I/O Server must be running for most TAC I/NET Seven communi-
cation functions to occur. Each time it is started, TAC I/NET Seven
launches I/O Server, which runs in the background. By default, I/O
Server continues to run as a background task even after TAC I/NET
Seven is shut down. This enables your host software to continue to
receive TAC I/NET data even if the host software is not operating.
Should you need to disable the I/O Server temporarily, you can
shut it down manually. You can also instruct TAC I/NET Seven to
shut down all TAC I/NET Seven-related background tasks auto-
matically.
When I/O Server is running, an icon is visible in the Windows
system tray. The specific icon loaded will depend upon whether the
workstation is directly connected to a Tap. Right-clicking on the
icon allows you to manually shut down I/O Server, start the config-
uration program, or start the archive configuration program.

LAN Communication
The TAC I/NET system is made of a series of LANs that perform
different functions according to the equipment to which they are
connected.
Configure your system with between one and 6,400 LANs, and up
to 4.096 million monitored/controlled points. The system auto-
matically reconfigures the LAN if a controller fails, to keep things
running smoothly.

1-6 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration LAN Communication

TAC I/NET forms a tiered hierarchy of up to four LAN types (see


Figure 1-1):

Figure 1-1. LAN hierarchy showing possible configurations

Ethernet LAN The Ethernet LAN is at the top of the TAC


I/NET structure and can be used to connect multiple host
workstations, via TCP/IP. NetPlus Routers (NPR) and Xenta
527/527-NPRs provide access from the Ethernet LAN directly
to the Controller LAN.
Host LAN Below the Ethernet LAN is the host LAN. Host
workstations connect to the host LAN through specialized
communication devices called Taps.
Controller LAN Below the host LAN is the controller LAN
where the controllers reside. Controller LANs use Taps to
connect to the host LAN and NetPlus Routers to connect
directly to an Ethernet LAN. Controllers connect to the
controller LAN directly, without the use of an adapter or Tap.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-7


TCON30004/13
LAN Communication System Configuration

Controller subLAN Some controllers, such as the Micro


Regulator Interface, Micro Controller Interface, Unitary
Controller Interface, and the I/SITE LAN, provide subLAN
connections. Unitary controllers, Door Processing Units, and
Micro Regulators reside on subLANs.

Ethernet LAN
TAC I/NET supports Ethernet LAN communication, allowing you
to take advantage of an existing Ethernet commercial network.
There is no need to run special cable or separate network commu-
nication.
Host workstations, NetPlus Routers (NPRs), and Xenta
527/527-NPRs connect to the LAN through Ethernet adapters
installed in each device. Host workstations and Xenta
527/527-NPRs may use a 10 MBPS or 100 MBPS Ethernet
segment. However, NPRs require a 10 MBPS segment. The system
network topology can take almost any shape and can be
constructed of 10-base T (shielded twisted pair), 10-base 2 (Coax),
or fiber optic interfaced devices.
You may connect up to 250 host workstations and 99 NPRs or
Xenta 527/527-NPRs on a single Ethernet LAN/WAN. Connection
is not limited to a single site and may be made through either dial
or Internet connections.
TCP/IP
TAC I/NET uses industry-standard TCP/IP communication
protocols to communicate between host workstations, NPRs, and
Xenta 527/527-NPRs to transfer controller data, route messages
and alarms, and to equalize files.
TCP/IP is actually two protocols, defined below, that are
commonly used together to transfer data across networks.
Transmission control protocol (TCP) This protocol divides
information into packets that are small enough to be transferred
across the network. When a packet reaches its destination, TCP
verifies that the packet has arrived intact. Finally, after all the
packets arrive, it reassembles them into a complete structure.

1-8 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration LAN Communication

Internet Protocol (IP) This protocol is responsible for the actual


routing of the data across a network (i.e., determining a path from
point A to point B).
TAC I/NET can exist on a pure TCP/IP network or on a mixed
protocol Ethernet such as NetWare and TCP/IP.

Note: TAC I/NET Seven requires Microsofts TCP/IP protocol. While TAC
I/NET Seven can coexist with another vendors networking software,
(Novell or Banyan, for example) it will not use any other version of
TCP/IP. You can add Microsofts TCP/IP in the Network options of
the Control Panel.

See Also: The section on Setup and Network Configuration in TCON299,


TAC I/NET Seven Operator Guide, and TAC I/NET Seven
Configuration in TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started.

Host LAN
A host LAN supports up to 8 Host Taps and 16 Link Taps. Each
Host Tap can connect directly to a workstation or indirectly to a
workstation through a modem. Use the host LAN to connect
multiple host workstations over a large area, segregating functions
at each station. Devices on the host LAN communicate with each
other at 19.2 Kbaud or 9600 baud. The host LAN reconfigures
automatically as devices are added or removed.

Controller LAN
All controllers reside on a controller LAN. The controller LAN can
hold up to 32 controllers on a segment of the LAN. Using a 7808
repeater Tap, you can increase the maximum number of controllers
to 64 on a controller LAN. Controller LANs connect to host LANs
through Link Taps.
The controllers on a controller LAN pass a software token along the
LAN, allowing each controller to broadcast in turn. If a controller
fails, or the communication wire is broken, the system reconfigures
itself, counting the controllers that can still pass the token. The
controller with the token becomes the master controller on the

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-9


TCON30004/13
LAN Communication System Configuration

LAN and restarts the token passing procedure. The controllers on


the other side of the wiring break do the same, even if there is only
one controller.
Even if the ability to communicate on the controller LAN and
possibly with the host LAN is impaired, normal functions at each
controller continue without interruption. When communication is
re-established with the other portions of the controller LAN, the
system reconfigures itself.

Link Support
Host workstations communicate with controller LANs through
Links. Within TAC I/NET Seven, a link may represent a hardware
device (i.e., a Tap, NPR, or Xenta 527/527-NPR) or it may represent
a distributed link (i.e., a single link address that is being shared
among multiple NPRs or Xenta 527/527-NPRs). The information
within this section focuses on TAC I/NET Sevens traditional use of
link devices. For information about distributed links, refer to
Distributed Link Architecture (DLA) Support, starting on page
1-11.
You can address up to 16 Link Taps on a single host LAN. Address
additional Link Taps through workstations, NPRs, or Xenta
527/527-NPRs on the Ethernet LAN, or through additional host
LANs. TAC I/NET supports up to 100 system link addresses (099).
Link Taps connect the operator station from the host LAN to a
controller LAN. You perform link definition from the Configure
program. Here you enter the system link name, the hardware link
number (the actual address, 0 to 15, assigned to the Link Tap), and
the system link number (099). The connection to the link is made
using the system link number when addressing the link through
TAC I/NET Seven software. If you selected Direct configuration,
the hardware and system addresses are typically set the same (00).

Note: You must always define all hardware and system links in the
Configure program. This ensures proper system operation.

Even though each host LAN is limited to16 links, the entire system
can support up to 100 links (099). All links on a system must be
mapped. This information can be shared through an Ethernet LAN

1-10 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration LAN Communication

with all other workstations. You can connect through a link which
is not on your host LAN. This use of the Ethernet LAN allows
communication to controller LANs without having to connect a
Link Tap for that controller LAN. This is helpful if your worksta-
tions do not need continual connection with certain controller
LANs.

Distributed Link Architecture (DLA) Support


TAC I/NET Seven allows you to define a system-wide total of up to
100 links in order to connect controller LANs to the TAC I/NET
system. In the traditional TAC I/NET 2000 system, if you use NPRs
or Xenta 527/527-NPRs to connect remote controller LANs (i.e.,
sites) to TAC I/NET Seven, each site consumes one unique link
address. This limits the traditional TAC I/NET 2000 system to a
maximum of 100 sites.
TAC I/NET Seven adds Distributed Link Architecture (DLA) capa-
bilities to NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs, and to the TAC I/NET
IOServer, in order to allow multiple devices to share the same link
number. In a system that is configured to use DLA-enabled devices,
up to 64 sites can share a single link address. The shared link is
referred to as a distributed link. The use of distributed links allows
the TAC I/NET Seven system to support up to 6400 sites.

Note: TAC I/NET Sevens system-wide limits of 6,400 controllers and 100
link addresses must be observed, regardless of whether or not DLA
functions are enabled. For example, if your TAC I/NET Seven system
already contains 6400 controllers, implementing DLA will not allow
you to expand the system with additional sites of controllers.

DLA Guidelines
Before you configure your system to use DLA, ensure that you
understand the following basic guidelines. This will help to prevent
communication failures from occurring within your TAC I/NET
Seven system.
Before you upgrade an NPR from TAC I/NET 2000 to TAC
I/NET Seven (i.e., before you download DLA-compatible
binary software to an NPR), ensure that you first install TAC
I/NET Seven on all host workstations in your system, begin-

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-11


TCON30004/13
LAN Communication System Configuration

ning with workstations that are being used as a Reference


Host. If necessary, refer to TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven
Getting Started, for installation and upgrade instructions.
In order to enable and use DLA in even a single NPR, you
must ensure that all NPRs within your system are loaded with
DLA-compatible binary software.
Even with DLA-compatible firmware loaded in your systems
NPRs, the DLA functionality will not be available until it has
been enabled.
Only Xenta 527/527-NPRs and DLA-enabled NPRs can share
the same distributed Link address. If a non-DLA NPR dupli-
cates the Link address of any other NPR or Xenta
527/527-NPR within your system, a communication error
will occur.
Ensure that you assign a unique Site address to each NPR and
Xenta 527/527-NPR that shares the same distributed Link
address. Duplicate Site addresses are not supported within the
same distributed Link.
Overview of TAC I/NET Seven Link Communications
Using a traditional Host LAN and Link LAN architecture, TAC
I/NET Seven has the ability to support multiple sites directly
connected to the same Link device. However, this feature requires
the use of 7802x Link Taps communicating with 7803x LAN Taps.
Referring to the example configuration in Figure 1-2, you will see
that Link Tap 01 has a permanent, direct connection to Buildings
A and B using 7802x/7803x Link/LAN Taps, and a Telco-
provided leased-line infrastructure. A single 78025 Link Tap can
communicate with up to 63 78035 LAN Taps. Therefore, a single
Host LAN with 16 78025 Link Taps will allow a total direct-
connected site capability of 1008 sites. With TAC I/NET Seven and
multiple Host LANs connected over TCP/IP, this limit is raised to a
total of 6,300 sites.
A limitation of this implementation is that typically, the cost of
multi-dropped Telco leased-lines is high, and Link/LAN communi-
cation rates are 9600-baud maximum.

1-12 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration LAN Communication

Figure 1-2. Traditional Host LAN/Link LAN Architecture

With the use of NetPlus Routers, systems can be designed to replace


the Host LAN/Link LAN infrastructure with high-speed Ethernet
LANs. These designs replace the architecture shown in Figure 1-2
with the architecture shown in Figure 1-3.
By using the DLA capabilities build into the TAC I/NET Seven
NPR, IOServer, and Xenta 527/527-NPR, you can create system
architectures similar to the one shown in Figure 1-4. DLA imple-
mentation takes advantage of the fact that most sites typically have
less than the maximum 64 primary controllers (DCU/PCU/SLI,
etc.).
Although TAC I/NET Sevens IOServer is DLA-compatible, it does
not provide the same duplicate link functions as the NPR and
Xenta 527/527-NPR. For example, local site TAC I/NET Seven Host
PCs (as shown at Buildings C and D in Figure 1-5) do not have the
ability to support directly connected controller LANs with the same

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-13


TCON30004/13
LAN Communication System Configuration

Figure 1-3. Traditional Architecture

Link address. Only Xenta 527/527-NPRs and DLA-enabled NPRs


(as shown at Buildings A and B in Figure 1-5) provide this capa-
bility.
To implement this system with a TCP/IP infrastructure, either
these controller LANs will consume an entire Link address, or addi-
tional Xenta 527/527-NPRs and/or DLA-enabled NPRs can be
installed as shown in Figure 1-6.

Benefits of Xenta 527/527-NPRs and DLA-enabled NPRs


Xenta 527/527-NPRs and DLA-enabled NPRs allow existing instal-
lations to replace Dial or Direct Connected Link/LAN infrastruc-
tures with TCP/IP-based infrastructures, while still maintaining
the ability to connect to more than 100 sites. The benefits of this
replacement include:

1-14 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration LAN Communication

Figure 1-4. DLA Architecture

Replace many, expensive, low-speed dial-up telephone lines


with a facility's existing high-speed TCP/IP WAN or the
Internet.
Replace many, expensive, low-speed leased telephone lines
and difficult to obtain and maintain synchronous modems
with a high-speed TCP/IP WAN or the Internet.
Maintain all existing TAC I/NET Seven database configura-
tions, including:
Graphic Pages
Controller SAV files
DocutrendTM/SevenTrends data
Site installation and commission costs are minimal.
As DLA configured devices can co-exist with non-DLA configured
devices, site expansion can be selective. That is, existing TAC I/NET
2000 installations with non-DLA configured NPRs can be
expanded beyond 100 sites without re-engineering or re-commis-

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-15


TCON30004/13
LAN Communication System Configuration

Figure 1-5. TAC I/NET Seven Host PC's Do Not Provide DLA
Functions

sioning the existing installation. All NPRs on the site, however,


must be upgraded with the new DLA compatible binary should
only one NPR be configured as DLA enabled.
As with 7802x/7803x Link/LAN Tap installations, the actual
number of sites that an TAC I/NET Seven system can support with
DLA enabled devices will be dependent on the number of control-
lers installed at each site. DLA architecture provides for a
maximum of 6,400 controllers distributed over 100 Link addresses.

DLA Functions
A DLA-enabled system provides the following major functions:
Allows duplicate Link addresses in multiple NPRs and Xenta
527/527-NPRs connected to the same system.
Detects conflicting Link/Site Number configurations and
notifies the user.

1-16 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration LAN Communication

Figure 1-6. Adding DLA-enabled Devices

Attaches the correct Link and Site Number to all Alarms,


Messages and Transactions generated by the controller envi-
ronment before routing them to an TAC I/NET Seven Host.
Checks for a valid DLA configuration before enabling the
DLA capability.
Provides non-DLA enabled device operation if a valid DLA
configuration is not present.
Allows Xenta 527/527-NPRs and DLA-enabled NPRs to
coexist gracefully with NPRs that are not DLA enabled,
provided they are all at the same binary software revision
level.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-17


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

TAC I/NET Seven Configuration


TAC I/NET Seven uses a separate program called I/NET Configu-
ration (INetCfg.exe), to specify system and communication
parameters for I/O Server and TAC I/NET Seven. Within the I/NET
Configuration program, you may define communication parame-
ters, set peripheral parameters, modify the default directory struc-
ture, define host masking and configure NetPlus Routers and Xenta
527/527-NPRs.

Note: Instructions for using the I/NET Configuration program are in


TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started.

The Database Server


TAC I/NET Seven host software provides an interface to data that
resides in a database server. The database server may be local or
remote, depending on the configuration of your workstation.
When a TAC I/NET Seven PC is configured as a Standalone, File-
master, or Equalized client workstation, it will use its own SQL
services to maintain a local TAC I/NET Seven database.
A TAC I/NET Seven PC configured as a Remote client will not
maintain a local TAC I/NET Seven database. Instead, this type of
workstation will use the SQL services and TAC I/NET Seven data-
base located on another TAC I/NET Seven workstation. Any work-
station that maintains a local TAC I/NET Seven database can be
used as the database server for a remote client.

User Authentication
TAC I/NET Seven displays an Authentication editor under the
following circumstances:
When you initially attempt to connect to a TAC I/NET Seven
SQL database.
When you attempt to add or modify a configuration profile
while the I/O Server is not running.
When you change the setting of the Workstation Type param-
eter in the Configuration Profile Editor.

1-18 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven Configuration

When you click the Connection button in the Configuration


Profiles Editor in order to change the way the workstation
connects to the SQL database.
TAC I/NET Seven Authentication
The authentication process will attempt to verify that you are a
valid TAC I/NET Seven user on the database server or filemaster
workstation, and that the Configuration system tray function is
enabled for your password.
If you are configuring a standalone workstation, this authentica-
tion is for the local TAC I/NET Seven SQL database. Otherwise, this
authentication is for the TAC I/NET Seven SQL database on the
filemaster or server workstation to which this workstation will
connect.
Database Authentication
During the authentication process, the login you provide must
enable public and db_owner roles for TAC I/NET Sevens data-
base.
If you are configuring a remote client workstation, this authentica-
tion is for the TAC I/NET Seven SQL database on the server. Other-
wise, this authentication is for the local TAC I/NET Seven SQL
database on your workstation.
Filemaster Database Authentication
This form of authentication is only active when you are configuring
an equalized client workstation. It is used to authenticate you as a
valid administrator of the TAC I/NET Seven SQL database located
on the filemaster. The login you provide must enable public and
db_owner roles for TAC I/NET Sevens database on the file-
master.
Authentication Types
Default This type of authentication will use a TAC I/NET
Seven-generated default username and password to connect
to the TAC I/NET Seven database on the database server. Use
this option when the TAC I/NET Seven database to which you
are connecting was created using the Default Account
option in DbCreate.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-19


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

Current Windows User This option is intended for use on


large TAC I/NET Seven installations where user permissions
will be administered using Enterprise Manager. This option
allows the Windows account of the currently logged in user to
also be used as the login for the TAC I/NET Seven database.
This option will only work if the Windows user account is
that of a Windows system administrator on the database
server, or it has been assigned the public and db_owner
roles for TAC I/NET Sevens database.
Manual Selecting this option causes the Database User
Name and Database User Password fields to become active
in the Authentication editor, allowing you to manually log
into a database server.

Configuration Profiles
The I/NET Configuration program allows you to specify and save
more than one set of configuration specifications. These specifica-
tions are called profiles. The majority of host workstations only
require one profile. However, multiple profiles are useful if you
work with several different TAC I/NET Seven environments,
because you can change system parameters simply by selecting a
different profile.
Most of the configuration parameters are saved in the system
registry and IP routing information specific to each profile is stored
in a .DAT file.

Note: There may be differences in the routing data for each configuration
profile; consequently, you should not change configuration profiles in
a stable TAC I/NET Seven network.

Serial Port Configuration


TAC I/NET Seven can only use one serial port, or modem, at a time.
The I/NET Configuration program allows you to either define a
serial port, or select a modem that has been previously installed
under Windows. If you need to configure multiple serial ports or
communication devices, you can use separate configuration
profiles.

1-20 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven Configuration

Link Types
For each serial port you configure, you must specify a link type.
Possible link types are:
Directa host TAP.
NetPlus Routera NetPlus Router or Xenta 527/527-NPR.
This link type is useful when you are configuring a NetPlus
Router or Xenta 527/527-NPR. When communicating with a
directly connected NetPlus Router or Xenta 527/527-NPR,
the baud rate is fixed at 19,200.
Embedded 4.x Diala modem that communicates with a
7806x Dial Tap.
Integrated Diala modem that initiates calls to a host or
controller LAN. This setting supports outgoing calls only. It
does not answer incoming calls.
Integrated NPR Diala modem that initiates calls to a
NetPlus Router or Xenta 527/527-NPR. This setting is other-
wise identical to the Integrated Dial option.

Note: Refer to the Communication chapter for detailed information on


configuring Dial functions.

The Link type specified dictates which other parameters are avail-
able in the Configuration Profile editor.
Link Numbers
After selecting the Link type, you must map a hardware link
number to a system link number. While you may use any number
for the hardware link, care should be taken to avoid duplicating
system link numbers. If you assign a system link number that is
already in use, either on the same, or different, host workstation,
TAC I/NET Seven produces an error message when it tries to use
that system link.
You can also set up a Multi-Link Dial capability. Multi-link Dial
permits a single host workstation, and modem, to support up to
100 links. To do this, assign multiple system link numbers (099)
to a hardware link number of 0.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-21


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

Note: Refer to the Communication chapter and to TCON298, TAC


I/NET Seven Getting Started, for detailed information on config-
uring specific link types, including Multi-link Dial.

TCP/IP Configuration
TCP/IP configuration includes assigning a host address and desig-
nating a reference host.
Host Address
Assign each host a host address number (1 through 250). This
number must be unique. If a duplicate host address is detected,
TAC I/NET Seven produces an error message.
Reference Hosts
A host workstation, NPR, or Xenta 527/527-NPR must have
knowledge of the other devices on the network in order to commu-
nicate with them. This knowledge is stored in what is commonly
called a routing table. A routing table will contain the IP address of
the devices known to the host workstation. When the host has data
to route to another TAC I/NET Seven device, it uses the addressing
information contained in the routing table to determine the desti-
nation path. I/O Server stores the routing table in a .DAT file.
To facilitate both the initial building and the updating of the
routing table, the I/O Server uses a reference host. The reference
host may be any host workstation, NPR, or Xenta 527/527-NPR on
the Ethernet LAN and is specified by its IP address. Each time the
I/O Server is launched, it uses the information in the routing table
on the reference host and updates the local routing table, accord-
ingly.
It is best to use a common reference host for all the hosts, NPRs,
and Xenta 527/527-NPRs in the TAC I/NET Seven system.
However, the only specific requirement is that the designated refer-
ence host be constantly powered. While a host workstation
provides greater memory and processing power, an NPR or Xenta
527/527-NPR is more likely to be always available. You may desig-
nate more than one reference host as a precautionary measure. You

1-22 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven Configuration

should also assign a reference host to the TAC I/NET Seven work-
stations, NPRs, or Xenta 527/527-NPRs that are acting as reference
hosts.
As an example of proper reference host assignments, Figure 1-7
shows each NPR at a remote site defining a host PC on the Ethernet
as a reference host. This reference host also points back to one of
the remote NPRs. This will ensure that proper communication can
be established during the commissioning of this system, or when
the system comes up following a communication interruption.

Explanation:

Figure 1-7. Example of Reference Host Assignments

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-23


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

File Equalization
Note: You must have Windows Administrator rights in order to make any
changes to your TAC I/NET Seven configuration that will affect file
equalization.

File equalization is essential in TAC I/NET Seven systems where


multiple host workstations will be used to manage access control or
TAC I/NET Sevens network configuration. It allows host worksta-
tions connected to an Ethernet LAN to share certain database
information while still maintaining their own TAC I/NET Seven
database.
File equalization is a function of the SQL server that is installed on
TAC I/NET Seven workstations. The SQL server ensures that each
individual workstation has up-to-date copies of equalized informa-
tion. The equalized information includes:
Network configuration (links, sites, stations, etc.)
Host passwords
Controller passwords
Tenant data
User-defined tenant field labels
Individual records
Group door assignments
Elevator floor assignments
Trend plot data
The Filemaster
In an equalized TAC I/NET Seven system, one host workstation is
designated as the filemaster. This designation is performed in the
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration Profile editor and is maintained
in the configuration profile. When you set the Workstation type to
Filemaster, TAC I/NET Seven automatically completes the File-
master name field with the Computer name (found in the Identi-
fication tab under Windows Network settings). The Filemaster
name field is read-only on the filemaster station and cannot be
changed.

1-24 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven Configuration

It is important that the workstation designated as the filemaster be


constantly powered and that its SQL service be running. The SQL
service will dock an icon in the system tray to indicate it is active.

Caution: If the filemaster workstation is powered off, or if SQL services are not
available, file equalization cannot occur. It is recommended that the
filemaster workstation be powered by a uninterruptable power
supply (UPS).

All host workstations configured as equalized clients must connect


to the filemasters SLQ database using the Computer name of the
filemaster workstation. SQL services run on all equalized clients
allowing the TAC I/NET Seven database to be constantly updated,
even when TAC I/NET Seven is shut down.
When you promote a workstation to filemaster, TAC I/NET Seven
requires that you provide proper authentication as an authorized
database administrator. As other workstations are being promoted
to equalized client status, they will also be asked to provide proper
authentication before they can begin receiving equalized data from
this filemaster. This helps to ensure that no data on the filemaster
gets distributed to unauthorized clients.
Equalized Clients
Equalization clients are TAC I/NET Seven workstations that receive
network configuration and access control data from a filemaster.
You can view a list of all the client workstations that reference your
filemaster workstation.
TAC I/NET Seven displays the File Equalization Clients editor
when you select Clients from the I/NET Configuration editor on a
filemaster workstation. On client and standalone workstations, the
Clients button appears grey and is non-functional.
The File Equalization Clients editor lists all equalization clients that
reference this workstation as their filemaster. The following infor-
mation is displayed for each client appearing in the list:
Client This is the computer name assigned to the client
workstation.
Last Status This is the result of the last successful communi-
cation between the filemaster and client.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-25


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

Time This is the time of the last successful communication


between the filemaster and client.
Elapse (min) This is the number of minutes that have
elapsed since the last time the filemaster and client success-
fully communicated with each other.
Options
The following commands are available from within the File Equal-
ization Clients editor:
Refresh Use this command to update the list of clients.
Drop If necessary, you can highlight a client in the list and
use the Drop command to prohibit the selected client from
receiving further updates from this filemaster. This is not the
same thing as demoting the client to a standalone worksta-
tion. However, if you wish to re-establish equalization
between the filemaster and the client, you will have to demote
the client to a standalone workstation, and then back to a
client workstation.
Snapshot
When you designate a workstation to be a filemaster, the SQL
server immediately creates an image of that workstations current
database. This image is a database snapshot that will be distrib-
uted to other workstations as they are promoted from being a stan-
dalone workstation to an equalized client. Along with the snapshot,
client workstations also receive any information that may have
changed since the filemasters snapshot was created.
At a scheduled time each day, the filemaster will regenerate its snap-
shot. This allows any changes that may have occurred since the last
snapshot was created to be captured in the new snapshot.

Note: A snapshot is not equalized among existing client workstations it is


only sent to a standalone workstation as it is being promoted to a
client. Existing client workstations are equalized and should therefore
already have up-to-date data.

1-26 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven Configuration

Promoting and Demoting Workstations

Caution: Before upgrading a TAC I/NET Seven filemaster or client to a newer


host software build, ensure that you first demote the workstation back
to standalone status. Otherwise, you risk corrupting database
contents among all equalized workstations.

Note: You must have Windows Administrator rights in order to make any
changes to your TAC I/NET Seven configuration that will effect file
equalization.
TAC I/NET Seven hosts by default are standalone workstations.
While standalone workstations may allow remote clients to
connect to them to use their database, they do not equalize their
TAC I/NET Seven database with a filemaster. When you set the
Workstation type to Filemaster in the Configure program, you
are promoting that workstation to filemaster status. When you
configure a workstation to receive equalized data from a filemaster,
you are promoting that workstation to equalized client status.
When you promote a workstation to filemaster, you will be
prompted to provide proper authentication as an authorized data-
base administrator of the local TAC I/NET Seven database.
When you promote a workstation to be an equalized client, TAC
I/NET Seven requires that you provide proper authentication as an
authorized TAC I/NET Seven user of the filemaster, and as a data-
base administrator of the local TAC I/NET Seven database and of
the filemasters database. This helps to ensure that no data on the
filemaster gets distributed to unauthorized clients.
Multiple Access
TAC I/NET Seven allows multiple operators to edit equalized data.
Thus, it is possible that two or more operators may be attempting
to edit the same record at the same time.
Each time a record change is saved, it is sent the SQL server on the
filemaster for processing. So, in the case of multiple edits, the last
one processed by the filemaster is the version that will then be
distributed. TAC I/NET Seven will display a message if, because of
multiple access, your edits could not be saved.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-27


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

Client/Server Infrastructure
Note: You must have Windows Administrator rights in order to make any
changes to your TAC I/NET Seven configuration that will affect the
client/server configuration.
Client and server workstations must use matching versions of SQL
Server, either 2000 or 2005.

TAC I/NET Seven's client/server configuration allows multiple


workstations connected to an Ethernet LAN to share a single SQL
database.
Much like file equalization, the client server infrastructure ensures
that each participating workstation has up-to-date data concerning
the following areas of TAC I/NET Seven:
NETCON (network configuration)
Host passwords
Controller passwords
Tenant data
User-defined tenant field labels
Individual records
Group door assignments
Elevator floor assignments
Trend plot data
Perhaps the biggest difference between the client/server infrastruc-
ture and file equalization is that in a client/server system, a single
TAC I/NET Seven database is being shared among multiple work-
stations. Remote clients do not maintain a local database.

1-28 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven Configuration

The following illustration shows some of the key differences


between file equalization and the client/server infrastructure:

File Equalization Client/Server Infrastructure

Filemaster Server

Equalized Equalized Equalized


Client Client Client Remote Remote Remote
Client Client Client

Key points: Key points:


Each workstation maintains its Only the server maintains an
own SQL database. SQL database.
Each equalized client uses local Fewer system resources are
system resources to maintain required on each remote client
the local SQL database. since there is no local SQL
If the filemaster goes offline, database.
each equalized client can Anytime the server is offline, no
continue to operate. remote clients can run TAC
Inherent database redundancy I/NET Seven.
lowers risk of data loss after a The use of a single shared
catastrophic system failure on database raises the risk of data
the filemaster. loss following a catastrophic
system failure on the server.

The Server

Caution: If the server workstation is powered off, disconnected from the


Ethernet, or its SQL services are not available, TAC I/NET Seven on
remote clients cannot operate. It is recommended that the server
workstation be powered by a uninterruptable power supply (UPS).

Note: Client and server workstations must use matching versions of SQL
Server, either 2000 or 2005.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-29


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

The server in a client/server configuration can be another TAC


I/NET Seven host workstation or it can be a computer that simply
has SQL services installed and running. Each type of server config-
uration is described below.
Server with TAC I/NET Seven Installed
Any TAC I/NET Seven workstation on the Ethernet that is config-
ured as Standalone can be used as a server in a client/server
network. It may also be possible to use an Equalized Client as a
server; however, this type of client/server configuration has had only
limited testing and is therefore not recommended.

Note: Do not use a Filemaster as the server in a client/server configuration.


Doing so may cause the Filemaster to change to a standalone work-
station, thus dropping its equalized clients.

The workstation being used as the server will not only manage and
maintain the TAC I/NET Seven database, but it will also be respon-
sible for collecting and storing trend and AMT data. This will
require that the routing masks on the server be configured to allow
collection of trend and AMT data. No remote clients should be
configured to collect trend and AMT data.
When a TAC I/NET Seven workstation is used as the server, all
remote clients must be configured as Remote Client. Refer to
Remote Clients on page 1-31 for more information.
Server without TAC I/NET Seven Installed
The server in a client/server network is not required to run TAC
I/NET Seven. The server must be on the Ethernet, provide SQL
services, allow authorized clients to connect, and have a TAC I/NET
Seven database. You can create the initial TAC I/NET Seven data-
base on the server remotely from a TAC I/NET Seven host worksta-
tion. Refer to the DbCreate chapter in TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven
Getting Started, for instructions.
Because the server does not run TAC I/NET Seven, it will be the
responsibility of a remote client workstation to write trend and
AMT data to the TAC I/NET Seven database. Only one remote
client should have this ability. This client must be configured as
Remote Client w/IO and its routing mask settings must allow for

1-30 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven Configuration

collection of trend and AMT data. All other clients must be config-
ured as Remote Client. Refer to Remote Clients on page 1-31
for more information.
Remote Clients

Note: You must have Windows Administrator rights in order to configure a


workstation to be a remote client.
Client and server workstations must use matching versions of SQL
Server, either 2000 or 2005.

All TAC I/NET Seven workstations configured as a remote client


must connect to a server. These workstations will rely completely
on the servers SQL database engine and its TAC I/NET Seven data-
base. Therefore, remote client workstations do not require a local
TAC I/NET Seven database.
You can configure a workstation to be a remote client by setting the
Workstation type to either of the following:
Remote client This type of remote client is incapable of
routing trend data or AMT messages to the TAC I/NET Seven
database. This client relies on the routing capabilities of
another TAC I/NET Seven workstation (either the server itself
or a remote client w/IO) to route trend and AMT data to the
database. If all remote clients are configured as remote
client, then the PC being used as the SQL server must also
run TAC I/NET Seven and be configured to provide routing
of trend and AMT data.
Remote client w/IO This type of remote client can route
trend data and AMT messages to the TAC I/NET Seven data-
base. By configuring one remote client this way, the PC being
used as the SQL server is not required to run TAC I/NET
Seven. In fact, the server should not have TAC I/NET Seven
installed to avoid the possibility of duplicate data being
written into the TAC I/NET Seven database. No more than
one remote client in a client/server configuration should be
configured as Remote client w/IO (i.e., all other remote
clients should use the Remote client setting described
above).

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-31


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven Configuration System Configuration

When you configure the workstation as a remote client, TAC I/NET


Seven will attempt to verify that you are a valid TAC I/NET Seven
user on the server workstation, and that the Configuration
system tray function is enabled for your password. This helps to
ensure that no data on the server gets accessed by unauthorized
remote clients. Refer to The Database Server on page 1-18 for
more information.
Limitations to TAC I/NET Seven on Remote Clients
Remote clients configured as Remote client w/IO have access to
TAC I/NET Sevens full functionality. Remote clients configured as
Remote client do not have access to the following TAC I/NET
Seven features:
Network functions
Automatic DPU restore
Trends and multi-point trend
Archiving
Dial after edit
Additionally, for any client configured as a Remote client, the
mask settings in the AMT Configuration editor and Host Configu-
ration editor are ignored. Only the mask settings on the server or
on the client configured as Remote client w/IO will control what
messages are received in AMT and what data is stored for trends.
You can, however, use unique filter settings at each remote client to
control what AMT messages are displayed.
Multiple Access
TAC I/NET Sevens client/server infrastructure allows multiple
operators to edit the database. Thus, it is possible that two or more
operators may be attempting to edit the same record at the same
time.
Each time a record change is saved, it is stored in the database by
the SQL server on the server workstation. So, in the case of multiple
edits, the last one processed by the SQL server is the version that
will then be stored in the database.

1-32 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration System Limits

System Limits
TAC I/NET Seven has physical limits concerning the connections of
hardware and LANs. While these limitations will not affect you in
most cases, Table 1-2, System Hardware Limits is provided for
your convenience.

Table 1-2. System Hardware Limits

Max. # on Max. # on Max. # on


Equipment System Totals
Ethernet LAN Host LAN Controller LAN
Host Workstation 250 8 64 250
NetPlus Router 99 1 99
Host Taps N/A 8 (1 per host) 64 (1 per host) 1 per host
Controller LAN (Link) Taps N/A 16 64 100
Controllers (without
N/A N/A 32 3200
repeater)
Controllers (with repeater) N/A N/A 64 6400
Limited to number
Unitary Controllers N/A N/A 32 per UCI
of UCI LANs
32 per I/SITE LAN
Door Processing Units / Limited to number
N/A N/A 32 per DPI
Security Control Units of subLANs
64 per MCI
64 per MRI
Limited to number
Micro Regulators / ASCs N/A N/A 64 per MCI
of subLANs
32 per I/SITE LAN

There are also limits on LAN distances (refer to Table 1-3, LAN
Specifications). These limits can be extended by using a repeater
to lengthen a LAN segment.

Table 1-3. LAN Specifications

Station Communication Connection Maximum Distance

RS485 at 19,200 baud or 9,600 baud


Controller LAN (Fixed at 19,200 baud for a NPR 5,000 ft.
controller LAN)
25,000 ft. using maximum of
Controller with LAN Repeater RS485 at 19,200 baud or 9,600 baud four repeaters, each at
5,000 ft.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-33


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware System Configuration

TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware


TAC I/NET Seven requires several pieces of hardware in order to
function:
One or more host workstations that run the TAC I/NET Seven
software, providing the controlling information, collecting
and storing the data, and compiling reports. Controllers that
provide the output and input points to sense, record, and
control the devices attached to them.
Depending upon your network configuration, you may also
include NetPlus Routers.
Taps linking controller and host LANs.
A hand-held console (HHC) providing immediate, local
access to controllers for initial programming of addresses,
baud rates, and to field check data and parameters. (This
equipment is not required with 7728 and 7798 DCUs.)

Series 2000 NetPlus Router


The NetPlus Router (NPR) connects multiple networks of TAC
I/NET controllers to any 10 MBPS Ethernet LAN or WAN using
TCP/IP. NPRs provide an efficient, robust, and low-cost platform
for direct connection to a commercial LAN.
The NPRs primary function is to route data traffic between a
controller LAN and the Ethernet LAN. They provide the capability
for one or more TAC I/NET Seven workstations to supervise and
manage single and multiple facilities remotely. The NPR provides
both host and Link Tap functions for your host workstation.
NPRs are designed to withstand more rigorous conditions than a
PC and can be physically located in facility maintenance areas.
Some specific features are listed below.
Microsofts TCP/IP protocol provides easy integration of TAC
I/NET Seven network with commercial Ethernet LAN/WAN.-
Link support allows distribution of commercial LAN down to
the single-controller environment.

