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Train the Trainer ASEAN Master

Assessor

MTA 2.1
Trainee Manual
Train the Trainer
ASEAN Master
Assessor
MTA 2.1

Trainee Manual
Project Base
William Angliss Institute of TAFE
555 La Trobe Street
Melbourne 3000 Victoria
Telephone: (03) 9606 2111
Facsimile: (03) 9670 1330
Acknowledgements
Project Director: Wayne Crosbie
Project Manager Jim Irwin
Chief Writer: Alan Hickman
Subject Writer: Alan Hickman
Editor: Jim Irwin
DTP/Production: Daniel Chee, Mai Vu

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was established on 8 August 1967. The Member
States of the Association are Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar,
Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam.
The ASEAN Secretariat is based in Jakarta, Indonesia.
General Information on ASEAN appears online at the ASEAN Website: www.asean.org.
All text is produced by William Angliss Institute of TAFE for the ASEAN Project on Process Refinement
and Training of ASEAN Tourism Master Trainers and Master Assessors.
This publication is supported by the Australian Governments aid program through the ASEAN-Australia
Development Cooperation Program Phase II (AADCP II).
Copyright: Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) 2016.
All rights reserved.
Disclaimer
Every effort has been made to ensure that this publication is free from errors or omissions. However, you
should conduct your own enquiries and seek professional advice before relying on any fact, statement or
matter contained in this book. The ASEAN Secretariat and William Angliss Institute of TAFE are not
responsible for any injury, loss or damage as a result of material included or omitted from this course.
Information in this module is current at the time of publication. Time of publication is indicated in the date
stamp at the bottom of each page.
Some images appearing in this resource have been purchased from stock photography suppliers
Shutterstock and iStockphoto and other third party copyright owners and as such are non-transferable and
non-exclusive. Clip arts, font images and illustrations used are from the Microsoft Office Clip Art and
Media Library. Some images have been provided by and are the property of William Angliss Institute.
Additional images have been sourced from Flickr and SXC and are used under Creative Commons
licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

File name: TM_Train_the_trainer_ASEAN_master assessor_160916


Table of contents
Introduction to trainee manual ............................................................................................... 1
Unit descriptor ....................................................................................................................... 3
Assessment matrix ................................................................................................................ 5
Glossary................................................................................................................................ 7
Element 1: Identify operational context .............................................................................. 11
Element 2: Identify the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition
System ................................................................................................................................ 35
Element 3: Identify ASEAN toolbox resources.................................................................... 71
Element 4: Implement assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard........................... 99
Element 5: Train National Assessors ................................................................................ 135
Presentation of written work .............................................................................................. 179
Recommended reading ..................................................................................................... 181
Trainee evaluation sheet ................................................................................................... 187
Trainee self-assessment checklist..................................................................................... 189

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ASEAN 2016
Trainee Manual
Train the Trainer ASEAN Master Assessor
Introduction to trainee manual

Introduction to trainee manual


To the Trainee
Congratulations on joining this course. This Trainee Manual is one part of a toolbox which is
a resource provided to trainees, trainers and assessors to help you become competent in
various areas of your work.
The toolbox consists of three parts:
A Trainee Manual for you to read and study at home or in class
A Trainer Guide with Power Point slides to help your Trainer explain the content of the
training material and provide class activities to help with practice
An Assessment Manual which provides your Assessor with oral and written questions
and other assessment tasks to establish whether or not you have achieved competency.
The first thing you may notice is that this training program and the information you find in the
Trainee Manual seems different to the textbooks you have used previously. This is because
the method of instruction and examination is different. The method used is called
Competency based training (CBT) and Competency based assessment (CBA). CBT and
CBA is the training and assessment system chosen by ASEAN (Association of South-East
Asian Nations) to train people to work in the tourism and hospitality industry throughout all
the ASEAN member states.
What is the CBT and CBA system and why has it been adopted by ASEAN?
CBT is a way of training that concentrates on what a worker can do or is required to do at
work. The aim is of the training is to enable trainees to perform tasks and duties at a
standard expected by employers. CBT seeks to develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes
(or recognise the ones the trainee already possesses) to achieve the required competency
standard. ASEAN has adopted the CBT/CBA training system as it is able to produce the type
of worker that industry is looking for and this therefore increases trainee chances of
obtaining employment.
CBA involves collecting evidence and making a judgement of the extent to which a worker
can perform his/her duties at the required competency standard. Where a trainee can
already demonstrate a degree of competency, either due to prior training or work
experience, a process of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is available to trainees to
recognise this. Please speak to your trainer about RPL if you think this applies to you.
What is a competency standard?
Competency standards are descriptions of the skills and knowledge required to perform a
task or activity at the level of a required standard.
242 competency standards for the tourism and hospitality industries throughout the ASEAN
region have been developed to cover all the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to work
in the following occupational areas:
Housekeeping
Food Production
Food and Beverage Service
Front Office

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Introduction to trainee manual

Travel Agencies
Tour Operation.
All of these competency standards are available for you to look at. In fact you will find a
summary of each one at the beginning of each Trainee Manual under the heading Unit
Descriptor. The unit descriptor describes the content of the unit you will be studying in the
Trainee Manual and provides a table of contents which are divided up into Elements and
Performance Criteria. An element is a description of one aspect of what has to be achieved
in the workplace. The Performance Criteria below each element details the level of
performance that needs to be demonstrated to be declared competent.
There are other components of the competency standard:
Unit Title: statement about what is to be done in the workplace
Unit Number: unique number identifying the particular competency
Nominal hours: number of classroom or practical hours usually needed to complete the
competency. We call them nominal hours because they can vary e.g. sometimes it will
take an individual less time to complete a unit of competency because he/she has prior
knowledge or work experience in that area.
The final heading you will see before you start reading the Trainee Manual is the
Assessment Matrix. Competency based assessment requires trainees to be assessed in at
least 2 3 different ways, one of which must be practical. This section outlines three ways
assessment can be carried out and includes work projects, written questions and oral
questions. The matrix is designed to show you which performance criteria will be assessed
and how they will be assessed. Your trainer and/or assessor may also use other assessment
methods including Observation Checklist and Third Party Statement. An observation
checklist is a way of recording how you perform at work and a third party statement is a
statement by a supervisor or employer about the degree of competence they believe you
have achieved. This can be based on observing your workplace performance, inspecting
your work or gaining feedback from fellow workers.
Your trainer and/or assessor may use other methods to assess you such as:
Journals
Oral presentations
Role plays
Log books
Group projects
Practical demonstrations.
Remember your trainer is there to help you succeed and become competent. Please feel
free to ask him or her for more explanation of what you have just read and of what is
expected from you and best wishes for your future studies and future career in tourism and
hospitality.

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Unit descriptor

Unit descriptor
Train the Trainer ASEAN Master Assessor
This unit deals with the skills and knowledge and attitudes to become an ASEAN Master
Assessor and train National Assessors.
Unit Code:
MTA 2.1
Nominal Hours:
105.

Element 1: Identify operational context


Performance Criteria
1.1 Explain background of the ASEAN Mutual Recognition Arrangement on Tourism
Professionals (MRA-TP)
1.2 Describe elements of MRA-TP
1.3 Define Competency Based Training and Assessment
1.4 Characterise role of ASEAN assessor

Element 2: Identify the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework


and Skills Recognition System
Performance Criteria
2.1 Identify Qualifications available under the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework
and Skills Recognition System
2.2 Explain concept of Packaging Rules to develop ASEAN qualifications

Element 3: Identify ASEAN toolbox resources


Performance Criteria
3.1 Name Labour Divisions to which ASEAN toolboxes apply
3.2 Identify unit titles of ASEAN toolboxes
3.3 Describe assessment-related elements of an ASEAN toolbox

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Unit descriptor

Element 4: Implement assessment of an ASEAN Competency


Standard
Performance Criteria
4.1 Detail competency standard assessment requirements
4.2 Plan and prepare for assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard
4.3 Conduct assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard
4.4 Evaluate an ASEAN assessment

Element 5: Train National Assessors


Performance Criteria
5.1 Discuss the learning process
5.2 Plan and prepare for delivery of National Assessor training
5.3 Conduct National Assessor training
5.4 Evaluate National Assessor training

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Assessment matrix

Assessment matrix
Showing mapping of Performance Criteria against Work Projects, Written Questions
and Oral Questions
The Assessment Matrix indicates three of the most common assessment activities your
Assessor may use to assess your understanding of the content of this manual and your
performance - Work Projects, Written Questions and Oral Questions. It also indicates where
you can find the subject content related to these assessment activities in the Trainee Manual
(i.e. under which element or performance criteria). As explained in the Introduction, however,
the assessors are free to choose which assessment activities are most suitable to best
capture evidence of competency as they deem appropriate for individual students.

