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Running head: SUSTAINABLE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 1

Zhu, Y. and Lin, B. (2004). Sustainable housing and urban construction in China. Energy and

Buildings, Volume 36, Issue 12: 1287-1297.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2003.11.007. Retrieved from

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378778804000623

This article discusses how in China there is a massive housing development and that there

should be a positive sustainable foundation for this development. This is an urgent task for China

to ingrain the concept of sustainability and put it into practice for urban construction. They find it

necessary to develop the sustainable building technologies applicable to various climate regions,

economic conditions, and residential customs in China, as well as sustainable to the most

occupants and owners. China is looking to hire people in all of these different fields of

sustainability in order to successfully accomplish this sustainable growth. Not only does this

create jobs boosting the economy but it also educates people in a prevalent issue in society today.

What this article showed our group is another perspective a whole different country takes

on the issue of sustainable design. Also shows us how such a massive scale issue can be handled.

The idea of building different technologies for different climates is a very interesting and there is

a lot of lessons learned because sustainable development is needed in different climates.

Robinson, D. and Edwards, D. (2009). Sustainable Housing Design: Measurement, Motivation,

and Management in Sutherland Shire, Sydney, Australia. Environmental Planning and

Design, Vol. 36, No. 2: 336-354 doi: 10.1068/b31161. Retrieved from

http://epb.sagepub.com/content/36/2/336.short

This article explains how Australia is implementing sustainable design in housing. There

are a few organizations and laws in Australia that are striving for sustainable development. The

motives and attitudes of key stakeholders towards sustainable housing design (SHD) were
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identified. Also, the feasibility of an Ecological Sustainability Index (ESI), a tool for the

assessment of residential developments, developed by Sutherland Shire Council was

investigated. Residential surveys, reviews of development applications, and interviews with

housing professionals all indicated that the status of environmentally sustainable housing in the

area was inadequate and was not improving.

This article showed our group how different organizations can be stakeholders and

develop their own tools to measure sustainability. Even though, Australia is a continent that is

quite isolated from the rest of the world with vast natural resources, there is a lot of lessons

learned from how they manage sustainability in housing development.

Modern Green Homes Sanctuary Magazine. Issue 24. (2013). Retrieved from

http://www.sanctuarymagazine.org.au/ideas-advice/design-matters/sustainable-home-design-

basics/

This article discusses many different components of a sustainable houses and small tips

on how to live a more sustainable life. For example one of the components it goes into is a

passively designed home makes the most of natural heating and cooling methods to keep its

occupants comfortable year-round. Orientation, spatial zoning, thermal mass, ventilation,

insulation, shading and glazing. It also has different sub-categories for things like design of

house for climate and another one was design of house for life. Another relevant topic this article

talked about was insulation. Insulation acts as a barrier, preventing heat passing in and out of a

house. By reducing this heat flow you can more easily maintain a comfortable temperature

inside, regardless of the temperature outside


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This article helps our group because it gives us a broad overview of how a sustainably

designed house should look for many different climates and in many different situations. Also

explains different materials we could possibly use and the pros and cons of those materials.

Hagbert, P. and Femenias, P. (2016). Sustainable homes, or simply energy-efficient buildings?

Journal of Housing and the Built Environment. Vol. 31, Issue 1: 1-17.

doi:10.1007/s10901-015-9440-y. Retrieved from

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10901-015-9440-y

The article explores the economics of sustainability in housing development in Sweden.

It discusses the differences between traditional housing market and the challenges of

implementing sustainability into the developments. The paper emphasizes the need to formulate

an integrative approach to sustainable residential environments.

This article helps our group to look into economics of sustainable housing development,

such as initial cost and long-term savings compared to traditional housing development market.

Min., Z., Morgenstern, P. and Marjanovic-Halburd, L. (2016). Facilities management added

value in closing the energy performance gap. International Journal of Sustainable Built

Environment. Vol.5, Issue 2, December 2016: 197209.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsbe.2016.06.004. Retrieved from

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212609016300218

This article investigates how the operational strategies of facilities management can

reduce building energy use. A case study was introduced where 14 years of energy data was

analyzed since 2001, and how the energy performance was optimized. The article highlights the
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importance of operations and maintenance in reducing the energy usage of existing buildings,

even though they are not built with recent sustainable design elements.

This article shows our group that a long-term operations and maintenance, and

management measures can be implemented after the sustainable house is developed to optimize

the energy use.


Running head: SUSTAINABLE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 5

References

Zhu, Y. and Lin, B. (2004). Sustainable housing and urban construction in China. Energy and

Buildings, Volume 36, Issue 12: 1287-1297.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2003.11.007. Retrieved from

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378778804000623

Robinson, D. and Edwards, D. (2009). Sustainable Housing Design: Measurement, Motivation,

and Management in Sutherland Shire, Sydney, Australia. Environmental Planning and

Design, Vol. 36, No. 2: 336-354 doi: 10.1068/b31161. Retrieved from

http://epb.sagepub.com/content/36/2/336.short

Modern Green Homes Sanctuary Magazine. Issue 24. (2013). Retrieved from

http://www.sanctuarymagazine.org.au/ideas-advice/design-matters/sustainable-home-design-

basics/

Hagbert, P. and Femenias, P. (2016). Sustainable homes, or simply energy-efficient buildings?

Journal of Housing and the Built Environment. Vol. 31, Issue 1: 1-17.

doi:10.1007/s10901-015-9440-y. Retrieved from

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10901-015-9440-y

Min., Z., Morgenstern, P. and Marjanovic-Halburd, L. (2016). Facilities management added

value in closing the energy performance gap. International Journal of Sustainable Built

Environment. Vol.5, Issue 2, December 2016: 197209.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsbe.2016.06.004. Retrieved from

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212609016300218
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