1-34 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware

LAN/WAN point globalization distribution to selected nodes,


with operator-defined limits on distribution to minimize
network traffic.
Message, alarm, and globalization buffering provides local
storage of data until distribution.
Battery protection of buffered data in case of power outages.

Note: Refer to TCON184, Series 2000 NetPlus Router Installation Guide


for additional information on NPRs.

Xenta 527/527-NPR
Like the NPR, the Xenta 527 and Xenta 527-NPR connect multiple
networks of TAC I/NET controllers to any Ethernet LAN or WAN
using TCP/IP. Xenta 527/527-NPRs can communicate over 10
MBPS or 100 MBPS networks.
Xenta 527
TACs Xenta 527 combines the capabilities of the following two
devices:
Xenta 511 The Xenta 511 is a web-based presentation
system for LonWorks networks. Using a standard web
browser, the operator can easily view and control the devices
in the LonWorks network via the Internet or a local intranet.
TAC I/NET NetPlus Router The TAC I/NET NetPlus Router
allows you to connect multiple networks of TAC I/NET
controllers over an Ethernet local area network (LAN) or
wide area network (WAN) using TCP/IP transport protocols.
Using the Xenta 527, you can create a hardware bridge that inte-
grates TAC I/NET devices into your LonWorks network. In addi-
tion to being a web-based presentation system for LonWorks
networks, you can also use the Xenta 527 to provide web access into
a TAC I/NET system.
TACs XBuilder is the programming tool you can use to design,
generate, and maintain web pages in the Xenta 527.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-35


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware System Configuration

Xenta 527-NPR
The Xenta 527-NPR provides the same NetPlus Router capabilities
as the standard Xenta 527, but does not have the capability of being
a web-based presentation system for LonWorks or TAC I/NET
networks. You cannot download XBuilder projects to the Xenta
527-NPR. You can, however, configure this device through a web
browser.

Note: Refer to Engineering TAC Xenta Server - Xenta 527/527-NPR


Supplement (0-004-7682) on Schneider Electrics web site for more
information on Xenta 527/527-NPRs.

Distributed Control Units


The 7700 family of controllers provides the muscle of the TAC
I/NET System. Through them you can monitor and control your
energy use and facility environment and access. By connecting
various sensors, actuators, transducers, signal converters, relay
boards, door readers and door strikes to the controllers, you can
measure interior/exterior temperatures and control HVAC equip-
ment and lighting, or control access to doors in the facility. Since
several controllers normally operate on a single controller LAN,
they can share information from sensors on other controllers, as
well as data on devices connected to their internal input/output
points. This lets you control the environment in a building by
programming the controllers, meeting energy conservation
requirements while providing maximum comfort.
7700 (Distributed Control Unit)
The majority of controllers used in many TAC I/NET configura-
tions are 7700s. This controller provides automatic control and
information about building operation and is located on the
controller LAN. This controller provides 16 discrete/pulse width
modulation (PWM) outputs, 16 analog inputs, and eight
discrete/pulse inputs.

1-36 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware

Optional hardware modules can add an additional twelve analog


input points, eight discrete/pulse input points, four additional
analog output points and eight discrete/PWM output points.
Because it can monitor and control so many points, this controller
is TAC I/NETs workhorse.

See Also: TCON095, Model 7700 Distributed Control Unit


7716 (Process Control Unit)
The 7716 provides the same functional capabilities of the larger
7700/7740 controllers on a smaller, less expensive board. The
smaller package size and reduced I/O point count make it ideal for
small applications. The base board of the 7716 provides eight
outputs and eight universal inputs. The inputs may be defined as
analog, discrete or pulse inputs, and may be supervised. Expansion
cards provide the 7716 with additional flexibility by adding input
and output points in different combinations and I/O types.
When used with an RS232 serial port expansion option, the 7716
can provide synchronous or asynchronous communication,
depending upon the type of device connected to it. The 7716 has
the ability to connect directly to a host workstation without using
a 7801 Tap. This controller is found on the controller LAN.

See Also: TCON096, Model 7716 Process Control Unit Installation Guide
7718 (Process Control Unit)
The 7718 controller is primarily designed for European distribu-
tion, but is sold in all markets. It is functionally similar to the 7716
controller, described above.

See Also: TCON106, Model 7718 Process Control Unit


7728 (I/SITE I/O)
The 7728 I/SITE I/O is a satellite controller with a built-in display
screen, providing 14 universal inputs, four analog outputs, and 10
triac outputs. It is designed to support local operation without a
local workstation or HHC. It is functionally similar to the 7716 and
7718 controllers.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-37


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware System Configuration

See Also: TCON114, 7728 I/Site I/O


7740 (Distributed Control Unit)
The 7740 is less expensive than the 7700. It provides the same basic
I/O point capabilities, but does not use the optional hardware
modules for I/O point expansion. It is used in situations where the
basic hardware meets the requirements for the number of I/O
points and price consideration. This controller is found on the
controller LAN.

See Also: TCON097, Model 7740 Distributed Control Unit


7750 (Building Manager)
The Building Manager provides an easy way for building occupants
to override normal day-to-day schedules for lighting, heating and
air conditioning of their area during after-hours work. The 7750
keeps track of these override requests by zone to generate energy
use bills.
By calling up the 7750 and answering questions using the telephone
keypad, the basic programming of the controller can be tempo-
rarily changed. Access codes prevent unauthorized access and are
assigned to each building zone. After a set amount of time, the
override ends. This controller is located on the controller LAN.

See Also: TCON098, Model 7750 Distributed Control Unit CSI Building
Manager
7760 (Unitary Controller Interface)
The Unitary Controller Interface (UCI) provides a communication
gateway between the controller LAN and the unitary controllers
(UCs) 7210/7211, 7251, 7260 and 7270. The UCI passes infor-
mation between the controller LAN and the UC subLAN. Up to 32
UCs operate on one UC subLAN under one UCI that can then be
connected to a controller LAN. The UCI appears as a controller on
the controller LAN and provides control functions that augment
the UCs and internal software I/O points.

1-38 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware

The UCs provide a smaller number of I/O points than do the 7700
or 7740. They are specifically designed to monitor and control
cooling/heating VAV terminal boxes, air handling units, and heat
pumps. Each UC usually has eight outputs and eight inputs.
Different UC models can receive different types of input signals.

See Also: Chapter 12, Unitary Control


TCON069, Model 7200 Unitary Controllers
TCON099, Model 7760 Unitary Controller Interface
7770 ICI (MODBUS)
The 7770 Industrial Controller Interface is a specialized controller
that provides a gateway from TAC I/NET to a MODBUS system.
The 7770 is similar to the 7760 UCI, although the 7770 processes
I/O data through an interface to and from the MODBUS, whereas
the 7760 UCI manipulates real world data/controls through its
network of Unitary Controllers.
The 7770 can support up to 256 points in each direction of the
gateway, appearing as a DCU on the TAC I/NET controller LAN,
and a slave on the polled MODBUS system.

See Also: Chapter 15, 7771 Industrial Controller Interface


TCON102, Model 7771 MODBUS Interface
7780 (Distributed Lighting Control Unit)
The 7780 connects directly to the controller LAN and works in
conjunction with other controllers and workstations on the LAN.
The 7780 is a specialized controller that controls up to 64 lighting
control relays in its maximum configuration. The 7780 is similar to
the 7716 controller but is designed specifically for lighting control.
Like the 7716, the 7780 offers the functional capabilities of a larger
controller at a lower cost through new, highly integrated tech-
nology, a smaller package size, and a reduced number of available
input/outputs.
The 7780 lets you populate databases, map circuits to zones to
override switches (circuits can be in more than one zone), and
create schedules by zone including wink parameters and zone over-

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-39


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware System Configuration

ride times. Features include downloadable firmware, up to 32


zones per controller, sequenced relays that minimize power
requirements, and on-board trending of all I/O points.

See Also: Chapter 7, Point Extensions


TCON100, Model 7780 Lighting Controller
7791 (Door Processor Interface)
The 7791 DPI is a SubLAN Interface (SLI), providing a communi-
cation gateway between the controller LAN and the Door Processor
Unit (DPU7900, DPU7910A, DPU7920, and SCU1284), Discrete
Input Unit (DIU7930 and SCU1200) and Discrete Input/Output
Unit (DIO7940 and SCU1280) controllers. Up to 32
DPU/DIO/DIU/SCU controllers operate on a subLAN connected
to a DPI. The 7791 DPI appears on the controller LAN as a DCU.
The DPI maintains a portion of the database and control parame-
ters for up to 32 DPU/SCU controllers connected to its Channel A
LAN port.
The 7930 DIU provides 8 inputs and no outputs on each of its two
stations (16 total inputs), and the 7940 DIO provides a total of 8
inputs and 8 outputs.
The SCU1200 and SCU1280 controllers provide 8 inputs on their
first station and 4 inputs on their second station. The SCU1280 also
provides 8 outputs.
The DPI and DPU, DIO, DIU, and SCU comprise the Access
Control element of the TAC I/NET integrated system. Through the
DPI and DPU/DIO/DIU/SCU, you may monitor, control, or
restrict access to various areas of your facility. Using Access Initi-
ated Control you may tie access control events from the Access
Control side of the system to the Facility Management side of TAC
I/NET.

See Also: Chapter 9, Access Control


TCON109, 7790 Sub-Controller Interface
TCON115, Door Processor Unit 7900
TCON116, Door Processor Unit 7910A
TCON117, Door Processor Unit 7920
TCON124, DIU 7930
TCON125, DIO 7940

1-40 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware

TCON306, Door Processor Unit 48K


TCON312, 1200-series Security Control Unit
7792 (Micro Regulator Interface)
The 7792 is a SubLAN Interface (SLI), providing a communication
gateway between the Controller LAN and the Micro Regulator
controllers (MR123-210MB, MR123-430MB, MR123-032MB,
MR123-400MB, MR88, MR632, MR160, and MR88R) and Appli-
cation Specific Controllers (MR-AHU and MR-VAV ASCs). The
MRs and ASCs operate on a subLAN on one of two channels
connected to an MRI. Each channel may contain up to 32 MRs and
ASCs. The MRI appears on the controller LAN as a DCU, and uses
two consecutive addresses, one for each channel. The MRI main-
tains the complete database (refer to Chapter 13, Micro Regulator
Control, and Chapter 14, Application Specific Controllers) and
control parameters for up to 64 MRs and ASCs connected to its two
MR LAN ports. The MRI supports the definition of internal points
with all of the extension capabilities typical of the 7716 PCU. The
internal points in the MRI are defined only for point addresses not
currently used by it associated MRs or ASCs.
The Micro Regulator controllers provide stand-alone DDC. The
number of output points and their type vary by model. Both
discrete and PWM modulated control are supported by the MRs.
Depending upon the model, high or low voltage triac outputs, or
Form-C relay outputs are available.
The Application Specific Controllers also provide stand-alone
DDC, but the DDC modules have been preprogrammed. The
number of output points and their type vary by model. Both
discrete and PWM modulated control are supported by the ASCs.

See Also: Chapter 13, Micro Regulator Control


Chapter 14, Application Specific Controllers
TCON109, 7790 LAN Interface Unit
TCON113, Micro Regulator Controllers
7793 (Micro Control Interface)
The 7793 is a SubLAN Interface (SLI), providing a communication
gateway for all DPU types (DPU7910A, DPU7920, and SCU1284),
micro controllers (DIU7930, DIO7940, SCU1200, and SCU1280),

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-41


TCON30004/13
TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware System Configuration

MRs, and ASCs. The 7793 functions identically to the 7791 and
7792 with the addition of the Demand editor. The 7793 MCI is a
two-station controller that supports up to 32 MRs/ASCs/DPUs/
SCUs on each port, for a total of 64 MRs/ASCs/DPUs.
7797 (Industrial Controller Interface)
The 7797 provides a communication gateway into the TAC I/NET
system for third-party controllers. You can configure the 7797 to
interface with one of several different third-party controllers. The
point count available to the 7797 depends upon the third-party
controller it connects to. Configuration of the 7797 is accom-
plished by configuring the ICI in the configuration/status editor,
and then performing a software restore of the appropriate .BIN file.

See Also: Chapter 15, 7771 Industrial Controller Interface


TCON122, 7797 Industrial Controller Interface
7798 (I/SITE LAN)
The 7798 is a SubLAN Interface (SLI), providing standalone
controls for Micro Regulator Controllers (MRs), Application
Specific Controllers (ASCs), Door Processor Units (DPUs), Secu-
rity Control Units (SCUs), and OP5 Arming Terminals. This allows
the operator or building manager to control the building through
a ViewCon (a built-in operator interface), a local host workstation,
a modem to a remote workstation, or an optional TAC I/NET
controller LAN.
When connected to an TAC I/NET Seven host workstation, it also
provides a communication gateway between the TAC I/NET
system and the MRs/ASCs/DPUs/SCUs.
The 7798 can support up to 32 MRs, ASCs, DPUs, SCUs, or any
combination on a subLAN. Up to four OP5 Arming Terminals are
also supported on the subLAN. The I/SITE LAN also supports
internal points with all of the extension capabilities typical of the
7793 MCI. The internal points are defined only for point addresses
not currently used by subLAN controllers.

1-42 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration TAC I/NET Seven System Hardware

7800 Tap Support


Taps provide communication links between various components
of the TAC I/NET system, from an operator station to a host LAN
or from a host LAN to one or more controller LANs, for example.
TAC I/NET architecture allows for economical configurations on
very small systems and can be expanded to much larger configura-
tions. The 7800 family of Taps let operator stations connect directly
to a single controller LAN, directly to a host LAN, or to a multi-
drop or polling Tap for communication between a single operator
station and multiple remote controller LANs.
TAC I/NET uses a proprietary, token-passing protocol operating in
a tiered LAN architecture. The operator stations require a
gateway or access into the LAN to communicate with the control-
lers. While the Taps are required to provide a variety of functions in
the TAC I/NET architecture, one of the most important is to handle
communication between the RS232 output of the operator stations
and the RS485 format of the LAN.

See Also: Chapter 2, Communication


TCON101, Model 7800 Series Tap Products

Hand-held Console (HHC)


The HHC is used during installation of controllers and AD/AA
Taps to set station addresses and other parameters. It is used to field
check controller input/output wiring and to verify that program-
ming information entered in the controller by TAC I/NET Seven is
actually present. It is also used as a troubleshooting tool and for
day-to-day system maintenance.

See Also: TCON073, Model HC7410 Hand-held Console

I/STAT
The I/STAT is an intelligent thermostat that connects to the micro
regulators, application specific controllers, and 7728 I/SITE I/O. It

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-43


TCON30004/13
System Addresses System Configuration

may be used to control and monitor points in the controller to


which it is connected.

See Also: Chapter 13, Micro Regulator Control


TCON113, Micro Regulator Controllers
TCON126, I/STAT and Micro Regulator Controllers

System Addresses
Each individual input and output point, controller, Tap, host work-
station, NPR, and Xenta 527/527-NPR has a unique number that
identifies it in the system. These identification numbers are called
system addresses. Each point address is determined by the address
of the equipment passed through to reach it.

Building an Address
An address in the TAC I/NET Seven system consists of a series of
alphanumeric characters, each describing the route from the top of
the LAN hierarchy to the final device or input/output point. This
addressing structure consists of four pairs of numbers and the
point type. The format for the address is:
LLSSPPBB PT
where:

LL = the 2-digit link number


SS = the 2-digit station number
PP = the 2-digit point number
BB = the 2-digit bit offset number
PT = the 2-letter point type

The link (LL) number (0099) is the software link address


that the operator connects through to connect to a specific
controller LAN.
The station (SS) number (0063) is the address of the
controller on that controller LAN.

1-44 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration System Addresses

Every controller provides 32 point address (PP) numbers


(0031), each with ten bit offset (BB) numbers (0009).
For example, to connect to a discrete input (DI) point on a 7740
with the system address 07222804 DI you would connect to link 07
which connects you to the controller LAN. On the controller LAN
you select controller #22, which contains DI point 28 with bit offset
04.

UC, DPU, SCU, and MR Addresses


The link (LL) and station (SS) portions of the address represent the
link and station address, respectively, of the UCI, DPI, MRI, or
MCI on the controller LAN. The point (PP) and bit offset (BB)
portions of the address are described below.
The UCI provides addresses (PP) for 32 UCs (0031), each of
these having eight input and output points using bit offset
(BB) addresses 0007.
The DPI provides addresses (PP) for 32 DPUs/SCUs/DIOs/
DIUs (0031), each of these having ten input and ten output
points using bit offset (BB) addresses 0009.
The MRI provides addresses (PP) for 32 MRs/ASCs (0031)
on two LANs, each of these having ten input and ten output
points using bit offset (BB) addresses 0009.
The MCI provides addresses (PP) for 32 MRs/ASCs/DPUs/
SCUs (0031) on two LANs, each of these having ten input
and ten output points using bit offset (BB) addresses 0009.
For example, to connect to a UC, DPU, SCU, or MR discrete alarm
(DA) point with the system address of 07230607 DA, select link 07
for the controller LAN and select the UCI/DPI/MRI at station
number 23 on that controller LAN. Then connect to
UC/DPU/SCU/MR/ASC at point address (PP) 06 and the DA point
at bit offset (BB) 07.

OP5 Arming Terminal Addresses


Up to four OP5 Arming Terminals can reside on a 7798C subLAN.
The link (LL) and station (SS) portions of the OP5 Arming
Terminals address represent the link and station address, respec-
tively, of the 7798C to which the OP5 Arming Terminal connects.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-45


TCON30004/13
User-defined Tools System Configuration

The point (PP) portion of the address can be 28, 29, 30, and 31 (the
only addresses selectable using a rotary switch located inside of the
arming terminal). The OP5 Arming Terminals bit offset (BB) will
always be 08.

See Also: Chapter 6, Input and Output Points


Appendix C, Controller Point Addressing
The specific user and installation guides for the controllers in your
system.

User-defined Tools
There are two types of user-defined tools that you can create within
TAC I/NET Seven. The first type, a shortcut, will launch the file
that you specify. The second, an event, allows you to start a list of
event sequences in controllers on the network.

The Shortcut Tool


The shortcut tool attempts to start any file stored on the local
machine or on any networked drive. This tool uses Windows to
either run the file in the case of an executable file (for example .EXE
or .BAT files), or start the application that corresponds to the data
file (for example Word for a .DOC file or Excel for a .XLS file). The
relationships between file extensions and applications are config-
ured by Windows when applications such as Word or Excel are
installed. This means that a data file will not run if it has no known
association with an application.

The Event Tool


The event tool starts its associated event sequence(s). The event
tool can only run event sequences that have already been defined
within controllers. When you run an event tool, it communicates
with each controller in its list and starts the appropriate sequences.
If an associated controller is offline, the sequences for that
controller do not run and the tool continues to the next controller.

1-46 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Configuration User-defined Tools

Running User-defined Tools


There are two methods for running user-defined tools. One way to
run a tool is to launch it from a graphic page. Using a tool marker,
you can associate a graphic page item with a tool. When you click
the item in a live graphic page, the associated user-defined tool
runs.
Another way to run a tool is by launching it from a user-defined
button. You can create up to 16 buttons that are accessible from
TAC I/NET Sevens main menu. Each button can be associated with
any user-defined tool. Click a button to run its associated tool.

See Also: Chapter 1, TAC I/NET Seven Basics, in TCON299, TAC I/NET
Seven Operator Guide.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 1-47


TCON30004/13
User-defined Tools System Configuration

1-48 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
CHAPTER

2
36
Communication

The backbone of TAC I/NET Seven is communication of data


between the various system components. Communication is
provided through the 7800 family of Taps, and NetPlus Routers.
TAC I/NET architecture allows for economical configurations on
very small systems and can be expanded to much larger configura-
tions.
Taps, NPRs, and Xenta 527/527-NPRs provide communication
links between the components and layers of your TAC I/NET
system. For example, Taps link an operator station to a host LAN
and a host LAN to one or more controller LANs. NPRs and Xenta
527/527-NPRs link controller LANs to host workstations over an
Ethernet connection.
TAC I/NET uses a proprietary, token-passing protocol, operating
in a tiered LAN architecture. Taps, NPRs, and Xenta 527/527-NPRs
are the gateway required by host workstations to gain access into
the LAN and communicate with the DCUs. While these devices
provide a variety of functions in the TAC I/NET architecture, one
of the most important is to handle communication between the
RS232 output of the operator stations and the RS485 format of the
LAN.

See Also: TCON101, Model 7800 Series Tap and Repeater Installation Guide
TCON184, Series 2000 NetPlus Router Installation Guide
Engineering TAC Xenta Server - Xenta 527/527-NPR Supplement
(0-004-7682)

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-1


TCON30004/13
7800 Tap Overview Communication

7800 Tap Overview


The 7800 family Taps allow an operator station to connect directly
to a single controller LAN, directly to a host LAN, or to a multi-
drop or polling Tap for communication between a single operator
station and multiple remote controller LANs.
Each Tap provides specific functions and capabilities. Some Taps
are used when communication lines are hard-wired between loca-
tions. Others are needed when communication takes place over
telephone lines.
The configuration of a TAC I/NET host LAN creates an environ-
ment that allows one or more operator stations to operate in a
direct-connect mode, an auto-dial/auto-answer (AD/AA) mode, or
both, while communicating with over 1,000 different networks.
Each host LAN can support up to eight operator stations connected
to 7801 Taps, and up to 16 link Taps (78050, 7802x and 7805x), in
any combination.
Taps connected to a controller LAN provide communication to a
single operator station or one or more host LANs through hard-
wired, polling communication modules (COMMODs), or AD/AA
modems.
The configuration requirements of a specific system determine the
quantity and type of Taps required. There are four types of Model
7800 Taps, each performing a different task (see Figure2-1, TAC
I/NET Communication Example):
Workstation to host LAN or controller LAN communication
(Host Tap). Connects an operator station directly to a
controller LAN or host LAN. You may also set up remote
communication with a LAN. For remote communication, a
companion Tap is typically connected to the LAN at the
receiving end.
Host LAN to controller LAN communication (Link Tap). Use
link Taps to connect a host LAN to one or more controller
LANs.

2-2 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication 7800 Tap Overview

Controller LAN to host LAN communication (Site Tap). This


family of Taps connects to a link Tap (a Tap connected to a
host LAN).
Special purpose Taps. These Taps fill specialized functions in
the TAC I/NET communication network. There are two types
of special purpose Taps; LAN repeater and printer Taps. The
LAN repeater lets you extend the number of DCUs on a
segment of the controller LAN from 32 to 64, extend your
system beyond the 5000-foot (1500 m) limit for a LAN, or use
a T connection in excess of the 300-foot (90 m) limit. The
printer Tap connects a stand-alone serial printer to a
controller LAN.

Figure 2-1. TAC I/NET Communication Example

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-3


TCON30004/13
7800 Tap Overview Communication

Host Taps
Host Taps are used in the following configurations:
Host workstation to host LAN. This configuration requires a
workstation to be connected to a host LAN. This can be a
direct-connect or an Integrated Dial Tap (refer to Direct-
Connect Function on page 2-7 or to Integrated Dial Func-
tion on page 2-10).
Host workstation to controller LAN. This configuration
requires a workstation to be connected to a controller LAN.
This can be a direct-connect or an Integrated Dial Tap (refer
to Direct-Connect Function on page 2-7 or to Integrated
Dial Function on page 2-10).
Host workstation to multiple controller LANs. This configu-
ration requires a workstation to be connected through a host
Tap to one or more controller LAN Taps. This can be a direct-
connect or an AD/AA Tap (refer to Direct-Connect Func-
tion on page 2-7 or to Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap
Function on page 2-14).

Note: You may share a telephone connection from a host or link Tap to a
site Tap with a second host. The procedure to connect is the same as if
you were using a Tap connected to your host. Each host must connect
to the 7806x Tap at the shared site in order to establish the shared
connection.

Link Taps
Link Taps are used in the following configurations:
Host LAN to controller LAN. Connects a host LAN directly to
a controller LAN. This is a direct-connect Tap.
Host LAN to multiple controller LANs. Connects a host LAN
to up to 64 controller LANs. This can be a direct-connect or
an AD/AA Tap.

Site Taps
Site Taps (also referred to as LAN Taps) are used in the following
configurations:

2-4 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Tap Configuration Editors

Controller LAN(s) to Host Tap. Communicates between each


controller LAN and a host Tap. This can be a direct-connect
or an AD/AA Tap.
Controller LAN(s) to Link Tap. Communicates between each
controller LAN and a link Tap. This can be a direct-connect or
an AD/AA Tap.

Printer Taps
Printer Taps connect to a controller LAN or a host LAN and allow
messages from the controllers to print without using a host.

Tap Configuration Editors


Tap configuration editors allow you to set parameters for each Tap
during initial system configuration, and later, when you add a new
Tap or change the configuration of an existing Tap. The following
Tap configuration editors are available:
Host Tap Configuration editor
Link Tap Configuration editor
Site Tap Configuration editor
Printer Tap Configuration editor
Before configuring your Taps, make sure each Tap address is set
properly with the switches found on the Tap. Refer to TCON101,
Model 7800 Series Tap Products, for information on Tap switch
settings.

Tap Configuration Parameters


When you update parameters in a Tap configuration editor, the
changes will take effect when you disconnect from the Tap. If the
changes are made to a shared dial Tap, the changes will take effect
when the last connected host disconnects from the Tap. Table 2-1
lists and describes Tap configuration editor parameters.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-5


TCON30004/13
Tap Configuration Parameters Communication

Table 2-1. Tap Configuration Parameters

Tap Type
Parameter Description
Host Link Site

Name The name assigned to the Tap, up to 16 characters.

Firmware The current revision number and date the revision occurred
Status (display only).
The communication baud rate for a Link Tap to its family of
Speed LAN Taps. This parameter can be any speed from 1200 to
9600 baud, depending on the Tap.
Select modem baud rate for data connection or Beep for
Type pager dial.
This parameter applies only to Dial Taps (7804x, 7805x, and
7806x).
On: Calls to and from the Tap are heard through an 8-ohm
speaker connected to the Tap speaker port or the speaker in
the external modem. The speaker remains on throughout the
Speaker call, whenever the user is connected to the Tap.
Off: The speaker is off.
Auto: Only the dialing portion of the connection is heard. The
speaker remains on through the dialing or call receiving
process but turns off when a connection is made or broken.
This applies only to Taps which reside on a controller LAN
LAN Address (78020, 7803x, 78010, and 7806x). This identifies the Tap
address (0063) on the controller LAN.
This applies to Taps which reside on a controller LAN (78010,
LAN Speed 78020, 7803x, and 7806x). This identifies the LAN speed
(9600 or 19,200 baud) for RS485 ports.
These parameters specify the distribution group number,
message priority and the message mask. The distribution
group number can be a value from one to four. The priority
Control
Parameters
can be None, Routine, Priority, or Critical. The distribution
group and mask should match at least one active mask
position on each the host workstation to which you want the
Tap to send messages.
Note: When using dual emulated Tap functions (Host Tap and Site Tap) in a 7716, 7718, 7728,
7756, 7791, 7792, 7793, or 7798, the values entered under Control Parameters in one Tap
editor are used by all Tap editors within the same DCU. Only one set of Control Parameters
have been provided in each DCU.

2-6 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Direct-Connect Function

Table 2-1. Tap Configuration Parameters (Continued)

Tap Type
Parameter Description
Host Link Site

This parameter is for AD/AA Site Taps (7806x) only. It


specifies the number of Priority messages that will be stored
in the Taps RAM, as a percent of the total available memory,
Percent Full before the Tap calls the host. This is a deferred dialing
parameter for Priority alarms (refer to Priorities in Chapter 3,
System Messages).
Note: An outgoing Critical message or alarm will upload all pending Priority messages and alarms.
The only messages stored by the AD/AA Taps for future dialing are Priority messages and
alarms.
This parameter is for AD/AA Site Taps (7806x) only. It
specifies the time interval from the occurrence of an alarm or
Dial Later message that must transpire before the site Tap calls the host
workstation. This is a deferred dialing parameter for Priority
alarms (refer to Priorities in Chapter 3, System Messages).
Note: The message priorities behave as follows when used with an AD/AA Site Tap:
Routine: Ignore the message or alarm.
Priority: Report the message or alarm after the Percent Full limit is reached or the Time
Interval occurs.
Critical: Report the message or alarm immediately.

Direct-Connect Function
The direct-connect function provides continuous two-way
communication within your TAC I/NET system. This function
requires dedicated communication circuits that are continuously
active (e.g., RS485 twisted pair cabling, dedicated phone lines,
leased lines, etc.). The direct-connect function supports the
following types of connections:
host workstation connection to a host LAN
host workstation connection to a controller LAN
host LAN connection to a controller LAN

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-7


TCON30004/13
Direct-Connect Function Communication

The Model 7801x, 7802x, and 7803x Taps support the direct-
connect function. Several of the 7802x and 7803x Taps are polling
devices that have the CSI line driver or modem communication
module (COMMOD).

Host Workstation Setup for Direct-Connect


Use a 7801x Host Tap to connect a host workstation directly to a
host LAN or controller LAN. At the controller LAN, the 7801 Tap
may be emulated by a controller. In this case, you may connect the
workstation to the device that is emulating the 7801 Tap.
You must use Configure to enable the direct-connect function
within the host workstation. Instructions on how to use Configure
are available in the TAC I/NET Seven Configuration chapter within
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started.
Within Configure, perform the following tasks:
Set the link type to Direct.
Choose the COM port to which the 7801x Host Tap (or
device that is emulating a 7801 Tap) is connected.
Set the baud rate to the highest speed supported by both your
COM port and the device connected to that port.
Define each link that will be available through this COM port.
The procedures for defining links will depend on whether you
are connecting the workstation to a host LAN or to a
controller LAN. Each of these types of connections are
described in the following paragraphs.
Exit Configure and TAC I/NET Seven (if running).
Depending on your system setup, I/O Server may shut down
automatically at this point. If not, manually exit I/O Server.
Restart TAC I/NET Seven to begin using the Direct configura-
tion.
Direct Connection to a Host LAN
This configuration allows the host workstation to connect directly
to the host LAN through a 78010 Host Tap. In this case, you must
define each link that is available from the host LAN (i.e., each 7802x
or 7805x Tap connected to the host LAN).

2-8 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Direct-Connect Function

Define the links for this configuration as follows:


Set the hardware address to a value from 0 to 15. This address
should match the value assigned to a link device (i.e., 7802x or
7805x Tap) connected to the host LAN.
Set the system address to a value from 0 to 99. The system
address must be unique for each device within your system.
Define a name for the link. This name will appear in the list of
available links when you select Connect in TAC I/NET Seven.
If the link device is a 7805x Tap, activate the Dial Link param-
eter. You may also define additional links for the same 7805x
Tap. Refer to Multi-link Dial Function on page 2-25 for
more information.
Repeat these tasks as necessary to define up to 16 hardware links.
Direct Connection to a Controller LAN
This configuration allows the host workstation to connect directly
to a controller LAN through a 7801x Host Tap, or through a device
(i.e., controller, NPR, or Xenta 527/527-NPR) that is emulating the
78010 Tap. In this case, you must define a single link for the work-
station COM port.
Define the link for this configuration as follows:
Set the hardware address to 0.
Set the system address to a value from 0 to 99. The system
address must be unique for each device within your system.
Define a name for the link. This name will appear in the list of
available links when you select Connect in TAC I/NET Seven.
Ensure that the Dial Link parameter is deactivated.
If the device at this COM port is a 78012, 78013, or 78015 Tap, you
can use the Network Configuration editor to define up to 64 sites
available through this link.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-9


TCON30004/13
Integrated Dial Function Communication

Integrated Dial Function

Note: The Integrated Dial description in this section is also applicable to the
Integrated NPR Dial function. Therefore, the term Integrated Dial
will be used throughout this section to describe both TAC I/NET
functions.

The Integrated Dial function allows you to remotely connect from


a workstation to a host LAN or controller LAN using asynchronous
modems and standard voice-grade telephone lines. TAC I/NET
Seven will allow a single Integrated Dial connection at any one
time; however, you may store parameters for up to 64 separate
connections.

Note: Integrated Dial connections can only be initiated from a host work-
station; the host LAN or controller LAN can not initiate the call. If
your application requires dial-out from a host LAN or controller
LAN, use the AD/AA Tap function (refer to Auto-dial/Auto-answer
(AD/AA) Tap Function on page 2-14).

You must connect an asynchronous modem (internal or external)


to each remote host that will be used to initiate an Integrated Dial
call. You must also connect an external asynchronous modem to a
78010 Tap (or a device emulating a 78010 Tap) at each LAN that
will be dialed.

Host Workstation Setup for Integrated Dial


Before you can use the Integrated Dial function, you must
configure your host workstation as follows:
Add a modem to your Windows environment. If necessary,
refer to your Windows documentation, on-line help, or
modem documentation for installation instructions.
Use Configure to enable the Integrated Dial function. Instruc-
tions on how to use Configure are available in the TAC I/NET
Seven Configuration chapter within TCON298, TAC I/NET
Seven Getting Started

2-10 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Integrated Dial Function

Set the link type to Integrated Dial or Integrated NPR


Dial. This setting will cause a Phone Numbers editor to
become available within TAC I/NET Seven. You will later
use the Phone Numbers editor to define parameters for
each remote device to be dialed.
The baud rate used for Integrated Dial or Integrated NPR
Dial is controlled by Windows and the speed negotiated
by the modems. Therefore, the baud rate field is disabled.
Choose the modem to be used for this link. Only
modems that have been added to your Windows environ-
ment will be listed.
Add a link as follows:
Set the hardware address to a value from 0 to 15.
If the workstation will be used to dial into a host
LAN, this address should match the value assigned
to a link device (i.e., a 7802x or 7805x Tap)
connected to the host LAN. You can add additional
links to this COM port for each link device at the
host LAN.
If the workstation will be used to dial into a
controller LAN, set the hardware address to 0.
Set the system address to a value from 0 to 99. The
system address must be unique for each link within
your system.
Define a name for the link. This name will appear in
the list of available links when you select Connect in
TAC I/NET Seven.
If this link defines a 7805x Tap, activate the Dial Link
parameter. Otherwise, ensure that the Dial Link
parameter is deactivated.
Shut down Configure and TAC I/NET Seven (if running).
Depending on your system setup, I/O Server may shut down
automatically at this point. If not, manually shut down I/O
Server.
Restart TAC I/NET Seven to begin using the Integrated Dial
configuration.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-11


TCON30004/13
Integrated Dial Function Communication

Use the Phone Numbers editor within TAC I/NET Seven to


define parameters for up to 64 connections. Refer to Phone
Numbers on page 2-14 for more information.

Modem Setup for Integrated Dial


The modem at the call initiating end connects directly (internally
or externally) to your host workstation; no Tap is required at this
location. You can configure TAC I/NET Seven to use an asynchro-
nous modem that has already been added to the Windows environ-
ment. If necessary, refer to the Windows documentation or on-line
help for instructions on adding a modem to Windows.
Call Initiating (Host) End
TAC I/NET Seven uses the Telephony Application Programming
Interface (TAPI) within Windows to initiate the Integrated Dial
phone call. No special modem configuration strings or switch
settings are required by TAC I/NET Seven to initiate an Integrated
Dial call.
For an external modem connection, use a standard modem cable to
connect the modem to the COM port of the host workstation. You
may also use TAC cable model number CBL008 for this connec-
tion.
Call Receiving (78010 Tap) End
The modem at the call receiving end (i.e., connected to the 78010
Tap, DCU, NPR, or Xenta 527/527-NPR at the host LAN or
controller LAN) must be configured to automatically answer
incoming calls. The procedures required to configure the modem
for this operation will depend upon the brand of modem being
used. Some modems provide configuration switches. Others
require you to connect the modem to a computer and issue config-
uration strings from a terminal emulator. Refer to the documenta-
tion included with your modem for instructions on placing the
modem in the auto-answer mode.

Note: If your modem requires you to issue configuration strings, ensure that
the modem is capable of saving settings in non-volatile memory
(NOVRAM). This will allow the modem to retrieve the settings at
power-up.

2-12 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Integrated Dial Function

Modem Setup Example


In the following example, the HyperTerminal application within
Windows is used to issue standard AT command strings to an
external modem connected to COM1 of a PC.
1. Using a standard modem cable, or TAC cable model number
CBL008, connect the modem to COM1 of the PC.
2. Start the HyperTerminal (HYPERTRM.EXE) application
within Windows. If necessary, refer to your Windows docu-
mentation or on-line help for instructions on using this appli-
cation.