Written Oral
Projects
Questions Questions

Element 1: Identify operational context

1.1 Explain background of the ASEAN Mutual


Recognition Arrangement on Tourism 1.1 1, 2 1
Professionals (MRA-TP)

1.2 Describe elements of MRA-TP 1.1 38 2

1.3 Define Competency Based Training and


1.1 9, 10, 11 3, 4
Assessment

1.4 Characterise role of ASEAN assessor 1.1 12 16 5

Element 2: Identify the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition
System

2.1 Identify Qualifications available under the


ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework 2.1 6, 17 6
and Skills Recognition System

2.2 Explain concept of Packaging Rules to


2.1 18, 19 7, 8
develop ASEAN qualifications

Element 3: Identify ASEAN toolbox resources

3.1 Name Labour Divisions to which ASEAN


3.1 20 9
toolboxes apply

3.2 Identify unit titles of ASEAN toolboxes 3.1 21 10, 11

3.3 Describe assessment-related elements of an


3.2 22, 23, 24 12, 13, 14
ASEAN toolbox

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Assessment matrix

Written Oral
Projects
Questions Questions

Element 4: Implement assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard

4.1 Detail competency standard assessment


4.1 25 29 15, 16
requirements

4.2 Plan and prepare for assessment of an


4.1 30, 31 17
ASEAN Competency Standard

4.3 Conduct assessment of an ASEAN


4.1 32, 33, 34 18
Competency Standard

4.4 Evaluate an ASEAN assessment 4.2 35, 36, 37 19

Element 5: Train National Assessors

5.1 Discuss the learning process 5.1 38 20, 21

5.2 Plan and prepare for delivery of National 5.2 39 49 22


Assessor training

5.3 Conduct National Assessor training 5.2 50 56 23

5.4 Evaluate National Assessor training 5.2 57, 58, 59 24

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Glossary

Glossary
Term Explanation

AADCP ASEAN Australia Development Cooperation Program

ACCSTP ASEAN Common Competency Standards for Tourism Professionals

AEC ASEAN Economic Community

AM Assessor Manual

AMS ASEAN Member States

AQEM ASEAN Qualifications Equivalence Matrix

ASEAN Association of Southeast Asian Nations

ASEC ASEAN Secretariat

ATA ASEAN Tourism Agreement

ATM ASEAN Tourism Ministers

ATP ASEAN Tourism Professionals

ATPMC ASEAN Tourism Professionals Monitoring Committee

ATQEM ASEAN Tourism Qualifications Equivalence Matrix

ATPRS ASEAN Tourism Professional Registration System

ATFTMD ASEAN Task Force on Tourism Manpower Development

C Competent (as opposed to NYC)

CATC Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum

CBA Competency Based Assessment

CBT Competency Based Training

CLMV Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam

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Glossary

Term Explanation

A unit which must be undertaken at the same time another unit is


Co-requisite unit
being undertaken

DTP Desk-top publishing

EU European Union

FB Food and beverage service

FO Front Office

FP Food Production

HK Housekeeping

ITAB Industry Training Advisory Board

MA Master Assessor

MT Master Trainer

M-ATM Meeting of ASEAN Tourism Ministers

MRA Mutual Recognition Arrangement

MRA-TP Mutual Recognition Arrangement on Tourism Professionals

NCVER National Centre for Vocational Education Research

NTO National Tourism Organisation

NTPB National Tourism Professional Board

NYC Not Yet Competent

OHP Overhead Projector

PC Pass Competent (as opposed to NYC)

PPT PowerPoint presentation/slides

Mandatory unit which must be completed before another unit is


Pre-requisite unit
undertaken

RCC Recognition of Current Competencies

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Glossary

Term Explanation

RITS Roadmap for Integration of Tourism Sector

RPL Recognition of Prior Learning

RQFSRS Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition System

RTO Registered Training Organisation

SRA Skills Recognition Audit

TA Travel Agencies

TAFE Technical and Further Education

TG Trainer Guide

TM Trainee Manual

TO Tour Operation

ToMT Training of ASEAN Master Trainers

ToMA Training of ASEAN Master Assessors

PCB Tourism Professional Certification Board

VAP Vientiane Action Plan

VET Vocational Education and Training

WAI William Angliss Institute

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Glossary

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Element 1:
Identify operational context
1.1 Explain background of the ASEAN Mutual
Recognition Arrangement on Tourism
Professionals (MRA-TP)
Introduction
The Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) on Tourism Professionals was adopted by the
ASEAN Tourism Ministers (ATM) in 2009 as a key ASEAN tourism initiative to support the
establishment of the ASEAN Economic Community 2015.

This section provides details on the MRA-TP.

Rationale for MRA-TP


A Handbook has been prepared (and is accessible through www.ATPRS.org) to assist with
explaining the MRA-TP system and processes. It was produced by Vietnam National
Administration of Tourism on behalf of The Association of Southeast Asian Nations
(ASEAN).

This Handbook provides (p.3) a Rationale for MRA for Tourism Professionals stating:
To ensure growth sustainability and greater contribution to the ASEAN economy, the
ASEAN tourism attractiveness needs to be accompanied by excellent quality of
services provided by the tourism industry within the region. Having high-skilled
tourism workers to deliver high-quality services should become normal practice in
order to guarantee satisfaction of tourists visiting the region. One of the ways to
achieve this goal is through mutual recognition of qualifications of tourism
professionals across Member States.

The purpose of this mutual recognition mechanism is to facilitate mobility of tourism


professionals within ASEAN based on competence-based tourism
qualifications/certificates, and at the same time, improve the quality of services
delivered by tourism professionals. There are 32 job titles covered under this MRA,
ranging from housekeeping, front office, food and beverages services, and food
production for hotel division, to travel agencies and tour operator for travel division.

Stakeholders
The major stakeholders are:

The Australian Government aid agency AusAid who funded the project through the
ASEAN-Australia Development Cooperation Program (AADCP1)
The ten ASEAN Member States Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos PDR,
Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Viet Nam
The ASEAN Secretariat based in Jakarta, Indonesia.

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Funding

The funding for the current and previous ASEAN Tourism Projects has been provided by the
Australian government agency, AusAid, to the ASEAN Secretariat via the ASEAN-Australia
Development Cooperation Program.

Objectives
The Handbook (p. 5) under the heading Purpose of MRA on Tourism Professionals
presents the following:
The ASEAN MRA on Tourism Professionals (MRA-TP) seeks to increase the
international mobility of tourism labour across the ASEAN region in line with ASEAN
policy. Each ASEAN nation has its own standards, certification and regulations for
recognising the competency of workers in the tourism sector. Therefore, there is a
need for an MRA to facilitate agreement on what constitutes equivalent competency
to work in tourism by a worker, for example from Indonesia, who is seeking a position
in Malaysia.
The MRA-TP is therefore designed to:
a) Address the imbalance between supply and demand for tourism jobs across the
ASEAN region; and
b) Establish a mechanism for the free movement of skilled and certified tourism
labour across the ASEAN region.
The objectives of MRA-TP are threefold, to:
a) Facilitate mobility of Tourism Professionals;
b) Encourage exchange of information on best practices in competency-based
education and training for Tourism Professionals; and,
c) Provide opportunities for cooperation and capacity building across ASEAN
Member States.

Recognition and Eligibility of Foreign Tourism Professionals


The ASEAN MRA-TP Handbook (available at www.ATPRS.org) states (p.1):

The ASEAN MRA on Tourism Professionals will provide a mechanism for agreement on the
equivalence of tourism certification procedures and qualifications across ASEAN. When
ASEAN nations mutually recognise each others qualifications this will encourage a free and
open market for tourism labour across the region and boost the competitiveness of the
tourism sector in each ASEAN nation, while at the same time attracting needed talent to
meet local skills shortages. The eligibility to work in a host country will of course be
subjected to prevailing domestic laws and regulations of the host country.

In order for a foreign Tourism Professional to be recognised by other ASEAN Member States
and to be eligible to work in a host country, they will need to possess a valid tourism
competency certificate in a specific tourism job title as specified in the Common ASEAN
Tourism Curriculum (CATC), issued by the Tourism Professional Certification Board (TPCB)
in an ASEAN Member State.

It is important to recognise that while the MRA on Tourism Professionals will be active, the
application and implementation by the various tourism educational and training providers in
each country will be voluntary. This is especially true in terms of quality of instruction,
evaluation and standards of curriculum development.

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William Angliss Institute


William Angliss Institute (WAI) has been closely involved in this project and:

Produced a Qualifications Framework see section 2.1 for details


Wrote Competency Standards for Units within the Qualifications Framework (see
section 3.2 for a complete list of these Units)
Developed Packaging Rules to guide the way Qualifications are created to reflect the
needs of individual students, industry and/or training providers: see section 2.2 for
details.
Information about William Angliss Institute

The main campus of William Angliss Institute is located in Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)
with training also delivered directly to industry partners through interstate offices,
independent and joint venture campus arrangements in Singapore, Sri Lanka, Malaysia,
Thailand and China, and international consultancy projects around the world.

Founded in 1940 William Angliss Institute is the only Government


Registered Training Organisation in Australia focussing solely on
tourism, hospitality and food industries
WAI has over 100,000 graduates now working in more than 30
countries in the global tourism industry.
WAI is the largest specialist single purpose provider of tourism,
hospitality and foods, education, training and consulting services in the
Southern Hemisphere with an annual enrolment of approximately
25,000 students.

It is a Victorian State Government TAFE (Technical and Further


Education) Institute, designated by the Victorian government as the
Specialist Centre for Tourism, Hospitality and Culinary Arts industries in
Victoria, Australia with annual revenue exceeding AUD$60 million.

Visit http://www.angliss.edu.au/ for more information.

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1.2 Describe elements of MRA-TP


Introduction
A proper understanding of MRA-TP requires a thorough appreciation of its elements.
This section presents and describes key elements of MRA-TP.

The key MRA components


The MRA-TP Handbook explains (pp. 1 2):
The MRA-TP model consists of six mechanisms or components:
a) The National Tourism Professional Board (NTPB),
b) The Tourism Professionals Certification Board (TPCB),
c) The Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum (CATC),
d) The ASEAN Tourism Professionals Registration System (ATPRS),
e) The ASEAN Tourism Qualifications Equivalency Matrix (ATQEM), and
f) The ASEAN Tourism Professional Monitoring Committee (ATPMC).
Each component forms part of a connecting infrastructure in support of effective
implementation of the MRA-TP system to become operational by 2015. Each part
requires development effort at either ASEAN (regional) level or Member State
(national) level.
At national or Member State level two agencies are required the National Tourism
Professional Board and the Tourism Professionals Certification Board.
The NTPB has the function of quality control of the education and training system
the Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum that delivers the qualifications recognized
in the MRA.
The Tourism Professionals Certification Board will apply national competency
standards, assess and certify tourism professionals and also support the ASEAN
Tourism Professionals Registration System.
The ATPRS is a web-based facility designed to disseminate details about qualified
tourist professionals in ASEAN Member States and provide a comparative
understanding of the scope, content and equivalent value (or status) of a tourism
qualification awarded in any one of the ASEAN Member States.
The MRA-TP is challenging because there are no agreed international tourism
standards which can act as a basis for conformity assessment for the MRA-TP. As a
result, it is essential to construct an equivalence matrix of tourism qualifications for
the AMS the ASEAN Tourism Qualifications Equivalency Matrix to be used as the
basis for conformity assessment. This is an essential supporting mechanism for a
robust, reliable and transparent Mutual Recognition Arrangement for Tourism
Professionals.
The overall MRA-TP system will be under the oversight of the ASEAN Tourism
Professional Monitoring Committee.

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Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum


When discussing the Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum, the MRA-TP Handbook
explains (p. 19):
The Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum (CATC) is the approved common
curriculum for ASEAN Tourism Professionals as mutually agreed upon by the
ASEAN Tourism Ministers upon recommendation by the ASEAN NTOs.
The concept is founded upon a number of initiatives, including the Vientiane Action
Plan (VAP), ASEAN Tourism Agreement (ATA) and the Roadmap for Integration of
Tourism Sector (RITS). The CATC is linked to the Regional Qualifications Framework
and Skills Recognition System (RQFSRS).
Design principles
The curriculum was designed to be industry based, well-structured and flexible, in
order to meet varying local requirements of the Member States.
It is based on the agreed Competencies adopted by all Countries in ASEAN, and
using the agreed ACCSTP Units of Competence aims at making qualifications
relevant and useful to both students and the tourism industry.
CATC
The CATC is founded upon six labour divisions: Front Office, Housekeeping, Food
Production, Food & Beverage Service, Travel Agencies and Tour Operations. CATC
& RQFSRS go hand in hand. CATC supports and contributes to the development of
a harmonized tourism education and training framework within the ASEAN region,
while the RQFSRS supports and contributes to the implementation of the MRA-TP
which ultimately will facilitate skilled labour mobility, contributing to economic
integration of the region.

Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition System


The Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition System (RQFSRS) is the
overriding educational framework for the ASEAN region.
The RQFSRS comprises 52 qualifications from Certificate II to Advanced Diploma Level,
spread across the six identified Labour Divisions.
Qualifications can be selected be users (according to mandatory Packaging Rules) to suit
individual need from the 242 Units for which Competency Standards were developed and
Toolboxes produced.
RQFSRS provides a common yardstick (a standardised teaching and assessment
framework) for ASEAN member states in terms of accreditation of tourism qualifications and
skills recognition across the region, assisting with the implementation of the MRA and
promoting labour mobility.

The nature and formulation of the RQFSRS means:


There is an opportunity and emphasis on qualifications meeting user (industry, students,
Training Provider) needs
Flexibility is provided for students to select Units to meet career goals and for employers
to nominate Units which respond to workplace need

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Students can move between qualifications, streams and Labour Divisions as their study
progresses and/or as their need alters
Students can enter the Framework at any level they do not have to start at the bottom
and work their way up.
It will provide, ensure and maintain quality assurance across all countries and
educational providers across the ASEAN region.

ASEAN Common Competency Standards for Tourism Professionals


ASEAN Common Competency Standards for Tourism Professionals (ACCSTP) are:
Blueprints which support the implementation of competency-based common ASEAN
tourism programs
Minimum requirements of competency standards in hotel and travel services which aim
to upgrade tourism services.
Together they provide Trainers and Assessors with the necessary guidance on the skills,
knowledge, and attitudes required for the participants to perform the tasks identified for the
six Labour Divisions at the defined standard for industry.

Developing the 242 Competency Standards of the ACCSTP has enabled stakeholders in the
ASEAN member states to implement tourism training programs which contain the minimum
standards required for participants to undertake a job effectively in the industry.

The MRA-TP Handbook (p, 15) notes:


In the development of the ACCSTP Framework (2004-2005), ATFTMD helped to
identify the minimum competency standards essential for each job title within the
following parameters:-
The ACCSTP Framework common competency standards matrix must be
compatible with best practice to be recognised internationally;
The ACCSTP Framework is the best available common denominator or common
language to advance the interests of the ASEAN community;
The ACCSTP Framework would only include competencies that were current,
relevant and applicable to member countries. A mainstream approach has been
used in cross-matching the common competencies (among member countries);
Given an agreed ACCSTP Framework, each member country or industry may
choose to add (at a later date) additional competencies that may be necessary to
suit local requirements.

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National Tourism Professionals Board


The National Tourism Professional Board (NTPB) refers to the Board for Tourism
Professionals composed of representatives from the public and private sectors (including
academia and other relevant tourism stakeholders) to be determined by the respective
ASEAN NTOs. (MRA-TP Handbook, p.7).

As stated above the NTPB has the function of quality control of the education and training
system the Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum that delivers the qualifications
recognized in the MRA.

Page 39 of the MRA-TP Handbook provides:

The NTPB of each ASEAN Member State shall have the following responsibilities:

Create awareness and disseminate information about the MRA-TP;

Promote, update, maintain, and monitor the ACCSTP and the CATC;

Facilitate the exchange of information concerning assessment procedures,


criteria, systems, manuals and publications relating to this MRA-TP;

Report its work progress to the ASEAN NTOs, including actions taken on cases
referred to it by the TPCB and/or ATPMC;

Formulate and update necessary mechanisms to enable implementation of this


MRA;

Facilitate the exchange of best practices and prevailing developments in tourism


sector with the view to harmonizing and updating regional and/or international
tourism competencies and curricula; and

Such other functions and responsibilities that may be assigned to it by the


ASEAN NTOs in the future.

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Tourism Professionals Certification Board


As mentioned above the Tourism Professionals Certification Board will apply national
competency standards, assess and certify tourism professionals and also support the
ASEAN Tourism Professionals Registration System.

The MRA-TP Handbook (p. 40) presents the following details regarding the TPCB:

Each Member State will establish a Tourism Professional Certification Board (TPCB).
Most will already have an established national qualifications accreditation agency
that would take on the role as TPCB. The TPCB would function in support of the
ATPRS by providing in-country qualification endorsements on existing professional
qualifications by applying the template established by the CATC Regional
Qualifications Framework.

In some countries, a TPCB or equivalent already exists and this development


presents a further indicator of the countrys readiness to proceed. For example, the
Government of Viet Nam with assistance from the EU established a working TPCB
named the Vietnam Tourism Certification Board which functions in support of the
VietNam National Authority on Tourism.

Responsibilities of the TPCB

Each Member Country will require the services of a Tourism Professionals


Certification Board. The TPCB will apply national competency standards and assess
and certify tourism professionals with an accredited qualification in order that they
can be registered on the ATPRS.

One of the primary functions of the TPCB is to manage the day-to-day operation of
the ATPRS. The TPCB is rooted firmly at the Member County level.

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ASEAN Tourism Professionals Registration System


The ASEAN Tourism Professional Registration System (ATPRS) is a web-based facility,
designed to register and disseminate details of certified ASEAN Tourism Professionals
(ATPs).
A key function of the ATPRS is to serve as a job-matching platform between industry and
ATPs across ASEAN.
Job seekers (foreign tourism professionals) can register on the system and seek job
opportunities in other member countries. Job opportunities can also be listed with the
specific requirements of the job so a match can be made. The job seeker will need to ensure
verification of his/her certificates by the national TPCB to ensure they match the
requirements of the Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum (CATC).
Once the certificates are validated, and if the job seeker matches the requirements of the
job, then an interview will take place and subject to job offer, a work permit will be provided
by the host country.
Pages 41 42 of the MRA-TP Handbook note:
There are two aims of the ATPRS:
1. To compile the records of applicants (tourism professionals) in a format compliant
with an agreed model and procedure. By this procedure, tourism professionals
will be registered and thus formally identified for recognition by industry as a
registered professional, and
2. Further to a satisfactory registration process, the ATPRS would provide a
database system on which the data on applicants could be appraised by licensed
employers or agencies. The process would indicate expressions of interest from
registered professionals in seeking employment on an industry-approved contract
in another AMS.
ATPRS Ethos
ATPRS will be established to provide affordable access, (equitable) to meet the needs of
suitably qualified job-seekers irrespective of where they live in the ASEAN region.
It will be a well-defined reference mechanism, linked to the standards of the ACCSTP
Framework. Most importantly, ATPRS will be managed in an environment conducive to
the MRA goals and in a competent manner that would engender confidence in its
operation and potential outcomes.