Note: Use the following step to ensure that the communication speed
between the 78010 Tap (or device emulating a 78010 Tap) and the
modem is supported by both devices.

3. Set the Port settings in HyperTerminal to the highest speed


supported by both your modem and the device to which the
modem will be connected.
Examples:
9600 Baud (or faster) Modem connected to a 78010 Tap.
Set the port settings in HyperTerminal to 9600 baud.
28.8 Kbaud (or faster) Modem connected to a DCU.
Set the port settings in HyperTerminal to 19200 baud.
Ensure the Tap Baud Rate within the DCU is also set to
19200 baud.
4. Within HyperTerminal, issue the following AT commands
directly to COM1.
AT&F (resets modem to factory default settings)
ATS0=1 (instructs modem to answer after 1 ring)
AT&W0 (stores settings in NOVRAM for retrieval at power-up)
The modem is now configured to automatically answer incoming
calls. Disconnect the modem from the PC and connect it to a 78010
Tap (or a controller that is emulating a 78010 Tap) at the remote
host LAN or controller LAN.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-13


TCON30004/13
Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function Communication

Phone Numbers
TAC I/NET Seven provides a Phone Numbers editor only when the
active configuration has been set to use the Integrated Dial func-
tion (refer to Host Workstation Setup for Integrated Dial on page
2-10). Use the Phone Numbers editor to define parameters for up
to 64 remote devices per link.
Address Use this parameter to identify the system address
of a remote device. This may be a value from 0 to 63.
Name Use this parameter to define a name for the remote
site. The name can be up to 16 characters.
Telephone Number Use this parameter to define a tele-
phone number (up to 31 characters). Start the number with a
T for tone dialing. No T indicates pulse dialing. If neces-
sary, use a comma (,) to indicate a two-second pause.

Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function


The AD/AA function allows TAC I/NET Seven to use voice-grade
telephone lines for communication between a host LAN, or stand-
alone host workstation, and a controller LAN. Like the Integrated
Dial function, AD/AA allows the connection to be initiated from a
host workstation or host LAN. However, AD/AA also enables the
controller LAN to initiate the connection (i.e., dial out) automati-
cally based upon point alarms, messages, and other user-defined
conditions.
Tap models 78040, 78041, 78050, 78051, 78060, and 78061 support
the AD/AA function. These Taps are referred to as Dial Taps. Dial
Taps can be divided into the following groups:
Dial Taps with Internal Modem The 78040, 78050, and
78060 Taps contain an integral synchronous modem.
Dial Taps with External Modem Interface Models 78041,
78051, and 78061 provide an RS232 interface allowing
connection to an external modem.

2-14 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function

As described above, the 78041, 78051, and 78061 Taps communi-


cate through an external modem. You may use a synchronous or an
asynchronous external modem, depending on the application
requirements of your system. The following rules apply to each
type of modem:
Synchronous You must use synchronous modems if 78040,
78050, or 78060 Taps (i.e., Taps with integral synchronous
modems) are used anywhere on your TAC I/NET Seven
system. If using synchronous modems on a TAC I/NET Seven
system, ensure that the entire system is configured for
synchronous AD/AA communication.
Asynchronous Asynchronous modems may be used only
when the entire system is configured for asynchronous
AD/AA communication (i.e., no 78040, 78050, or 78060 Taps
will be used).

Note: Ensure that your entire TAC I/NET Seven system is configured to use
the same AD/AA protocol either synchronous, or asynchronous.
Mixing protocols will cause communication errors.

Embedded 4x Dial Tap


TAC I/NET Seven allows the host workstation to emulate the 78041
Tap. This allows you to use an asynchronous modem connected
directly to the host workstation (internal or external) for AD/AA
communication. If you use this function, ensure that your entire
TAC I/NET Seven system is configured for asynchronous AD/AA
communication.
Before you can use the 78041 embedded Tap function, you must
configure your host workstation as follows:
1. Add a modem to your Windows environment. If necessary,
refer to your Windows documentation, on-line help, or
modem documentation for installation instructions.
If your PCs operating system is Windows 7 Professional, refer
to Adding a Modem to Windows 7 Professional on page 2-17
for important information.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-15


TCON30004/13
Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function Communication

2. Use the I/NET Configuration editor to enable the 78041


embedded Tap function. Instructions on how to use the
I/NET Configuration editor are available in the TAC I/NET
Seven Configuration chapter within TCON298, TAC I/NET
Seven Getting Started.
The overall procedure is:
a. Set the link type to Embedded 4x Dial.
b. Choose the modem to be used for this link. Only
modems that have been added to your Windows environ-
ment will be listed.
If you have just completed the instructions in Adding a
Modem to Windows 7 Professional on page 2-17,
choose Standard 9600 bps modem (Com) as the
modem for this link.
c. Add a link as follows:
The hardware address must be 0 and will be set auto-
matically.
Set the system address to a value from 0 to 99. The
system address must be unique for each link within
your system.
Define a name for the link. This name will appear in
the list of available links when you select Connect in
TAC I/NET Seven.
The Dial Link parameter must be activated and will
be set automatically.
The Embedded 4x Dial Tap function allows you to define
multiple links. This is referred to as Multi-link Dial.
Refer to Multi-link Dial Function on page 2-25 for
more information.
3. Exit from I/NET Configuration and TAC I/NET Seven (if
running). Depending on your system setup, I/O Server may
shut down automatically at this point. If not, manually exit
I/O Server (refer to Manually Shutting Down IO Server in
Chapter 1 of TCON299, TAC I/NET Seven Operator Guide, for
instructions).

2-16 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function

4. Restart TAC I/NET Seven to begin using the Embedded 4x


Dial Tap configuration.
5. Use the Network Configuration editor within TAC I/NET
Seven to define each of up to 64 sites available through this
link. If you are using the Multi-link Dial function (i.e., you
have defined multiple links for the same Embedded 4x Dial
Tap), you may define up to 64 sites for each link. Refer to
Multi-link Dial Function on page 2-25 for more informa-
tion.

Adding a Modem to Windows 7 Professional


Note: This section specifically describes how to add a US Robotics V.92 56K
modem to a PC running Windows 7 Professional. The US Robotics
V.92 56K modem is the only modem that has been tested with TAC
I/NET Seven running under Windows 7 Professional.

The plug-n-play features in Windows 7 Professional allow it to


automatically discover new hardware and install device drivers.
The device drivers that get automatically installed for the US
Robotics V.92 56K modem do not readily support TAC I/NET
Sevens AD/AA feature.
Rather than modifying the automatically installed device to allow
AD/AA to function properly, we suggest that you manually install
additional device drivers for a standard 9600 bps modem. You can
then configure TAC I/NET Seven to use the manually installed
device rather than the plug-n-play device. The instructions are
described below.
To add a US Robotics V.92 56K modem to Windows 7 Professional
1. With the PC turned off, plug the modem into an available
USB port.
2. Turn on the PC and allow Windows 7 Professional to discover
the modem and automatically install the US Robotics 56k
FAX EXT driver.
3. Click the Windows Start button, right-click Computer and
select Manage from the resulting popup menu.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-17


TCON30004/13
Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function Communication

4. In the left-hand panel of the Computer Management window,


highlight Device Manager.
5. In the right-hand panel of the Computer Management
window, right-click the top-most item (i.e., your PCs name)
and select Add legacy hardware from the resulting popup
menu.
6. In the welcome screen of the Add Hardware wizard, click
Next.
7. Select the Install the hardware that I manually select from a
list (Advanced) option. Click Next to continue.

8. In the list of common hardware types, scroll down and select


Modems. Click Next to continue.
9. Activate () the Dont detect my modem, I will select it
from a list option. Click Next to continue.

10. In the list of models for Standard Modem Types, scroll


down and select Standard 9600 bps Modem. Click Next to
continue.
11. Select the port to which the modem is connected. Click Next
to complete the installation. The wizard will close.
12. In the right-hand panel of the Computer Management
window, locate the Modems folder and verify that it contains
the Standard 9600 bps Modem that you just added.
13. Close the Computer Management application.
To configure TAC I/NET Seven to use the newly added modem
Use the instructions in Embedded 4x Dial Tap starting on
page 2-15 to configure AD/AA in TAC I/NET Seven.
When you get to the step where you choosing the modem for
the link, choose Standard 9600 bps modem (Com).

2-18 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function

Modem Setup Examples


In the following examples, a terminal emulator (such as the Hyper-
Terminal application within Windows) is used to issue standard AT
command strings to an external modem connected to a PC.
Synchronous Modem Settings
The examples below describe the setup procedure necessary to
configure common Hayes synchronous modems.
Hayes 2400 Baud SmartModem
Issue the following settings to your Hayes 2400 baud Smartmodem
prior to connecting the modem to the Tap:
1. AT&F
2. ATM1Q0&C1&D2&M1
3. ATS0=1S7=60
4. ATE0V0&W0
5. Cycle power on the modem to store the setup commands of
the users profile to the modems NOVRAM.
Hayes Optima Series SmartModem
Issue the following settings to your Hayes Optima modem prior to
connecting the modem to the Tap:
1. AT&F
2. ATM1Q0&C1&D2&Q1
3. ATS0=1S7=60 (Optima 24)
or
ATS0=1S7=60S37=0 (Optima 96, Optima 14.4, or Optima
28.8 V.34 + Fax + Voice)
4. ATE0V0&W0
5. Cycle power on the modem to store the setup commands of
the users profile to the modems NOVRAM.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-19


TCON30004/13
Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function Communication

Asynchronous Modem Settings


Issue the following settings to your asynchronous modem prior to
connecting the modem to the Tap:
1. AT&F
2. ATS0=1
3. AT&W0
The modem is now configured to automatically answer incoming
calls. Disconnect the modem from the PC and connect it to a
78041, 78051, or 78061 Tap (or a device that is emulating an
AD/AA Tap).

7806x Tap Parameters


The following parameters are specific to the 7806x Taps.
Telephone Number
The 7806x Taps can have up to eight phone numbers defined, each
using up to 31 characters (this includes any commas or T char-
acters in the number). Telephone numbers preceded by a T indi-
cate touch-tone dialing. Phone numbers without a T are pulse
dialed. A comma causes the system to pause for two seconds
between characters.
The phone numbers of the 7806x Taps are stored in both
NOVRAM and RAM memory (up to the storage capacity of the
NOVRAM). The 7806x Taps always call out to their stored phone
numbers from NOVRAM memory.
When NOVRAM is exceeded, the remainder of the phone numbers
of the MIP 7806x Taps are stored in RAM memory only. This allows
a MIP 7806x Tap, to call out from NOVRAM and RAM, up to eight
phone numbers, each with a maximum of 31 digits. A MIP 7806x
Tap with lost or damaged RAM can still call out to as many phone
numbers as were stored in NOVRAM.
Time-out
This parameter defines the number of seconds (30 or 60) the Tap
waits when calling out before hanging up if a connection is not
made.

2-20 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function

Type
This parameter defines the type of device the controller LAN calls.
This setting determines at what baud rate to attempt the remote
connection. The 78060 Tap can dial out from 300 to 1200 baud to
a 7804x or 7805x Tap, or to a beeper. The 78061 Tap can dial out
from 1200 to 19.2K baud to a 7804x or 7805x Tap, or to a beeper.

Note: When setting the Type parameter, do not choose a rate higher than
9600 baud. This is currently the highest supported baud rate.

Link
This is the system address (0099) assigned to the link. This must
match the system link address defined in the Configure program if
you want to receive on-line messages when the host initiates the
phone call. Also, the telephone number in the 7806x Tap editor
must match the telephone number of the 7804x or 7805x Tap you
entered in the host Network Configuration editor.
Group
This parameter further defines the dialing characteristics of each
phone number entered. You can have up to eight different groups,
each containing one phone number, or one group containing eight
phone numbers. The total number of phone numbers cannot be
greater than eight. Refer to the following example for ideas.
Example
Have the Tap call the phone numbers in group 1 if a fire alarm
occurs and call the phone numbers in group 2 if an electrical failure
occurs. Or, call one group for alarms in one building, and a
different group for alarms in a different building. By having more
than one phone number in a group, you increase the chances of the
message getting through. The Tap will continue to dial the phone
numbers (in the order in which they appear within TAC I/NET
Seven) until it successfully uploads the corresponding message to
one of the numbers in the group.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-21


TCON30004/13
Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function Communication

Dial Mask
The dial mask works like the printer and message masks you define
in the host configuration editor. When a Tap dials out, the point
mask of the point(s) initiating the action is compared to the dial
mask in the Tap. If any of the active point mask positions matches
an active mask position in this field, the Tap dials out. The messages
are sent and then compared at the workstation to determine if the
workstation accepts the messages. If the masks do not match, the
workstation ignores the call.

Note: Use only distribution group 1 with 78060/1 Taps. These Taps require
distribution group 1 to initiate a dial-out.

Non-Volatile
This read-only parameter provides an indication of the telephone
numbers storage location within the Tap. Phone numbers are
stored in either of the following locations:
Non-Volatile = Y indicates phone numbers are stored in
NOVRAM memory (and in RAM memory for the MIP
78060/1 Taps only).
Non-Volatile = N indicates phone numbers are stored in
RAM memory only.

7806x Tap Pager Operation


Pagers may be called using the 7806x Tap. There are several addi-
tional phone number character strings for use with dial strings.
The following table shows the characters and their definitions.

Table 2-3. Pager Character Definition

Pager
Definition
Character

Waits for five seconds, replaces the need for numerous


@
commas.
Causes an immediate hang up, and should be used at the
;
end of every pager number dialed.

2-22 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function

Table 2-3. Pager Character Definition (Continued)

Pager
Definition
Character

Issues a Hook flash, forcing the phone to go on-hook for 0.5


!
seconds.
W Wait for a dial tone.

It is important that you be familiar with your pager service and


phone system so that you know of any specific characters that may
be required to place a successful call. For example, if you were to
enter a phone number for SWB MobileComm pagers in a 78060/1
Tap, using an ITT System 3100 PBX you would use the following
format:
T9W8172731511#@123456;
The T at the beginning of the character string initiates tone dialing,
the 9 obtains an outside line. The W causes the Tap to wait for the
modem to receive a dial tone before dialing the pager service phone
number. At the end of the phone number is a # sign which causes
the PBX to perform speed dialing, eliminating any unwanted
delays.
The @ character causes the 7806x to wait five seconds and then
sends the code that will display on the recipients pager. The Tap
then uses the ; character to signal the modem to immediately go
on-hook, ending the call.
If your telephone system has no speed dial function, but has a
period of silence exceeding five seconds before the connection is
made, add additional @ characters or commas to prevent the Tap
from prematurely sending the pager code.

7806x Tap Beeper Operation


Beeper calls are used for notification of specific condition occur-
ring in the TAC I/NET Seven system. This condition is user-defin-
able, and uses message masking and priorities. The beeper is only a
notification tool; it does not have the ability to display an origi-
nating code or phone number. It issues either a tone, or it vibrates
the beeper. To specify a beeper call, select Beep in the Type field of
the 7806x Configuration editor. If a Beeper service is used, enter the

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-23


TCON30004/13
Auto-dial/Auto-answer (AD/AA) Tap Function Communication

Beeper service phone number. If human response is expected, enter


an @ symbol at the end of the beeper number. This allows the 7806x
Tap to retry during busy or no answer conditions.
The @ symbol causes the modem to listen for a five-second period
of silence once the first ring is detected. The length of time that the
modem will listen for this silent period is established by the
Timeout field in the editor. If a period of silence is detected, the call
is considered to be complete.
Since this Beeper function is used to dial out to numbers that must
have a human response, it is necessary to accommodate differences
in the manner in which beeper systems and humans respond.When
using an external modem (78061 Tap emulation), you should
initialize your Hayes-compatible modem with the X4 command
(factory default). This enables your modem to return the busy
response code if it is expected that a person will answer (or not
answer) the telephone. This will provide a rapid response to a busy
error.
Some experimentation with the timeout period that is set in the
Tap editor may be required. This timeout period should be long
enough to cause the modem to hang-on-the-line until the five-
second period of silence can be detected.

Note: It is imperative that any modem used to interface with a beeper


operate as described above.

7806x Tap Save and Restore


The following parameters are available when you are connected to
a 7806x Tap.
Site Tap Save
The Site Tap Save option saves the Tap parameters in a host SAVE
file. Refer to 7806x Tap Parameters on page 2-20 for descriptions
of these parameters.
Site Tap Restore
Use this function to restore the 7806x Tap parameters if you previ-
ously saved them using the Site Tap Save function.

2-24 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication Multiple Site Dial Function

Multiple Site Dial Function


The multiple site dial feature of TAC I/NET Seven allows you to
connect to more than one site at a time. Each host may connect to
up to eight dial sites at a time from a graphic system page. Each host
may also use additional connections for background tasks (i.e.,
DCU synchronization) as well as software restore functions. You
must dial through a 7805x Link Tap on the local host LAN or
through a 7804x Host Tap. These dial links must have been previ-
ously defined and saved in the Network Configuration editor.
The number of possible dial links available to a host is restricted by
whether the system is stand-alone or an ethernet LAN configura-
tion, and the system limitations of TAC I/NET. The maximum
number of physical links on a single host LAN is 16, the maximum
number of system links is 99.
When a dial link is chosen from a system page, TAC I/NET Seven
will attempt to use the dial Tap associated with the dial link. If that
Tap is busy, the system will roll to the next available system Link
Tap (i.e. link Tap 67 is busy, the system rolls to Link Tap 68). The
system continues until it finds a Dial Tap that is unused, or it
reaches the system limit (e.g. link Tap 99), at which point it rolls to
Link Tap 01 and continues the search for an unused Dial Tap.
Multiple site dial connections are made either from the Connect
main menu selection or through graphic dial icons on the graphic
pages.

Multi-link Dial Function


The Multi-link Dial function allows a single 7804x or 7805x Dial
Tap (or Embedded 4x Dial Tap) to be defined as more than one link
within your system. There are two major advantages to this func-
tion:
A single Dial Tap can be used to communicate with more than
64 sites (i.e., you can define up to 64 sites per link).

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-25


TCON30004/13
NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs Communication

Separate links can be defined for specific sites. This provides


the following advantages:
The link address associated with an incoming message
will allow you to more easily identify the origin of the
message.
Station addresses assigned to controllers at one site can
also be assigned to controllers at another site. Defining
separate links eliminates the risk of mistaking one
controller for another.
You can implement the Multi-link Dial function within the
Configure editor. While defining the serial port settings for the
active configuration, perform the following tasks:
Add a link as follows:
Set the hardware address
For a 7804x Tap, set the hardware address to 0.
For an Embedded 4x Dial Tap, the hardware address
must be 0 and will be set automatically.
For a 7805x Tap, set the hardware address to a value
from 0 to 15. This address should match the value set
through the DIP switches on the Tap.
Set the system address to a value from 0 to 99. The system
address must be unique for each link within your system.
Define a name for the link. This name will appear in the
list of available links when you select Connect in TAC
I/NET Seven.
Ensure that the Dial Link parameter is activated.
Repeat these tasks to create additional links. Repeat the same
hardware address for each link. Only the system address and
link name should be unique for each link.

NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs


NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs allow you to connect multiple
networks of TAC I/NET controllers over an Ethernet local area
network (LAN) or wide area network (WAN) using TCP/IP trans-

2-26 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs

port protocols. This provides an efficient, robust, and low-cost


platform for direct connection to the commercial LAN/WAN
network environment.
This LAN/WAN network connection provides the capability for
one or more TAC I/NET Seven workstations to supervise and
manage a single facility or multiple facilities from across the street
or around the world, while providing high-speed continuous
access and presentation of facility information. This allows you to
have a central control location for multiple facilities. You may also
use this ability to set up a backup control facility in case the
primary facility experiences a power outage or other communica-
tion problem.

Note: NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs permit the simple and efficient
extension of controller LAN communications over small or large
LANs and WANs while preserving the full station capacity and
wiring flexibility at each controller LAN. Individual controller LANs
are still limited to the 5000-foot (1500 m) maximum cable length
(25,000 feet/7500 meters with repeaters).

NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs provide Host and Link Tap func-
tions for your TAC I/NET system. See 7800 Tap Overview on
page 2-2 for a discussion of these Tap functions.

Communication to TAC I/NET Seven


NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs can communicate with TAC I/NET
Seven in several ways:
Direct communication with devices and workstations
connected to the same controller LAN. This includes buff-
ering messages in the same manner as a Tap.
If the NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR is connected to a commer-
cial LAN system, it can communicate with TAC I/NET Seven
host workstations that also reside on the commercial LAN.
A modem may be connected to the NPR or Xenta
527/527-NPR, allowing communication through a TAC
I/NET Seven workstation equipped with a modem. This
provides access to the NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR configura-

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-27


TCON30004/13
NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs Communication

tion and buffered messages, and to TAC I/NET devices on the


same controller LAN. Refer to Integrated Dial Function on
page 2-10.
A portable workstation can be plugged directly into the NPR
or Xenta 527/527-NPR, providing access to the devices
configuration and buffered messages, and to TAC I/NET
devices on the same controller LAN.

Note: Receiving messages through the NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR requires


at least one matching mask position. Refer to Masking in
Chapter 3, System Messages.

Downloadable Firmware
Like many TAC I/NET devices, the NPR has downloadable binary
firmware. You can download firmware to this device from the TAC
I/NET Seven host application (refer to Software Restore on page
5-15), or from the I/O server configuration utility (refer to
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started).
The Xenta 527/527-NPR is also downloadable; however, you
cannot download firmware to this device from TAC I/NET Seven.
If the need should arise to reload this devices firmware, you can
download it from TACs web site. Before installing downloaded
firmware, review its release information to verify compatibility
with your hardware.

Configuration
The TAC I/NET Seven Configure program is used to enter the setup
parameters for NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs. Refer to
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started, for more information
about Configure.
Perform the initial setup for the NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR
through a local workstation connected directly to the device. This
initial setup must be performed before connecting the NPR to
either the TAC I/NET controller LAN or the commercial LAN.
Once installation is complete and the device is fully connected to
the TAC I/NET system and commercial network, changes to the
setup can be performed either locally (through a connected

2-28 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs

portable workstation) or through the TAC I/NET Seven editors on


a host workstation. The Xenta 527/527-NPRs have the additional
capability of being configured directly from a web browser.
For installations with multiple NPRs and/or Xenta 527/527-NPRs,
the initial setup can be performed on all the devices at a central
location, before sending them out to the field for installation. This
is important because the setup requires information that is gener-
ally available only to the network administrator for the commercial
LAN system.

Note: After entering the configuration parameters (see below), you must
exit Configure and I/O Server. (This will require you to shutdown
TAC I/NET Seven, if running.) The new configuration will not take
effect until I/O Server is shutdown and restarted. (I/O Server starts
automatically when TAC I/NET Seven or Configure is started.)

Configuration Parameters
Name
Each NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR must be given a unique name.
This name is used to identify the unit to other devices in the TAC
I/NET system. The name can be up to 15 characters. Only letters,
numbers, and the hyphen (-) symbol are allowed in machine
names. Spaces, underscores, and other characters may NOT be
used.
This field is required if the unit resides on an Internet domain (refer
to Domain Name Service (DNS) on page 2-32).
Address
The IP (Internet Protocol) address for this unit. Each machine
(host workstation, NPR, and Xenta 527/527-NPR) that communi-
cates across the commercial network (LAN/WAN) must have a
unique IP address. Your system administrator should provide you
with the appropriate IP address(es), or your network should use
DHCP to automatically assign IP addresses. If you are using a
stand-alone configuration with only a single unit, you may skip this
section.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-29


TCON30004/13
NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs Communication

A unique IP address must be assigned to each unit. Failure to do so


can result in communication errors beginning at the time of
connection to the Ethernet.

Note: A host workstation connected directly to the controller LAN does not
need an IP address to communicate across the controller LAN. An IP
address is only necessary if that host workstation needs to communi-
cate across the commercial network.

The IP address is a four-octet value, with the octets separated by


periods (.). An example IP address is 168.192.200.68. The router
is shipped with a default address (this address will vary).
While TAC I/NET Seven fully supports dynamic IP addressing
through the use of DHCP, a static fixed IP address is preferred. A
duplicate IP address will cause a system error message in TAC
I/NET Seven, and will initiate the appropriate LED error code.
Subnet Mask
This field indicates which sections of the IP address (see above) are
used to indicate the network on which the unit resides. This infor-
mation is typically supplied by the network administrator.
For example: an entry in this field of 255.255.255.0 means that the
first three bytes of the IP address are part of the network identifica-
tion. Therefore, if the entry in the IP address field is
168.192.200.68, the network identification is 168.192.200 (the
first three octets). The example given (255.255.255.0) is the default
mask, which will typically be encountered in the field.
Domain Name
This field indicates the name of the internet or intranet domain to
which the unit is connected. An example domain name is tac.com.
If the NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR is connected to a private
network, this field may be left blank.
Gateway
The IP address for the network IP router or gateway for your
LAN/WAN system (your network router, not the NPR or Xenta
527/527-NPR). This address is provided by your network adminis-
trator.

2-30 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs

This field may be left at the default (000.000.000.000) for systems


which do not include a TCP/IP network router.
Reference Hosts
The reference host is any TAC I/NET Seven workstation, NPR, or
Xenta 527/527-NPR that you want to know your IP address, and
that can provide IP addresses to you. You may specify up to a total
of eight (8) reference hosts.
You cannot duplicate entries in the Reference Hosts list. If the IP
address or machine name you entered is already listed as a reference
host, the existing entry will be highlighted when you return to the
configuration screen. The entry place that you selected will not
retain the duplicate entry.
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
DHCP's purpose is to enable individual computers and devices on
an IP network to extract their configurations from a server (the
DHCP server). The overall purpose of this is to reduce the work
necessary to administer a large IP network. The most significant
piece of information distributed in this manner is the IP address.
Activate the DHCP option only if your networks IP addresses are
generated by a DHCP server.
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
If your network is running Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP), you may configure the NetPlus Router to send a block of
information (a trap) when a specific event occurs (for example,
when the error count reaches a predetermined number). Both the
machine name and the IP address of the trap host must be entered.
Trap Host Name: The machine name of the host machine
that will receive trap data from this NetPlus Router. This
information is required for the trap to be received and
retained at the host machine.
The trap host name must include the domain. For an
example, an entry of ADMIN.CSICONTROLS.COM indicates
a machine name of ADMIN in the domain CSICON-
TROLS.COM.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-31


TCON30004/13
NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs Communication

Trap Host IP Address: The IP address of the host machine


that will receive trap data from this NetPlus Router. This
information is required for the trap to be received and
retained at the host machine.
Domain Name Service (DNS)
DNS translates domain names into IP addresses. For example, the
domain name www.example.com might translate to 198.105.232.4.
If your network is configured to use DNS, enter the IP address of
the DNS server. If you have activated the DHCP option, the DNS
IP address may be automatically set by the DHCP server.
TAC I/NET Link Address
As with the Taps, each NPR and must be assigned a system link
address (099). This is the LL portion of the LLSSPPBB address
(see TAC I/NET Controller LAN Address, below).
This number must be unique on the TAC I/NET system. A dupli-
cate link address will cause a system error message in TAC I/NET
Seven, and will initiate the appropriate LED error code on the NPR
(see Diagnostics (NPR only) on page 2-34).
TAC I/NET Controller LAN Address
The NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR resides as a device on the
controller LAN, and must be given a station address (063). This is
the SS portion of the LLSSPPBB address.
Controller LAN Speed (Xenta 527/527-NPR only)
The Xenta 527/527-NPR has the ability to communicate on the
controller LAN at a selectable baud rate either 19200 or 9600.
Choose the speed setting that matches all other devices on the
controller LAN.
Network Connection (NPR only)
Each NPR has two different network connection ports, to support
two different network protocols. Both ports are active for all NPR
models, but only one port can be activated at a time. The port selec-
tion will depend on the network cable connection available at the
remote site.

2-32 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication NPRs and Xenta 527/527-NPRs

In order to connect to the network, you must have a network outlet


installed on-site.
Managing Configurations
Saving and Restoring Configurations
The NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR configuration may be saved to a
local hard drive on the host workstation. The saved configuration
file may be downloaded to the unit using the restore function. This
is similar to the controller save and restore options described in
Station Save and Restore in Chapter 5, Controller Functions.
The configuration save file is in the form:
NAME.NPR
where NAME indicates the name given to this device. This file is
saved in the directory that you have specified for save files (refer to
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started).
The configuration save file allows you to view configuration infor-
mation even if the unit is off-line, and provides a backup in case the
configuration becomes corrupted.
You may also modify a saved configuration off-line, but the
changes will not take effect until:
the unit is on-line, and
the restore function is used to download the changed configu-
ration to the device.
Security
The NPR or Xenta 527/527-NPR configuration may be protected
with a password to prevent unauthorized changes. If a password
has been set for the unit, the configuration cannot be viewed or
changed unless the user enters a password.
The password must also be used before saving or restoring config-
urations.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-33


TCON30004/13
IP Filtering Communication

Diagnostics (NPR only)


The NPR is equipped with a self-diagnostic function that runs
every time the unit is powered up. Four LEDs on the upper right
side of the unit provide feedback of the progress of this test, and
indicate any error conditions.
If the NPR fails the automatic diagnostic pattern, one or more of
the LEDs will remain lit. Other error conditions can also cause the
LEDs to light up. The pattern of lit LEDs indicates the nature of the
error. The diagnostic patterns can be divided into four main cate-
gories: self-test failure, addressing error, firmware failure, and
remote diagnostic session.

See Also: TCON184, Series 2000 NetPlus Router Installation Guide

IP Filtering
IP filters are available from the I/NET Configuration program.
Using IP filtering, you can configure each TAC I/NET Seven host to
only see specific sections of the overall network. This allows you to
create segmented networks that can be secured from outside access.

Filter Priority
Within the I/NET Configuration program you can select any host
workstation, NPR, or Xenta 527/527-NPR that is currently
communicating with your local host, and view a summary of its IP
filters. These filters are listed and executed in order of their priority.
The first IP filter in the list has the highest priority. The last IP filter
in the list has the lowest priority.
Each filter is configured to affect only one or more specific IP
addresses. When a device attempts to communicate with another
TAC I/NET device on the Ethernet, its IP address is compared with
the target devices IP filters.
Beginning with the highest priority filter, TAC I/NET Seven deter-
mines if the filter pertains to the incoming IP address. If it does, the
filters block or allow setting will determine whether or not
communications are allowed. If the filter does not pertain to the

2-34 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Communication IP Filtering

incoming IP address, or if it allows communication, processing


proceeds with the next highest priority filter in the list. If at any
point a filter blocks the IP address, communications with the
device will be prohibited and no lower priority filters will be
processed.
By default, TAC I/NET Seven automatically creates a single filter for
each workstation, NPR, or Xenta 527/527-NPR on the network.
This default filter allows communications with all IP addresses. You
can modify or delete this default filter, and create new filters.

Caution: When configuring IP filtering, be careful not to remove all entries


from the selected device. This would leave the device inaccessible.

TAC I/NET Seven allows you to create the following types of IP


filters:
Single IP Address
Range of IP Addresses
Mask

Filter Mask
This option allows you to filter IP addresses based on a base IP
address and a mask. The mask is used to identify the portion of the
Base IP address that defines a network or subnetwork.
When defining a mask, type 255 for each octet of the Base IP
address that represents a portion of the network address or subnet
address. For example: if the Base IP address defines a class B
network, define a mask of 255.255.0.0. If the base IP address defines
a subnet or Class C network, set the mask to 255.255.255.0.
TAC I/NET Seven performs a bitwise AND operation on the Mask
and the Base IP address. This operation is also performed on the
mask and the incoming IP address of any host that attempts to
communicate with this host. If the result of both operations are
equal, communications will be allowed or blocked, depending on
the setting of the Permission parameter. If the result of both oper-
ations are not equal, this filter will have no affect.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 2-35


TCON30004/13
IP Filtering Communication

Heres two examples:

Base IP: 10.0.12.0


(Class B Network: 10.0)
(Subnet Address: 10.0.12)
Mask: 255.255.255.0

Example 1:
Incoming IP Address = 10.0.12.5
1. Perform a bitwise AND of the base IP and mask:
10.0.12.0 (00001010.00000000.00001100.00000000)
AND 255.255.255.0 (11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000)
result: 10.0.12.0 (00001010.00000000.00001100.00000000)
2. Perform a bitwise AND of the incoming IP and mask:
10.0.12.5 (00001010.00000000.00001100.00000101)
AND 255.255.255.0 (11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000)
result: 10.0.12.0 (00001010.00000000.00001100.00000000)
3. The result of 1 and 2 are the same; therefore, allow or block the
incoming IP address according to the setting of the Permission
parameter.

Example 2:
Incoming IP Address = 10.0.10.0
1. Perform a bitwise AND of the base IP and mask:
10.0.12.0 (00001010.00000000.00001100.00000000)
AND 255.255.255.0 (11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000)
result: 10.0.12.0 (00001010.00000000.00001100.00000000)
2. Perform a bitwise AND of the incoming IP and mask:
10.0.10.0 (00001010.00000000.00001010.00000000)
AND 255.255.255.0 (11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000)
result: 10.0.10.0 (00001010.00000000.00001010.00000000)
3. The result of 1 and 2 are not the same; therefore, do nothing.
Processing passes to the next filter (if any).

2-36 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
CHAPTER

3
60
System Messages

System messages provide information about events occurring in


the system. A message can be generated when a point changes state,
when an alarm occurs, when a user signs on to a host or controller,
or when virtually any change takes place in the system.
Every TAC I/NET device, including hosts, Taps, controllers, and
points in the system have individual message parameters. These
parameters include group, mask, and priority. Routing and storing
of these messages is determined by these parameters. Location of
the stored messages is determined by the Message/masking field in
the host configuration editor.

Caution: The database server should not be shut down while TAC I/NET
Seven is running. Shutting down the database server drops all
existing connections to the database, and can result in corrupted data
displays. (Only users with administrative privileges on the worksta-
tion can stop or start the database server.)

Routing Parameters
Every TAC I/NET device, including hosts, Taps, controllers, and
points in the system, have individual message parameters. These
parameters include message masking and priority. Routing and
storing of messages is determined by these parameters. Storing of
messages is determined by the message masking field in the AMT
configuration editor.

Masking
Masking is a combination of the distribution group and active
message mask positions for a system event that generates a message
or alarm. The distribution group and active mask(s) of a message
or alarm determine where that message or alarm will be stored,

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-1


TCON30004/13
Routing Parameters System Messages

displayed and printed. Data will be received, stored, displayed, and


printed only at those host workstations whose distribution group
and active mask selection match the entry for the system event
generating the message.

Note: Masking for the DCU points can be set from any host workstation.
Masking for a host workstation can be set only at that workstation.

You can assign a unique mask in each of the four distribution


groups on each host workstation and printer. Each point and
controller also has a mask and distribution group number that
must correspond to an active position in the mask of the intended
receiving host workstation or printer.
Using this setup allows you to manage your message and alarm
routing. For instance, routine messages (such as door activity) may
be sent to a single workstation, while critical alarms may go to
several, if not all, workstations.
The distribution group is any number from one to four. Each
distribution group has eight mask positions. This makes a total of
32 mask positions (4 8 = 32) that you can use to determine which
workstation(s) will receive which messages and alarms.

Dist. Group 1 2 3 4
Mask

Active Positions

Figure 3-1. Activating Mask Positions

Each DCU editor may have active mask positions in only one
distribution group. The host workstation(s) may have active mask
positions in any or all of the distribution groups.

Note: The far left masking position in distribution group 1 must be acti-
vated in the printer and message/alarm masking configurations
defined in the AMT configuration editor for system-specific messages
to be received at the host or the printer. These messages include Host

3-2 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages Routing Parameters

sign on, Host sign off, Host lost/restored, Online 90%/95% full,
Online data lost, Special day lost, Time-sync failed, DCU-save failed,
ATS-mstr failed, Auto-DIF failed, and all audit trail messages.

To set the masking, select a distribution group (14), and then acti-
vate each mask position desired. When a DCU generates a message
or alarm, it is sent to all directly-connected workstations. Only
those workstations that have a matching active mask position in the
corresponding distribution group can store, display, and print the
message (see Figure 3-2).

Workstation 1 Workstation 2 Workstation 3


Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4

Editor A
Dist. Group Information from this
1 2 3 4 editor will be received at
Mask all three workstations.

Editor B
Dist. Group Information from this
1 2 3 4 editor will be received at
Mask workstations 1 and 3.

Editor C
Dist. Group Information from this
1 2 3 4 editor will be received at
Mask workstations 2 and 3.