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ASEAN Tourism Professionals Monitoring Committee


The ASEAN Tourism Professional Monitoring Committee (ATPMC) has oversight of the
overall MRA-TP system.
The ATPMC consists of ASEAN NTOs and appointed representatives from National Tourism
Professional Boards (NTPB).
The MRA-TP Handbook (p. 6) adds:
The ATPMCs responsibilities in relation to the MRA-TP, are:
a) Create awareness and disseminate information about the MRA on Tourism
Professionals within ASEAN;
b) Promote, update, maintain and monitor the ASEAN Common Competency
Standards for Tourism Professionals (ACCSTP) and the Common ASEAN Tourism
Curriculum (CATC);
c)Notify promptly the concerned Tourism Professional Certification Board (TPCB)
upon receipt of feedback from National Tourism Professional Board (NTPB), in case
a foreign Tourism Professional is no longer recognised by the host country;
d) Facilitate the exchange of information concerning assessment procedures, criteria,
systems, manuals and publications relating to this Arrangement;
e) Report its work progress to the ASEAN NTOs;
f) Formulate and update necessary mechanisms to enable the implementation of the
MRA on Tourism Professionals;
g) Such other functions and responsibilities that may be assigned to it by the ASEAN
NTOs in the future; and
h) Resolve any differences among ASEAN Member States concerning the
interpretation or application of the MRA on Tourism Professionals and to settle them
in an amicable manner.

Recognition of Prior Learning


Recognition of Prior Learning is the process that gives current industry professionals who
do not have a formal qualification, the opportunity to benchmark their extensive skills and
experience against the standards set out in each unit of competency/subject.
Also known as a Skills Recognition Audit (SRA), this process is a learning and assessment
pathway which encompasses: Recognition of Current Competencies (RCC) Skills auditing
Gap analysis and training Credit transfer.
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a similar process to RCC that recognizes previous
study or learning which can be mapped against competency standards.
(Source: MRA-TP Handbook, p. 34)

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Regional Secretariat MRA-TP


The Regional Secretariat for the Implementation of the MRA-TP was established through an
agreement signed by all ASEAN Tourism Ministers on 30 December 2015.
The Regional Secretariat, stationed in Jakarta, Indonesia, has the following functions:
(1) To enhance awareness and provide capacity building on the implementation of the MRA
TP including marketing and promotion of the services offered by the Secretariat;
(2) To develop, maintain and update the ATPRS including its database management and
resources for implementation of the MRA;
(3) To formulate, update and recommend the necessary mechanism including certification
and assessment to enable the smooth implementation of the MRA-TP;
(4) To ensure effective and efficient use of human, financial and capital resources of the
Secretariat; and
(5) To perform such other functions and responsibilities that may be assigned to it by the
Governing Council.
The Agreement is available at:
http://www.asean.org/storage/2016/01/6Jan/agreement/Agreement_on_the_Establishment_
of_the_Regional_Secretariat.pdf

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1.3 Define Competency Based Training and


Assessment
Introduction
All the Toolboxes are based on Competency Based Training and Competency Based
Assessment.
This section defines competency, CBT and CBA.

Competency
The following is contained in the Trainer Guide for all Toolboxes:
Competency refers to the ability to perform particular tasks and duties to the standard of
performance expected in the workplace.
Competency requires the application of specified
knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to effective
participation, consistently over time and in the
workplace environment.
The essential skills and knowledge are either
identified separately or combined.
Knowledge identifies what a person needs to know
to perform the work in an informed and effective manner.
Skills describe the application of knowledge to situations where understanding is
converted into a workplace outcome.
Attitude describes the founding reasons behind the need for certain knowledge or why
skills are performed in a specified manner.
Competency covers all aspects of workplace performance and involves:
Performing individual tasks
Managing a range of different tasks
Responding to contingencies or breakdowns
Dealing with the responsibilities of the workplace
Working with others.

Competency Based Training


CBT evolved over decades from the mid-1900s originating in America and spreading
globally and developing into a system/method that is now recognised as the optimal training
method for vocational training.
The approach focuses on what candidate/student can do in the workplace rather than on
what they know.
This dramatically shifts the focus of learning from completing a program/course to being able
to demonstrate competency.
In relation to CBT:

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It is an approach to vocational (work) education and training that places emphasis on


what a person can do or is required to do in the workplace.
It is not time based
Participants achievements are measured against Competency Standards rather than
against the achievement of other learners
For a person to be assessed competent they need to demonstrate the ability to perform
tasks and duties to the standard expected in employment
CBT focuses on the development of skills, knowledge and attitudes required to achieve
the competency standard
It is industry relevant.
CBT can be seen as comprising
Competency Standard Common ASEAN Tourism Curriculum = the skills required to do a
job
Assessment including RPL = process to judge if people have the required skills and
knowledge
Learning strategies and learning material (Toolbox) = How people acquire the skills and
knowledge (Competency Toolbox)
Qualification Framework/Regional Qualifications Framework & Skills Recognition =
system for the recognition of skills and knowledge.

Competency Based Assessment


For Competency Based Training to be complete and
effective there must be Competency Based Assessment.
CBT does not exist effectively on its own.
The results of CBA are either Pass Competent or Not
Yet Competent: the concept of Pass or Fail and/or
percentages (such as 75% pass, or 82 out of 100) does
not exist within CBA.
In relation to CBA:
It is a process of systematically collecting evidence and making a judgement of a person
performance against the prescribed competency standard
It seeks evidence/proof of trainee competency, in relation to the endorsed Industry
Competency Standards against which they are being assessed.
This evidence may be obtained by:
Observing their work in the workplace or in a simulated setting
Obtaining reports of their competence from supervisors, co-workers and customers
Sighting samples of work they have done.
To be assessed as Competent a candidate must demonstrate they are able to:
Perform at an acceptable level of skill
Organise the required tasks
Respond and react appropriately when things go wrong

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Fulfil a role in the scheme of things at work


Transfer skills and knowledge to new situations.
Overview of CBT and CBA
Occupational/job analysis forms the basis of a competency
The focus of training is on the performance of the
competency
Trainees have access to the competency statements and
the level of achievement/assessment required
Assessment methods are appropriate
The results are reported as competencies achieved
Detailed records are maintained.

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1.4 Characterise role of ASEAN assessor


Introduction
It is important to understand the role of ASEAN assessors in this initiative.
This section discusses the pre-requisite requirements to become an assessor, looks at the
roles and responsibilities of assessors and examines the relationship between assessors
and trainers.

To become a Toolbox Assessor


All ASEAN Member States strive to ensure their vocational Assessors provide rigorous and
professional assessment of vocational training.
To do this they set non-negotiable standards/criteria which every
Assessor must comply with in order to be deemed eligible to
assess accredited industry training.
These standards/criteria while they may differ slightly between
individual countries are similar across ASEAN Member States and
relate to:
A minimum number of years of experience in a relevant
industry which may be required at a given position level, or
above
A base industry-specific/trade or vocational qualification
A nominated and accredited vocational assessing (or training and assessing) certification
issued by a recognised provider.

National Trainer and National Assessor training


To supplement and facilitate the professional delivery of ASEAN Toolbox training and
assessment, National Trainer and National Assessor courses have been developed.
Train the Trainer ASEAN National Trainer course is 50 hours.
Train the Trainer ASEAN National Assessor course is 35 hours.

Roles and responsibilities of Assessor


The common roles and responsibilities of an Assessor include:
Being responsible to their employer/the Training Provider they work for in terms of:
Complying with all relevant legal obligations
Aligning with workplace requirements applicable to Assessors
Being responsible to their students in terms of:
Applying themselves to their work:
Diligently
Honestly
Fairly.

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Making quality assessment of vocational training a constant objective and predominant


priority
Organising assessment of candidates planning and preparing for assessments by:
Reading and digesting the Competency Standard for the Unit to be assessed in order
to gain an appreciation of:
Content in terms of Elements and Performance Criteria
The stated Assessment Guide
Critical Aspects of Assessment
Context of Assessment
Options provided under Assessment Methods.
Gathering information about candidate characteristics in order to determine special
needs characteristics which need to be accommodated as part of the assessment
process
Confirming a safe environment for the conduct of all assessment activities
Liaising with the Trainer to:
Determine the content the Trainer is delivering to help serve as a basis for
determining competency of candidates
Time-table/schedule planned assessments to integrate with training delivery
plans
Discuss and confirm planned assessment activities are valid and appropriate to
the content being delivered.
Liaising and communicating with other Assessors to:
Learn from their activities and initiatives
Schedule assessment activities to accommodate their needs where there is the
potential for a clash of assessment activities, or the potential to benefit from
coordinating/combining assessment tasks.
Accessing, obtaining, preparing and/or and reviewing relevant assessment resources
and assessment materials for suitability and relevance, and seeking assistance to
interpret contextual application if required to ensure assessment aligns with actual
training delivery
Organising access to necessary equipment or
physical resources required by the candidate/s
in order for them to undertake identified
assessment
Preparing for every assessment session and
item without exception
Notifying candidates of details regarding their
planned assessment in terms of dates, start
times, venues/locations, duration and assessment requirements and criteria
Conducting assessments undertaking/applying assessments as planned, including:
Following the assessment plan/s developed for assessing each candidate for every
Competency Standard to be assessed

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Briefing candidates on requirements for the assessments they are about to undertake
ensuring they are perfectly aware of what they are required to so and fully understand all
parameters and/or criteria and standards (for example: time limits, materials available,
finished product descriptors) which apply
Ensuring the actual assessments reflect:
What the candidates were told to expect
What the candidates were taught by their Trainers.
Using appropriate assessment techniques according to the nature and content of each
Competency Standard to obtain necessary evidence to enable the C or NYC decision
to be made
Applying suitable techniques during assessments to encourage, motivate and support
the candidate
Using clear and appropriate communication skills to provide information to and instruct
candidates, as required, throughout the assessment activities
Providing and organising further/additional opportunities for candidates to be assessed
when their initial assessment resulted in a NYC decision
Liaising with Trainers after a candidate achieves a NYC outcome to assist with
determining extra training which needs to be provided to facilitate a successful
subsequent assessment event
Maintaining assessment records in keeping with internal requirements and such that
they will accurately reflect the outcomes/results achieved by each candidate for every
assessment item/activity for each Competency Standard assessed.
Reviewing personal assessment performance and
finalising documentation in terms of:
Reflecting upon personal performance in
planning for and conducing assessments
Documenting strategies for improvement to
assessments
Maintaining, storing and securing candidate
outcomes, results and records according to
organisational and legal requirements.
Growing personal assessment expertise through further training and by engaging with
new and varied assessment experiences.
Roles and responsibilities of Master Assessor
The score/rating participants receive on completion of Master Trainer and Master Assessor
training will determine to a large extent their roles and responsibilities.
The primary role of the Master Assessor training is to give participants the knowledge, skills
and attitudes required to successfully deliver training on how to use the Toolboxes to
conduct vocational assessments to other teachers and educators in their respective
countries and in the other ASEAN Member States.

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In order to fulfil their primary role Master Assessors are required to:
Promote the ASEAN Toolboxes project and their use
Assist with selection of candidates for undertaking the program
Train Master Assessor candidates in the use of ASEAN Toolboxes to conduct
assessments and to become Master Assessors in their own right applying all the
issues identified under roles and responsibilities of assessors (immediately above)
Monitor the progress of the Program and the participants
Provide assistance to other Assessors and Master Assessors on an ongoing basis
Give feedback to relevant personnel and bodies regarding progress, implementation,
problems and opportunities and potential for extending and improving the project.
Evaluation and rating of Master Trainers and Master Assessors
On completion of Master Trainer and Master Assessor
training participants will be rated into one of four
Levels (as described below) based essentially on their:
Attitude
Aptitude
Vocational knowledge
Vocational experience
Ability to train
Communicative competence (including English language ability)
Knowledge of CBT/CBA
Knowledge of CATC, MRA
Knowledge of specialist or common core toolboxes
Personal characteristics.
Scoring/rating system
Participants will be scored out of a maximum score of 30 points, as follows:
Level 1: (25 30) Outstanding Master Trainer and/or Assessor
This Master Trainer or Master Assessor has demonstrated:
In-depth understanding of the background to vocational
training in the ASEAN context, the MRA and the toolbox
project
In-depth understanding of the structure, purpose and
application of CBT/CBA
In-depth understanding of the ASEAN context and the MRA
A high level of English language (listening, speaking,
reading, writing)
Ability to train trainers and/or assessors nationally
Ability to train trainers and/or assessors in other AMS.

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Level 2: (19 24) Competent Master Trainer and/or Assessor


All of the above in Level 1 but at a reduced level of ability and experience
Able to train Trainers and/or Assessors at a national level but may not yet be at a suitable
level of ability to train Trainers and/or Assessors at a multi-national level.
Level 3: (15 19) Competent Trainer and/or Assessor
The candidate has many of the skills and abilities mentioned in (1) and (2) but needs further
development in:
English, and/or
CBT, and/or
CBA, and/or
Developing a training program, and/or
Developing an assessment schedule.
Suitable to train vocational trainees but not yet other Trainers and/or Assessors
Level 4: (0 14) Not Yet Competent Trainer and/or Assessor
Unsuitable to perform the role of Master Trainer and/or Assessor either due to certain
character faults or lack of knowledge, ability, aptitude, attitude or communicative ability (in
English and/or native language) or requires more intensive study and vocational experience
in order to be able to train other trainees or other Trainers/Assessors.
Interpretation of Ratings
Based on the scoring system above Master Trainers or Assessors will be graded into four
levels on completion of this Unit:
Category (a) = Outstanding Master Trainer or Assessor: Master Trainers or Assessors who
have the ability to train Trainers or Assessors nationally and in other AMS
Category (b) = Competent Master Trainer or Assessor: are
competent to train Master Trainers or Assessors nationally
but not yet multi-nationally
Category (c) = Competent Trainer or Assessor: they have
many of the skills and abilities of national Master
Trainers/Assessors but need more development in English,
CBT/CBA understanding or in developing training or
assessment programs
Category (d) = Not Yet Competent Trainer or Assessor: they
are unsuitable to perform the role of Master Trainer and/or Assessor either due to some
personal characteristics or lack of knowledge, ability, aptitude, attitude or communicative
ability in English and/or mother language.

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Grading tool
The following (subject to change/development as deemed appropriate) will be used to guide
rating of participants:

Degree of competency
Competency Scoring system
1= low 5= high

Can conduct training in English 12345

Demonstrates ASEAN competency based training and/or


12345
assessment knowledge

Demonstrates application of an ASEAN Toolbox in the


design of a competency based learning and/or assessment 12345
program

Demonstrates the ability to conduct training independently 12345

Has sufficient ability to support experienced trainers 12345

Demonstrates knowledge of and has the ability to


implement the ASEAN competencies of the CATC in at
12345
least one specialist area (e.g. English, housekeeping or in
the common core)

TOTAL (out of 30)

Relationship between assessors and trainers


There must be an active working relationship between ASEAN Toolbox Assessors and
Trainers.
The relationship needs to be characterised by:
Openness both must communicate honestly
Fact-based communication there needs to be total truth
in all exchanges between both parties
Cooperation both individuals need to work together and
be willing to do whatever it takes for the benefit of the
learner/the candidate for assessment
Collaboration there will be times when Assessors and Trainers need to alter their
plans, or the individual practices and procedures to accommodate the needs of the other
or the identified/emerging needs of the student/candidate
Harmony there should be no tension, mistrust or negative feelings between the two
individuals
Mutual learning the relationship is rich with opportunities for both Assessor and Trainer
to learn from what the other can contribute to the association.

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Importance of the relationship


The relationship ASEAN Toolbox Assessors and Trainers is important because:
The student/candidate is reliant on both the Assessor and the Trainer for their
outcomes/results of their training
The Assessor must understand/know what the candidate is being taught so there
should always be a pre-training meeting between the two to:
Discuss the Competency Standard
Share ideas regarding training delivery and subsequent matching assessment
Get an idea of what the other person is thinking in relation to their intended practices
(that is, their intended ways of delivering training, and their intended ways of
conducting assessment) including rationale for same
Share the training plan and program so the Assessor has a full appreciation of the
training to be conducted and can use this input/knowledge to assist with the
development of their assessment planning activities.
The Assessor must only assess what the learner/candidate has been taught in
accordance with the requirements of the nominated Competency Standard
The Assessor will always need to plan their assessments based on the delivery schedule
established by the Trainer training obviously needs to precede assessment and there
needs to be discussion regarding the timing of assessments
Sometimes the focus of vocational training requires the Trainer to contextualise the
content of delivery to reflect/match identified employer, industry or workplace need and
the Assessor needs to adjust assessment to accommodate this where applicable
There will often be situations where the Assessor and the Trainer need to use the same
equipment, resources and/or space so they need to organise or negotiate a mutually
satisfactory outcome to this which does not disadvantage the learner/candidate
There needs to be feedback between the Assessor and the Trainer for example:
The Assessor can advise the Trainer of areas (topics, Elements, Performance
Criteria) where candidates have not performed well and this information can require
the Trainer to revise their approach to this content in the future
The Assessor needs to communicate the outcomes of assessments with the Trainer
so the Trainer can:
Update their training records
Determine follow-up action required to convert NYC outcomes to C results
The Assessor may be told by candidates (learners) about good and bad aspects of,
or thoughts about, their training experiences which can be shared with the Trainer so
future delivery take these comments into account
The Assessor needs to inform the Trainer when assessments have been completed
and what the outcomes are.

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Ways to achieve the required relationship


ASEAN Toolbox Assessors and Trainers can create and maintain the necessary relationship
by:
Communicating regularly this is the real key to the relationship: it is the Golden Rule for
an effective partnership.
Assessors and Trainers must be in contact on a
regular basis.
Sometimes contact every week is sufficient;
sometimes it is required on a daily basis; sometimes
it is necessary several times per day.
Most problems in the relationship have their roots in
failing to do this.
Communication may be via email, phone or in-
person/face-to-face.
Face-to-face contact is always the most effective and
mutually beneficial.
Setting a meeting schedule this means planning times, dates and venues for meetings
in advance.
When these times/dates have been set they must be a priority
for both parties to honour.
Not attending scheduled meetings immediately de-values the
relationship and damages the bond which needs to be fostered.
Sharing information a full and open sharing of information
(with attention paid to being sensitive and supportive when the
need to be so arises) is another critical factor in a positive
relationship.
This approach not only builds trust but helps give a reason for
and purpose to the meetings, exchanges and the overall
relationship
Having an open door policy in relation to working cooperatively
with the other person this means:
Being prepared to take unscheduled telephone calls
Being ready to respond promptly to unexpected emails
Being prepared to attend unplanned meetings to discuss and/or resolve issues
arising.
Acknowledging what the other person does by verbally and sincerely thanking and
complimenting them on their work as opposed to ignoring their effort and taking for granted
all the good things they do.