Editor D
Dist. Group Information from this
1 2 3 4 editor will not be received
Mask at any workstation.

Figure 3-2. Masking and Data Transmission

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-3


TCON30004/13
Routing Parameters System Messages

Note: The active mask position(s) in any resident I/O point or extension
editor must match at least one mask position activated for the desired
workstation(s). If there is no workstation with a matching distribu-
tion group and mask, the message or alarm will be lost (see Editor
D in Figure3-2, Masking and Data Transmission). You may
choose to designate a special workstation with ALL distribution
groups and masks defined, to receive all generated messages and
alarms.

It is recommended that you plan your distribution groups and


masks in advance. Be consistent when assigning the mask posi-
tions. If you use the far right position to send the information to
workstation #1, then use that same position for any and all points
whose messages/alarms are to go to that workstation.

Priorities
Message Priority and Alarm Priority are controlled separately,
though they use the same definitions. Priorities have the greatest
effect on messages and alarms sent through Dial Taps. When
connected through a direct-connect Tap, assigning any priority
level other than None () causes the alarm or message to be sent to
the host immediately. Dial Taps act upon the message or alarm
depending upon the priority.
There are three priority level settings: Routine, Priority, and Crit-
ical. You may also set the priority level to None () for no priority.
The priority level determines how a Dial Tap will handle the
message. A direct-connect host will receive any message with a
priority of Routine or higher. Dial Taps will not send a message
unless it has a priority of Priority or Critical. Priority messages will
cause the Dial Tap to dial out when the deferred dialing parameters
are met, while Critical messages cause the Dial Tap to dial out
immediately.
When used with an auto-dial/auto-answer (AD/AA) LAN Tap, the
message priorities behave as described in Table 3-1.

3-4 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages Message Queue

Table 3-1. AD/AA LAN Tap Message Priorities

Priority Action
Routine Ignore the message.
Report the message after the Dial Taps Percent Full limit is reached or the Dial Later
Priority
Time Interval has expired.
Critical Report the message immediately.
A Critical message generated by a Dial Tap will also upload all pending Priority messages.

Reliable Tap
If you are configuring an TAC I/NET controller that is loaded with
firmware dated 08/21/06 or later, you can implement reliable
messaging by specifying a Reliable Tap. Refer to Reliable
Messaging on page 3-7 for more information about this TAC
I/NET Seven feature.

Message Queue
Every device in TAC I/NET contains a message queue to store
incoming point messages, alarms, transactions, upload requests,
system broadcasts, etc. The purpose of the message queue is to
support large surges of message traffic for distribution onto unso-
licited controller LANs (RS485) or upstream devices (Link Tap or
workstation). The size of the queue is a function of the device. All
TAC I/NET controllers contain a fixed-length queue and all
external Taps contain a variable-length queue. Any time a queue
gets full, the device will replace the oldest message with the newer
message on a first-in, first-out (FIFO) basis. Consequently, it is
important to understand how the system distributes and stores
system messages in order to determine the best system configura-
tion to suit your needs.
Each LAN device is designed to provide a maximum of 10 messages
per second on an unsolicited token passing RS485 LAN. To reduce
the effects of this system limitation, care should be taken regarding
system architecture, scan rates on points, broadcast change counts
on analog points, scans between broadcast on global pulse input
points, etc.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-5


TCON30004/13
Buffer Capability System Messages

Buffer Capability
Even though every device in the system contains a message queue,
only a few of the devices will successfully buffer the queued
messages for later distribution. All controllers and Taps distribute
messages out of their RS485 port even with the absence of any LAN
communication. This is due to the fact that there is no requirement
for an acknowledgment to be received at the generating device. The
RS485 LAN is for both solicited and unsolicited message traffic.
The only devices that perform extended buffering are the ones
which directly communicate to polling devices such as the 7801
Taps, 7803 Taps, 7804 Taps, and all DPUs/SCUs. The MRs, ASCs,
and UCs do not generate messages; messages relating to these
devices are generated by the relevant MRI, MCI, etc.
The following is a detailed breakdown of each device and its avail-
able message buffering capacity:
7801/7803/7804/7806 EPROM Taps = approximately 1000
messages
7801/7803/7804/7806 MIP Taps = approximately 1200
messages
7716xx/7718xx/7756xx/7780xx/7792xx = approximately 150
messages
7791xx/7793xx/7798xx
Controller software prior to TAC I/NET Seven version
2.0 = approximately 150 messages.
Controller software for TAC I/NET Seven version 2.0:
Without embedded Tap = approximately 100
messages
With embedded Tap = approximately 1000 messages
DPU7910A and DPU7920
Controller software before version 2.20 = exactly 100
messages

3-6 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages Reliable Messaging

Controller software version 2.20 and later = variable,


based on the number of resident individuals (refer to
Table 9-2, DPU7910A or DPU7920 Memory Manage-
ment, in Chapter 9).
DPU48K = variable, based on the number of resident individ-
uals and active secondary schedules (refer to Table 9-3,
SCU1284 and DPU7920 w/DPU48K Memory Management,
in Chapter 9).
SCU1284 = variable, based on the number of resident indi-
viduals and active secondary schedules (refer to Table 9-3,
SCU1284 and DPU7920 w/DPU48K Memory Management,
in Chapter 9).
NetPlus Router = approximately 1000 messages

Note: xx represents the embedded 7801/7803/7806 Taps functions

All other controllers (RS485 only), 7802 Taps, 7805 Taps, Micro
Regulators (MRs), Application Specific Controllers (ASCs), and
Unitary Controllers (UCs) contain no buffering capability. The
message buffering capacities listed above are true for all message
types except Action messages, which require twice as much
memory.
An overflow message is generated by a DPU/SCU whenever the
message queue gets full and at least one transaction has been lost.
The overflow message is stored in a protective memory location
and is the first message uploaded when communication is restored
to the controller.
The buffering approximations on Taps are due to the varying sizes
of the Taps downloaded binary file and editor entries such as
phone numbers.

Reliable Messaging
Reliable messaging describes a way of configuring controllers so
that they verify that their messages are being received by a target
device.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-7


TCON30004/13
Reliable Messaging System Messages

Each controller on a controller LAN can distribute its messages in


either of the following ways:
through its RS485 port
through its RS232 port when emulating a tap
A controller communicating through its RS232 port will automat-
ically use reliable messaging to ensure that its messages are being
delivered.
A controller communicating through its RS485 port may or may
not use reliable messaging, depending on its configuration.

Defining a Reliable Tap


Using the DCU configuration editor in TAC I/NET Seven, you can
configure a controller (firmware dated 08/21/06 or later) for reli-
able messaging by specifying a reliable tap. The reliable tap can be
any tap (or device emulating a tap) that is being used to route
messages from the controller to a TAC I/NET Seven host.
When a controller is configured to communicate with a reliable tap,
it will not purge a sent message from its queue, nor will it send any
other messages, until it has received an acknowledgment from the
reliable tap.

Storing Messages During a Communication Failure


When a controller loses communication with its reliable tap, it
begins storing messages in its message queue. If communications
between the controller and its reliable tap are not restored before
the message queue gets full, the controller will begin replacing its
oldest messages with newer messages on a first-in, first-out (FIFO)
basis.
When communications between a controller and its reliable tap are
restored, the controller will once again begin transmitting its
messages at a rate of up to 10 messages per second. If any messages
were lost during the communication outage, the controller will
send a DCU Queue ovflw message. The date/time stamp for this
message will be the date and time of the first message that was lost.

3-8 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

The value assigned to the DCU Queue ovflow message represents


the number of messages that were lost during the communication
outage.

Retaining Messages During a Power Failure


Any messages stored in a controller's message queue are battery-
backed and are protected from loss during a power failure. This is
true regardless of whether or not the device has been configured
with a reliable tap.

AMT

Caution: The database server should not be shut down while TAC I/NET
Seven is running. Shutting down the database server drops all
existing connections to the database, and can result in corrupted data
displays. (Only users with administrative privileges on the worksta-
tion can stop or start the database server.)

AMT (Alarms, Messages, and Transactions) is the program that


controls communication traffic relating to TAC I/NET Seven
system events. Event notices are divided into three categories
(alarms, messages, and transactions). The TAC I/NET Seven
system generates and sends a notice anytime a specific event occurs.
The I/O Server program must be running in order to store and
route system communication traffic. You do not need to be
running the TAC I/NET Seven host interface or AMT. Refer to
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started, for more information
about I/O Server.

Warning: If I/O Server is not running the system will not record any incoming
event notices (alarms, messages, or transactions) or SevenTrends
data.

Overview
Each system event is a message; something that happened within
the TAC I/NET environment. Event notices pertaining to access
control, such as door reader activity, are transactions.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-9


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Certain messages and transactions may also be classified as alarms,


if somebody needs to be aware of the event. Any alarm is also either
a message or a transaction. An alarm is a higher level notice, as
somebody must acknowledge receipt of the event notice. Alarms
are further divided into three levels: Routine, Priority, and Critical.
File Storage
All AMT events (messages, transactions, and alarms) are stored in
a database table. This database includes individual tables for events
(messages and transactions) and alarms. The database is capable of
storing up to 20 million AMT records.
The alarm database table stores the active alarms of each priority.
Each alarm event is also stored in the events table.
AMT Screen
The AMT screen allows you to open up multiple windows, each of
which can be configured separately. Preconfigured windows
provide the classic TAC I/NET Seven window layouts.
Display Mode
There are two display modes: tile and cascade. In tile mode, the
windows are automatically sized to fit into the AMT screen without
overlapping, showing all windows at once. In cascade mode the
windows are placed one on top of the other (overlapping), showing
only one window at a time.
You may toggle between display modes at any time using the
Windows menu options.
Active Window
Only one AMT window is active at any given time. The active
window is designated by a solid title bar. A window must be active
to scroll through, or update, the window entries.

Note: Only entries in Alarm windows may be updated. Updating entries


includes acknowledging and purging alarms, and entering dispatch
messages.

3-10 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Toolbar
The toolbar options on the AMT screen provide an alternate
method of accessing selected menu commands. The toolbar may be
docked or floating.
Depending on the active window, one or more toolbar options may
be grayed out or unavailable. The operators access level may also
cause one or more toolbar buttons to be grayed out, if the operator
is not authorized to perform that function.
User Settings
AMT saves the settings for each user. When you log into AMT, the
settings will be the same as the last time you logged out. The
following settings are saved:
Configuration settings (see Configuration on page 3-12):
Alarm and archive color settings
Toolbar and status bar settings
Alarm topmost setting
Settings for open windows:
Size and placement
Window options, including name and filter selection (see
Window Options Editor on page 3-16)
Auto-image verification settings, including door filter
and field selection, for open event windows (see Image
Verification on page 3-49)

Note: Static image verification window settings are not saved. Any open
static image verification windows will be discarded upon logoff, and
will not reappear upon subsequent login.

Security
The AMT functions, including window display, may be protected
by password. When you set password access in the Host Passwords
editor, you may select which AMT functions can be accessed with
that password. Refer to Host Passwords in Chapter 4, Host Func-
tions.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-11


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Configuration
The AMT configuration editor allows you to set the display param-
eters for AMT.
Miscellaneous
This section allows you to set display options in AMT.
Display site address 0 as blank This option, when activated,
leaves the Site Address field blank in open windows, if the site
address is zero (0). This allows you to quickly skim the list for dial
and/or Distributed Link Architecture (DLS) sites.

See Also: Integrated Dial Function in Chapter 2, Communication


Distributed Link Architecture (DLA) Support in Chapter 1,
System Configuration
Alarm topmost This option, when activated, will cause the
AMT screen to come to the front of the computer screen when a
new alarm is received. The AMT screen will move in front of any
other program screen you are currently viewing, including a TAC
I/NET Seven screen or any other application.

See Also: Alarm Notification on page 3-18


Max Online Events The upper limit for events stored online, in
thousands (an entry of 100 indicates 100,000 online events). Once
this number is reached, old events are replaced by new ones, on a
first-in, first-out basis, and can no longer be viewed on the AMT
screen. This field is for display only.

See Also: CCTV on page 3-51


Alarm Colors
This section allows you to determine the colors used to indicate the
status of an alarm. These colors are used only in the AMT windows,
and are not part of the actual database files. If you change the
colors, all existing alarm entries will change to reflect the new color
scheme.
Foreground Select the foreground color for each alarm status.
This is the color of the text within the entry.

3-12 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Background Select the background color for each alarm status.


This is the color of the table cell within the entry.
To select a color, click under either foreground or background on
the appropriate alarm status:
Unack Alarm This status indicates a point that is currently in
alarm, and the alarm has not yet been acknowledged by an oper-
ator. All new alarms will have this color until they are either
acknowledged or return to normal.
Ack Alarm This status indicates a point that is currently in
alarm, but the alarm has been acknowledged by an operator.
Unack RTN This status indicates a point that is not currently in
alarm, but previously had an alarm that remains unacknowledged.
A selection window will pop up, showing the available colors. The
selected color will appear in the block next to the selected status.
Image Window
This section allows you to set a timer that controls the length of
time that the image verification window stays open. You can set a
time of up to 60 minutes. A setting of zero causes the image verifi-
cation window to stay open until it is manually closed by the oper-
ator.
Archive Colors
This section allows you to specify the foreground and background
colors for archived events. These colors are used only in the AMT
windows, and are not part of the actual database files. If you change
the colors, all archived events listed will change to reflect the new
color scheme.
Foreground Select the foreground color for archived events.
This is the color of the text within the entry.
Background Select the background color for archived events.
This is the color of the table cell within the entry.
To select a color, click under either foreground or background, and
select the desired color from the color selection palette.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-13


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Relay Tap
This section contains two options, Priority and Critical. When you
enable an option in this section, it's corresponding relay in the
7801R tap will activate if an alarm of the correct priority passes
through, unless it is one of the following:

Return to normal Sign on Host


Door normal Sign off Host
Action message Sign on DCU
Dispatch message Sign off DCU
LAN reconfigure Host restored
Station restored LAN tap restored
MCU restored

Note: It is important not to check these boxes unless there is an actual 7801
or 7801R tap connected. Otherwise, enabling these options will result
in messages/alarms not being displayed in AMT.

Audible Alarms
This section allows you to determine which alarms shall generate
an audible alarm, and the duration of the audible tone. It also
allows you to configure AMT to produce audible alarms for specific
alarm events.
You can choose one of the following options when defining audible
alarms:
None: an alarm of this type will not generate an audible tone.
Once: and alarm of this type will generate and audible tone
that plays once.
Timed: an alarm of this type will generate an audible tone that
lasts for a specific time period (see below), or until the alarm
is acknowledged or silenced, whichever comes first.
Constant: an alarm of this type will generate an audible tone
that continues until the alarm is acknowledged or silenced.
Audible duration Enter the duration of a Timed audible alarm,
in seconds.

3-14 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

A default .WAV sound file is supplied for each alarm priority.


However, you may elect to assign a .WAV sound file of your own
choosing to be played when an alarm of the appropriate priority is
received. Please note that only .WAV sound files may be used for
audible alarms.

Note: If an alarm sound is already playing and a new alarm arrives, the
sound which is already playing will only be stopped if the new alarm
is of greater priority.

Message/Alarm
Use this section to set the message and alarm masking for this
workstation. Refer to Masking on page 3-1 for a complete
description of message masking.
Printer
Use this section to set the message and alarm masking for a printer
connected to this workstation. If no printer is connected to the
workstation, you may skip this section. Refer to Masking on page
3-1 for a complete description of message masking.

Note: The message mask must match at least one workstation mask to be
received, and must also match at least one printer mask in order to be
sent to the printer.

Force Dispatch
Use this option when you wish to require a dispatch message on
alarms. To use this option, set the desired distribution group(s) and
mask position(s). Any alarms with at least one matching mask
position can be acknowledged, but must have a dispatch message
before they can be cleared from the alarm window.
Acknowledge Return-to-Normal
Use this option when you wish to require a separate acknowledg-
ment for a return-to-normal message. To use this option, set the
desired distribution group(s) and mask position(s). Alarms which
have returned to normal will still remain in the alarm window, even
after the original alarm is acknowledged, until the return to normal
message is also acknowledged.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-15


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Window Options Editor


The Window Options editor allows you to individually configure
each window you open in AMT. The window settings will remain
as long as the window is open. Open windows and their settings are
saved at log-off, and will display when you log back in.
This editor appears automatically when you open a new window
(except for predefined windows), and may also be opened manu-
ally any time you wish to change the display options for the active
window.
Selected
The parameters listed here will appear in the selected window. The
order of the columns will be the same as displayed here, with the
top parameter being the left-most column. Use the Move Up and
Move Down buttons to rearrange the column order.
De-Selected
The parameters listed here will not appear in the selected window.
Use the Add, Remove, Add All, and Remove All buttons to move
the parameters between the Selected and De-Selected lists.
Sort By
This option allows you to select the parameter that you wish to use
as the sort criteria for the window. This option is only available for
alarm windows. Only the parameters in the Selected list are avail-
able. Once you have selected the parameter to sort by, select
whether the sort is to be in Ascending or Descending order.
Filter
Select the filter to use for this window. All existing filters appro-
priate to this window type are listed.

Note: Only one filter may be applied to an AMT window. If the active
window is already using a filter, including one of the predefined
filters, selecting a filter here will change the window to use only the
selected filter.

See Also: Filtering on page 3-23

3-16 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Use Default Window Name


This checkbox indicates whether you wish the windows title bar to
contain only the default information: filter name, sort column
(alarm windows only), and pause indicator (if applicable). Disable
this box to enter a custom window name.
Window Name
The custom name for this window. The name will be added to the
windows title bar. The default data (see above) remains in the title
bar as well. This option is only available if the Use default window
name box is disabled.

Alarms
TAC I/NET Seven alerts you to alarm conditions and gives you a
way to locate, acknowledge, and purge these alarms, as well as add
dispatch messages to them.
The AMT alarm windows display the active alarms for the selected
filter criteria. The window header lists the filter name, the number
of alarms, and the number of unacknowledged alarms. The specific
data listed for each entry depends on the selected window settings.
The alarms are shown in reverse order, with the most recent alarm
listed first. If you have a system printer with appropriate masking,
the alarms will also be printed on the system printer.
The Archive utility allows you to save these records indefinitely,
depending only on the storage space available on your system.
Alarm Totals
Each alarm window shows the number of active alarms and the
number of unacknowledged alarms. These totals apply only to
alarms which meet the selected filter criteria.
Alarms is the number of points currently in alarm. If a point
was in alarm but has returned to a normal state, it is not
counted in this total.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-17


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Unack Alarms is the number of points with unacknowledged


alarms. If a point was in alarm but has returned to a normal
state, it is still counted in this total if the alarm was never
acknowledged. Thus, you could have a situation where your
unacknowledged alarm total is higher than your alarm total.
The AMT header contains the total number of active alarms and
unacknowledged alarms, for all points. If your alarm window is
unfiltered, the totals on the alarm window will match the totals in
the AMT header.
If AMT is minimized, you can check the alarm totals by placing
your cursor over the AMT taskbar item. The popup window will
show the current alarm and unacknowledged alarm totals.
Alarm Notification
If you have a message/printer mask and distribution group defined,
then points matching at least one of the active mask positions will
store/display/print the alarm messages. Any host workstation with
a matching distribution group and active message mask will receive
the alarm.
There are three forms of alarm notification. Depending on your
configuration settings, you may have one, two, or all three methods
active.
Flashing bar Whenever there is an unacknowledged alarm
(any priority), the taskbar button for AMT will flash. The title
bars for minimized alarm windows with unacknowledged
alarms will also flash. This is an automatic notification, which
cannot be disabled.
Top screen If you selected the Alarm topmost option in
the AMT configuration screen, a new alarm will cause the
appropriate AMT window to move to the front of your
desktop, on top of any open application windows (such as
TAC I/NET Seven).
You may select another application window, which will then
move in front of the screen, but any additional incoming
alarms will move AMT to the front of the desktop again.

3-18 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Audible tone If you specified an audible alarm for one or


more alarm priorities, any incoming alarm with the desig-
nated priority will initiate the alarm tone. This tone will
sound for the duration set, or until the alarm is acknowledged
or silenced, whichever comes first.
The F2 function key will silence the alarm. You may also
silence the alarm using the Silence Alarm option on the
Actions menu, or by selecting the Silence Alarm button.
The audible alarm is not related to the Alarm topmost option:
the alarm will sound whether AMT is the top window or not.

See Also: Configuration on page 3-12


TCON299, TAC I/NET Seven Operator Guide
Alarm Windows
Alarm windows display all active alarms for the selected filter.
These are points that are, or have been, in alarm.
Three status indicators are available for alarms. Use the Colors
section of the AMT configuration editor to set the color for each
condition (see Configuration on page 3-12). The conditions are
as follows:
Alarm. The point is currently in alarm, and the alarm has not
yet been acknowledged.
Alarm Ack. The point is currently in alarm, and has already
been acknowledged.
Ret. Normal. The point went into alarm, but has since
returned to its normal (non-alarm) state without the alarm
being acknowledged.
The alarm fields are listed in Table 3-2. Your window may or may
not display all of the fields, depending on the settings you selected
in the Window Options editor for this window (see Window
Options Editor on page 3-16).

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-19


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-2. Alarm Field Descriptions

Field Description
Date The date and time this entry was last updated. Initially, this shows
the date and time that the original alarm occurred. Any activity
Time (alarm, return to normal, acknowledge, or dispatch message)
updates the date and time for the entry.
Cycle count indicating how many times the point has gone into
alarm. The count increases each time the point cycles into alarm.
The count continues until the entry is purged.
Count
Note: The count does not differentiate between acknowledged
and unacknowledged alarms: it merely counts the number
of alarms.
Address The point address generating the alarm.
The name of the link containing the device that generated the
alarm. If the alarm is generated by a host or link, this field will be
Link name blank and the host or link name will be in the Device Name field
(see below). The value of this field is determined by the name
given to the link in the network configuration.
The name of the station containing the device that generated the
alarm. If the alarm is generated by a host, link, or station, this field
will be blank and the host, link, or station name will be in the
Station name
Device Name field (see below). The value of this field is
determined by the name given to the station in the network
configuration.
The name of the device generating the alarm.
If the device generating the alarm is an MCU, this field will be
blank, as the Link Name and Station Name fields identify the
Device name device.
If the device generating the alarm is a door, this field will contain
the door name, if available. If the door name is not available,
the point name is displayed.
The site number (01-63) assigned to the device which generated
Site name
the message.
Event Type The specific event causing the alarm condition.
Priority The priority setting for this alarm.
The current state of this alarm: unacknowledged, acknowledged,
Acknowledge Status
or returned to normal (unacknowledged).
If an event action has been defined for this event type, the action
message will display in this field. If the alarm is a Bad Card Read
Action Message
generated by a card number not in the system, this field will
indicate the card number. Otherwise, the field will be blank.

3-20 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-2. Alarm Field Descriptions (Continued)

Field Description
If an operator has entered a dispatch message for this alarm, the
Dispatch Message
message will display in this field. Otherwise, this field will be blank.
The number assigned to the CCTV camera that generated the
alarm. This field is blank when the alarm is not associated with a
Camera CCTV camera. Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database
Connectivity and Reporting, for more information about integrating
CCTV with TAC I/NET Seven.
The value of a user-defined field for the individual associated with
the alarm. Use the Access Control Options editor to designate one
Unique Field of the 16 user-defined fields as a unique user field. Refer to the
description of the Unique User Field parameter on page 9-89 for
more information.

Event Messages
The TAC I/NET Seven system uses event messages to notify you of
specific event occurrences. When you enter your point informa-
tion, you specify the actions which will generate messages. Message
masking is used to determine which messages are stored/printed at
specific operator workstations.
Message Display
The AMT database can contain up to five million events. Events are
listed chronologically, with the most recent message at the top of
the list. The messages displayed will depend on the filter selected
for the window. Each message includes the information described
in Table 3-3. Your window may or may not display all of the fields,
depending on the settings you selected in the Window Options
editor for this window (see Window Options Editor on page
3-16).

Table 3-3. Message Field Descriptions

Field Description

Date The date this message was generated.


Time The time of day (in 24-hour time) this message was generated.
The system address of the point or station address of the host or
Address
controller which generated the message.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-21


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-3. Message Field Descriptions (Continued)

Field Description
The name of the link containing the device that generated the
message. If the message is generated by a host or link, this field
Link name will be blank and the host or link name will be in the Device Name
field (see below). The value of this field is determined by the name
given to the link in the network configuration.
The name of the station containing the device that generated the
message. If the message is generated by a host, link, or station,
this field will be blank and the host, link, or station name will be in
Station name
the Device Name field (see below). The value of this field is
determined by the name given to the station in the network
configuration.
The assigned name associated with the Tap, controller, or point
Device Name
which generated the message.
The site number (01-63) assigned to the device which generated
Site
the message.
Event type The event that generated this message.
First Name (Transaction only) The first name of the individual.
Last Name (Transaction only) The last name of the individual.
Group Name (Transaction only) The primary group assigned to the individual.
Tenant (Transaction only) The tenant number for this individual.
Individual (Transaction only) The individual number.
The analog value of a point in alarm, or the analog value of a
Value
manually commanded point.
If an operator has entered a dispatch message for an entry, the
dispatch message will display in this field. Otherwise, this field will
Message
be blank. This field can only be populated if this event also
generated an alarm.
(Transaction only) The access control zone for the key/card
Zone
reader.
Cell The SevenTrends cell number assigned to alarms from this point.

3-22 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-3. Message Field Descriptions (Continued)

Field Description
The value of a user-defined field for the individual associated with
the event. Use the Access Control Options editor to designate one
Unique Field of the 16 user-defined fields as a unique user field. Refer to the
description of the Unique User Field parameter on page 9-89 for
more information.
The number assigned to the CCTV camera that generated the
alarm. This field is blank when the alarm is not associated with a
Camera CCTV camera. Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database
Connectivity and Reporting, for more information about integrating
CCTV with TAC I/NET Seven.

Filtering
Use the Filter editor to select criteria used to select events for
display. If you do not use filters, the system displays all messages
from all possible point types and all possible point addresses. You
may find that this produces an unmanageable amount of informa-
tion.
The filter editor will have a slightly different appearance,
depending on the type of window selected.
If the active window is an event window, or if there are no
open windows, the Event Filter editor displays. This version of
the editor includes the Event Info section, used to select indi-
vidual event types for display in event windows, and the
button to open the Transaction Filter editor. Filters defined
through this editor are available for all window types, but
alarm windows will ignore any event and/or transaction
filtering parameters.
If the active window is an alarm window, the Alarm Filter
editor displays. Alarm filters do not include the Event Info
section or access to the Transaction Filter editor.

Note: Archiving and filtering both use a great deal of system resources.
While archiving, particularly when there are a large number of
online AMT records, it may appear as though your AMT filters are
not operating properly. Filter operation will return to normal when
the archive function is complete.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-23


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

The system displays messages in chronological order, with the most


recent messages displayed first. The range options include date
range, time range, and point address range. You may wish to use
one or more range options to limit the information displayed on
the message screen. The range options are co-dependent: only
messages which meet all three range entries will appear in the
display window.
Point Address
Set the Point address range Start and End parameters to limit the
resulting message list to specific addresses. Messages originating
from addresses outside of this range will be excluded.
Device Name
The desired Device name. The default is [All] for all devices. Enter
up to 16 characters, including the wildcard characters ? (single
character replace) and * (multiple character replace).
Priority
Select the Priority for the system message. Only messages with the
selected priority (set in the DCU editor) will be included in the
window view.
Site
Select the starting and ending Site numbers. Messages originating
from sites outside of this range will be excluded.
Cell
Select the starting and ending Cell numbers. This corresponds to
the cell number entered in the Resident I/O Points editor for the
selected point(s). Messages originating from points will cell
numbers outside of this range will be excluded.
Filter Date Range
This section allows you to use a date or date-time range to filter
events. The date-time range is typically used when attempting to
pinpoint a particular event. There are two steps to this process:

3-24 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Specify the type of range you wish to use, either date only or
date and time. Do not activate the checkboxes if you do not
wish to filter by date. You cannot filter by time unless you are
also filtering by date.
Specify the start and end of the selected chronological range.
The range is inclusive.

Note: If you enter a time range but have not activated time range filtering,
the time entries are ignored.

Event Info
This option only appears in the Event Filter editor, which appears
when the active window is an event window, or when there are no
open windows (and thus no active window) when the filter editor
is accessed. This feature is used to filter the displayed events
according to the type of event. These option settings are ignored if
the filter is applied to an alarm window.
This listbox contains a list of all possible messages. Select which
events will be listed in the active event window. You will probably
want to select only certain event types, to produce a manageable
number of messages.

Note: This filtering only controls which messages are displayed in the AMT
event windows. Messages are generated according to the parameters
set in the individual DCU point databases. If this filter is applied to
an alarm window, event filtering is ignored.

If at least one transaction (access control) event is selected, the Tran


Filtering button becomes active, allowing access to the Transaction
Filter editor. Refer to Transaction Filter on page 3-44.
Event types are listed in Table 3-4. This table also shows the
description, source, and the masking and priority required to
receive each message.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-25


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Operator has
Host configuration
acknowledged an
Host editor message/
Acknowledge NA NA Online 90% full, Online
workstation alarm mask: group
95% full, or Online
1, far left position
data lost message.
An event-driven
message was
generated (point went
Event actions
Action message DCU NA R, P, C into/out of an alarm
editor
state, to a specified
state, or crossed a
certain value).
Resident I/O points
Alarm An alarm has been
editor for DA, DM,
acknowledge DCU R, P, C NA acknowledged by an
DO, DC, and AI
operator operator.
points
The archive activity
completed
successfully. If
Archive
Host verification was
Archive complete configuration audit R, P, C NA
workstation enabled, this message
trail mask
indicates that
verification was
successful.
The archive activity did
Archive not complete
Host
Archive failed configuration audit R, P, C NA successfully. The type
workstation
trail mask of error is listed in the
event description field.
Automatic
DCU configuration Temperature Control
ATC start DCU NA R, P, C
editor in the DCU was
enabled.
Automatic
DCU configuration Temperature Control
ATC stop DCU NA R, P, C
editor in the controller was
disabled.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-26 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Resident I/O points Automatic Time


ATS control DCU editor for DO/DC NA R, P, C Schedule control has
points commanded this point.
Automatic Time
DCU configuration
ATS start DCU NA R, P, C Scheduling in the DCU
editor
was enabled.
Automatic Time
DCU configuration Scheduling in the
ATS stop DCU NA R, P, C
editor controller was
disabled.
An Automatic Time
Host configuration Schedule master
Host editor message/ schedule
ATS-mstr failed NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group programming attempt
1, far left position has failed to reach a
remote controller.
The card reader was
unable to validate the
card entered by the
user.
If the DPU/SCU is
Resident I/O points currently sensing a
DPU or editor for door Wiegand reader
Bad card read R, P, C NA
SCU1284 parent point (BB = tamper condition, this
08 or 09) message can occur
each time a
subsequent Reader
Tamper signal is
received at the
DPU/SCU.
An unsuccessful
Resident I/O points command was issued
Command error DCU editor for output R, P, C NA to a point
points (communication
failure).
Resident I/O points This point was
Host
Control editor of DC, DO, NA R, P, C commanded by a host
workstation
AO, and GO points workstation.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-27


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Operator
Host, link, or LAN acknowledged a DCU
Host
DCU alm ack Tap configuration NA R, P, C Lost, DCU Restored,
workstation
editor mask or DCU SW Lost
message.
The message storage
Host configuration
capacity of a DCU has
editor message/
DCU queue ovflw DCU NA NA been exceeded.
alarm mask: group
Messages are being
1, far left position
lost.
The downloadable
software in a controller
DCU software DCU configuration has been lost. You
DCU NA R, P, C
lost editor mask must restore the
controller software and
database.
An automatic
Host configuration
controller save from a
Host editor message/
DCU-save failed NA NA remote controller has
workstation alarm mask: group
failed to reach the
1, far left position
host.
Resident I/O points The point has been
Demand control DCU editor for DO/DC NA R, P, C shed or restored by
points demand control.
The predicted demand
Resident I/O points at the end of the
Demand editor for Demand current demand
DCU R, P, C NA
exception programs current interval will exceed the
demand point user-specified shed
target.
Entry through an
access controlled door
was denied until the
DPU or Door extension individual exits the
Deny entry APB R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor same door or another
door within the same
anti-passback (APB)
zone.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-28 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Entry through an
access controlled door
DPU or Door extension
Deny entry dsbl R, P, C NA was denied because
SCU1284 editor
the key/card used is
disabled.
Entry through an
access controlled door
DPU or Door extension was denied because
Deny entry PIN R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor an invalid personal
identification number
(PIN) was entered.
Entry through an
access controlled door
DPU or Door extension was denied because
Deny entry sched R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor the individual is not
allowed access at the
time attempted.
Entry through an
access controlled door
was denied because a
DPU or Door extension door and personnel
Deny entry sel R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor schedule has not been
selected for the
individual, or the
individual is disabled.
Entry through an
access controlled door
was denied because
the individuals
Deny entry DPU or Door extension key/card is not in the
R, P, C NA
tenant SCU1284 editor system, or the
individual is attempting
to enter a door
assigned to a different
tenant.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-29


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Exit through an access


controlled door was
DPU or Door extension
Deny exit dsbl R, P, C NA denied because the
SCU1284 editor
key/card used is
disabled.
Exit through an access
controlled door was
DPU or Door extension denied because an
Deny exit PIN R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor invalid personal
identification number
(PIN) was entered.
Exit through an access
controlled door was
DPU or Door extension denied because the
Deny exit sched R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor individual is not
allowed access at the
time attempted.
Exit through an access
controlled door was
denied because a door
DPU or Door extension
Deny exit sel R, P, C NA and personnel
SCU1284 editor
schedule has not been
selected for the
individual.
Exit through an access
controlled door was
denied because the
individuals key/card is
DPU or Door extension
Deny exit tenant R, P, C NA not in the system, or
SCU1284 editor
the individual is
attempting to exit a
door assigned to a
different tenant.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-30 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Resident I/O points


An operator entered
or Tap
dispatch message has
Configuration
Host been
Dispatch editor of point or R, P, C R, P, C
workstation generated/printed in
device which
response to a
reported original
point/device alarm.
alarm
DCU configuration Demand control in the
DMD start DCU NA R, P, C
editor DCU was enabled.
Demand control in the
DCU configuration
DMD stop DCU NA R, P, C controller was
editor
disabled.
Resident I/O points
An access controlled
DPU or editor for door
Door normal R, P, C NA door has returned to
SCU1284 parent point (BB =
normal.
08 or 09)
Resident I/O points
An access controlled
DPU or editor for door
Door re-locked R, P, C NA door has automatically
SCU1284 parent point
re-locked.
(BB = 08 or 09)
A Door Open Too
Resident I/O points Long alarm has been
DPU or editor for door received.
DOTL R, P, C NA
SCU1284 parent point (BB = This alarm will not be
08 or 09) generated if the door is
in Unlocked mode.
The message storage
Host configuration
capacity of a DPU has
DPU or editor message/
DPU queue ovflw NA NA been exceeded.
SCU1284 alarm mask: group
Messages are being
1, far left position
lost.
Resident I/O points
A duress code has
DPU or editor for door
Duress elev R, P, C NA been entered at an
SCU1284 parent point (BB =
elevator PIN pad.
08 or 09)
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-31


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

A duress code has


DPU or Door extension
Duress entry R, P, C NA been entered at an
SCU1284 editor
entry reader PIN pad.
A duress code has
DPU or Door extension
Duress exit R, P, C NA been entered at an exit
SCU1284 editor
reader PIN pad.
The host workstation
Host configuration
is currently unable to
Host editor message/
DVR Srv Offline NA NA communicate with the
Workstation alarm mask: group
Digital Video Recorder
1, far left position
(DVR) server.
The host workstation
Host configuration is successfully
Host editor message/ communicating with
DVR Srv Online NA NA
Workstation alarm mask: group the Digital Video
1, far left position Recorder (DVR)
server.
Host configuration
A change in the
Host editor message/
Edit AIC NA NA access initiated control
workstation alarm mask: group
editor has been made.
1, far left position
Host configuration
A change in the DCU
Host editor message/
Edit DCU PW NA NA passwords editor has
workstation alarm mask: group
been made.
1, far left position
Host configuration
A change in the
Host editor message/
Edit Door NA NA access control door
workstation alarm mask: group
editor has been made.
1, far left position
Host configuration
A change in the
Host editor message/
Edit Elev. NA NA elevator editor has
workstation alarm mask: group
been made.
1, far left position
Host configuration
A change in the
Host editor message/
Edit Group NA NA access control group
workstation alarm mask: group
editor has been made.
1, far left position
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-32 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Host configuration
A change in the host
Host editor message/
Edit Hst PW NA NA passwords editor has
workstation alarm mask: group
been made.
1, far left position
Host configuration A change in the
Host editor message/ access control
Edit Indiv. NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group individuals editor has
1, far left position been made.
Host configuration A change in the
Host editor message/ access control
Edit P/Schd NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group personnel schedule
1, far left position editor has been made.
Host configuration
A change in the
Host editor message/
Edit Tenant NA NA access control tenant
workstation alarm mask: group
editor has been made.
1, far left position
Host configuration A change in the
Host editor message/ access control
Edit Trans. NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group key/card translation
1, far left position editor has been made.
A valid key/card was
DPU or Door extension used in an access
Elev entry R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor controlled elevator
reader.
A valid personal
identification number
DPU or Door extension
Elev entry - PIN R, P, C NA was used in an access
SCU1284 editor
controlled elevator
reader.
Resident I/O points A point has been
DCU or
Event control editor for output NA R, P, C commanded by an
SCU1284
points event sequence.
Resident I/O points
An access controlled
DPU or editor for door
Forced Door R, P, C NA door has been forced
SCU1284 parent point (BB =
open.
08 or 09)
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-33


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Resident I/O points A point has been


HHC control HHC editor for DC, DO, NA R, P, C commanded by an
AO, and GO points HHC.
Resident I/O points An analog or digital
High limit alarm DCU editor for AI/GI R, P, C NA input point exceeded
points its high limit value.
Remote host Host configuration I/NET has lost
work-station editor message/ communications over
Host lost NA NA
on same alarm mask: group the Ethernet LAN with
Ethernet LAN 1, far left position a host workstation.
The host LAN has
reconfigured because
Host LAN Host Tap
Host Tap NA R, P, C a device has been
reconfigure configuration editor
added or taken away
from the LAN.
Remote Host I/NET has established
workstation communication with a
Host configuration NA NA
on same host workstation over
Host restored Ethernet LAN editor message/ the Ethernet LAN.
alarm mask: group
1, far left position I/NET program
Any Host
NA NA background driver
workstation
started.
The downloadable
software in a Host Tap
Host Tap
Host Tap Host Tap, has been lost. You
configuration editor NA R, P, C
software lost NPR must restore the Tap
mask
software and
database.
Host configuration The downloading of
Host editor message/ Individuals information
Ind. D/L failed NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group to a DPU/SCU has
1, far left position failed.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-34 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

The IP address
selected for the NPR
or Xenta 527/527-NPR
NPR or Xenta NetPlus Router
IP Addr Conflict N/A N/A is a duplicate of
527/527-NPR configuration editor
another IP address
already residing on the
system.
Site (LAN) The controller LAN
Tap, Link has undergone
Host, link, or LAN
Tap, Host reconfiguration
LAN reconfigure Tap configuration NA R, P, C
Tap, NPR, because a device was
editor
Xenta added or taken away
527/527-NPR from the LAN.
Host or Link Tap An operator has
Host
LAN Tap ack configuration editor NA R, P, C acknowledged the
workstation
mask LAN Tap lost alarm.
I/NET has lost
Host or Link Host or Link Tap
LAN Tap lost NA R, P, C communication with
Tap configuration editor
this LAN Tap.
The message storage
capacity of a LAN Tap
Host or Link Host or Link Tap
LAN Tap Ovflw NA NA has been exceeded.
Tap configuration editor
Messages are being
lost.
I/NET has
LAN Tap Host or Link Host or Link Tap reestablished
NA R, P, C
restored Tap configuration editor communication with
this LAN Tap.
The downloadable
software in a LAN Tap
LAN Tap
LAN Tap Site (LAN) has been lost. You
configuration editor NA R, P, C
software lost Tap must restore the Tap
mask
software and
database.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-35


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

A control action has


Resident I/O points been issued to a
editor for lighting lighting zone and its
Lighting control 7780 DLCU NA R, P, C
zones and/or associated circuits by
circuits the override
pushbutton.
An operator has
Host Tap
Host acknowledged a Link
Link ack configuration editor NA R, P, C
workstation Tap Software Lost
mask
alarm.
The link address
selected for the NPR
or Xenta 527/527-NPR
NPR or Xenta NetPlus Router
Link # Conflict N/A N/A is a duplicate of
527/527-NPR configuration editor
another link address
already residing on the
system.
The downloadable
software in a Link Tap
Link Tap
Link Tap has been lost. You
Link Tap configuration editor NA R, P, C
software lost must restore the Tap
mask
software and
database.
Resident I/O points An analog or digital
Low limit alarm DCU editor for AI/GI R, P, C NA input point exceeded
point its low limit value.
A point has been taken
Resident I/O points out of the manual
Manual off
DCU editor for output NA R, P, C mode and placed back
operator or HHC
points into automatic
operation.
A point has been taken
Resident I/O points out of automatic mode
Manual on
DCU editor for output NA R, P, C and is under manual
operator or HHC
points operation from a host
workstation.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-36 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

This micro control unit


DCU configuration
(UC, MR, ASC, SCU,
Host editor mask for
MCU alm ack NA R, P, C or DPU) alarm was
workstation MCI, MRI, UCI,
acknowledged from a
DPI or I/SITE LAN
host workstation.
UCI, DPI, MRI, MCI, or
I/SITE LAN has lost
communication with
DCU configuration
UCI, DPI, this micro control unit
editor mask for
MCU lost MRI, MCI, or NA R, P, C (UC, MR, ASC, SCU,
MCI, MRI, UCI,
I/SITE LAN or DPU). Usually due
DPI or I/SITE LAN
to communication
failure or power loss at
the MCU.
DCU configuration RAM has been
MCU mem
MR editor for MCI, NA R, P, C exceeded in
overflow
MRI, or I/SITE LAN associated MR.
The MR or ASC has
DCU configuration
been reset due to an
editor mask for
MCU Reset MR/ASC NA R, P, C application timeout, a
MCI, MRI, UCI,
power interruption, or
DPI or I/SITE LAN
a manual reset.
This MCU (UC, MR,
DCU configuration ASC, SCU, or DPU)
UCI, DPI,
editor mask for has reestablished
MCU restored MRI, MCI, or NA R, P, C
MCI, MRI, UCI, communications with
I/SITE LAN
DPI or I/SITE LAN the UCI, DPI, MRI,
MCI, or I/SITE LAN.
DCU configuration
DPU or editor mask for A DPU/SCU has failed
Memory failure NA NA
SCU1284 MCI, MRI, UCI, checksum.
DPI or I/SITE LAN
The Mode Schedule
Resident I/O points
for this door has
DPU or editor for door
Mode APB reset NA NA performed a reset of
SCU1284 parent point
the anti-passback
(BB = 08 or 09)
flags.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-37


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Resident I/O points The Mode Schedule


DPU or editor for door for this door has
Mode lock NA NA
SCU1284 parent point changed its status to
(BB = 08 or 09) locked.
Resident I/O points The Mode Schedule
DPU or editor for door for this door has
Mode PIN enable NA NA
SCU1284 parent point changed its status to
(BB = 08 or 09) require a PIN for entry.
Resident I/O points The Mode Schedule
DPU or editor for door for this door has
Mode secure NA NA
SCU1284 parent point changed its status to
(BB = 08 or 09) secured.
Resident I/O points The Mode Schedule
DPU or editor for door for this door has
Mode unlock NA NA
SCU1284 parent point changed its status to
(BB = 08 or 09) unlocked.
Indicates a low
memory condition in
the NPR or Xenta
527/527-NPR. Try
NPR Table Mem NPR or Xenta NetPlus Router
N/A N/A reducing the number
Low 527/527-NPR configuration editor
of globalized points or
message routing
masks in order to free
memory in the unit.
Host configuration RWONLN file is 90%
Host editor message/ full. When this file is
Online 90% full NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group full, all incoming data
1, far left position will be lost.
Host configuration The RWONLN file is
Host editor message/ 95% full. When this file
Online 95% full NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group is full, all incoming
1, far left position data will be lost.
The RWONLN file is
Host configuration
full and has not been
Host editor message/
Online data lost NA NA archived. All
workstation alarm mask: group
subsequent incoming
1, far left position
data has been lost.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-38 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

A point has been


Resident I/O points commanded by a 7750
Override control 7750 DCU editor for DO/DC NA R, P, C Building Manager
points zone or a points ATS
has been overridden.
Power to the indicated
DCU or Tap device (usually a Tap
Power restored DCU or Tap NA R, P, C
configuration editor or controller) has been
restored.
A valid key/card was
DPU or Door extension used to enter through
Reader entry R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor an access controlled
door.
A valid personal
identification number
Reader entry - DPU or Door extension
R, P, C NA was used to enter
PIN SCU1284 editor
through an access
controlled door.
A valid key/card was
DPU or Door extension used to exit through an
Reader exit R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor access controlled
door.
A valid personal
identification number
DPU or Door extension
Reader exit - PIN R, P, C NA was used to exit
SCU1284 editor
through an access
controlled door.
The door was
DPU or Door extension unlocked due to a
Request to exit R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor pushbutton or motion
detector activation.
This point has
returned to its normal
Resident I/O points
value from a high or
Return to normal DCU editor for AI/GI/DA/ R, P, C NA
low limit alarm or to its
DM points
normal state if it is a
discrete point.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-39


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

A runtime accumulator
Resident I/O points
Runtime reset DCU NA R, P, C point has been reset to
editor for PI point
zero.
Analog or discrete
sample data has been
Host configuration
lost. Usually due to
Host editor message/
Sample data lost NA NA communication failure
workstation alarm mask: group
or because no file
1, far left position
space is available on
the hard disk.
The date was set on
DCU configuration this device from an
Set date DCU or HHC NA R, P, C
editor HHC or host
workstation.
The time was set on
DCU configuration this device from an
Set time DCU or HHC NA R, P, C
editor HHC or host
workstation.
This operator has
DCU configuration
Sign off DCU DCU NA R, P, C disconnected from this
editor
controller.
Host configuration This operator at a host
Host editor message/ workstation has
Sign off host NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group disconnected from a
1, far left position Host Tap in I/NET.
This operator has
DCU configuration
Sign on DCU DCU NA R, P, C connected to this
editor
controller.
Host configuration This operator has
Host editor message/ connected from a host
Sign on host NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group workstation to a Host
1, far left position Tap in I/NET.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-40 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

The site address


selected for the NPR
or Xenta 527/527-NPR
NPR or Xenta NetPlus Router
Site # Conflict N/A R, P, C is a duplicate of
527/527-NPR configuration editor
another site address
already used on the
same distributed link.
A non-resident
individual could not be
DPU or Door extension verified because
SLI not available R, P, C NA
SCU1284 editor communication could
not be established with
the SLI.
Host configuration
An attempted special
Host editor message/
Special day lost NA NA day broadcast failed to
workstation alarm mask: group
reach a remote DCU.
1, far left position
Resident I/O points A discrete points state
State change DCU NA R, P, C
editor for DI point has changed.
Site (LAN) I/NET lost
Tap, Link communication with
Host, link, or LAN
Tap, Host this controller (usually
Station lost Tap configuration NA R, P, C
Tap, NPR, due to communication
editor
Xenta failure or power loss at
527/527-NPR the controller).
Site (LAN)
Tap, Link Controller has
Host, link, or LAN
Tap, Host reestablished
Station restored Tap configuration NA R, P, C
Tap, NPR, communications with
editor
Xenta I/NET.
527/527-NPR
Resident I/O points A point state change
Status alarm DCU editor for DA/DM R, P, C NA (defined as an alarm)
points has occurred.
Host configuration
Downloading tenant
Host editor message/
Ten. D/L failed NA NA information to a
workstation alarm mask: group
DPU/SCU has failed.
1, far left position
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-41


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

Test off Resident I/O points A point has been taken


DCU NA R, P, C
operator editor for any point out of test mode.
All points in the
DCU configuration controller have been
Test off HHC HHC NA R, P, C
editor taken out of test mode
by an HHC.
A point has been
placed into test mode.
Test on Resident I/O points
DCU NA R, P, C The point is no longer
operator editor for any point
displaying real-time
data.
All points in the
DCU configuration controller have been
Test on HHC HHC NA R, P, C
editor placed into test mode
by an HHC.
Host configuration Controller time
Host editor message/ synchronization
Time-sync failed NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group attempt failed to reach
1, far left position a remote DCU.
SevenTrends
consumption,
override, demand, or
Host configuration runtime cell
Host editor message/ information has been
Upload data lost NA NA
workstation alarm mask: group lost. Usually due to
1, far left position communication failure
or because no file
space is available on
the hard disk.
The CCTV system has
CCTV system DVR Server notified I/NET of an
Video Alarm NA NA
DVR server Message mask alarm condition at this
video camera.
The CCTV system has
notified I/NET that an
CCTV system DVR Server
Video Alarm RTN NA NA alarm condition has
DVR server Message mask
ended at this video
camera.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

3-42 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-4. Event Types (Continued)

Required Required
Message Enabled by
Source Alarm Message Description
Type Mask/Priority of:
Priority* Priority*

The CCTV system


CCTV system DVR Server DVR server has lost
Video lost NA NA
DVR server Message mask communication with
this video camera.
The CCTV system
CCTV system CCTV Camera video camera has
Video Motion NA NA
DVR server Message mask detected motion at this
video camera.
The CCTV system
video camera has
Video Motion CCTV system CCTV Camera
NA NA stopped detecting
RTN DVR server Message mask
motion at this video
camera.
The CCTV system
DVR server has re-
CCTV system DVR Server
Video Restored NA NA established
DVR server Message mask
communication with
this video camera.
* R = Routine, P = Priority, C = Critical, NA = Not Applicable

Transactions
Transactions are specific event messages related to access control
functions. These messages are stored in the TRANSACT table in
the database. Transactions may be stored indefinitely using the
Archive utility.
The actual distribution of these messages is determined by
assigning the event as a transaction or as an alarm. The event type
selection (either alarm or transaction) will determine which distri-
bution group, mask, cell number and report priority will be used.

Note: All alarms are also stored as transactions.

The following parameters are available in the door parameters


editor for controlling message distribution:

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-43


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Group and Mask


The distribution group and mask of a message determine where
that message will be stored/printed.

Note: Only distribution Group 1 messages will cause a Dial Tap to dial out.

See Also: Masking on page 3-1


Cell Number
The desired cell number (01023). You must assign a value other
than zero in order for SevenTrends to store the information. Other-
wise, this field is not used in TAC I/NET Seven and can be any
value.
This field provides backward compatibility for systems which
previously used the DocutrendTM data collection system. If desired,
you may use the cell number to provide a grouping function on
reports.

See Also: Chapter 16, SevenTrends


Report Priority
This parameter can be set to one of the following settings:
Routine Used for Direct connect systems.
Priority Used in Dial systems. The messages are stored in the
7806x Tap until a specified percentage of the buffer is filled or
a time delay expires, and then are sent to the host.
Critical Send Dial request immediately without any delays.
Transactions and Alarms
For each transaction type, you can select whether you want a trans-
action event to generate no event notice (ignore the event), a trans-
action, or an alarm. The transaction types are listed in Table 3-5.
Transaction Filter
This function allows you to further refine your filter for display of
transactions. This function is only available if you have selected at
least one transaction in the Event Info section of the Event Filter
(see Event Info on page 3-25).

3-44 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-5. Transaction Event Types

Event Transaction or Alarm Message(s)

Reader entry. A valid key/card was used to enter through an access controlled
door. Message includes the individuals name, tenant, and key/card number.
Reader entry Elev. entry. A valid key/card was used in an access controlled elevator reader.
Message includes the individuals name, tenant, key/card number, and floor
selection.

Reader exit. A valid key/card has been used to exit through an access controlled
Reader exit
door. Message includes the individuals name, tenant, and key/card number.

Deny entry Sched. Entry through an access controlled door was denied because
Denied the individual is not allowed access at the time attempted.
schedule Deny exit Sched. Exit through an access controlled door was denied because
the individual is not allowed access at the time attempted.

Deny entry PIN. Entry through an access controlled door was denied because
an invalid Personal Identification Number (PIN) was entered.
Denied PIN
Deny exit PIN. Exit through an access controlled door was denied because an
invalid PIN was entered.

Deny entry APB. Entry through an access controlled door was denied until the
Denied APB individual exits the same door or another door within the same anti-passback
(APB) zone.

Deny entry Ten. Entry through an access controlled door was denied because
the individuals key/card is not in the system, or the individual is attempting to
enter a door assigned to a different tenant.
Denied - tenant
Deny exit Ten. Exit through an access controlled door was denied because the
individuals key/card is not in the system, or the individual is attempting to exit a
door assigned to a different tenant.

Deny entry Iss. Entry through an access controlled door was denied because the
key/card used has an invalid issue level.
Denied - issue
Deny exit Iss. Exit through an access controlled door was denied because the
key/card used has an invalid issue level.

Deny entry Sel. Entry through an access controlled door was denied because a
Denied - door and personnel schedule has not been selected for the individual.
selection Deny exit Sel. Exit through an access controlled door was denied because a door
and personnel schedule has not been selected for the individual.

Duress entry. A duress code has been entered at an entry reader PIN pad.
Duress entry
Duress elev. A duress code has been entered at an elevator PIN pad.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-45


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Table 3-5. Transaction Event Types (Continued)

Event Transaction or Alarm Message(s)

Duress exit A duress code has been entered at an exit reader PIN pad.

The card reader was unable to validate the card entered by the user. This may
Bad card read
indicate a faulty card, a user error, or a problem with the reader.

Door open too long. The door has been opened longer than the __ time set in
DOTL
the door parameters editor.

Forced door An access controlled door has been forced open.

Door return to normal. An access control door has returned to normal from
Door normal
either a Door Open Too Long or Forced Door alarm condition.

The fields for defining a transaction filter are shown in Table 3-6.

Table 3-6. Transaction Filter Field Descriptions

Group Field Description

These fields are alphanumeric fields that allow you to determine


search criteria for data within each field. You may enter up to 16
Last name
characters, including the wildcard characters ? and *. The filter
First name may include all elements or only one.
Name
Selection For example, if you place J* in the last name field, all transactions
will be filtered for individuals with a last name beginning with a J
Group name (James, Johnson, etc.) If you place Johns?n in the last name field,
all transactions will be filtered for individuals with a last name using
a form of Johnson (e.g., Johnson or Johnsen).

The starting and ending tenant numbers for displayed


Tenant
transactions. The default values include all tenants (0255).
The starting and ending key/card numbers for displayed
Key/Card
Range transactions. The default values include all keys/cards (032,000).
Selection
Note: Tenant 0 and Key/Card 0 are used for specific transactions, such as Bad
Card Read. Excluding them from the filter range will eliminate these
transactions.
The starting and ending access control zones for displayed
Zone
transactions. The default values include all zones (031).

3-46 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-6. Transaction Filter Field Descriptions (Continued)

Group Field Description


Select whether transactions from individuals with a record type of
Permanent
Permanent will be included in the transaction display.
Record Type Select whether transactions from individuals with a record type of
Temporary
Selection Temporary will be included in the transaction display.
Select whether transactions from individuals with a record type of
Disabled
Disabled will be included in the transaction display.

Print
The print function allows you to print a list of all events that pass
through the current filter. Statistics concerning non-elevator reader
entries, elevator reader entries, reader exits, and reader denies for
the selected readers are included at the bottom of the printout.
The default is to print the entire contents of the window. You may
use the options in the print dialog window to specify a range of
pages.
To determine which page(s) you wish to print, move the mouse
cursor to the Date/Time field in the active window. Do not click in
the field, but just place the mouse cursor over it. After a slight delay,
a popup window will indicate which page that transaction is on.

Note: The page number feature does not work on alarms that contain a
dispatch message: the popup window shows the dispatch text instead.
To see which page an alarm is on, check the page number for the
event above or below it.

The actual number of pages printed depends on the number and


size of columns displayed in the window. Enough sheets will print
for each page to show all columns. For example, if you have an
active event window that includes all of the possible columns,
printing requires three sheets per page in landscape mode
(default). For each page you select to print, three actual pages will
be printed.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-47


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Text Library
This feature allows you to specify a text message to send across a
serial (COM) port when a point goes into alarm. This can be used
to send commands to third-party hardware that can accept ASCII
text instructions, such as CCTV and paging or intercom systems.
The serial port and transmission rate are set in the I/NET Config-
uration active profile. Refer to the section on TAC I/NET Seven
Configuration in TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started.
Point Address
Each entry in the text library must have a unique point address;
only one entry is allowed for each point. When the point goes into
alarm, the text command is sent out over the designated COM
port.

Note: The point address cannot be changed when modifying an existing


entry. Use the copy function to copy the information from an existing
entry to a new entry.

Text
The text message can be up to 127 characters long, including alpha-
numeric characters and special escape sequences. Escape sequences
always start with the backslash (\) character to indicate the escape
(Esc) command. The supported escape sequences are shown in
Table 3-7. Escape sequences count as a single character.

Table 3-7. Text Library Escape Sequences

Esc
Character
Sequence

\xxx ASCII character code, up to 3 digits


\a Alert bell
\b Backspace
\f Form feed
\n New line
\r Carriage return
\t Horizontal tab
\v Vertical tab

3-48 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Table 3-7. Text Library Escape Sequences (Continued)

Esc
Character
Sequence

\ Single quote
\ Double quote
\\ Backslash
\? Literal question mark

Image Verification
Image verification allows the operator to view the picture of the
individual associated with transactions (access control events). The
image verification window is set to always on top. There are two
image verification options:
Automatic: the system can be set to create an image verifica-
tion window for an AMT event window. This window will
automatically display the image associated with the individual
from the most recent transaction, updating at the screen
refresh rate (every two seconds). At every refresh, the window
shows the image associated with the most recent transaction
event.

Note: If more than one transaction occurs during the refresh interval, the
earlier events will not have an image displayed in the automatic
image verification window.

On demand: the operator can open a static image window, to


view the image associated with a particular transaction in an
event window, or a transaction alarm in an alarm window.
The procedure for adding image verification is as follows:
1. Add user images to the individual record in the Individual
Parameters editor (refer to Individual Parameters in
Chapter 9, Access Control).
2. Select the desired fields for image verification windows in the
Image Verification Configuration editor (see Image Verifica-
tion Configuration Editor on page 3-50).
3. (Automatic image verification only) Complete the following:

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-49


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

a. Select the doors for the image verification window in the


Image Verification Door Filter editor (see Image Verifi-
cation Door Filter Editor on page 3-50).
b. Open an event window, or select an existing event
window. The event window must be the active window.
c. Activate automatic image verification for the selected
event window.
4. (On demand image verification only) Open a static image veri-
fication window for an event or transaction alarm.
Image Verification Configuration Editor
Use this editor to select up to seven individual parameters to
display in the image verification windows, along with the image.
After selecting the desired fields, arrange them in the desired order.
If you change the selected parameters while there are image verifi-
cation windows open, any automatic image verification windows
will be updated with the new information.
Static image verification windows for specific transactions will not
be updated if the parameters are changed. To update a static image
verification window, close the window and re-open it for the same
transaction.
Image Verification Door Filter Editor
Use this editor to specify the doors to include in the automatic
image verification window for the active event window. A separate
filter may be set for each event window.
AMT will retain the door filters for an event window, as long as the
window is left open. You may turn off the automatic image verifi-
cation, and even shut down AMT, and the door filter settings will
remain until the event window is closed.

Note: This filter does not affect the events displayed in the event window. It
only affects the events shown in the automatic image verification
window.

3-50 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

CCTV
CCTV features are available only after you have integrated a Pelco
digital CCTV system with TAC I/NET Seven. For instructions on
how to integrate and use digital CCTV with TAC I/NET Seven,
including information on how to use CCTV from within AMT,
refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database Connectivity and
Reporting.

Archives
The archive function allows you to periodically save AMT events to
a separate database. This allows you to store events indefinitely, and
to have the stored events available for viewing and reporting
purposes. Refer to the help file for information on the report func-
tions available.

Note: Archiving and filtering both use a great deal of system resources.
While archiving, particularly when there are a large number of
online AMT records, it may appear as though your AMT filters are
not operating properly. Filter operation will return to normal when
the archive function is complete.

The archive database will be stored in the location specified as the


Archive directory in I/NETs Configure program. Refer to
TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started, for more information
on setting directories.
There are two ways to create an archive: triggered and manual.
A triggered archive is one that is initiated by the system, based
on reaching a certain number of online events (threshold
trigger), or a certain passage of time (scheduled trigger).
Triggered archives may be set to run automatically, or to
require confirmation from the operator.
A manual archive is one that is initiated by the operator,
through the Archive Now button on the Archive Configura-
tion editor.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-51


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Note: Each archive file consumes a minimum amount of disk space due to
the identifying parameters that must be saved. Frequent archive
activity resulting in small archive files can therefore consume a large
amount of disk space. To conserve disk space, archive parameters
resulting in fewer, larger archive files are recommended.

File Naming
Each archive is stored in a separate file. The file naming convention
is as follows:
ARC_YYMMDDX.mdf (TAC I/NET Seven 2.12 or earlier)
OR
ARC_YYMMDDX.ARC (TAC I/NET Seven 2.13 or later)
where:
ARC_ = indicates an event archive
YY = last two digits of the year
MM = month
DD = day of month
X = sequential letter used to differentiate multiple archives
created on the same day. The first archive of the day will not
have a letter (for example: ARC_061025.mdf). The second
archive will have the letter A appended (for example:
ARC_061025A.mdf), the third will have the letter B, and so
on.
.mdf (TAC I/NET Seven 2.12 or earlier) = indicates a file in
Microsoft standard database format.
OR
.ARC (TAC I/NET Seven 2.13 or later) = indicates a file in SQL
database format.
Number of Records
Records are archived in batches of 1000. An archive will only run if
the current online (unarchived) records exceeds the minimum
online records by at least 1000. The minimum online records is set
in the Archive Configuration editor (see Archive Configuration
Editor below).

3-52 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

The number of records available for archive is calculated as:


current records minimum online records
This number is rounded up, as it is unlikely the current number of
records is an exact multiple of 1000. Therefore, the actual number
of records in an archive will vary. The more frequently you run
archives (either triggered or manual), the smaller each archive file
will be.
Archive Reminders
If a triggered archive is set to require operator confirmation, the
operator has the choice of postponing the archive. If an archive has
been postponed, a reminder screen will appear when an operator
logs on.
In addition, the Archive Confirmation editor will reappear every 24
hours, or when another trigger point is reached, until an archive is
successfully completed.
Archive Configuration Editor
I/O Server must be running to enter or edit the archive configura-
tion.
Archive Settings
Enable event archiving Indicate whether you wish to archive
events. If this checkbox is not activated, all AMT archiving func-
tions are disabled. When the number of events exceeds the set
maximum (see Maximum Online Events on page 3-54), old
events are discarded as new ones come in on a first-in, first-out
basis. If events are not archived, this will result in loss of data.
Verify archive contents Indicate whether you wish the system
to verify the number of records archived. If this checkbox is acti-
vated, then an Archive complete message indicates that the veri-
fication was successful.
Archive Failure Alarm Set the alarm level for a failed archive
attempt: Routine, Priority, or Critical.
Archive device Enter the path to the storage location for the
archive files. This must be an existing folder on your local drive.
Click the browse button (...) to search for a folder.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-53


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Online Event Storage


Minimum Online Events Enter the minimum number of
events that must be saved in online storage, in thousands (13000).
This is the minimum number of events that will remain unar-
chived. This entry should be the smallest number in this section.
The maximum entry of 3000 indicates three million online events.
Archive Threshold Enter the number of unarchived events
required to initiate a threshold archive, in thousands (14,000).
When the system reaches this number of unarchived events, an
automatic archive will be initiated (see Threshold Trigger on
page 3-55). This entry should be higher than the Minimum Online
Events, and smaller than the Override Threshold. The maximum
entry of 4000 indicates four million online events. This field is
unavailable if the Threshold Trigger is set to Disabled.
Override Threshold Enter the number of unarchived events
that will trigger an override archive, in thousands (14900). When
this number is reached, an automatic archive will be generated,
regardless of the settings for the threshold trigger. This is to prevent
data loss in the case where the operator has postponed a confirmed
archive, or an unusual number of events have occurred between
scheduled archives. This entry should be higher than the Archive
Threshold, and less than the Maximum Online Events. The
maximum entry of 4,900 indicates 4.9 million online events.

Note: The only way to prevent an archive at the Override Threshold is to


disable the Enable event archiving checkbox.

Maximum Online Events Enter the maximum number of


events you wish to view online, in thousands (15000). Depending
on the other settings in this section, these will be a combination of
online and archived events. This is the total number of events that
can be viewed through the AMT editor, after which incoming
events will overwrite old ones on a first-in, first-out basis. This
entry should be the highest number in this section. The maximum
entry of 5000 indicates five million online events.

Note: The maximum online events parameter should be changed as little as


possible. See Database Wrap-Around on page 3-57.

3-54 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Audit Trail
Distribution Group Select the group (14). A distribution
group extends the scope of the eight-position mask, described
below, increasing the available masking positions to 32.
Distribution Mask Enable or disable each of the eight available
positions to create the audit trail distribution mask. Audit trail
messages will then appear at the host workstations with a matching
distribution group and active mask position. Refer to Masking
on page 3-1 for a complete discussion of masking.
Triggers
Threshold Trigger Select the action that will occur when the
unarchived events reach the Archive Threshold: Confirm, Auto-
matic, or Disable.

Confirm will trigger the Archive Confirmation editor when


the threshold is reached. The operator may either approve the
archive, allowing it to start, or postpone the archive. Refer to
Archive Confirmation Editor on page 3-56.
Automatic will trigger an automatic archive. The records will
be archived without any user intervention or notification.
Disabled means that no threshold archives will take place.
When this trigger is disabled, the Archive Threshold field in
the Online Event Storage section is also disabled.

Note: Even if the Threshold Trigger is disabled, an automatic archive will


take place if the number of unarchived records reaches the Override
Threshold.

Scheduled Trigger Select the action that will occur on a speci-


fied schedule: Confirm, Automatic, or Disable.
Confirm will trigger the Archive Confirmation editor when
the specified amount of time has passed. The operator may
either approve the archive, allowing it to start, or postpone
the archive. Refer to Archive Confirmation Editor on page
3-56.
Automatic will trigger an automatic archive. The records will
be archived without any user intervention or notification.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-55


TCON30004/13
AMT System Messages

Disabled means that no scheduled archives will take place.


When this trigger is disabled, the fields used to define the
schedule are also disabled.

Note: Even if the Scheduled Trigger is disabled, an automatic archive will


take place if the number of unarchived records reaches the Override
Threshold.

Elapsed Time Select this radio button if you wish to generate an


archive based on strict passage of time. Selecting this button will
de-select the Day of Week radio button. If you select this button,
you must also select the number (131) and the units (days or
weeks).
Day of Week Select this radio button if you wish to generate a
weekly archive on a specific day. Selecting this button will de-select
the Elapsed Time radio button. If you select this button, you must
also select the desired day from the drop-down box.
Time of Day Enter the time you would like the archive to start.
If either of your triggers is set to Confirm, this should be a time
when the station is occupied. Other system activity may cause a
delay, but the archive will start (or the Archive Confirmation editor
appear) within 15 minutes of the selected time.
Archive Confirmation Editor
The Archive Confirmation editor appears when:
an archive is triggered by threshold or schedule, and the
matching trigger is set to Confirm; or
the operator initiates a manual archive.
Thousands of records to archive Sets the number of records
that will be archived, in thousands. The number cannot be set to
more than (current online events minimum online events). The
default number is the maximum records that can be archived. The
operator may reduce this number to archive fewer records, but it
cannot be set to a higher number than the default.

3-56 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages AMT

Verify archive contents Indicates whether the system will verify


that the number of records in the archive matches the number of
records that should have been archived. The default for this
matches the setting in the Archive Configuration editor. The oper-
ator may change the setting.
Start button Approves the archive settings and starts the
archive.
Cancel button Closes the window without starting the archive.
This will postpone a triggered archive, or abort a manual archive.
Database Wrap-Around
The maximum size of the AMT portion of the TAC I/NET Seven
database is set using the Maximum Online Events parameter in the
AMT Archive Configuration editor (see Archive Configuration
Editor on page 3-53). This parameter should be changed as little
as possible, because of the way the data wrap-around works in the
database.
When you first create the database, the default for maximum
online events (1000) sets aside a block for one million records. Any
changes to this value increases or decreases the block accordingly.
Once the designated block is full, new records overwrite old records
on a first-in, first-out (FIFO) basis. To prevent data loss, it is
important to set your archive parameters so that the data is
archived before this occurs.
A potential problem arises when the designated block is full (i.e.,
FIFO has commenced), and then the number of online records is
decreased. Say for example that you change the maximum online
events to 75,000 records. The system then changes its focus to the
most recent 75,000 records, ignoring any older messages.
If you again increase the database size, the system allocates the
appropriate additional space at the end of the current database.
Thus, the latent records are still there, taking up database space, but
are never accessed again by TAC I/NET Seven.
Each time the maximum online events setting is decreased and
then increased, another dead section of latent records could
potentially be created. Over time, this can greatly increase your
overall database size, affecting system performance.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-57


TCON30004/13
DCU Error Messages System Messages

Archive Window
The archive file contents may be opened from the System menu.
Archives are displayed in an event window. The title bar for an
archive window includes the archive file name.
Window options (see Window Options Editor on page 3-16) and
filtering (Filtering on page 3-23) are available on archive
windows.

DCU Error Messages


In the course of system operation, a DCU error message may
appear in a pop-up window on the TAC I/NET Seven screen. These
messages are generated by the DCU or by a communication
problem between TAC I/NET Seven and the DCU. The error
messages and their meanings are shown in Table 3-8.

Table 3-8. DCU Error Messages

Error Message Description

Unknown DCU
This message indicates an internal error contact technical support.
response error
I/O Server did not reply. Check to make sure I/O Server is running. You may
have to restart I/O Server to clear the error.
No reply from
I/O Server Note: Restarting I/O Server requires you to shut down TAC I/NET Seven
and Configure (if running). If this is an Access Control filemaster
workstation, you must also shutdown the equalization server.
No reply from Host Tap The Host Tap is not responding. Check the Tap connections.
The DCU is not responding to the connection request. Check the DCU
No reply
connections and communication link.
No carrier (Dial connections only.) Telephone connection is not active.
Invalid password The password entered is not valid for the attempted connection.
A command issued from the host has no associated function in the
Invalid subcommand
receiving controller.
A command parameter included in the message issued from the host is
Invalid parameter
invalid for the command type used.
Host database differs from DCU database. This may be due to multiple
Entry not found
computers editing the same DCU database at the same time.

3-58 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
System Messages DCU Error Messages

Table 3-8. DCU Error Messages (Continued)

Error Message Description


One or more bits of the issued command was not received properly. This
LRC error
may be due to line noise or other interference during the transmission.
Less than 256 bytes
DCU memory is nearly exhausted.
remaining in DCU
Memory error DCU memory exhausted.

Note: DCU error messages are not stored in the database.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 3-59


TCON30004/13
DCU Error Messages System Messages

3-60 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
CHAPTER

4
36
Host Functions

Host Configuration
The Host Configuration editor allows you to define user-interface
parameters for the current workstation. The changes you make
here go into effect as soon as you exit the editor.

Main Window Title


This allows you to customize the title of the TAC I/NET Seven
window (shown in the blue bar, unless you have customized your
window settings). Enter up to 79 characters.

SevenTrends Masks
SevenTrends data is sent only to the workstations whose distribu-
tion group (14) and active mask position(s) match an active mask
position in the originating point. Both the distribution group and
active mask position must match for the data to be received.
Group 14
All message masks are assigned to one of four distribution groups.
The distribution group extends the number of possible masks in a
system to 32. In order for a mask to match, it must find an active
mask position in the assigned distribution group. Each distribution
group may contain up to eight active mask positions.

Note: System messages always use the far left mask position in distribution
group 1. Dial messages always use distribution group 1.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-1


TCON30004/13
Host Configuration Host Functions

Distribution Mask
Use masks to screen data sent from DCUs to SevenTrends database
tables by accepting only those messages with the same group
number and matching active mask positions. Refer to information
on message routing in Chapter 3, System Messages, and to the point
parameter descriptions in Chapter 6, Input and Output Points.

Monitor
The host configuration editor provides monitor options that allow
you to further customize TAC I/NET Seven. The following monitor
options are available.
Refresh Interval
This option controls the number of seconds between screen
refreshes when a system page or summary is being displayed. The
refresh rate can be adjusted from 1 to 60 seconds.

Note: Page refresh will be suspended during host tasks such as software
downloads, station saves, and station restores.