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Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You
must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the
project to your Trainer by the agreed date.

1.1 Prepare and present a 15 minute verbal presentation which identifies the context for
the Master Trainer program.
Presentation may be made live to assessor or recorded for playback.
Presentation must address all of the following:
Explanation of the background of MRA-TP
Identification and description of the elements of MRA-TP
Definition and explanation of Competency Based Training and Assessment
Overview of the key points of the role of ASEAN assessors and their
relationship with trainers.

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Summary
Identify operational context

When identifying operational context:


Appreciate the background and rationale for MRA-TP
Know the objectives and key elements of the MRA-TP
Support and promote ATPRS and the Regional Secretariat for the Implementation of the MRA-TP
Explain and stress the principles attached to and the value of Competency Based Training and
Assessment in the delivery of vocational training
Realise the role of the assessors.

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Skills Recognition System

Element 2:
Identify the ASEAN Regional
Qualifications Framework and Skills
Recognition System
2.1 Identify Qualifications available under the
ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework and
Skills Recognition System
Introduction
There are 52 qualifications available under the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework
and Skills Recognition System across the six Labour Divisions.
This section identifies all Qualifications provided under the Qualifications Framework across
all Labour Divisions from Certificate II to Advanced Diploma levels and gives and brief
explanation of the context for each certification level.

Overview of qualifications
The following table provides an overview of the qualifications currently provided for under the
Framework matched against Labour Divisions please note these qualifications were
correct at the time of writing but are subject to change as the Project is implemented:

Cert Cert Cert Diploma Advanced Sub-Total


II III IV Diploma

Food and Beverage 2 2 3 1 1 9


Service

Food Production 2 3 3 1 1 10

Front Office 1 1 1 1 1 5

Housekeeping 1 1 1 1 1 5

Tour Operation 2 3 4 2 1 12

Travel Agencies 3 3 3 1 1 11

Total 52

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Brief description of qualifications at each level


The following is an overview of the qualification levels.
Certificate II
Certificate II represents a base operational qualification encompassing a range of
functions/activities requiring fundamental operational knowledge and limited practical skills in
a defined context.
Certificate III
Certificate III represents a qualification of the skilled operator who applies a broad range of
competencies within a more varied work context, possibly providing technical advice and
support to a team including having team leader responsibilities.
Certificate IV
Certificate IV represents a qualification based on more sophisticated technical applications
involving competencies requiring increased theoretical knowledge, applied in a non-routine
environment and which may involve team leadership and management and increased
responsibility for outcomes.
Diploma
The Diploma represents a qualification which assumes a greater theoretical base and
consists of specialised, technical or managerial competencies used to plan, carry out and
evaluate work of self and/or team.
Advanced Diploma
The Advanced Diploma represents a qualification involving technical, creative, conceptual or
managerial applications built around competencies of either a broad or specialised base and
related to a broader organisational focus.

Qualification names
This presents approved and endorsed titles for each of the qualifications:
Food and beverage service qualifications:
Advanced Diploma of Food and Beverage Service (Management)
Diploma of Food and Beverage Service (Supervision and Administration)
Certificate IV in Food and Beverage Service (Waiting)
Certificate IV in Food and Beverage Service
(Supervision)
Certificate IV in Food and Beverage Service (Beverages)
Certificate III in Food and Beverage Service (Waiting)
Certificate III in Food and Beverage Service (Beverages)
Certificate II in Food and Beverage Service (Waiting)
Certificate II in Food and Beverage Service (Beverages).

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Food production qualifications:


Advanced Diploma of Food Production (Management)
Diploma of Food Production (Supervision and Administration)
Certificate IV in Food Production (Cookery)
Certificate IV in Food Production (Operations)
Certificate IV in Food Production (Patisserie)
Certificate III in Food Production (Cookery)
Certificate III in Food Production (Operations)
Certificate III in Food Production (Patisserie)
Certificate II in Food Production (Cookery)
Certificate II in Food Production (Patisserie).
Front office qualifications:
Advanced Diploma of Front Office (Management)
Diploma of Front Office (Supervision and Administration)
Certificate IV in Front Office (Guest Services Supervision)
Certificate III in Front Office
Certificate II in Front Office.
Housekeeping qualifications:
Advanced Diploma of Housekeeping
(Management)
Diploma of Housekeeping (Supervision and
Administration)
Certificate IV in Housekeeping (Guest
Services Supervision)
Certificate III in Housekeeping
Certificate II in Housekeeping.

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Tour Operation qualifications:


Advanced Diploma of Tour Operation (Management)
Diploma of Tour Operation (Operations)
Diploma of Tour Operation (Supervision and
Administration)
Certificate IV in Tour Operation (Guiding)
Certificate IV in Tour Operation (Eco Tours)
Certificate IV in Tour Operation (Sales and Finance)
Certificate IV in Tour Operation (Reservations and
Ticketing)
Certificate III in Tour Operation (Guiding)
Certificate III in Tour Operation (Sales and Finance)
Certificate III in Tour Operation (Reservations and Ticketing)
Certificate II in Tour Operation (Guiding)
Certificate II in Tour Operation (Reservations and Ticketing).
Travel agencies qualifications:
Advanced Diploma of Travel Agencies (Management)
Diploma of Travel Agencies (Supervision and Administration)
Certificate IV in Travel Agencies (Operations)
Certificate IV in Travel Agencies (Sales and Service)
Certificate IV in Travel Agencies (Reservations and Ticketing)
Certificate III in Travel Agencies (Operations)
Certificate III in Travel Agencies (Sales and Service)
Certificate III in Travel Agencies (Reservations and Ticketing)
Certificate II in Travel Agencies (Operations)
Certificate II in Travel Agencies (Sales and Service)
Certificate II in Travel Agencies (Reservations and Ticketing).

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2.2 Explain concept of Packaging Rules to develop


ASEAN qualifications
Introduction
Each of the Qualifications identified under the Qualifications Framework can be created
using a variety of Units to suit individual need.
This section explains the use and benefits of the Packaging Rules and provides an indicative
selection of Packaging Rules for a range of qualifications under the Qualifications
Framework.

Use of Packaging Rules


General background
Packaging Rules prescribe requirements for creating a qualification.
They are compulsory requirements they MUST be adhered to:
they are not optional.
They identify for each qualification:
The combination of mandatory Core and Generic competencies
by Unit name
The Functional competencies from which Units may be chosen
by Cluster and number of Units from each Cluster.
In all cases the Functional competencies selected must reflect
intended Job Title, local industry requirements and Certificate
level.
Operational imperatives
In general terms Packaging Rules operate on the basis of the following:
Higher level qualifications require students to complete more Units
Higher level qualifications give access to more management-oriented Units
Lower level qualifications give less choice of Clusters and focus on operational
competencies
Students can enter the Qualifications at any level from Certificate II to Advanced Diploma
there is no need/requirement for students to start at Certificate II and work up through
each level
Students can switch study from one qualification to another with ease:
Given commonality of many Units/competencies
To respond to changing workplace/career needs.
These changes can be made within the same Labour Division or movement can be
to a different Labour Division.

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Students are free to select the Functional competencies they want to comprise their
qualification providing:
They are within the nominated Clusters
Training providers are willing and able to deliver them.
In-keeping with CBT principles qualifications are not time-based a legitimate
qualification of the same type may be of different lengths depending on:
Individual students and/or their needs or preferences for studying
Delivery methods and timetables of training providers.
It is possible each qualification of the same type will consist of different
Units/competencies to reflect:
Individual need/preferences and proposed work career path
Industry/employer need
Local need/demand.

Clusters
Clusters form the basis of determining which Competency Standards can be used when
applying the Packaging Rules to create a qualification which meets the needs of the
individual student and aligns with the requirements of the Qualifications Framework.
Each of the 242 Units has been allocated into one or more Clusters within three Competency
Standards Menus.
Where a Competency Standard has more than one Unit Number this means it has been
listed in more than one Cluster.
HOTEL SERVICES (RESTAURANT SERVICES)

CLUSTER 1 RESTAURANT SERVICES - COMMON CORE


D1.HRS.CL1.01 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HRS.CL1.02 Apply standard safety procedures for handling foodstuffs
D1.HRS.CL1.03 Clean and maintain kitchen equipment and utensils
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.06 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.09 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HRS.CL1.10 Organise and prepare food products and services
D1.HRS.CL1.11 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.13 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams

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D1.HRS.CL1.15 Receive and resolve customer complaints


D1.HRS.CL1.16 Receive and store kitchen supplies and food stock
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HRS.CL1.21 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations

CLUSTER 2 COMMERCIAL COOKERY


D1.HCC.CL2.01 Apply basic techniques of commercial cookery
D1.HCC.CL2.02 Establish and maintain quality control in food production
D1.HCC.CL2.03 Identify and prepare various meats
D1.HCC.CL2.04 Maintain strategies for safe food storage
D1.HCC.CL2.05 Organise food service operations
D1.HCC.CL2.06 Plan and manage menu-based catering
D1.HCC.CL2.07 Plan, prepare and display a buffet service
D1.HCC.CL2.08 Prepare a variety of sandwiches
D1.HCC.CL2.09 Prepare and cook poultry and game meats
D1.HCC.CL2.10 Prepare and cook seafood
D1.HCC.CL2.11 Prepare and store foods
D1.HCC.CL2.12 Prepare appetizers and salads
D1.HCC.CL2.13 Prepare chocolate and produce chocolate products
D1.HCC.CL2.14 Prepare hot, cold and frozen dessert dishes
D1.HCC.CL2.15 Prepare portion-controlled meat cuts
D1.HCC.CL2.16 Prepare soups
D1.HCC.CL2.17 Prepare stock and sauces
D1.HCC.CL2.18 Prepare vegetables, eggs and farinaceous dishes
D1.HCC.CL2.19 Present and display food products
D1.HCC.CL2.20 Select, prepare and serve special cuisines
D1.HCC.CL2.21 Select, prepare and serve various cheeses

CLUSTER 3 COMMERCIAL CATERING


D1.HCA.CL3.01 Apply catering control principles and procedures
D1.HCA.CL3.02 Design a concept for a major event or function
D1.HCA.CL3.03 Design meals to meet specific dietary or cultural needs
D1.HCA.CL3.04 Design meals to meet specific market requirements
D1.HCA.CL3.05 Operate a fast food outlet
D1.HCA.CL3.06 Prepare tenders for catering contracts

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D1.HCA.CL3.07 Select catering systems

CLUSTER 4 PATISSERIE
D1.HPA.CL4.01 Manage and operate a coffee shop
D1.HPA.CL4.02 Prepare and display petits fours
D1.HPA.CL4.03 Prepare and display sugar work
D1.HPA.CL4.04 Prepare and model marzipan
D1.HPA.CL4.05 Prepare chocolate and produce chocolate products
D1.HPA.CL4.06 Present desserts
D1.HPA.CL4.07 Prepare and present gateaux, torten and cakes
D1.HPA.CL4.08 Prepare and produce cakes and pastries
D1.HPA.CL4.09 Prepare and produce yeast goods
D1.HPA.CL4.10 Prepare bakery products for patisserie

CLUSTER 5 FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICE


D1.HBS.CL5.01 Clean and tidy beverage and food service areas
D1.HBS.CL5.02 Develop and maintain food and beverage product knowledge
D1.HBS.CL5.03 Manage responsible service of alcohol
D1.HBS.CL5.04 Operate a bar facility
D1.HBS.CL5.05 Operate a cellar system
D1.HBS.CL5.06 Prepare and serve cocktails
D1.HBS.CL5.07 Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages
D1.HBS.CL5.08 Process liquor sales at a bar facility
D1.HBS.CL5.09 Provide a link between kitchen and service area
D1.HBS.CL5.10 Provide advice to patrons on food and beverage services
D1.HBS.CL5.11 Provide gueridon service
D1.HBS.CL5.12 Provide food and beverage services
D1.HBS.CL5.13 Provide room service
D1.HBS.CL5.14 Provide silver service
D1.HBS.CL5.15 Serve a range of wine products
D1.HBS.CL5.16 Take food orders and provide table service
D1.HBS.CL5.17 Manage intoxicated persons

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CLUSTER 6 CUSTOMER SERVICE, SALES AND MARKETING


D1.HCS.CL6.01 Develop a marketing strategy and coordinate sales activities
D1.HCS.CL6.02 Establish and maintain a business relationship
D1.HCS.CL6.03 Maintain quality customer/guest service
D1.HCS.CL6.04 Organise functions
D1.HCS.CL6.05 Develop and implement a business plan
D1.HCS.CL6.06 Prepare and deliver a presentation
D1.HCS.CL6.07 Develop new products and services

CLUSTER 7 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


D1.HGE.CL7.01 Design, prepare and present various types of reports
D1.HGE.CL7.02 Gather and present product information
D1.HGE.CL7.03 Maintain a paper-based filing and retrieval system
D1.HGE.CL7.04 Manage and implement small projects
D1.HGE.CL7.05 Monitor and maintain a business computer system
D1.HGE.CL7.06 Manage stock purchases and inventory
D1.HGE.CL7.07 Plan and establish systems and procedures
D1.HGE.CL7.08 Plan, manage and conduct meetings
D1.HGE.CL7.09 Prepare business documents
D1.HGE.CL7.10 Produce documents, reports and worksheets on a computer
D1.HGE.CL7.11 Receive and store stock
D1.HGE.CL7.12 Use common business tools and technology
D1.HGE.CL7.13 Work cooperatively in a general administration environment
D1.HGE.CL7.14 Develop and implement operational policies

CLUSTER 8 FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION


D1.HFI.CL8.01 Audit financial procedures
D1.HFI.CL8.02 Maintain financial standards and records
D1.HFI.CL8.03 Manage financial performance within a budget
D1.HFI.CL8.04 Manage payroll records
D1.HFI.CL8.05 Prepare and monitor budgets
D1.HFI.CL8.06 Prepare financial statements
D1.HFI.CL8.07 Process a financial sale transaction
D1.HFI.CL8.08 Monitor catering revenue and costs

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CLUSTER 9 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT


D1.HRD.CL9.01 Coach others in job skills
D1.HRD.CL9.02 Plan, conduct and evaluate a staff performance assessment
D1.HRD.CL9.03 Implement, monitor and evaluate a training and development
program
D1.HRD.CL9.04 Prepare and deliver training sessions
D1.HRD.CL9.05 Plan and implement a series of training events
D1.HRD.CL9.06 Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of training outcomes
D1.HRD.CL9.07 Evaluate the effectiveness of an assessment system
D1.HRD.CL9.08 Manage an assessment system for training outcomes

CLUSTER 10 MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP (HRM)


D1.HML.CL10.01 Develop and supervise operational approaches
D1.HML.CL10.02 Establish and maintain a safe and secure workplace
D1.HML.CL10.03 Lead and manage people
D1.HML.CL10.04 Monitor and maintain a business computer system
D1.HML.CL10.05 Manage legal requirements for business compliance
D1.HML.CL10.06 Manage physical assets and infrastructure
D1.HML.CL10.07 Maintain quality customer/guest service
D1.HML.CL10.08 Manage special events
D1.HML.CL10.09 Manage stock purchases and inventory
D1.HML.CL10.10 Manage the effective use of human resources
D1.HML.CL10.11 Manage workplace diversity
D1.HML.CL10.12 Monitor workplace operations
D1.HML.CL10.13 Monitor staff performance
D1.HML.CL10.14 Provide professional support to business colleagues
D1.HML.CL10.15 Recruit and select staff
D1.HML.CL10.16 Roster staff
D1.HML.CL10.17 Manage and maintain workplace relations

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CLUSTER 10/11 ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY


Speaking and Listening
D1.LAN.CL10.01 Respond to instructions given in English
D1.LAN.CL10.02 Start conversations and develop good relations with guests
D1.LAN.CL10.03 Communicate in English on a telephone
D1.LAN.CL10.04 Use oral English to convey a complex exchange of ideas
D1.LAN.CL10.05 Deliver a short oral presentation in English
D1.LAN.CL10.06 Read and write English at an advanced level
Reading
D1.LAN.CL10.07 Read general information texts or media
Writing
D1.LAN.CL10.09 Write a short message in English
D1.LAN.CL10.10 Prepare a business letter in advanced English

HOTEL SERVICES (FRONT OFFICE AND HOUSEKEEPING)

CLUSTER 1 COMMON CORE COMPETENCIES


D1.HOT.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HOT.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HOT.CL1.03 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.04 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.05 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.06 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HOT.CL1.07 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HOT.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.09 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.10 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HOT.CL1.11 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HOT.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.13 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HOT.CL1.14 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations
D1.HOT.CL1.15 Converse in English at a basic operational level

CLUSTER 2 HOTEL FRONT OFFICE


D1.HFO.CL2.01 Receive and process reservations
D1.HFO.CL2.02 Operate a computerised reservation system
D1.HFO.CL2.03 Provide accommodation reception services
D1.HFO.CL2.04 Maintain guests financial records

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D1.HFO.CL2.05 Process a financial sale transaction


D1.HFO.CL2.06 Conduct a night audit
D1.HFO.CL2.07 Provide Bell Boy/Porter services
D1.HFO.CL2.08 Operate a (PABX) switchboard
D1.HFO.CL2.09 Receive and place in-coming phone calls
D1.HFO.CL2.10 Facilitate out-going phone calls
D1.HFO.CL2.11 Provide information about in-house services
D1.HFO.CL2.12 Provide international (IDD) service information

CLUSTER 3 HOUSEKEEPING
D1.HHK.CL3.01 Provide housekeeping services to guests
D1.HHK.CL3.02 Clean public areas, facilities and equipment
D1.HHK.CL3.03 Clean and prepare rooms for in-coming guests
D1.HHK.CL3.04 Maintain and operate an industrial laundry
D1.HHK.CL3.05 Launder linen and guests clothes
D1.HHK.CL3.06 Provide valet services to guests
D1.HHK.CL3.07 Clean and maintain industrial work area and equipment

CLUSTER 4 SECURITY SERVICES


D1.HSS.CL4.01 Establish and maintain a safe and secure workplace
D1.HSS.CL4.02 Maintain the security of premises and property
D1.HSS.CL4.03 Operate basic security equipment
D1.HSS.CL4.04 Maintain the safety of premises and personnel
D1.HSS.CL4.05 Observe and monitor people
D1.HSS.CL4.06 Provide for the safety of VIPs
D1.HSS.CL4.07 Manage intoxicated persons
D1.HSS.CL4.08 Escort, carry and store valuable items
D1.HSS.CL4.09 Provide a lost and found facility
D1.HSS.CL4.10 Plan and conduct an evacuation of premises