Auto AMT startup/shutdown


This option specifies whether AMT should automatically start
when TAC I/NET Seven is started, and shut down when TAC I/NET
Seven is shutdown. Activate this checkbox if you with AMT to start
and shutdown in tandem with TAC I/NET Seven. This does not
affect your ability to start AMT independently.
Default System Page
The default system page selection determines which system page is
displayed by default. Any existing system page may be specified.
Refer to System Pages (Graphics Editor) on page 4-19.
Operator Timeout Action
Specify the action that will occur when the operator time-out
interval expires. There a four options as follows:
Signoff Determines that the system will automatically sign
the current operator off when the operator timeout expires.

4-2 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Configuration

Default page Displays the default system page when the


operator timeout expires.
Both Enables both the signoff and auto page functions.
None Specifies that no action will occur when the operator
timeout interval expires. Use this option if you do not wish to
use the operator timeout function.
Operator Timeout
This option controls the number of minutes (up to 255) of inac-
tivity (no mouse or keyboard activity) that can elapse before the
Operator Timeout Action is enabled. A setting of zero (0) disables
the operator timeout.

Note: The timeout function only monitors keyboard and mouse activity.
Functions such as a software restore will not halt the timer. If lengthy
automatic operations are to be performed, the operator timeout func-
tion should be disabled to ensure they will be completed.

Do Not Notify on Operator Time-out


This option allows you to control whether or not an informative
message will be displayed each time an operator timeout occurs.
Select this option if you wish to prevent the display of the message.

I/NET Logoff Options


The parameters in this section allow you to prohibit or allow the
closing, resizing, or moving of TAC I/NET Seven windows while no
operator is logged into TAC I/NET Seven. Once a user logs in, their
host password settings will determine what window controls are
available.
Size/Move
If this option is deactivated, TAC I/NET Seven windows cannot be
resized or moved until an operator logs into TAC I/NET Seven.
Close
If this option is deactivated, TAC I/NET Seven windows cannot be
closed until an operator logs into TAC I/NET Seven.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-3


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

Close All Graphics


If this option is activated, all open graphic pages will automatically
be closed when any logged in operator logs off.

DCU Save File Encryption


Starting with TAC I/NET Seven revision 2.41, you can encrypt the
DCU password that gets stored in DCU save files.

Note: Any DCU save files that are created with encryption will not be
restorable in versions of TAC I/NET Seven prior to version 2.41.

After enabling encryption, any new DCU save files you create will
have the DCU password stored in an encrypted format. Already
existing DCU saves are not affected and will not contain encrypted
DCU passwords unless they get overwritten by new save files.
Each DCU save files encryption key is stored within the file itself.
Therefore, if you ever change the encryption key in the Host
Configuration editor, existing DCU save files will still decrypt
properly.
Password Encryption Key
To enable encryption, use this field to define an encryption key of
up to 16 characters. If you leave this field blank, no encryption will
be performed.

Host Passwords
Passwords are used in TAC I/NET Seven to control user access and
privileges. You can assign host passwords to users and DCU pass-
words to controllers. Host passwords provide system-level security.
When you assign host passwords to users, you can specify which
TAC I/NET Seven editors, remote host, and tenants a user can
access. You can also preassign controller passwords and controller
access levels to host passwords, enabling users to access certain
controllers without the need to enter a controller password.

4-4 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Passwords

Note: Whenever you add a new host to a commercial LAN with existing
TAC I/NET Seven hosts, the system prompts you to update the host
passwords from the filemaster. In this case, the default user of TAC
and default password of DACS may not be functional at the new
host. This prevents someone at the new host from overwriting all
previously defined passwords. To use the new host, you must already
be familiar with the existing passwords.

The host password editor lets you assign individual user passwords
and specify which editors, remote host LAN systems, and access
control tenants the user can access. This editor also lets you preas-
sign controller passwords to users, enabling them to access certain
controllers without the need to enter a controller password. You
may print out a report of a users password authorizations for refer-
ence (see Password Report on page 4-17).
The host password parameters are as follows:
Name Use up to 30 characters to define the operators name.
The following characters cannot be used within the operator
name: " / \ [ ] : ; | = , + * ? < >.
Display Name Use up to 30 characters to define a display
name for the operator. The following characters cannot be
used within the display name: " / \ [ ] : ; | = , + * ? < >.
Password Each operators password can contain up to 127
characters. All keyboard characters are valid.
Confirmation Confirm that the password has been entered
correctly by retyping it in the Confirmation field. TAC I/NET
Seven will not accept your parameter settings if the password
confirmation fails.
Initials Use up to four characters to define the operators
initials.
Alternate ID Use this for either of the following purposes:
Create a text string to appear in custom reports
Have this user inherit permissions and/or window
settings from another users account. Refer to Indirect
User Settings in the Passwords chapter of TCON299,
TAC I/NET Seven Operator Guide for more information.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-5


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

Enable Password Re-use By default, TAC I/NET Seven does


not allow operators to define a password that they have
already used in the past. However, you can enable password
re-use if necessary.
Enable Password Expiry You can force operators to periodi-
cally change their password by enabling password expiry.
Expiry Interval (days) If you have enabled password expiry,
you can specify how often the system forces the operator to
change their password. After the specified number of days
have elapsed since the Expiry Start Date, the system will force
the operator to change their password the next time that they
attempt to log onto the system.
Expiry Start Date The Expiry Interval countdown begins
upon the Expiry Start Date. The operator will be prompted to
enter a new password when they log in after the start date plus
the expiry period. The logic for this is:
If current date > (Expiry Start date + Expiry Interval)
then change password.
Once the operator has entered a new password, the start date
will be reset to the current date and the process repeats. If the
operator chooses to change the password before it expires,
then the start date will be reset to the current date.
Card/I-Disc If you define a card/I-Disc number, TAC I/NET
Seven can allow the operator to logon by presenting their
Wiegand card/I-Disc at a Wiegand reader connected to the
host workstations RS232 port. This feature requires that the
AC Reader Type and AC Reader Port fields must to be setup in
the I/NET Configuration editor for the active profile. Refer to
Peripherals in the TAC I/NET Seven Configuration chapter
of TCON298, TAC I/NET Seven Getting Started.
If password expiry is enabled, a dialog box will appear the first time
the operator signs on after the password has expired. This will
force the operator to enter and confirm a new password.
If the new and confirmation passwords match, the new password
will replace the old one. If the passwords do not match, then the
dialog will display an error message and the operator will need to
re-enter the passwords. This process will continue indefinitely
until the operator enters two matching passwords.

4-6 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Passwords

In the event that the operator cancels the forced password change
process, they will be logged out of the system. However, if the oper-
ator voluntarily chooses to change their password while already
logged into TAC I/NET Seven, then they will be allowed to cancel
the process and remain logged on.

Function Selection
Note: When changing a host password's function assignments, the changes
do not take affect until the next time the associated operator logs into
TAC I/NET Seven.

Function selection allows you to assign TAC I/NET Seven functions


to a password. After signing on, only the functions that have been
assigned to the password are accessible to the operator. These func-
tions are categorized as follows:
Command line functions Functions used to view or
summarize TAC I/NET Seven system status, generate reports,
manually control points or devices, or acknowledge alarms.
Host computer functions System-level editors and functions
available to an operator. When an operator accesses the TAC
I/NET Seven system, only the system-level editors associated
with the operators password appear on the screen.
Tap configuration/status editors Includes host, link, and site
Tap editors.
DCU functions Controller-level editors and functions avail-
able to an operator. When an operator connects to a
controller, only the controller-level editors associated with the
operators password appear on the screen.
Access functions Editors and functions used for access
control. Access functions are divided into Host Access func-
tions and DCU Access functions.
AMT functions Editors and functions used in Alarms,
Messages, and Transactions (AMT).
System tray functions Editors and functions accessed from
the I/O Server icon in the system tray.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-7


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

Window control functions Functions used for moving,


closing, and resizing TAC I/NET Seven and AMT windows.
Refer to Controlling Window Layouts in TAC I/NET Seven
in the TAC I/NET Seven Basics chapter of TCON299, TAC
I/NET Seven Operator Guide for more information.
Seven Reports functions Functions used for accessing the
Seven Reports application.
The functions are detailed in Table 4-1.

Table 4-1. Function Select Editor Fields

Function/Editor Action

Command Line
Enable the Host Masks, NP Routers, and Advanced IP buttons in
Advanced WAN Options
the I/NET Configuration Profile editor.
Create new report generation schedules, or modify/delete existing
Auto Report Generation
schedules.
Automatic Control Take a point out of manual operation and place it in automatic mode
Allow display of a CCTV button in the I/NET Configuration Profiles
editor. The Enable CCTV option must also be activated () in the
active profile in order for this button to be displayed.
When present, the CCTV button provides access to the editors
CCTV
necessary for viewing and configuring DVR servers and CCTV
cameras.
Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database Connectivity and
Reporting, for more information about CCTV-related features.
Modify CCTV camera parameters in the Camera Parameters editor.
This does not affect the message masking parameters in the Camera
CCTV - Camera Parameters Parameters editor.
Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database Connectivity and
Reporting, for more information about CCTV-related features.
Add, modify, copy, or delete DVRs. Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET
CCTV - DVR Seven Database Connectivity and Reporting, for more information
about CCTV-related features.
Modify CCTV camera message masks in the Camera Parameters
editor.
CCTV - Message Parameters
Refer to TCON301, TAC I/NET Seven Database Connectivity and
Reporting, for more information about CCTV-related features.
Change Password Replace users existing host password with a new password
Configuration View controller, Tap, and host configuration summaries

4-8 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Passwords

Table 4-1. Function Select Editor Fields (Continued)

Function/Editor Action
Controller View controller point summaries
Disabled Point View disabled (test or manual mode) point summaries
Door APB Reset Reset antipassback for doors from the door summary display.
Door Lock Manually lock doors from the door summary display
Place doors back to the automatic mode from the door summary
Door Manual Off
display
Allow momentary access through doors from a summary or system
Door Momentary Release
page
Door Secure Manually secure doors from the door summary display
Door Summary View door point summaries
Door Unlock Manually unlock doors from the door summary display
Exit Exit from TAC I/NET Seven
Live Graphic Page View live system graphic pages
Manual Control Take a point out of automatic operation and place it in manual mode
Multi-Point Trend Access the multi-point trend plot editor
Off Normal Point View offnormal (in alarm) point summaries
Page View the graphic page point summaries
Page Acknowledge Alarms Acknowledge all alarms on the current alarm summary screen page
Control a point to a specific state or value. This function allows
Point Control
operator control of the environmental equipment
Test Off Take a point out of test mode
Test On Place a point into test mode
Work Offline Configure controller-level settings without establishing a connection.
Host Computer
Archive Data Archive SevenTrends data
Configuration The host configuration editor
Data Inquiry/Edit View SevenTrends sample data
Definitions Create, modify, or delete SevenTrends definitions.
Graphics Editor The system pages editor
Host ATS The automatic time schedule editor in the host workstation
Host Trend Log The 12-point host trend log function
Network Configuration Edit the network configuration

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-9


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

Table 4-1. Function Select Editor Fields (Continued)

Function/Editor Action
Setup automatic DCU saves, time synchronization, special day
Network Functions broadcasts, offnormal point and disabled point displays; print
database tables
Passwords The host passwords editor. By default, this function is not selected
Phone Numbers The phone number editor in a Dial host workstation
Software Restore Database and software restore editor for all downloadable devices
Transfer Configuration Setup parameters for transferring SevenTrends records.
Trend Delete Delete a previously defined trend or cell definition from SevenTrends.
Host Tap
Host Tap The host Tap configuration/status editor.
Link Tap
Link Tap The configuration/status editors for link Taps.
Site Tap
The remote dial Tap configuration editor (when connecting through a
Remote Dial Tap Configuration
controller LAN)
Site Tap Configuration The configuration/status editors for LAN Taps.
Site Tap Restore The 7806x Tap phone number restore function.
Site Tap Save The 7806x Tap phone number save function.
DCU
MRI, MCI, or I/SITE LAN editor used to define MR-AHU or MR-VAV
ASC Parameters
operational parameters.
Alarm Inhibit The alarm inhibit (AI) extension editor
Calculation The calculated (CA) point extension editor
Configuration The controller configuration editor
Consumption The consumption (CN) extension editor
Control Descriptions Define up to 8 control description pairs for a DCU
Conversion Coefficients Define mathematical constants used for A/D conversion
DPU Configuration The DPI resident door processing unit configuration editor
Demand Control The demand control (DC) extension editor
Direct Digital Control The DDC editor
Dynamic Data Upload Initiate a data upload from a controller
The access control elevator (EL) editor used to control elevator
Elevators
pushbuttons within the selected DPI, MCI, or I/SITE LAN
Engineering Units Define up to 16 units of measure

4-10 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Passwords

Table 4-1. Function Select Editor Fields (Continued)

Function/Editor Action
Equipment Mapping Define equipment mapping parameters for a 7750 Building Manager.
Event Actions Message/report/conversion editor
Event Definition The event definition (EV) point extension editor
Event Sequences The event sequences editor
I/STAT Parameters I/STAT parameters editor for MRs and ASCs
Input Configuration Edit DPU parameters
I/SITE I/O and I/SITE LAN editor used to define ViewCon page
LCD Page Definition
displays
Lighting Circuit Add, delete, modify, or copy a lighting circuit in a 7780 DLCU
Lookup Tables Define a lookup table for a 7716, 7718, 7756, or 7728
MCU Configuration The MCI or I/SITE LAN resident MR/ASC/DPU configuration editor
MR Configuration The MRI resident MR configuration editor
The MR resident parameters, factory coefficients, and standalone
MR Functions
ATS editors
The editor used to copy operating parameters from one MR to
MR to MR Copy
another.
Override Access Codes Define codes for remotely initiating overrides
Override Parameters The override billing (OB) extension editor
Passwords The controller passwords editor
Resident I/O Point The resident I/O point editor
Runtime The runtime (RT) extension editor
Special Days The special days editor
State Descriptions Define the descriptors used to indicate point and device status
Station Restore Restore controller database from disk
Station Save Save controller database to disk
Temperature Control The temperature control (TC) extension editor
Time Scheduling The time scheduling (TS) extension editor
Trend Plot Initiate a trend plot
Trend Sampling The trend sampling (TR) extension editor
UC Configuration The UC configuration editor
UC to UC Copy The editor used to copy operating parameters from one UC to another
Unitary Control The unitary control (UC) editor
Zone Definition Define a lighting zone

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-11


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

Table 4-1. Function Select Editor Fields (Continued)

Function/Editor Action

Host Access
The menu item Access Access Initiated Control.
Access Initiated Control Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define
access initiated control parameters
The menu item Access Access Wizard.
Access Wizard Selecting this menu item causes a wizard to open and guide you
through the process of adding an individual to a tenant.
The menu item Access Door Schedules.
Door Schedules Selecting this menu item causes the Door Selection Summary to
open.
The menu item Access Doors.
Doors Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define door
operating parameters.
The menu item Access Generate PINs.
Generate PINs Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to generate a
list of personal identification numbers (PINs)
The menu item Access Generate PINs.
Groups Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define
groups.
The menu item Access Individuals.
Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to to define
individual parameters. A password being used as the second
Individuals
password required to save changes to an individual record must also
have this function enabled (refer to Second Password Required for
Individuals on page 9-85 for more information).
The menu item Access Key/Card Translations.
Key/Card Translations Selecting this item opens an editor you can use to translate key/card
numbers
The menu item Access Options.
Options Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to customize
the individuals editor display parameters
The menu item Access Personnel Schedules.
Personnel Schedules Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define
individual valid times of entry/exit
The menu item Access Recycle Bin and all parameters
associated with the recycle bin function.
Recycle Bin
The recycle bin can be used to temporarily store deleted Access
Control items.
Recycle Bin Purge Purge deleted Access Control items from the recycle bin

4-12 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Passwords

Table 4-1. Function Select Editor Fields (Continued)

Function/Editor Action
Allow deleted Access Control items to be recovered from the recycle
Recycle Bin Restore
bin
The menu item Access Tenants.
Tenants Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define
groups of individuals
DCU Access
The menu item Edit Controller Access Initiated Control.
Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define
Access Initiated Control
access initiated control sequences for all points within the selected
DPI, MCI, or I/SITE LAN.
The menu item Edit Controller Door Schedules.
Door Schedules Selecting this menu item causes the Door Selection Summary to
open.
The menu item Edit Controller Doors.
Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define the
Doors
door operating parameters for all doors within the selected DPI, MCI,
or I/SITE LAN
The menu item Edit Controller Personnel Schedules.
Personnel Schedules Selecting this menu item opens an editor you can use to define valid
entry/exit times for individuals
AMT
Acknowledge Acknowledge an alarm
Alarm Window View alarm messages
Archive Window View archived messages
Access the Camera Assignment editor. Refer to TCON301, TAC
Assign Camera to Point I/NET Seven Database Connectivity and Reporting, for more
information about CCTV-related features.
Auto-Image Verification Enable automatic display of user images for transactions
Configuration Configure AMT operation
Critical Alarm Window View critical alarms
Dispatch Dispatch messages for alarms
Event Window View events
Exit Shutdown AMT
Filters Define filters for AMT event and alarm windows
Home Page Display the home page for a point that is in alarm
Message Window View system messages
Print Print messages in an AMT window

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-13


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

Table 4-1. Function Select Editor Fields (Continued)

Function/Editor Action
Priority Alarm Window View priority alarms
Purge Purge alarms from the system
Routine Alarm Window View routine alarms
View CCTV video associated with an event. Refer to TCON301, TAC
Show Video I/NET Seven Database Connectivity and Reporting, for more
information about CCTV-related features.
Transaction Window View transactions
Window Options Choose how information is displayed within AMT windows
System Tray
Define parameters for archiving AMT records using the AMT Archive
Archive Configuration
Configuration editor
Configure Add, modify, or delete configuration profiles using INETCFG
Exit Shutdown IO Server
Window
Allow AMT Alarm wnd. close Allow the user to close the AMT alarm window
Allow AMT Alarm wnd. move
Allow the user to move and size the AMT alarm window
and size
Allow AMT Event wnd. close Allow the user to close the AMT event window
Allow AMT Event wnd. move
Allow the user to move and size the AMT event window
and size
Allow AMT main wnd. close Allow the user to close the AMT main window
Allow AMT main wnd. move
Allow the user to move and size the AMT main window
and size
Allow I/NET to be closed Allow the user to close the TAC I/NET Seven main window
Allow I/NET to move and size Allow the user to move and size the TAC I/NET Seven main window
Allow all wnd. to be closed Allow the user to close all TAC I/NET Seven windows
Allow all wnd. to move and size Allow the user to move and size all TAC I/NET Seven windows
Allow graphics to be closed Allow the user to close graphic windows
Allow graphics to move and
Allow the user to move and size graphic windows
size
Allow tree wnd. to be closed Allow the user to close tree windows
Allow tree wnd. to move and
Allow the user to move and size tree windows
size
Seven Reports
Seven Reports Allow access to Seven Reports.

4-14 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Passwords

Station Selection
You may restrict controller access by assigning each controller a
password. When you combine this with preassigned password
levels, operators do not have to remember the controller password
when connecting to a password-protected controller. This speeds
up connection and simplifies day-to-day operation.
Preassignment of passwords is a three step process. The first step is
to assign the appropriate password level (Level 2/Level 3/Level 4) to
the desired host password in the host passwords DCU selection
editor. Secondly, assign the actual password and associated pass-
word level to each link/controller listed in the DCU passwords
editor. The third step is to assign the same password and associated
password level in the DCU passwords editor of the controller. Refer
to Controller Passwords in Chapter 5, Controller Functions.

Tenant/Group Selection
Tenant selection allows access control system password protection
for each tenant defined in the system. You may select from the
complete list of tenants, the maximum is 255 tenants. Only the
tenants selected will appear in the tenants, group, and individual
editors for an operator using this password.
Besides assigning full tenant access to a user, you can also limit the
users access to specific groups within select tenants. After logging
into TAC I/NET Seven, the limited-access user will be unable to
modify any parameters or access any TAC I/NET Seven features
associated with groups that have not been assigned to the user.
Refer to Limited-access Users on page 4-17 for more informa-
tion.

Individual Field Selection


Note: The Individual Field Selection feature described below affects only
host passwords that have the Individuals function enabled ([X]).
Refer to Function Selection on page 4-7 for more information.

This option allows you to specify which individual fields will be


visible to the operator. This feature can be used to provide multiple
levels of security in an access control environment by specifying

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-15


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

each field that the operator will be able to view and edit. You must
have at least one individual defined for this option to be available.
Only the fields and buttons selected will be available to an operator
using this password.
If you wish to allow a user to view, but not edit, the fields, de-select
the OK Button parameter. When the user accesses the Individuals
Parameter editor, all displayed fields will be read-only. The user will
not be able to select the OK button to exit the editor, but must use
the Cancel button instead.

DCU Password Preassignment


TAC I/NET Seven allows you to preassign controller passwords to
individual host passwords. This allows users to connect to pass-
word-protected controllers without typing a password. The preas-
signed password is sent to the controller automatically. If the
preassigned password is valid for the selected controller, then the
user is granted access.
After preassignment, when the operator connects to the controller
level, the preassigned controller password for the operators
assigned level is compared to the controller password assigned to
the same level. If they match, the operator is granted access. The
controller passwords and associated level entered for the individual
host password must match the passwords and associated level
entered in the DCU password editor.
There are four password authorization levels, each relating to the
degree of access permitted the user of the password. Each password
may be up to four characters in length. Refer to Table 5-1,
Controller Access Levels, in Chapter 5 for a description of the
degrees of access granted at each of the four password authoriza-
tion levels.

Caution: Only level 4 lets you add or modify passwords. At least one user must
have a level 4 password. Also, if two passwords are identical but have
different priorities, the higher priority is granted to the user.

4-16 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Passwords

Password Report
Any operator with host password privileges may print a report of
other operators password authorizations from the Host Passwords
Summary editor. Select the operator(s) whose authorizations you
wish to include on the report. At least one operator must be
selected to activate the print function.

Limited-access Users
Note: An example of limited-access users in provided in the Passwords
chapter of TCON299, TAC I/NET Seven Operator Guide.

When adding or modifying a user in TAC I/NET Seven's Host Pass-


words editor, you can use the tenant selection process to limit the
users access based on specific tenants and groups. When defining
which of a tenants groups will be accessible to the user, you can
choose no access, full access, or read-only access.
After logging into TAC I/NET Seven, the limited-access user will be
unable to use some TAC I/NET Seven features associated with
groups that have been limited by the users host password.
The restrictions placed on a limited-access user are described
below.
Tenants
When a limited-access user selects Access Tenants from TAC
I/NET Seven's main menu, the following restriction will apply:
Cannot Add a new tenant.
Cannot Delete, Modify, or Copy any tenants for which limited
access has been assigned.
Individuals
When a limited-access user selects Access Individuals from TAC
I/NET Seven's main menu, the following restrictions will apply:
Can only see individuals associated with allowed groups.
Cannot Add or Delete individuals. The limited-access user
can only Modify existing individuals.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-17


TCON30004/13
Host Passwords Host Functions

Individual Doors
When a limited-access user is modifying an individual and selects
the Doors button, the following restrictions will apply:
Can only see doors associated with allowed groups.
Can assign the individual direct schedules to allowed doors.
Individual Groups
When a limited-access user is modifying an individual, selects the
Doors button, and then selects the Groups button, the following
restrictions will apply:
Can only add and remove allowed groups to and from the
individual, respectively.
Can only change the priority of allowed groups.
Cannot remove an allowed group if doing so would cause the
limited-access user to lose access to the individual.
Groups
When a limited-access user selects Access Groups from TAC
I/NET Seven's main menu, the following restrictions will apply:
Can only see individuals associated with allowed groups.
Can only see doors associated with allowed groups.
Cannot Delete groups for which the user has read-only access.
Cannot Modify groups for which the user has read-only
access.
Can Add groups. The user will automatically receive full
access to the groups he adds. By default, no other users will
have access to groups added by this user (only a person with
password privileges can assign these groups to other users).
Group Doors
When a limited-access user is modifying a group and selects the
Doors button, the following restrictions will apply:
Can only see doors associated with allowed groups.
Can assign the group direct schedules to allowed doors.
Can assign allowed groups to the group.

4-18 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions System Pages (Graphics Editor)

System Pages (Graphics Editor)


TAC I/NET Seven includes a graphics editor that you can use to
develop graphical system pages. System pages serve a variety of
functions but are designed primarily to let you graphically depict
the location and/or current state or value of your system compo-
nents. Each point on a system page can represent an internal,
external, or remotely connected system component. Use any one
point as often as you require it. Display discrete points in ASCII
text, with icons, or with dynamic graphic symbols. Display analog
data in decimal form, with icons, or as horizontal or vertical bar
charts.

File Formats
TAC I/NET Seven saves graphic pages and library symbols in
different formats than previous versions of TAC I/NET. Graphic
pages from earlier versions of TAC I/NET have a .pag file extension
and library symbols have a .bol extension. TAC I/NET Seven pages
will have a .gpg extension and library symbols will have a .gls exten-
sion. However, TAC I/NET Seven has the capability to open and
automatically convert both .pag and .bol graphic files.
References to Files
Graphic pages can include references to other graphic pages (i.e.,
page markers) and external graphic images (i.e., background
images and library symbols). When TAC I/NET Seven encounters
a referenced file, it will first attempt to locate a version of the file
that has been saved in a newer file format. Therefore, if a .pag file is
being referenced, TAC I/NET Seven will first attempt to open a .gpg
file of the same name. If a .bol file is being referenced, TAC I/NET
Seven will first attempt to open a .gls file of the same name.
For example: if a page marker links to a file named
c:\pages\mypage.pag, TAC I/NET Seven will first attempt to open
a file named c:\pages\mypage.gpg. If the file is not found, TAC
I/NET Seven will then search alternate paths for mypage.gpg
(refer to Alternate Graphic Paths below). If the result of this
search is unsuccessful, TAC I/NET Seven will open the file named
c:\pages\mypage.pag.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-19


TCON30004/13
Network Configuration Host Functions

Alternate Graphic Paths


TAC I/NET Seven can automatically search alternate paths for
missing files or for files of a newer format (as described above). You
can define unique alternate paths for page references and for
graphic symbol references. When TAC I/NET Seven attempts to
locate a referenced file, it uses the following search sequence:
Path defined by the object (i.e., page marker, discrete point,
library symbol, etc.).
Alternate paths defined for the object type (i.e., page or
symbol).
When defining multiple alternate paths, separate each path with a
semicolon (;). In the following example, the system will search
c:\graphics and d:\pages if a graphic page file cannot be found
at its original location.
Example alternate path definition: c:\graphics;d:\pages
Refer to TCON299, TAC I/NET Seven Operator Guide, for more
information on the graphics editor.

Network Configuration
You must create a permanent record of the devices you want
included in your system. If links or DCUs exist and are communi-
cating successfully, they automatically appear in the Network
Configuration editor. In this case, all you have to do is save the
configuration.
As you penetrate the system, the first level is link configuration
followed by site configuration, station (DCU) configuration,
UC/DPU/MR/ASC configuration, and door configuration (if
applicable). This follows TAC I/NETs tiered hierarchy of host
LAN, controller LAN, and UC/MR/ASC/DPU subLAN.
Depending on which link you penetrate, you may move to another
link configuration screen, a site configuration screen, or a
controller configuration screen.

4-20 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Network Configuration

Note: Before assigning doors in access control you must first penetrate the
system and save each level configuration. Refer to Chapter 9, Access
Control for more information.

Summary Information
Each summary provides basic information about the devices
defined in the system, and the status of their configuration. The
information displayed in a summary will be determined by the type
of device (i.e., Link, Link/LAN, Dial Link, etc.) being summarized.
The following items may appear in the summary, depending on the
device being summarized:

Note: An asterisk appearing next to an items value indicates a mismatch


between the information in the network configuration and the infor-
mation actually residing in the system.

Link The logical address assigned to the link.


Within the Link Summary, this item is a column that displays
each link defined in the host. If the host is communicating on
an Ethernet LAN, the Link column will include the links on
every other host communicating on the LAN.
Within other summaries, this item shows the link address of
the penetrated link device.
Host This item displays the number of the host through
which the connection is made.
Site The logical address assigned to the site Tap.
Type The type of device through which the connection is
made. TAC I/NET Seven displays the appropriate model
number.
Name The name of the link. A visual cue is presented when
there is a mismatch between the name listed in the network
configuration and the name given to the device residing in the
system. Mismatches are almost always caused by the replace-
ment of one type of equipment with another.
Download (Dn) Determines whether or not the device can
be downloaded via the software restore editor.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-21


TCON30004/13
Network Configuration Host Functions

Telephone Number This is the telephone number that other


devices dial to reach this device. This option is active only for
dial Taps 7804 Host/Link, 7805 Link, and 7806 Dial LAN.
R/H The R/H column displays the number of a host work-
station that will restore this links door controllers when
required due to a download failure during an access control
edit session. An L in this column indicates that the local
host workstation will perform any necessary automatic DPU
restore. A D indicates that the automatic DPU restore
feature is disabled. Refer to Automatic DPU Restore in
Chapter 5, Controller Functions, for more information about
the Restore Host.
Speed (7806 Taps only) The Tap baud rate. The baud rate
can be from 300 to 9600.
Stations This determines the number of stations occupied
by the device. Most controllers occupy a single station;
however, the 7750, 7792, and 7793 may represent two
stations. The 7797 may represent up to eight stations for
specific ICI types.
Cnf This item indicates whether the device is communi-
cating successfully and whether the device has been saved in
the network configuration. The following indications are
possible:
+ The device is successfully communicating but has not
been saved in the network configuration.
The previously saved device is not communicating
successfully.
blank The device is on-line and communicating properly as
defined in the last configuration save.

Link Configuration Summary


The Link Configuration Summary lists each link defined in the
host. If the host is communicating on an Ethernet LAN, this
summary will include the links on every other host communicating
on the LAN.

4-22 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Network Configuration

Table 4-2 lists the types of devices that may appear in the Link
Configuration Summary. This table also describes the purpose of
each device.

Table 4-2. Link Device Types

Type Purpose

7802 Link/LAN Connects a host LAN to the controller LAN


7802 Link Connects a host LAN to LAN Taps in a multiple controller LAN setup.
7805 Link Connects a host LAN to an external modem or directly to a telephone line.
7801 Host/Link/LAN Connects a workstation to the controller LAN.
7801 Host/Link Connects a workstation to host LAN Taps in a multiple controller LAN setup.
7804 Host/Link Connects a workstation to an external AD/AA host Tap.
2000 NetPlus Router Connects a controller LAN to an Ethernet network.
Both the Xenta 527 and the Xenta 527-NPR connect a TAC I/NET controller
LAN to an Ethernet network. The Xenta 527 also provides web-based access
Xenta 527
into the TAC I/NET system (the Xenta 527-NPR does not provide web-based
access).

Site Configuration Summary


The Site Configuration Summary is displayed when you penetrate
a 7802 Link, 7804 Dial Host/Link, or 7805 Dial Link Tap. This
summary contains a list of all defined 7803 and 7806 Taps.
You must save the link configuration through which you accessed
the site configuration before TAC I/NET Seven will let you save a
site configuration.

Station Configuration Summary


The Station Configuration Summary is available after penetrating
the system through a Link or Site Configuration Summary. The
Station Configuration Summary contains a list of all connected
controllers.
If your controller configuration includes a 7760 Unitary Controller
Interface, 7791 Door Processor Interface, 7792 Micro Regulator
Interface, 7793 Micro Controller Interface, or 7798 I/SITE LAN,

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-23


TCON30004/13
Network Functions Host Functions

then you may continue to penetrate the system through one of


these controllers. Otherwise, the controller level is the deepest level
of your configuration.
This is the only summary that includes the Stations item. This
item shows the number of stations occupied by the controller. Most
controllers occupy a single station; however, the 7750, 7792, and
7793 may represent two stations. The 7797 may represent up to
eight stations for specific ICI types.

MCU Configuration Summary


TAC I/NET Seven displays the MCU Configuration Summary
when you penetrate an interface unit in the Station Configuration
Summary. Interface units provide support for micro control units
(MCUs) connected to a subLAN. The MCU Configuration
Summary shows the MCUs defined for an interface unit.

Door Configuration Summary


TAC I/NET Seven displays this summary when you penetrate a
Door Processor Unit (DPU) from the MCU Configuration
Summary. This summary shows the doors defined for the DPU or
SCU1284.
You may modify a door to enter a name (up to 64 characters) in the
Door Parameters editor. This editor is used only to assign a name
to a door point. If you do not enter a name in this editor, all
windows and editors that display a door will use the point name
entered in the Resident I/O Points editor.

Network Functions

Note: Network Functions are not available on a workstation configured as a


Remote Client in a client/server network. Refer to Client/Server
Infrastructure on page 1-28 for more information.
The TAC I/NET Seven Network Functions editor lets you perform
a variety of special functions. You can synchronize the date/time of
your controllers, select automatic DCU save for all or some of your

4-24 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Network Functions

controllers, broadcast special day schedules, display off-normal


and disabled points, and print all or some of the information
currently residing in your system database.
The following program functions are available from the Network
Functions editor:

DCU synchronization Off-normal points


Automatic DCU save Disabled points
Special day broadcast Database print

DCU Selection
Select the controllers you wish to receive the network function. The
system displays each of the links configured for your system. This
list includes the link type and link name. The link type consists of
a Tap number followed by one of the following designations:
Host/Link/LAN
Link/LAN
Link
NetPlus Router
When you choose a link, the system lists controllers associated with
the link. If you selected a link type of Host/Link/LAN,
Link/LAN, or NetPlus Router, the system allows you to choose
specific controllers. If you selected a link type of Link, the system
allows you to choose a site. After choosing a site, the system displays
all controllers at that site. At this point you can choose which
controllers will receive the network function.

DCU Synchronization
Note: The DCU Synchronization function is intended for use with direct-
connect, TCP/IP, or auto-dial/auto-answer (AD/AA) communica-
tion only. If the communication path from your host workstation to
the controller consists of an Integrated Dial or NPR Dial connection,
do not activate the DCU Synchronization function for that
controller.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-25


TCON30004/13
Network Functions Host Functions

The DCU synchronization function allows you to periodically


synchronize the hardware clocks in your controllers with the host
workstation clock. While the hardware clocks are quite accurate,
they do drift slightly over long periods of time. DCU synchroniza-
tion lets you automatically re-establish synchronization at a speci-
fied time, without any further action on your part.

Note: If the time in the controller is ahead or behind the workstation clock
by more than one minute, the controllers clock will be reset to the
workstation time. This will cause any existing trend samples to be
cleared from the controllers memory. If the trend samples must be
retained, ensure that they are directed to a SevenTrends table/cell.

The following four synchronization options are available:


None This option changes controllers to no synchroniza-
tion. This is TAC I/NET Sevens default setting.
Daily Use this option to synchronize controllers on a daily
basis. Synchronization occurs at 3:15 a.m. (03:15) each day.
Weekly This option synchronizes controllers on a weekly
basis. Synchronization occurs each Sunday at 3:15 a.m.
(03:15).
Monthly Use this option to synchronize controllers on the
link on a monthly basis. Synchronization occurs on the first
day of the month at 3:15 a.m. (03:15).

Note: A change in the DCU time will result in the loss of all trend data that
has not yet been uploaded.

Daylight Savings Time


As a part of DCU Synchronization, you can also broadcast daylight
savings time settings to controllers. Using this feature you can avoid
having to manually connect to each controller.
As the host workstation synchronizes the daylight savings time
settings in a controller, it will also check for the existence of a corre-
sponding SAV file. If a SAV file for the controller is found, the host
workstation processes it as follows:

4-26 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Network Functions

SAV file is current If the controller's SAV file is current, the


host automatically updates it with the daylight savings
settings from this editor. This ensures that if you later restore
the controller using this SAV file, the correct daylight savings
time settings will be downloaded.
SAV file is old If the controller's SAV file is out-of-date, the
host does not change it. In this case, you can manually update
the controller's SAV file or use the Automatic DCU Save func-
tion in order to create an up-to-date SAV file for the
controller. Refer to Station Save and Restore for more infor-
mation.

Note: If no SAV file is found for the controller, the host workstation will not
create one. Only the Automatic DCU Save function can create a SAV
file automatically.

Automatic DCU Save


Note: The Automatic DCU Save function is intended for use with direct-
connect, TCP/IP, or auto-dial/auto-answer (AD/AA) communica-
tion only. If the communication path from your host workstation to
the controller consists of an Integrated Dial or NPR Dial connection,
do not activate the Automatic DCU Save function for that controller.

If you activate this option for a controller, the system performs an


automatic save of controller programming each 24-hour period at
3:15 a.m. (03:15), provided a change has been made to the
programming. The host workstation must pass through midnight
and be allowed to continuously run uninterrupted until 3:15 a.m.
(03:15) for this period.

Special Day Broadcast


Use this option to distribute previously-defined temporary special
day schedules to selected controllers as needed. Special day
start/stop/cycle schedules are defined using the time scheduling
point extension editor and are assigned to a particular date (S1S7)
in the special day editor. These TAC I/NET Seven features are
discussed in detail in Chapter 7, Point Extensions, and Chapter 8,
Dynamic Control.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-27


TCON30004/13
Network Functions Host Functions

The special day broadcast function is similar to the controller-level


special day function in that it lets you assign a previously-defined
special day schedule to a particular date. However, the controller-
level special day function would require that you enter the special
schedule separately for each controller you wish to control. By
using the special day broadcast function from the host, you can
quickly direct special schedules to multiple controllers. This option
is extremely useful for snow days in a school district or sale days in
retail outlets where you may need to quickly place hundreds of
controller points under the same special schedule.
Setup (Day Format)
Establish the following parameters for the special day broadcast
function.
Date
This parameter is used to define the starting month and day of the
temporary special day.
Duration
This is the duration of the special day schedule. The duration may
be between 0 and 127 days. A duration of one day causes the system
to execute the changed schedule only on the date defined by the
date parameter.
Schedules S1 Through S7
These are the seven available special day schedules. These must be
pre-defined in the time scheduling point extension editor discussed
in Chapter 7, Point Extensions, and Chapter 8, Dynamic Control. It
is helpful if you have previously set aside one special schedule in
each DCUs ATS schedule for this purpose. If, for example, S2 is
defined identically in all ATS schedules, you can be sure all
controller points are following the same special schedule when a
special day 2 broadcast is executed.
Broadcast Time
You may delay the broadcast of the temporary special day schedules
to take advantage of reduced telephone tariffs or delay the broad-
cast to a time when communications lines are unloaded. Enter the

4-28 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Network Functions

date and time for the scheduled broadcast. This does not have to be
the same day as the date you want the special day schedule to go
into effect, this is simply the date when the broadcast will occur.
If a communications failure occurs and the system in unable to
broadcast the special day schedule to all selected controllers, it
displays the extent of this failure in the messages table and prints
the error message Special day lost along with the link and station
address (LLSS) of the failed transaction. Always check the messages
after you issue a special day broadcast to make sure the broadcast
was successful. In order to receive this message, the host worksta-
tions far left mask position in distribution group 1 must be acti-
vated.
Broadcast Failure
The system alerts you when it is unable to connect to a controller
that has been selected to receive the special day broadcast. At this
time you can try selecting the controller again or you can choose to
abort the procedure. In order to receive this message, the host
workstations far left mask position in distribution group 1 must be
activated.
Broadcast Review
If you are not sure which special day schedule you selected to be
broadcast, connect to the controller in question and inspect the
special day editor. Refer to Chapter 7, Point Extensions for details
on the special day and time scheduling editors.

Off-normal Points
Off-normal is another term used to describe points that are in an
alarm state. The off-normal points option in the Network Func-
tions editor allows you to choose which controllers will be interro-
gated for off-normal point summaries. The interrogation is
initiated, and off-normal points are displayed, when you select the
off-normal points option from the summary options menu. Refer
to the section on Summaries in TCON299, TAC I/NET Seven
Operator Guide.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-29


TCON30004/13
Network Functions Host Functions

Disabled Points
Disabled is another term used to describe points that are in test or
manual mode. Use this option to select controllers containing the
points you want displayed when you select the disabled point
summary option from the summary option menu.

Database Print
Use this option to print a copy of any or all controller database
point or extension entries. This lets you see exactly what points,
point extensions, and DDC modules you have added to the
controllers on your system.

Note: The system lets you select more than one link; however, this may
result in a very lengthy printing session. The selected DCU must be
defined on the system.

The database print function provides the following options:


Setup Use this option to select those parameters you wish to
print for selected controllers.
Print Use this option to proceed to the actual printing. Since
database prints may be lengthy, make sure no manual
commands from the workstation are needed during the time
required for printing. If the workstation is configured with an
operator time-out option, you may wish to turn off this func-
tion. The print process may be interrupted but there may be a
delay while the printer buffer empties.

Note: Even though the system keyboard is unavailable for use while a data-
base print is in process, the workstation is still available to the system
for data collection and message processing. The background opera-
tion of the TAC I/NET Seven system software guarantees that any
interrupt generated by a field condition is handled at a higher
priority than the printing task.

4-30 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Configuration Summaries

Configuration Summaries
Configuration summaries give you a quick glance at the devices
communicating at a particular level in your system. You must be
connected at the level of the summary you wish to display.
Table 4-3 lists and describes the configuration summaries available.

Table 4-3. Configuration Summaries

Summary Description

If your system is configured with an Ethernet LAN, the host summary displays all
operator stations connected to the EtherNet LAN. If your host is on a host or
Host Summary
controller LAN, the host summary displays the Host Taps name and revision
level.
Displays all link Taps available through the connected operator station. If you
Link Summary connect to a remote operator station through the EtherNet LAN, this summary
displays the available links at the remote operator station.
Displays the controllers available through the connected link Tap. The summary
identifies the separate controller LANs on a link with multiple LAN Taps. The
Station Summary station summary lists only LAN Taps and their phone numbers on a dial link Tap.
If you request a station summary after you connect to a controller LAN through
a dial link Tap, this displays all the stations on that controller LAN.
Displays all the unitary controllers connected to the 7760 controller (UCI) to
UC Summary
which you are connected.
Displays all the micro regulator controllers connected to the 7792 (MRI) 7793
MR Summary
(MRI), or 7798 (I/SITE LAN) on the associated controller LAN.
Displays all the DPUs/SCUs/DIUs/DIOs connected to the 7791 (DPI),7793
DPU Summary
(MCI), or 7798 (I/SITE LAN) on the associated LAN.

Table 4-4 lists the information that may be included in the


summary, depending on which summary is selected.

Software Restore
The software restore function allows you to restore software and
previously-saved controller database information. Controller data-
base information is stored in SAVE files that are automatically
created when you perform a controller save. If a SAVE file does not

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-31


TCON30004/13
Software Restore Host Functions

Table 4-4. Configuration Summary Fields

Field Summary Type(s) Definition


The system address of the operator station, link Tap,
or controller.
The UC address includes the UCI address. For
Host, Link, Station, UC, example, 2401 indicates UCI 24 and UC 01.
Address
MR, DPU The MR address includes the MRI address. For
example, 2401 indicates MRI 24 and MR 01.
The DPU address includes the DPI address. For
example, 2401 indicates DPI 24 and DPU 01.
Host PC Name Host The name assigned to the operator station.
Host (direct connect),
Tap Name The name assigned to the Tap.
Link
Host (direct connect),
Revision The revision level of the Tap or controller firmware.
Link, Station
Host (direct connect),
Type Link, Station, UC, MR, Type of Tap or controller.
DPU
The site number for the controller. This is a user-
Site Station, UC, MR, DPU
assigned number for multiple LANs (typically AD/AA).
Station Name Station The name assigned to this controller.
The number of stations occupied by the controller.
Most controllers occupy one station. Some controllers
Stations Station (7750, 7791, 7792, 7793) may occupy up to two
stations. The 7797 controller may have up to eight
stations, depending on the ICI controller type.
The current communication status of the controller.
Communicating means the device is
Status UC, MR, DPU communicating properly.
Unknown means the system has lost
communications with the controller.

exist for a particular controller, then you cant perform a database


download; however, you can still perform a software download.
Software for Taps and controllers is stored in binary files added to
your system during the installation or upgrade process.
When you select the software restore option, the system provides a
list of all the Taps and controllers you previously defined as down-
loadable in the network definition portion of the network configu-

4-32 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host Trend Log

ration editor (refer to Summary Information on page 4-21). You


may mark devices to receive downloadable software (binary files)
and downloadable database information (SAVE files). Taps do not
have databases and therefore cannot be selected to receive down-
loadable database information.
When you use the software download option, the system starts the
download from the default data subdirectory defined during instal-
lation. If you do not want to restore from the default directory, you
may enter a different path for an external drive, or a different path
on the hard drive.
For each device marked for download, the system restores any
selected controller/Tap software first, and then the controller data-
base. The download of both types of information is completed
before the system moves on to the next device marked in the list. If
a download was successful, the device marked for download
becomes unmarked. If the device does not become unmarked, then
either:
a SAVE file does not exist (the system could not find a data-
base to download); or
the specified address (LLSS) does not match the address for
the DCU; or
a communication failure has occurred.
Default SAVE files exist in the SAV directory for the 7728, 7780, and
7791 controllers. These save files are downloaded to the appro-
priate controller if no SAVE file exists with the correct link and
station address for the target controller. These files contain the
necessary basics for initial programming.

Host Trend Log


The host trend log lets you generate your own customized tabular
trend log reports. A trend log can contain up to 12 unique discrete
or analog point addresses.

Note: Do not mix point types in a trend log. Each trend log should contain
all discrete points, or all analog points.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-33


TCON30004/13
Host Trend Log Host Functions

For each address, sampled data is stored and printed. You can
specify how often the points are sampled, how often the trend log
is printed, and during what part of the day the printing takes place.

Note: The host trend log is designed to print sampled data for points. It
assumes that a valid sample has been stored for each point in the
trend log before it is requested to print the report. If, for whatever
reason, a sample has not been stored for a point, the value ????????
is printed. This is normally not a problem except when the print and
sample intervals are set the same and the first trend log is being
printed. A host software change has been made to ensure that valid
sample data appears for points in this first host trend log (at the print
begin time), when the sample interval and the print interval have
been set to the same values.

Table 4-5 lists and describes trend log options.

Table 4-5. Trend Log Options

Option Description
Use this option to change point sample interval, print times, and print start and
Parameter Edit
stop times. Table 4-6 list the parameters for this option.
Use this option to add a point to the host trend log. You may add up to 12 points
to your host trend log. When you add a point to the trend log editor, this
automatically adds a DCU trend sampling extension to the associated point.
You cannot add a point to the trend log editor if the point already contains a
Add Point DCU Trend Sampling extension.
The newly-added DCU trend sampling extension contains the same sample
interval value as the one entered in the host trend log editor. The number-of-
samples value equals the host trend logs print interval divided by the sample
interval plus five.
Delete Point Use this option to delete a point from the host trend log.
Manual Generation Use this option to display and print a host trend log.

4-34 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Host Functions Host ATS (Automatic Time Schedule)

Table 4-6. Editable Trend Log Parameters

Parameter Description
Enter a number between 1 and 1,440. The default is 1. This is the number of
Sample Interval (min) minutes between samples. A point can be sampled as often as once each
minute or only once each 24-hour period.
Enter a number between 1 and 1,440. The default is 1,440. This is the
Print Interval (min) number of minutes between host trend log prints. You can print each minute,
once a day, or at any time interval in between.
Enter the time (hh:mm) you wish printing to begin. Time is entered in 24-hour
Print Begin
format where PM hours are entered as the time plus 12 hours.
Enter the time (hh:mm) you wish printing to end. Time is entered in 24-hour
Print End
format where PM hours are entered as the time plus 12.
Note: If points are going to be used in the host trend log, the above parameter entries must be
entered through the host trend log for the point(s), not through the DCU-resident trend
sampling editor.

Host ATS (Automatic Time Schedule)


Time scheduling allows you to define how controller-resident
output points will operate based on the day of the week and the
time of day. Time schedules can be defined at the controller level
using the time scheduling (TS) point extension (refer to Chapter 7,
Point Extensions for more information).
The host ATS function allows you to define schedules at the host
level and distribute this information to controller-resident master
time schedule points. This way you dont need to access each
controller separately. Instead, you can create a master schedule that
is edited from the workstation and affects points with master
schedules (along with their associated slave schedules) in multiple
controllers. You cannot download a host time schedule to an inde-
pendent time schedule.

Note: When modifying an existing host ATS, pay special attention to the
date and time values. When you modify an existing schedule, the
default values for the date and time fields will be the current date and
time, even if the user previously defined a different date and time.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 4-35


TCON30004/13
Phone Numbers Host Functions

When you select the host ATS option, the system provides a list of
previously-defined host time schedules. If a schedules download
time has not already occurred, the date on which it will be down-
loaded is also shown. The system allows you to add, delete, modify,
or copy host time schedules.

Phone Numbers
The Phone Numbers editor is available only when the Link Type is
set to Integrated Dial or Integrated NPR Dial in the TAC I/NET
Seven active configuration. Use this option to define the address,
name, and telephone number of up to 64 remote devices per host
link. The system allows you to add, delete, modify, or copy phone
numbers. When you attempt to connect to a remote site, TAC
I/NET Seven will present a list of the remote sites defined on this
host.

4-36 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
CHAPTER

5
50
Controller Functions

Controller Passwords
TAC I/NET Seven uses passwords to control operator access and
privileges. Separate passwords are used for host access and
controller access. Host passwords are assigned to operators and
DCU passwords may be assigned to controllers. You can link
controller passwords and access levels to host passwords by using
the DCU password preassignment function. Password preassign-
ment enables an operator to access assigned controllers without
entering the controller passwords.
Controller passwords add an additional level of security for the
indicated controller. Operators must enter a valid password to gain
access to a password-protected controller. This additional security
may not be necessary in systems with only one principal operator.
Each controller may have up to four passwords; one password for
each access level. Access to certain functions and editors depend on
the access level of the password used to connect to the controller.
Refer to Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for a list and description of
controller access levels.
When the DCU password preassignment feature is used an oper-
ators host password is linked with specific controller passwords.
The operator enters one password to sign on to the system and is
not prompted for controller passwords. The operators access to
controller functions depend upon the access level granted in the
DCU password preassignment. If the operator does not have the
correct access level he will not be able to view the controller editors,
even though he is connected to the controller.
If the DCU password preassignment feature is not used, the oper-
ator must enter a separate controller password for each password-

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-1


TCON30004/13
Configuration and Status Controller Functions

protected controller. The level of access is determined by the pass-


word the operator enters.

Note: If you are assigning passwords to a 7728 or 7798 controller, the pass-
words must be numeric only (no alpha characters) and must be 4
digits long. Failure to observe these rules will not allow sign-on from
the controllers remote LCD panel.

Assign controller passwords for each level, as described in


Table 5-1, and then decide which operators should have which
access level. All operators can connect to the controller but their
capabilities are limited by the level of their password. Lastly, deter-
mine whether to preassign specific controller passwords to each
operators host password, or to have each operator enter the indi-
vidual controller passwords as needed.

See Also: Host Passwords in Chapter 4, Host Functions

Table 5-1. Controller Access Levels

Password Level Access


Level 1 Display-only access.
These operators can display controller data, issue commands,
Level 2
and acknowledge alarms.
These operators can display data, issue commands,
Level 3 acknowledge alarms, and edit all functions except the DCU
password function.
This operator can display data, issue commands, acknowledge
Level 4 alarms, and edit all functions including the DCU password
function.

Configuration and Status


The controller configuration/status editor lets you display and edit
various parameters associated with each selected controller. You
must be connected to the controller in order to use this editor.
The screen is divided into sections. Some sections may be edited,
and some are for display only.

5-2 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Configuration and Status

Control Parameters
This section allows you to set the basic features of the controller.
Name
You may enter any alphanumeric string as the controller Name, up
to 16 characters. The default name for each device is the controller
type (i.e. PCU 7716). If the device is downloadable, the text boot
appears next to the type (i.e. PCU 7716 Boot).
Date
Date shows the current date, according to the controller. This date
matches the date on the workstation if you perform a station
restore. If you wish to change the date, enter it in MM/DD/YY
format (or the date convention defined in your Windows settings).
Time shows the current time according to the controller. The time
is entered in 24-hour format. AM hours are entered as the regular
time. PM hours are entered as the time plus 12 hours. If you leave
the minutes or seconds field blank, the system defaults to zero
minutes, zero seconds.
If you perform a station restore, the time is taken from the work-
station. This is important to remember if your workstation is
located in a different time zone than the controller. If this is the
case, you will always want to use this editor to set the correct time
after a station restore.

Memory Status
These fields are informational only. You cannot make changes.
Total bytes available shows the total memory space available in
the controller for your modifications and additions. Bytes
remaining shows the unused memory space. Not all unused
memory is available for use.

Database Last Changed


These fields are informational only. You cannot make changes.
Save file shows the date of the most recent station save. Controller
indicates the date of the most recent changes. Changes that have
not been saved are indicated with an asterisk (*).

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-3


TCON30004/13
Configuration and Status Controller Functions

Loading Details
Note: This field contains information that is usually of interest only to
high-level users. This information can also be obtained using the
hand-held console.

These fields are display only. You cannot make changes. The first
field displays the Controller processor percent loading (0
100%). This number is an indication of how busy the controller is.
If this number is 100, control actions may be lost or delayed. LAN
percent loading shows the percentage of controller LAN commu-
nication attributable to this controller.

Firmware Status
These fields are informational only. You cannot make changes.
Shown is the Revision number and Date of the firmware installed
in the controller.

Controller Memory
Note: This field contains information that is usually of interest only to
high-level users. This information can also be obtained using the
hand-held console.

Address lets you specify a memory address (up to four characters)


and Contents displays the location value (0000FFFF) within the
controller. You cannot control the value; you can only display it.

Distribution Parameters
This panel sets the message masking and priority for messages sent
from the controller. These parameters only affect controller
messages (such as power failure, sign-on, sign-off, etc.). All point-
related messages are controlled by the masking and priority set for
the point and its assigned extension editor(s), if any.
Masking
Select a Distribution group and activate the desired Message
mask positions. Messages from the controller will be
received/stored/printed only at workstations with a matching

5-4 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Configuration and Status

distribution group and at least one matching active mask position.


Refer to Masking in Chapter 3, System Messages for more infor-
mation.

Note: Dial Taps only recognize masks in distribution group 1.

Priority
There are three priority levels: Routine, Priority, and Critical. A
selection of None (-) indicates no priority.
This level applies to messages originating from this controller.
Routine messages are for direct connect systems. A direct connect
host will receive any message with a priority of Routine, Priority,
or Critical. Only Priority and Critical messages are applicable to
Dial Taps.
The message priorities behave as follows when used with an
AD/AA LAN Tap:
Routine Ignore the message.
Priority Report the message when the Dial Taps Percent
Full limit is reached or the Time Interval has transpired.
Critical Report the message immediately. All pending
Priority messages will also be reported.
Reliable Tap
If the controller is loaded with firmware dated 08/21/06 or later,
you can implement reliable messaging by specifying a reliable tap.
The reliable tap can be any tap (or device emulating a tap) that is
being used to route messages from the controller to a TAC I/NET
Seven host.
Refer to Reliable Messaging on page 3-7 for more information
about this TAC I/NET Seven feature.

Sunrise/Sunset
These parameters are used to calculate sunrise and sunset. The
required information, longitude, latitude, and time zone informa-
tion, can be found in a variety of public places. Try newspapers,
atlases, almanacs, and libraries.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-5


TCON30004/13
Configuration and Status Controller Functions

Provide the Longitude and Latitude information for the facility in


degrees, minutes, and direction.
Enter the Time zone for the facility (124). Time zones begin at
Greenwich, England (Greenwich Mean Time = zone 1) and
increase from east to west. Refer to the time zone world map
located in Appendix B, Time Zone Map. Enter 0 to disable this
function. Enter a decimal number for regions in half-time zones.
TAC I/NET Seven rounds the number to the nearest half.

Daylight Savings
Use this function to enter the beginning and ending dates and
times for Daylight Savings time, using the following parameters:
Month (112): This is the month daylight savings time
begins/ends. January is month 1, February is month 2, and so
on, ending with December as month 12.
Week (15): This is the week daylight savings time
begins/ends.
Enter a 1 if the daylight savings start falls during the first
seven days of the month (17).
Enter a 2 if the daylight savings start falls during the
second seven days of the month (814).
Enter a 3 if the daylight savings start falls during the third
seven days of the month (1521).
Enter a 4 if the daylight savings start falls during the
fourth seven days of the month (2228).
Enter a 5 if the daylight savings start falls after the 28th
day of the month.
Day (17): This is the day daylight savings time begins/ends.
Sunday is day 1, Monday is day 2, and so on, ending with
Saturday as day 7.
At 2:00 a.m. (02:00) on the day specified, the clocks will move
forward (begin date) or backward (end date) one hour.

5-6 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Configuration and Status

Program Extensions
Use this section to activate or deactivate specific control extensions
for all points in this controller. The parameters displayed are
dependent upon connected controller and may not always be avail-
able.

Note: Activating these functions does not add the related extension to any
point(s) in the controller. Use the appropriate extension editor to
specify the appropriate extensions to add to each point.

Time Scheduling
Activate or deactivate Time scheduling for points in this
controller.
When activated, all the time scheduling program extensions in this
controller are selected. Once activated, the controller looks back as
far as the previous midnight to determine the point state during the
next minute and issues the proper command.
When time scheduling is deactivated and the controller has time
scheduling programs working, the individual loads remain in the
state that existed when the program was turned off.
Temperature Control
Activate or deactivate Temperature control for points in this
controller.
If this function is not activated for the controller, the individual
temperature control extensions on the attached point(s) will not be
activated.
Demand Control
Activate or deactivate Demand control for points in this controller.
If you deactivate this function, the demand program ceases. All
loads that were currently shed by the demand program are restored
after honoring their minimum off (minimum trip or close) time as
defined for the individual point. Even if turned off, the demand
program will continue to gather KW and KWH data.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-7


TCON30004/13
Editing the Database while Offline Controller Functions

All Lights On/Off


Activate or deactivate all lights on/off for points in this controller
(available on the 7780 controller only).
This performs the same function as codes 8 and 9 on the HHC.
Activating All Lights On enables input address 0000 to be used to
energize all associated RR7 relays. Activating All Lights Off enables
input point address 0001 to be used to de energize all associated
RR7 relays. This function does not permanently override lighting
circuit control commands. Even after an All Lights On/Off
command has been issued, the lighting zone can still issue controls
to the lighting circuit.

Note: When using All Lights On/Off, input 0000DI and 0001DI should not
be used for any other input point. If you do, lighting control will not
be as expected.

Editing the Database while Offline


TAC I/NET Seven allows you to add controllers, and copy or edit
controller databases when you are not actually connected to the
controllers. This will allow DCU parameters, Host Access Control
parameters, Host parameters and Graphics pages to be created,
added and/or modified without a physical connection.

Note: If you elect to work offline after a connection has been made, your
connection will be terminated automatically and you must reconnect
before you can resume working in online mode.

Connecting Offline
When Connect is selected, and you are working in offline mode,
the Connect Offline dialog will be presented. This will allow you to
select the .SAV file you wish to edit from among a list of those avail-
able. This dialog will display the Link address, station address,
controller type, station name, number of stations, save date and
filename. Additionally, you may Add, Delete, and/or Copy your
files.

5-8 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Save and Restore

Station Save and Restore


This feature lets you save controller database modifications to the
host workstation. Automatic controller save is also available.
Station restore is used to restore a database to the controller from a
previously saved version. This may be necessary if the database has
been corrupted following power outages that out last the controller
batterys ability to retain memory, or for large-scale recurrent
seasonal changes to the controller that may be necessary at your
facility.

Station Save
Once modifications have been made to a controller database, use
this function to save the modifications to the hard disk or a
diskette. You must be connected to the controller whose configura-
tion you wish to save.
Data is saved to the directory specified in the Configure program.
The length of time the system needs to perform the save is deter-
mined by a number of factors. Dial connections increase the save
time; slower baud rate equals slower save time. Other factors
include: LAN speed, number of points on the controller, number of
time schedules, and number of calculations. The save file is named
DCUllss.SAV where ll is the link address and ss is the station address
of the controller associated with the save file.

Station Restore
Use this option to restore a database file to a specified controller.
This is useful if the controller database has been lost, corrupted, or
if you need to install a new controller. The last saved version of the
programming can then be restored to the controller. This avoids
the time-consuming job of reentering the entire program.
The restore procedure uses the directory specified in the Configure
program. The factors that increase the duration of a station save
also increase the duration of a station restore.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-9


TCON30004/13
Station Save and Restore Controller Functions

Station Restore on a DPI


When you perform a station restore on a DPI, this cold starts the
DPI and then downloads the save file for the controller. This
includes points, access initiated control, and elevator data.
Station Restore on a DPU or SCU1284
When you perform a station restore on a DPU/SCU, this cold starts
the DPU/SCU and then downloads all access control data from the
host, including individual data, tenants, and translation table. All
points and extensions associated with the DPU/SCU including
door extensions, personnel schedules, and elevator extensions are
downloaded from the DPI (not the host).

Automatic DPU Restore


Note: The Automatic DPU Restore parameters in the Link Parameters
editor will be disabled if either of the following conditions are true:
Access control is disabled in the I/NET Configuration editor.
The workstation is configured as a Remote Client in a client/
server network. Refer to Client/Server Infrastructure on page
1-28 for more information.
The Automatic DPU Restore function serves two purposes:
At the appropriate start and end dates, this function activates
and deactivates temporary individuals in the door controller.
Following a communication error, this function automati-
cally updates door controllers with any changes that may have
occurred to the configuration of the access control system.
Using the Link Parameters editor, you can configure the Automatic
DPU Restore feature and select restore hosts for a link. Any door
controllers located beneath the link will be automatically restored
by a restore host when required due to a download failure during
an edit session, or when a door controller comes online with a
Memory Failure message.

5-10 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Save and Restore

Unlike a manually performed DPU Restore, the Automatic DPU


Restore does not typically cold start the door controller. However,
in the event that the door controller comes back online with a
Memory Failure message, the system will cold start the door
controller just as if you had manually initiated the DPU Restore.
The Automatic DPU Restore function divides TAC I/NET Seven
host workstations into the following two categories:
Local Hosts Local hosts are any TAC I/NET Seven host
workstations that are being used to modify access control
data.
Restore Hosts Restore hosts are any TAC I/NET Seven
host workstations that are responsible for performing an
automatic DPU restore.
Local hosts and restore hosts are not necessarily separate
computers. If you activate () a links Restore from Local Host
option, you allow it to become one of several possible restore hosts
for the link.
Recording Offline Door Controllers
As mentioned earlier, when you make changes to the access control
system, your local host immediately attempts to download these
changes to affected door controllers. If an attempt to update a door
controller fails because of a communications loss, the local host
stores a record of the failed download in an equalized DpuRestore
table. The local host then skips the offline door controller and
continues on to the next device.
When creating a record of a failed download, the local host stores
the following information:
The offline door controller's address (i.e., Link, Station, and
Point).
The host number of the restore host that has responsibility for
updating the door controller.
A time stamp (i.e., the local host's current time in hh:mm:ss
format)
The table that stores this information (i.e., the DpuRestore table) is
equalized among all equalized hosts.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-11


TCON30004/13
Station Save and Restore Controller Functions

Restore from Local Host


The Restore from Local Host option's setting is not equalized.
Activate this option on each host you want capable of performing
automatic DPU restores for this link.
A host could be required to perform an automatic DPU restore for
the following two reasons:
It was assigned as a Restore Host on this link
A value of 0 was used in a Restore Host field
In either of these cases, the Restore from Local Host option must
be activated in order for the host to perform an automatic DPU
restore.
Be aware that if the local host is currently assigned as a restore host
in any of the four Restore Host fields for this link, the Restore from
Local Host option will be activated automatically. In this case, the
option will also be grey-out to prevent it from being deactivated.
Restore Host Selection

Caution: Before assigning restore hosts to a link, ensure that you have enabled
File Equalization. Otherwise, a restore host could download out-of-
date information to the link's DPUs and SCU1284s.

The restore hosts you define for links are equalized among all hosts.
You can define up to four restore hosts for a link. When assigning
Restore Hosts, choose hosts that are most likely to always be online.
For performance reasons, you may also wish to choose hosts that
are not being used as the file master.
For each of up to four Restore Host fields, enter a host number (1
to 250). TAC I/NET Seven automatically activates and greys out the
Restore from Local Host option on each restore host you assign
to this link.
You can leave any field at its default value of 0 to designate any host
as a restore host. When you use a setting of 0, be sure to also activate
() the Restore from Local Host option on any hosts that should
have the ability to perform Automatic DPU restores to this link.

5-12 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Save and Restore

Use the following guidelines when choosing restore hosts:


Ensure that message masking on the restore host worksta-
tion(s) allows detection of restore messages. This requires that
the left-most mask in distribution group 1 be selected.
For a link directly connected to your local workstation, set
Restore Host 1 to the host number of the local workstation.
For a link directly connected to a remote workstation, set
Restore Host 1 to the host number of the remote workstation.
See Figure 5-1 for example restore host settings.

Ethernet LAN

Host 1 Host 2 Host 3

TAP

TAP TAP TAP NPR

Link 01 Link 02 Link 03 Link 04


Restore Host 1 = 2 Restore Host 1 = 2 Restore Host 1 = 3 Restore Host 1 = 1
Restore Host 2 = 1 Restore Host 2 = 1 Restore Host 2 = 1 Restore Host 2 = 3
Restore Host 3 = 3 Restore Host 3 = 3 Restore Host 3 = 2 Restore Host 3 = 2
Restore Host 4 = 0 Restore Host 4 = 0 Restore Host 4 = 0 Restore Host 4 = 0

Figure 5-1. Example Restore Host Settings

When the local host creates a record of a failed download, it uses


settings from the Link Parameters Editor to determine which
restore host to include in the record. It is this restore host that will
have responsibility for updating the door controller when it comes
back online.
In order to determine which one of its restore hosts to use, the local
host first checks the current status of Restore Host 1. If it is online,
its host number is stored. Otherwise, the local host checks the

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-13


TCON30004/13
Station Save and Restore Controller Functions

status of next restore host, and so on. The first restore host found
to be online will be given the responsibility of updating the door
controller.
While checking the status of restore hosts, if the local host reaches
a Restore Host field that is set to 0, it will store its own host number
in the failed download record and will stop checking the status of
any other restore hosts. Even if no field is set to 0, the local host will
store its own host number in the record if no restore hosts are
online.
How TAC I/NET Seven Performs the Automatic DPU Restore
To ensure that door controllers receive updated databases, any TAC
I/NET Seven host that detects a restore message of any kind will
check the equalized DpuRestore table to see if it is responsible for
performing an automatic DPU restore. All TAC I/NET Seven hosts
also perform this check every 15 minutes, regardless of whether or
not a restore event occurs.
When a host checks the DpuRestore table, it first looks for any
records that have a non-zero time stamp (i.e., a time stamp that is
not 00:00:00). If a record with a non-zero time stamp is found, the
host then checks for its own host number in the record. If it finds
its own host number, it then checks the status of the Restore from
Local Host option in the Link Parameters Editor. If this option is
activated (), the host performs an Automatic DPU Restore on the
door controller. The Automatic DPU Restore requires that all 255
Tenants be sent to the door controller to ensure that tenant-related
changes correctly take affect.
When the door controller has been successfully updated, the
restore host changes the time stamp of the record in the DpuRestore
table. This will prevent the restore host from performing an un-
needed Automatic DPU Restore at the next 15-minute interval, or
when another restore message occurs.

The Memory Interface Processor Module


If the controller has a Memory Interface Processor (MIP) card
installed, you must download the controllers software using the
software restore function. Some controller types, including the

5-14 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Software Restore

7716, 7718, 7780, 7791, 7792, 7793, 7728, and 7797 are built on
downloadable platforms that enable them to receive a downloaded
software file without a MIP.
The MIP plugs into existing CPU sockets in TAC I/NET controllers
and Taps where it enhances product function and expands RAM.
The MIP lets you download software from the host workstation to
a Tap or controller without a technician visiting the job site. This is
supported through direct-connect TAC I/NET LAN communica-
tions, Ethernet commercial LAN communications, or remotely
accessed phone lines.
The MIP module contains a new microprocessor, expanded RAM
memory, on-board battery backup and the necessary hardware and
firmware to support downloadable firmware to the control-
lers/Taps. You can add the MIP card to all Taps and controllers with
the following exceptions:
The speech module in the 7750 Building Manager does not
leave room for a MIP card at this time.
The 78012/13/15 host Taps, the 78022/23/25 link Taps and
78032/33/35 LAN Taps have an onboard communications
module that prevents you from installing a MIP card.
The MIP can only be used with certain 78020 link Taps with
base card part number 330190.

Note: If you install a MIP card, LAN address 63 is no longer valid for the
7803 LAN Tap and the 78061 Dial Tap.

Software Restore
The Software Restore database download capability is similar to the
Station Restore option. Taps, of course, do not require a database,
but do require software to perform their function.
While controller database data is stored in save (.SAV) files, the
software for Taps and controllers is stored in binary (.BIN) files that
are included with the TAC I/NET Seven software.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-15


TCON30004/13
Dynamic Data Upload Controller Functions

When you select this option, the screen displays all the Taps and
controllers that you previously defined as downloadable in the
Network Definition portion of the Network Configuration editor.
You can individually select or deselect stations, or you can use All
Yes and All No to speed the selection process. Stations that you
select to receive the software restore will display a Y in the Software
or the Database column of the list.
If necessary, define the drive and path to the directory that contains
the software to be restored. By default, TAC I/NET Seven restores
software from the DATA subdirectory defined during TAC I/NET
Seven installation.
For each device selected, the system downloads any selected
controller/Tap software first, and then the controller database. The
download of both types of information is completed before the
system moves on to the next device in the list. If a download was
successful, the Y in the Software or Database column changes to
, meaning you have just completed the download and there is
nothing more to download. If you try to download a controller
database and the Y does not change to for that controller, this
means a save file does not exist (the system could not find a data-
base to download) or a communications failure has occurred.
Default save files exist in the SAV directory for the 7728, 7780 and
7791 controllers. These save files are downloaded to the appro-
priate controller if no save file exists with the correct link and
station address for the target controller. These save files contain the
necessary basics for initial programming.

Dynamic Data Upload


This option lets you upload the latest midnight SevenTrends data
for demand, override billing, consumption and runtime statistics
to the appropriate SevenTrends database tables in the host.
This option executes within sixty seconds of starting the upload.

Note: Each time you exercise this option a copy of the midnight data is
placed in the host.

5-16 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Parameters

Station Parameters

Control Descriptions
Control descriptions are English-language displays that define the
controllable states of discrete output points. The descriptions are
used in pairs (i.e., STRT/STOP). You may enter up to eight pairs of
commands.
Each control description is limited to four alphanumeric charac-
ters. The first control description should always be the Start or On
command of the pair, followed by the Stop or Off command on the
next line.

See Also: State Descriptions on page 5-18


Command
Correlates the control description with the desired state of the
output. For example, you can make an On command issue a 1 to
the points database and to the hardware. This energizes the open
collector transistor or relay in the controller. If you have the On
command issue a 0, this deenergizes the hardware. This also deter-
mines the fail-safe state for the point.
For example, if you control lights in an interior space you might
want to have the lights On in the event of a system failure. In this
case you have the On command issue a 0 and the Off command
issue a 1, and wire the light to a normally closed (NC) contact.

Note: The DO point used for a lighting circuit must have a 0 command
as its first control descriptor. The DO point used for a lighting zone
must have a 1 command as its first control descriptor.

Delay
Specify a time delay (0127 seconds) between sequential
commands which use the same control command pair. This feature
prevents multiple loads from starting simultaneously when power
is restored to the controller, or when simultaneous commands are
received from an automatic program such as time scheduling. This

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-17


TCON30004/13
Station Parameters Controller Functions

prevents massive overload of motor control centers. An example


might be morning start-up at a business or school: if everything
came on at once the electrical system could overload.
A delay of one to three seconds is normally adequate for preventing
problems. However, if you have very large loads at your facility you
may wish to extend the delay. The maximum delay is 127 seconds.
For multiple commands, the delay is honored after the first
command is issued.

Note: You should not use control command delays on VAV-UC, AHU-UC,
or HPMP-UC parent points, or on the UC pushbutton override indi-
cator point.

Control Descriptions for Doors


You must define the following parameters for DPU-resident door
points (LLSSPP08 or LLSSPP09).

Table 5-2. Door Control Descriptions

Description Command Delay


SECR (secure) 0 0
UNLK (unlock) 0 0
LOCK 0 0

State Descriptions
All discrete points should have state descriptions assigned to them.
Analog point types display/control values, not states, so this
parameter does not apply to them. State descriptions are associated
with various discrete input and output points to describe the
current state of the device being controlled or monitored.
A descriptor pair typically describes the two states of the device: On
or Off, Open or Closed, Alarm or Normal, and so on. The first
descriptor of the pair should describe the trip or the deenergized
(0) condition of a discrete output point or the open (0) condition
of a status point. The second descriptor of the pair should describe
the closed or energized (1) condition of a discrete output point
or the closed (1) condition of a status point.

5-18 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Parameters

Enter up to 16 pairs of descriptors to describe a discrete point state


(On and Off, Open and Clos, Alrm and Nrml, and so on). Each
description can be up to four characters long.
Some devices require multiple state descriptions. Refer to Number
of Bits in Chapter 6, Input and Output Points.

See Also: Control Descriptions on page 5-17

Conversion Coefficients Tables


Conversion coefficients are the mathematical constants the
controller uses to convert analog inputs from the digital value
(counts) used by the microprocessor to analog display values. They
are also used to convert digital commands from the microprocessor
into analog outputs which are then used by field interface devices.
You may enter up to 16 sets of conversion coefficients in each
controller.
The linear equation y = m(x) + b can be used for all conversion
types: analog to digital (A/D), digital to analog (D/A), and pulse
width modulation (PWM). The flow conversion equation
y = m x + b may be used for A/D and D/A only, depending on
the type of transducer being used. The variables are defined in
Table 5-3 below:

Table 5-3. Conversion Equation Variables

Variable Definition
The output of the conversion equation expressed in
y
engineering units (i.e., degrees, lbs, percent, etc.).
Conversion coefficient that represents the engineering unit
m
weight of each count (bit).
x The counts (A/D and D/A) or time units (PWM).
The engineering unit value that is equivalent to 0 (zero) A/D
b
or D/A converter counts.

Pop-up Calculator
To help you calculate conversion coefficients, you have the option
of using a pop-up calculator. The following parameters are used
with the pop-up calculator:

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-19


TCON30004/13
Station Parameters Controller Functions

Equipment counts low A number between 0 and 65,535.


This number is typically zero.
Equipment counts high A number between 0 and 65,535.
For a 16-bit A/D converter, enter 65,535. For a 12-bit A/D
converter, enter 4095. For an 8-bit converter, enter 255.

Note: Different controllers use different converters, with different count and
voltage ranges. Please refer to the appropriate installation guide(s)
for specific information concerning the controller(s) installed in your
facility.

Engineering units low The units being measured (degrees,


etc.) for the sensor when the device is at its low count value.
For example, a Lini-Temp sensor which operates between
40 and 230F with voltage readings between 2.33 and 3.83
volts respectively, reads 459.4F at zero volts (0 counts) and
440.6F at 5 volts (4095 counts). This example assumes AI
input is 05 VDC.
Engineering units high The units being measured for the
sensor when the device is at its high count value.
Once you enter the four numbers described above and choose Flow
or Linear as the equation type, the pop-up calculator can automat-
ically calculate the slope and intercept values. You can then choose
to have the calculated values added to your list of conversion coef-
ficients. The m and b values automatically appear on the line. If the
line already contains m and b values, they are replaced by the new
values.
Calculating Coefficients
Coefficients are used to convert one type of data into another type.
TAC I/NET Seven supports three specific conversion types: analog
to digital (A/D), digital to analog (D/A), and digital to pulse width
modulation (PWM).

Note: Different controllers use different converters, with different count and
voltage ranges. Please refer to the appropriate installation guide(s)
for specific information concerning the controller(s) installed in your
facility.

5-20 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Parameters

Analog to Digital Conversion


The analog to digital (A/D) converter is an 8-, 12-, or 16 bit device
that converts electrical input (for example, 420 mA) into counts
corresponding to the engineering units displayed. The count
ranges for the different converters are as follows:

Table 5-4. A/D Converter Count Ranges

Converter
Count Range
Type
8-bit 0 255
12-bit 0 4,095
16-bit 0 65,535

For example, if the transmitter you are using is measuring relative


humidity from 8 to 100 percent and its signal into a 7700 (8-bit)
controller is 420 mA, use the linear equation. This converts the
analog signal to digital format by dividing the full range of the rela-
tive humidity measurement (92 percent, 100 8 = 92) by the
number of bits available in the A/D converter (4,095). The equation
is solved as follows:

Table 5-5. Example Analog to Digital Conversion


y = m (x) + b The basic linear equation.
Substitute 100 for y (top end of scale is 100% relative
100 = m (x) + b
humidity).
100 = m (4095) + b Substitute 4,095 for x (number of counts).
Substitute 8 for b (low current of 4 mA is equivalent
100 = m (4095) + 8
to 8% relative humidity).
92 = m (4095) Subtract 8 from each side.
m = 92 / 4095 Divide each side by 4,095.
m = 0.022466 m is equal to 92 divided by 4,095.

The entries you put in the conversion table are:


m = 0.022466 b=8

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-21


TCON30004/13
Station Parameters Controller Functions

For the CSI Lini-Temp sensor, when connected to a DCU with a 12-
bit A/D converter (such as the 7716), the conversion coefficients
are:
Degrees Fahrenheit: m = 0.17592 b = 279.4
Degrees Celsius: m = 0.09762 b = 173.0
Digital to Analog Conversion
Calculation of the digital to analog (D/A) conversion coefficients is
similar to A/D conversion. The D/A conversion uses either an 8-bit
or 12-bit converter. The range for x is either 0 255 counts (8-bit
converter) or 0 4,095 counts (12-bit converter).
For example, if we wish to calculate the conversion coefficients for
a 420 mA (0 255 counts) output from a 7700 (8-bit) controller
to a 3 15 PSI I/P transducer and would like the AO to read 3 15
PSI, we solve the equation this way:

Table 5-6. Example Digital to Analog Conversion


y = m (x) + b The basic linear equation.
15 = m (x) + b Substitute 15 for y.
15 = m (x) + 3 Substitute 3 for b.
15 = m (255) + 3 Substitute 255 for x.
12 = m (255) Subtract 3 from both sides of the equation.
m = 12 / 255 Divide both sides of the equation by 255.
m = 0.047059 m is equal to 12 divided by 255.

The entries you put in the conversion table are:


m = 0.04705 b=3
Digital to Pulse Width Conversion
TAC I/NET Seven lets you direct an analog output software value
to a discrete output hardware point in a time-based manner known
as pulse width modulation. This is accomplished by the fact that
the duration of the pulse (the width) is proportional to the value of
the corresponding analog value.

5-22 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Parameters

Use the linear equation as in the previous examples. This time,


however, x is the desired range of time. The full range is 0 to 65,535
time units, with each time unit equal to 10 milliseconds (0 655.35
seconds).
For example, we wish to use a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM)
output point to control a PSI transducer with an input range
between 0.2 and 25.3 seconds (x), and an output range between 3
and 18 PSI.
Although the equation is the same as the one described above, it is
solved in a slightly different way. We do this because we are gener-
ally dealing with a PID module with an output range of 0 to 100
percent. This requires two calculations: one to determine m, and a
second to determine b.
To determine m, substitute the high limits for x and y into the
linear equation. Substitute 0 for b, and solve for m. Once m has
been calculated, substitute the low limits for x and y into the linear
equation. Substitute the calculated value for m, and solve for b.

Table 5-7. Example Digital to Pulse Width Conversion


y = m (x) + b The basic linear equation.
100 = m (x) + b Substitute 100 for y.
100 = m (x) + 0 Substitute 0 for b
100 = m (2530) + 0 Substitute 2530 time units (25.3 seconds) for x (move
decimal two places to the right to change 25.3 to 2530).
100 = m (2530) Subtract 0 from each side of the equation.
m = 100 / 2530 Divide both sides of the equation by 2530.
m = 0.039526 m is equal to 100 divided by 2530.
y = 0.039526 (x) + b Substitute 0.039526 for m.
0 = 0.039526 (x) + b Substitute 0 for y.
0 = 0.039526 (20) + b Substitute 20 time units (0.2 seconds) for x (move decimal
over two places to the right to change 0.2 to 20).
0 = 0.79052 + b Multiply 0.039526 and 20.
b = 0.79052 Subtract 0.79052 from each side of the equation.

The entries you put in the conversion table are:


m = 0.039526 b = 0.79052

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-23


TCON30004/13
Station Parameters Controller Functions

Note: The output range of the transducer does not enter into the equation
in any way, and x is expressed in time units rather than counts.

Engineering Units Table


This feature lets you define the units of measure for analog
input/output points and accumulator points. These descriptions
only appear in point-related alarms or messages stored in the
system message queue or printed on the system printer.
You may enter up to 16 different units descriptions, each consisting
of up to four characters. This might be gallons (GAL), kilowatts
(KW), kilowatt-hours (KWH), and so on.

Lookup Tables
The 7716, 7718, 7728, and 7756 controllers let you define up to 32
lookup tables, each consisting of up to 31 entries. These lookup
tables may be used for several purposes. You may use the lookup
tables to create engineering units, or to create sensor limits that
focus on a specific span of interest. The primary use of user-defined
lookup tables is to provide simple translation and monitoring of
non-linear signal sources.
Sensors that produce non-linear voltage, current, or resistance
signals are usually accompanied by a graph or table defining the
sensors output characteristics relative to the engineering unit
being monitored. The lookup table allows you to define the desired
span and resolution of translation that is appropriate for the task.
Lookup Table Calculation
A worksheet for calculating A/D counts and adjusted counts is
available in TCON157, TAC I/NET Seven Forms and Worksheets.
Fill in the worksheet using the following steps.

Note: It is usually not necessary to use the entire span of the sensor. Select
the lowest and highest engineering units of interest. Populate this
span mostly with samples from the area of your interest, focusing the
tables accuracy in this area.

5-24 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Parameters

1. Enter the voltage, current, or ohms information from the


sensor manufacturers information into column B of the chart
for the span that you desire to monitor.
2. Enter the Engineering Units (degrees, flow per minute, etc.)
into column C that correspond to the voltage/current/ohms
listed on the same row.
3. The Calculated A/D Count column translates the measure-
ment units (V/mA/Ohms) to a positive integer count as
generated by the A/D convertor on the 7716, 7718, 7728, and
7756 controller. Calculate these counts as follows.
Voltage inputs:
12-bit resolution:
A/D Count = (volts/5) 4095 05 V input span
(volts/10) 4095 010 V input span
16-bit resolution:
A/D Count = (volts/5) 65535 05 V input span
(volts/10) 65535 010 V input span
Obtained from column B of Table 5-8, Sample 16-bit Lookup
Table Calculation Chart
Current inputs:
12-bit resolution:
A/D Count = (mA/20) 4095 020 mA input span
(mA/40) 4095 040 mA input span
16-bit resolution:
A/D Count = (mA/20) 65535 020 mA input span
(mA/40) 65535 040 mA input span
Obtained from column B of Table 5-8, Sample 16-bit Lookup
Table Calculation Chart

Note: The mA formulas assume a 249-ohm resistor configuration in the


7716, 7718, 7728 or 7756. Refer to the appropriate installation guide
for details.

Ohms inputs:

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-25


TCON30004/13
Station Parameters Controller Functions

12-bit resolution:
A/D Count = [Ohms/(Ohms+10,000)] 4095
16-bit resolution:
A/D Count = [Ohms/(Ohms+10,000)] 65535
Obtained from column B of Table 5-8, Sample 16-bit Lookup
Table Calculation Chart

Note: The ohm formula assumes a 10K voltage divider circuit is in place
(refer to the appropriate installation guide for details). Accuracy of
ohms conversion is dependent upon accuracy of 5 V excitation. Use of
the on-board 5 V supply for excitation typically yields 2% accuracy,
5% maximum. Use external precision references and resistors to
excite resistance sensors when better accuracy is required.

1. An arbitrary Bias value is used to raise or lower the engi-


neering unit in column C to be above zero and as close to zero
as possible. A bias result in the range of 020 is desired for the
lowest Engineering Unit entry (table entry line 1). The Engi-
neering Unit is added to the Bias value for all entries and the
result is placed in column F.

Note: The Lookup Table entry cannot be negative. If the Engineering Unit
was 32C, a bias of 40 would raise the value to a positive integer.

2. An arbitrary Multiplier is applied to all Bias Results. The


highest Bias Result (table entry line 11) should be raised to a
value less than or equal to 65,535 for all 16-bit resolution, and
4095 for all 12-bit resolution.
a. For example, calculating for 16-bit resolution a Bias
Result of 120 could be used with a multiplier of 540 (120
540 = 64,800) but not 550 (120 550 = 66,000, which
exceeds 65,535).
b. Calculating for 12-bit resolution a Bias Result of 120
could be used with a multiplier of 30 (120 30 = 3600)
but not 40 (120 40 = 4800, which exceeds 4095).
Place the result of multiplying the Bias Result by the Multi-
plier in the Adjusted Count column.

5-26 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Parameters

3. Enter the Adjusted Counts (column H) value into the lookup


table editor in the Adjusted Counts column and the associated
calculated A/D Count (column D) value is entered in the
Counts column.

Note: The maximum value that may be placed in the Adjusted Count
column of the lookup table is 65,535 for 16-bit resolution DCUs, and
4095 for 12-bit resolution DCUs. The lookup table editor allows
entry of up to 65,535 counts for all devices; therefore, make sure that
no more than 4095 counts are entered for 12-bit resolution devices.
To convert the adjusted counts to engineering units use the engi-
neering unit conversion formula y = m(x) + b, with m = 1/Multiplier
and b = Bias.

Table 5-8 on page 5-27 shows a finished lookup table calculation


chart. It is based upon a 5 V sensor connected to a 7756 DCU (16-
bit A/D converter), and does not use the full span of the sensor as
defined by the manufacturer. This example focuses resolution
upon a span of interest of 1258C, and increases the resolution
over that span.

Table 5-8. Sample 16-bit Lookup Table Calculation Chart

A B C D E F G H

Sensor
Manufacturer
Table
Information Calculated Bias Adjusted
Entry Bias Multiplier
A/D Count Result Counts
Number
V / mA / Eng.
Ohms Units
1 1 32 819 40 8 540 4320
2 2.2 20 1802 40 20 540 10800
3 2.8 10 2293 40 30 540 16200
4 3.4 2 2785 40 42 540 21600
5 3.8 12 3112 40 52 540 28080
6 4 18 3276 40 58 540 31320
7 4.2 25 3440 40 65 540 35100
8 4.4 33 3604 40 73 540 39420
9 4.6 44 3757 40 84 540 45360

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-27


TCON30004/13
Station Parameters Controller Functions

Table 5-8. Sample 16-bit Lookup Table Calculation Chart (Continued)

A B C D E F G H

Sensor
Manufacturer
Table
Information Calculated Bias Adjusted
Entry Bias Multiplier
A/D Count Result Counts
Number
V / mA / Eng.
Ohms Units

10 4.8 58 3931 40 98 540 52920


11 5 80 4095 40 120 540 64800
12

7728 Lookup Tables


The 7728 does not have a set of lookup tables included in its
EPROM, as do the UCs, MRs, and ASCs. In order to use the CSI
I/STAT or a 10K ohm thermistor, you must use one of the lookup
tables provided in the DEF7728.SAV file. The 7728 I/SITE I/O does
not support hardware inputs in the 03xx range. The lookup tables
for the four AI external points defined with those tables are
contained in the default database.
Table 5-9 shows the four lookup tables provided in the
DEF7728.SAV file. When these lookup tables are used, the
following conversion coefficients (m and b) must also be used:
F: m = 0.1 b = 300
C: m = 0.05 b = 150

Table 5-9. 7728 I/STAT and Thermistor Lookup Tables

F Thermistor F I/STAT C Thermistor C I/STAT

Adjusted Adjusted Adjusted Adjusted


Counts Counts Counts Counts
Counts Counts Counts Counts

153 521 153 520 153 601 153 600


344 1062 344 1060 344 1202 344 1200
816 1604 816 1600 816 1804 816 1800
1245 1875 1245 1870 1245 2105 1245 2100
1827 2146 1827 2140 1827 2406 1827 2400

5-28 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Station Parameters

Table 5-9. 7728 I/STAT and Thermistor Lookup Tables


(Continued)

F Thermistor F I/STAT C Thermistor C I/STAT

Adjusted Adjusted Adjusted Adjusted


Counts Counts Counts Counts
Counts Counts Counts Counts

1914 2182 1914 2176 1914 2446 1914 2440


2003 2218 2003 2212 2003 2486 2003 2480
2048 2236 2048 2230 2048 2506 2048 2500
2093 2254 2093 2248 2093 2526 2093 2520
2183 2290 2183 2284 2183 2566 2183 2560
2274 2326 2274 2320 2274 2606 2274 2600
2366 2361 2366 2356 2366 2646 2366 2640
2457 2397 2457 2392 2457 2686 2457 2680
2548 2433 2548 2428 2548 2726 2548 2720
2637 2469 2637 2464 2637 2766 2637 2760
2725 2505 2725 2500 2725 2806 2725 2800
2812 2541 2812 2536 2812 2845 2812 2840
2897 2577 2897 2572 2897 2885 2897 2880
3209 2756 3209 2752 3209 3084 3209 3080
3577 2934 3577 2932 3577 3283 3577 3280
3923 3293 3923 3292 3923 3681 3923 3680

7756 Thermistor Lookup Table


Use Table 5-10 to establish a lookup table for 10K Thermistors
connected to the lower I/O board of a 7756. When these lookup
tables are used, the following conversion coefficients (m and b)
must also be used:
F: m = 0.018 b = 148
C: m = 0.01 b = 100

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-29


TCON30004/13
LCD Pages Controller Functions

Table 5-10. 7756 PCU (Lower I/O Board) and 10K Thermistor
Lookup Tables

Count Adjusted Count F C


128 32846 443.22 288.46
2048 20039 212.70 100.39
4096 17584 168.52 75.84
6144 16185 143.34 61.85
8192 15180 125.24 51.80
10240 14373 110.72 43.73
11264 14016 104.29 40.16
12288 13681 98.26 36.81
13312 13363 92.53 33.63
14336 13058 87.04 30.58
15360 12762 81.72 27.62
16384 12474 76.54 24.74
17408 12191 71.44 21.91
18432 11910 66.38 19.10
19456 11629 61.33 16.29
20480 11346 56.23 13.46
21504 11058 51.04 10.58
22528 10762 45.72 7.62
23552 10455 40.19 4.55
24576 10132 34.37 1.32
26624 9412 21.42 5.88
28672 8514 5.26 14.86
30720 7161 19.10 28.39
32640 2438 104.11 75.62

LCD Pages
The 7728 I/SITE I/O and the 7798 I/SITE LAN allow you to view
named pages for review and control from the I/SITEs operator
interface. Both the 7728 and 7798 support up to 64 pages, with each
page containing up to 640 points. The points on each page may be

5-30 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Points and Point Extensions

from the local 7728/7798, or another DCU on the same controller


LAN. In either case, all points on the same LCD page must reside in
the same DCU.

Points and Point Extensions


A controller database consists of multiple points. These points
provide input information (temperature is 75 degrees, door is
closed) to the controller which then makes decisions (turns fan on,
turn light off) and provides information or commands to output
points. Each controller may contain up to 640 points: 320 input
points and 320 output points. Points residing in other controllers
may share information with, or may be controlled by, other
controllers through the use of indirect points. If a resident point is
defined as a global point, it can control an indirect point in another
controller and the controllers can share that points data. Refer to
Chapter 6, Input and Output Points for more information about
points.
Point extensions are used to assign pre-defined functions to speci-
fied points. The extensions available to each point depend on the
point type and the type of controller where the point resides. Refer
to Chapter 7, Point Extensions for more information.

Test and Manual Point Control


TAC I/NET Seven provides two methods for you to manually
control points. Both the Test mode and the Manual mode allow you
to set the state or value of a point. Each of these two modes are
described below.

Test Mode
Caution: Hardware connected to an output point stops being controlled when
the point is placed in Test mode. The actual output from that point is
frozen at the state/value that exists when the point is placed in Test
mode.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-31


TCON30004/13
Special Days Controller Functions

The Test mode isolates an input or output point from the outside
world. This allows you to manipulate the controller database for
that point, or verify normal controller operation, without
using/affecting the external input or output hardware.
If an output point in Test mode is not also placed in Manual mode,
the controller continues to control the database for that point. In
this case, operator-entered states/values can be overridden by the
controller. You can stop the controller from overriding your
states/values by also placing the point in Manual mode. Because the
point is in the Test mode, operator-entered point states/values do
not affect the connected external hardware.

Manual Mode
The Manual mode allows you to freeze an output point at its
current state or value and then, if desired, manually control the
point. This mode is limited to output points only. Manual mode
differs from Test mode in that hardware connected to the external
output point will continue to be controlled unless the point is also
in Test mode (refer to Test Mode description, above).
Manual mode overrides all other methods of point control
including automatic time scheduling (ATS), temperature control
(TC), lighting control (LC), etc.

Special Days
The special days editor is used with the time scheduling point
extension. You may define up to seven different special days in the
time scheduling editor. You then use the special days editor to
assign these special days to specific calendar days in the controller.
Entries made in this editor do not require additional bytes of
memory.
If you have a special day defined in a DCU, there must be a special
day schedule (S1S7) defined for all the time schedule-controlled
points in the DCU. If a time schedule does not have a special day
schedule defined, the point will remain at its last commanded state
until the special day period is over.

5-32 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Special Days

Special days are ideal for holidays which are known well in advance,
and do not change from year to year. This lets you alter the opera-
tion times of all the equipment controlled by this controller and
schedule these changes up to one year in advance. For instance, if
your facility is not used on Christmas Day you could create a
special day which keeps your lights off and your heating at a lower
level than you want when the facility is occupied. You would do this
by using the time scheduling editor to create a special day schedule
for each point that controls the equipment involved in heating and
lighting your facility. Then you would use the special days editor to
assign this as a permanent special schedule on December 25th
(12/25). Every Christmas, this special schedule will go into effect.
Temporary special day schedules can be used for one-time occa-
sions that require a different schedule, or holidays that change dates
from year to year (such as Hanukkah). Once the selected date is
past, the temporary schedule is erased from that date. For example,
if your facility will be closed on Hanukkah, you could use the same
special day schedule that you created in the example above. When
you assign it to Hanukkah (for example, 12/18), assign it as a
temporary special schedule. This schedule will be in effect on
Hanukkah, and then the special day schedule marker will be erased,
so that December 18 of the next year will use the normal schedule.

Note: Temporary special day schedules must be reassigned every year for
holidays that do not always occur on the same date.

You may want to reserve a special day slot, such as S7, for special
day broadcasts (see Special Day Broadcast in Chapter 4, Host
Functions) initiating from the host workstation. In this way you can
be sure a special day broadcast activates the same schedule in each
controller receiving the broadcast.

Note: When the date assigned to the special day occurs, the special day
schedule (S1 S7) replaces all normal (Sunday Saturday) sched-
ules in the DCU. In an ATS schedule, if the S1 S7 column is left
with all , no commands occur on that day. The point(s) will
remain in the last commanded state for the duration of the special
day.

The field entries for this editor are as follows:

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-33


TCON30004/13
Special Days Controller Functions

Date Enter the date of the special day. For a holiday that
lasts more than one day enter the first day of the holiday.
Enter the date as MM/DD. It is not necessary to enter a zero
before a single-digit month or day (enter July 4th as 7/4).
Dates do not have to be entered chronologically. Dates will be
sorted automatically when you exit the editor. You may also
assign more than one special day schedule to a single date, in
effect creating a new special day type.
Duration This is the length of the special day. Enter the
number of days (1127) this schedule is in effect. For the
Christmas holiday in a business environment, you might
enter a 1, while a school district might enter 7 days as the
duration of their Christmas schedule. If you enter a duration
of zero (0), this special day will be deleted when you exit the
editor.

Note: Special days cannot extend beyond the end of the year. If you have a
single holiday period beginning at Christmas and extending into
January (typical school holiday schedule) you must create two special
days: one beginning 12/25 and having a duration of seven days and
another beginning 1/1 and lasting the remaining number of days in
the holiday period.

Special Days The next seven columns are labeled S1


through S7. The default is a dash () in each column. This
indicates that no special day is assigned. Select , P, or T.
indicates no special day. If you do not select any
special days (all in S1S7), this special day will be
deleted when you exit the editor.
P is a permanent special day that remains in the
controllers memory from year to year. Assign a P to a
holiday that occurs on the same date each year (New
Years Day, Christmas Day).
T is a temporary special day. Assign a T to holidays that
occur on different days each year (Hanukkah, Good
Friday). The special day will be removed automatically
once the date has passed.

5-34 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Event Sequences

Event Sequences
The event sequences editor is used with the event definition point
extension. Adding an action sequence to a point requires 8 bytes of
memory plus additional bytes for each action defined in the
sequence. The memory required for each event sequence action is
shown in Table 5-11.

Table 5-11. Event Sequence Action Memory Requirements

Memory
Action
Required

Start
Start with Lock
Stop
Stop with Lock
Lock Door 5 bytes
Lock Door with lock
Inhibit alarm
Enable alarm
Event Unlock
Output
9 bytes
Output with Lock
Skip if Zero
Skip if Non-Zero 6 bytes
Unconditional Skip

Use this editor to define a specific set of actions that occurs when
an event defined in the event definitions extension editor takes
place. For example, this function lets you plan what control or
output commands will be initiated in an emergency situation.
In addition to emergency planning, event sequences let you
program normal sequential operations such as the start up of a
conveyor line, a chilled water plant, or any other sequential process
you may require at your facility.
It is strongly recommended you use the forms provided in
TCON157, TAC I/NET Seven Forms and Worksheets, to organize
and design the event sequences you need at your facility. Event

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-35


TCON30004/13
Event Sequences Controller Functions

sequences may be quite complicated and it is virtually impossible


to enter the information into the computer unless you have put the
information on paper.

Note: Event sequences run in a linear manner. They must run from the first
item in the sequence through to the last item in the sequence. Once
started, the sequence must finish before it may be called again.

The field entries for the event sequences editor are described below:
Sequence Number The sequence/action number (064)
you entered in the event definition extension editor. You may
define up to 64 event sequences for each controller. You may
also specify an event sequence #0, that runs at power-up, after
a controller reset, or after a database restore of the DCU. The
restart control action for any DO/DC point that is controlled
by event sequence #0 should be None. No other event
sequences run at power up. If more than one sequence (18
commands) are required, the SKIP command can be used to
connect as many sequences as required.
Sequence Name The name you wish to associate with this
sequence. The name can consist of up to 8 alphanumeric
characters. Be careful to enter a unique name for each event
sequence since the system allows duplicate names to be
entered.
Delay The delay in seconds (03,600) to be honored before
the defined sequence command on the same line is executed.
Typically the delay function is used for timing between
commands.
Action The action the system is to take is entered here.
Event sequences always issue the first of a control descrip-
tion/command pair as a start command and the second of the
control description/command pair as a stop command. Verify
that your control description/command pairs are defined
accordingly. The valid actions are listed in Table 5-12.
Point The name or address of the point to receive the
action you specified.

5-36 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Event Sequences

Table 5-12. Action Types Event Sequences

Action Description
This command issues a start command (first command of the points control
description/command pair) to the designated piece of equipment. If you issue
this command to a door, it places the door into the Secure mode.
Start The Start command can be overridden by any other automatic program that
normally starts or stops this point, or by a person using a workstation or HHC. In
the case of a door point, this command can also be overridden from a PIN pad
by a user with access to the appropriate user-defined PIN pad function.
This action issues a stop command (second command of the points control
description/command pair) to the designated piece of equipment. If you issue
this command to a door, it places the door into the Unlock mode.
Stop The Stop command can be overridden by any other automatic program that
normally starts or stops this point, or by a person using a workstation or HHC. In
the case of a door point, this command can also be overridden from a PIN pad
by a user with access to the appropriate user-defined PIN pad function.
This command should not be used with indirect points. This action issues a start
command to the designated piece of equipment and locks the device in this
state. If you issue this command to a door, it places the door into a fixed Secure
mode.
Start with Lock With its state locked, the point cannot be controlled by any automated processes
other than another event sequence. However, the locked state can still be
overridden manually through the use of a host workstation or HHC.
An Event Unlock command can be used to unlock the point, allowing it to once
again be controlled by normal automated processes.
This command should not be used with indirect points. This action issues a stop
command to the designated piece of equipment and locks the device in this
state. If you issue this command to a door, it places the door into a fixed Unlock
mode
Stop with Lock With its state locked, the point cannot be controlled by any automated processes
other than another event sequence. However, the locked state can still be
overridden manually through the use of a host workstation or HHC.
An Event Unlock command can be used to unlock the device, allowing it to once
again be controlled by normal automated processes.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-37


TCON30004/13
Event Sequences Controller Functions

Table 5-12. Action Types Event Sequences (Continued)

Action Description

This command will lock the specified door (i.e., it changes the doors mode to
Lock).

Lock Door The Lock Door command can be overridden by any other automatic program that
normally starts or stops this point. It can also be overridden manually by a person
using a workstation, HHC, or PIN pad (if the user has access to the appropriate
user-defined PIN pad function).
As with the Lock Door command, this command will lock the specified door.
However, this command will also lock the doors state. With its state locked, the
door cannot be controlled by any automated processes other than another event
sequence. The locked state can still be overridden manually through the use of
Lock Door with a host workstation or HHC.
lock
An Event Unlock command issued to the door point will unlock the doors state
and reinforce the doors normal operating mode (i.e., Lock, Unlock, or Secure).
With the door state unlocked, it can once again be controlled by normal
automated processes.
This pair of commands lets you inhibit or enable the alarm function of any point.
Unlike the alarm inhibit/enable extension, this function allows points to be
Inhibit/Enable
enabled/inhibited immediately, and does not depend upon the state of another
Alarm
point. This command overrides an inhibit or enable condition set by the alarm
inhibit/enable extension, and vice versa.
This command can be used to unlock a device that was previously locked by any
of the following commands:
Stop with lock
Output with lock
Event Unlock Lock Door with lock
The locked state of a device can only be changed manually (i.e., using a
workstation or HHC) or by another event sequence. After issuing the Event
Unlock command to a device, the devices state can once again be controlled by
normal automated processes.
This command lets you designate an analog value that is output to an AO/GO
point as part of this event sequence. This output does not override the high or
low output limit you specified when you defined the point. This desired output is
Output
entered in the Value field. This action is later subject to override by any other
automatic program that normally starts or stops this point, or by a person using
a workstation or HHC.

5-38 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Event Sequences

Table 5-12. Action Types Event Sequences (Continued)

Action Description

This command should not be used with indirect points. As in the Start with Lock
and Stop with Lock commands, the Output with Lock issues a command that
cannot be overridden by any automatic program other than another event
sequence. The points locked state can still be overridden manually through the
use of a host workstation or HHC.
Output with Lock The Output with Lock feature lets you pre-plan a specific value or position. Due
to memory limitations, if using only Output with Lock commands, you may only
use 12 line items per event sequence instead of the normal 18 line items per
event sequence.
An Event Unlock command can be used to unlock the point, allowing it to once
again be controlled by normal automated processes.
Tells the controller to refer to another system point to see if it is currently in the
0 state and, if so, command the event sequence to either skip to another
sequence or to another element in the same sequence. If the point state is 1
Skip if zero (nonzero), this line in the sequence is ignored and the sequence proceeds to the
next entered item. The point to be verified does not need to be an element in the
sequence. Typically, the point being verified is an input feedback point such as
a DM or DI point that monitors the state of a commanded device.
This command functions just as the zero command described above. In this
Skip if non-zero case, however, the controller checks to see if the point in question is in the 1
(nonzero) state.
This command allows the sequencing of commands to skip to another sequence
Unconditional
number or skip a specified number of actions in the same sequence following the
skip
current line number.
Note: Lock commands have the highest possible priority. For example, use lock commands for
stairwell pressurization fans when a fire alarm signal is received to pressurize the stairwell
when smoke is detected.

Skip/Value Use this option to chain more than one event


sequence to an event definition, or to skip certain elements in
the sequence when the Zero or Nonzero conditional state-
ments are used. Enter the number of actions to be skipped,
the event sequence to skip to, or the analog value to be issued
in the case of an output analog value command.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-39


TCON30004/13
Event Actions Controller Functions

Event Actions
The event actions editor is used with the event definition point
extension. It allows the operator to print a message when a specific
event occurs.
Adding an action message requires four bytes of memory for the
editor, plus one byte of memory per character in the message. The
maximum memory used is 68 bytes per message (4 for the editor
plus 64 characters in the message).
Use this editor to generate action messages in response to an event
or condition defined using the event definition editor.
You may define up to 64 event actions for each controller. Each
action type contains unique parameters required to perform the
function including message distribution parameters.

Message Actions
The field entries for message actions are described below:
Action Message The message to display or print in
response to the event defined. The limit is one line per
message. Each line may contain up to 64 alphanumeric char-
acters. The message will be printed on the host workstations
event printer, and stored in the host workstation alarm table.
Distribution Group and Mask The distribution group (1
4) and active mask position(s) desired. With four possible
distribution groups and eight possible masks, there are a total
of 32 mask positions (4 8 = 32). Distribution groups and
masks direct information from this editor to those worksta-
tions with a matching distribution group and active mask
position.
Priority The priority for sending information from this
editor. The options are None , Routine, Priority, and Critical.
None indicates no priority (no message will be generated).
Select Routine if you want only directly connected worksta-
tions to receive the action message when the event occurs in
the controller. Select Priority or Critical if you want both
remote AD/AA and directly connected workstations to receive

5-40 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Trend Plot

the action message when the event occurs in the controller.


Priority will cause the Dial Tap to dial the workstation when
the 7806x LAN Tap deferred dialing parameters are met, and
upload all messages that are pending. Critical will cause the
Dial Tap to dial the workstation immediately and upload all
messages, including any pending Priority messages.

Report Actions
This function is reserved for future use.

DIF Conversion Actions


This function is reserved for future use.

Trend Plot
The trend plot editor automatically plots the data collected
according to the parameters defined in the trend sample extension
editor. Data is plotted on an x-y graph. The x-axis represents time
and the y-axis spans the point value range.
The trend plot begins displaying sampled data at the rate of 35
samples per page (five samples per major division). When the 36th
sample is collected, the time scale (x-axis) changes to 70 samples
per page (10 samples per major division). The scale continues to
change to 140 (20 samples per division), 280 (40 samples per divi-
sion), and 560 (80 samples per division), as needed. The maximum
samples per page is 560. At this point, data is displayed on a second
page.
The actual time stamps on the x-axis are determined by the base
time and interval you entered in the trend sampling editor. If you
are sampling every 10 minutes starting at 12:00, the time stamps are
1200, 1250, 1340, and so on. After 36 samples, this scale changes to
1200, 1340, 1520, and so on.

2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. 5-41


TCON30004/13
Multi-Point Trend Plot Controller Functions

Multi-Point Trend Plot


This function allows you to plot up to six different points on the
same trend plot. The points do not have to be on the same
controller, nor do you have to be connected to the controller(s)
where the points reside. Any direct connect point on the system
may be used; dial points are not available.
The features of the multi-point trend plot include:
Live or historical data display. The historical data will show all
of the trend data currently residing in the controller. The live
display plots real-time data.
Grid option. This option displays a grid over the plot. The grid
may be turned on and off as desired when viewing data.
Multiple scaling. Two y-axes may be defined, to be used simul-
taneously on the display. This allows you to define the specific
data range(s) of interest. Each point on the plot is assigned to
one or the other y-axis, and will be plotted against that scale.
Only one x-axis is displayed at a time.
Automatic scaling. This option will change the y-axis scales to
the optimum values for displaying data. This prevents off-
scale data, which can cause gaps in the plot. You may switch
back and forth from automatic scaling to the manual scaling
entered in the plot definition.
Clip Board. This option will copy the data into the Windows
clipboard, allowing you to paste it into a third-party program.
See Plot Functions on page 5-47 for a more detailed description
of these options.

Trend Data
In order to use this function, the points to be plotted must have
trend sampling data available. Refer to Chapter 7, Point Extensions,
for information on adding the trend sampling (TR) extension to a
point.

5-42 2013 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.


TCON30004/13
Controller Functions Multi-Point Trend Plot

This plot uses the trend information stored in the controller. This
limits the maximum number of samples to 1440 for each point.
Trend sampling parameters should be set so as to provide data over
the desired period of time within that sample number.

Note: This plot does not use data stored in SevenTrends tables, only what is
currently stored in the controller. Once a trend sample is overwritten
with new data in the controller, the old sample data is unavailable for
this trend plot.

Trend Report Definition


Trend plot definitions are stored on the host workstation, and can
be called up at a later date. This is useful in cases where the same
trend information is desired on a periodic basis.
The trend editor has a window for selecting a plot definition. When
you first enter the editor, this report selection window is empty.
This is because no plots have been defined yet.