CLUSTER 5 CUSTOMER SERVICE, SALES AND MARKETING


D1.HSM.CL5.01 Organise functions
D1.HSM.CL5.02 Plan and implement sales activities
D1.HSM.CL5.03 Develop a marketing strategy and coordinate sales activities
D1.HSM.CL5.04 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HSM.CL5.05 Prepare and deliver a presentation
D1.HSM.CL5.06 Establish and maintain a business relationship
D1.HSM.CL5.07 Develop and implement a business plan

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CLUSTER 6 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


D1.HGA.CL6.01 Plan and establish systems and procedures
D1.HGA.CL6.02 Work cooperatively in a general administration environment
D1.HGA.CL6.03 Maintain a paper-based filing and retrieval system
D1.HGA.CL6.04 Gather and present product information
D1.HGA.CL6.05 Plan, manage and conduct meetings
D1.HGA.CL6.06 Prepare business documents
D1.HGA.CL6.07 Produce documents, reports and worksheets on a computer
D1.HGA.CL6.08 Design, prepare and present various types of reports
D1.HGA.CL6.09 Manage stock purchases and inventory
D1.HGA.CL6.10 Receive and store stock
D1.HGA.CL6.11 Manage and implement small projects
D1.HGA.CL6.12 Use common business tools and technology
D1.HGA.CL6.13 Develop and implement operational policies

CLUSTER 7 FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION


D1.HFA.CL7.01 Process a financial sale transaction
D1.HFA.CL7.02 Manage financial performance within a budget
D1.HFA.CL7.03 Maintain financial standards and records
D1.HFA.CL7.04 Prepare financial statements
D1.HFA.CL7.05 Audit financial procedures
D1.HFA.CL7.06 Manage payroll records
D1.HFA.CL7.07 Prepare and monitor budgets

CLUSTER 8 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT


D1.HHR.CL8.01 Plan, conduct and evaluate a staff performance assessment
D1.HHR.CL8.02 Implement, monitor and evaluate a training and development
program
D1.HHR.CL8.03 Coach others in job skills
D1.HHR.CL8.04 Prepare and deliver training sessions
D1.HHR.CL8.05 Plan and implement a series of training events
D1.HHR.CL8.06 Manage an assessment system for training outcomes
D1.HHR.CL8.07 Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of training outcomes
D1.HHR.CL8.08 Evaluate the effectiveness of an assessment system

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CLUSTER 9 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


D1.HRM.CL9.01 Manage the effective use of human resources
D1.HRM.CL9.02 Manage workplace diversity
D1.HRM.CL9.03 Monitor workplace operations
D1.HRM.CL9.04 Monitor staff performance
D1.HRM.CL9.05 Provide professional support to business colleagues
D1.HRM.CL9.06 Maintain quality customer/guest service
D1.HRM.CL9.07 Manage special events
D1.HRM.CL9.08 Develop and supervise operational approaches
D1.HRM.CL9.09 Roster staff
D1.HRM.CL9.10 Recruit and select staff
D1.HRM.CL9.11 Manage physical assets and infrastructure
D1.HRM.CL9.12 Manage stock purchases and inventory
D1.HRM.CL9.13 Monitor and maintain a business computer system
D1.HRM.CL9.14 Manage legal requirements for business compliance
D1.HRM.CL9.15 Manage and maintain workplace relations

CLUSTER 10 ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY


D1.LAN.CL10.01 Respond to instructions given in English
D1.LAN.CL10.02 Start conversations and develop good relations with guests
D1.LAN.CL10.03 Communicate in English on a telephone
D1.LAN.CL10.04 Use oral English to convey a complex exchange of ideas
D1.LAN.CL10.05 Deliver a short oral presentation in English
D1.LAN.CL10.06 Read and write English at an advanced level
Reading

D1.LAN.CL10.07 Read general information texts or media


D1.LAN.CL10.08 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
Writing

D1.LAN.CL10.09 Write a short message in English


D1.LAN.CL10.10 Prepare a business letter in advanced English

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TRAVEL SERVICES

CLUSTER 1 COMMON CORE COMPETENCIES


D2.TCC.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D2.TCC.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D2.TCC.CL1.03 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.04 Follow safety and security procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.05 Communicate on the telephone
D2.TCC.CL1.06 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D2.TCC.CL1.07 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D2.TCC.CL1.08 Promote products and services to customers
D2.TCC.CL1.09 Perform clerical procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.10 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D2.TCC.CL1.11 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D2.TCC.CL1.12 Process a financial sale transaction
D2.TCC.CL1.13 Use common business tools and technology
D2.TCC.CL1.14 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D2.TCC.CL1.15 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.16 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations

CLUSTER 2 TRAVEL AGENCY TICKETING


D2.TTA.CL2.01 Access and interpret product information
D2.TTA.CL2.02 Administer a billing and settlement plan
D2.TTA.CL2.03 Apply advance airfare rules and procedures
D2.TTA.CL2.04 Book and co-ordinate supplier services
D2.TTA.CL2.05 Construct and ticket a non-air travel plan
D2.TTA.CL2.06 Construct and ticket domestic airfares
D2.TTA.CL2.07 Construct and ticket promotional international airfares
D2.TTA.CL2.08 Construct and ticket regular international airfares
D2.TTA.CL2.09 Develop a marketing strategy and coordinate sales activities
D2.TTA.CL2.10 Create promotional display stand
D2.TTA.CL2.11 Develop and update local knowledge
D2.TTA.CL2.12 Maintain product information inventory
D2.TTA.CL2.13 Operate a computerised reservation system
D2.TTA.CL2.14 Operate an automated information system
D2.TTA.CL2.15 Produce travel documentation on a computer
D2.TTA.CL2.16 Prepare and submit quotations
D2.TTA.CL2.17 Receive and process reservations

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D2.TTA.CL2.18 Source and package tourism products and services


D2.TTA.CL2.19 Source and provide destination information and advice

CLUSTER 3 TOUR GUIDE SERVICES


D2.TTG.CL3.01 Work as a tour guide
D2.TTG.CL3.02 Allocate tour resources
D2.TTG.CL3.03 Conduct interpretive activities in the field
D2.TTG.CL3.04 Conduct pre-departure checks
D2.TTG.CL3.05 Co-ordinate and operate a day-tour (or short excursions)
D2.TTG.CL3.06 Demonstrate/observe respect for indigenous cultures
D2.TTG.CL3.07 Develop and monitor culturally appropriate tourism activity
D2.TTG.CL3.08 Develop and update local knowledge
D2.TTG.CL3.09 Drive various types of service vehicles
D2.TTG.CL3.19 Establish and maintain a safe and secure workplace
D2.TTG.CL3.10 Establish and maintain safe touring conditions
D2.TTG.CL3.11 Lead tour groups in a responsible manner
D2.TTG.CL3.12 Maintain contacts with handling agents
D2.TTG.CL3.13 Manage and facilitate an extended tour experience
D2.TTG.CL3.14 Plan, develop and evaluate interpretive activities
D2.TTG.CL3.15 Plan, trial and implement minimal impact operations
D2.TTG.CL3.16 Prepare and present tour commentaries
D2.TTG.CL3.17 Provide arrival and departure assistance
D2.TTG.CL3.18 Research and share information on indigenous cultures

CLUSTER 4 TOUR OPERATION


D2.TTO.CL4.01 Allocate tour resources
D2.TTO.CL4.02 Carry out vehicle maintenance or minor repairs
D2.TTO.CL4.03 Clean premises and equipment
D2.TTO.CL4.04 Conduct pre-departure checks
D2.TTO.CL4.05 Demonstrate climbing skills at a basic level
D2.TTO.CL4.06 Develop and implement operational plans
D2.TTO.CL4.07 Develop interpretive content for eco-tourism activities
D2.TTO.CL4.08 Drive large tour buses or coaches
D2.TTO.CL4.09 Manage and execute a detailed tour itinerary
D2.TTO.CL4.10 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D2.TTO.CL4.11 Manage operational risk
D2.TTO.CL4.12 Monitor tourism operations
D2.TTO.CL4.13 Maintain tourism vehicles in safe and clean operational condition

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D2.TTO.CL4.14 Operate and maintain a 4WD vehicle in safe working condition


D2.TTO.CL4.15 Operate tours in remote areas
D2.TTO.CL4.16 Set up and operate a camp site
D2.TTO.CL4.17 Plan and implement sales activities
D2.TTO.CL4.18 Provide camp site catering

CLUSTER 5 CUSTOMER SERVICE, SALES AND MARKETING


D2.TCS.CL5.01 Apply point of sale handling techniques
D2.TCS.CL5.02 Assess and plan tourism opportunities for local communities
D2.TCS.CL5.03 Build and maintain a team approach to service delivery
D2.TCS.CL5.04 Construct and apply tourism product research
D2.TCS.CL5.05 Develop a marketing strategy and coordinate sales activities
D2.TCS.CL5.06 Co-ordinate production of brochures and marketing materials
D2.TCS.CL5.07 Create, implement and evaluate strategic product initiatives
D2.TCS.CL5.08 Develop and monitor culturally appropriate tourism activity
D2.TCS.CL5.09 Develop conference programs
D2.TCS.CL5.10 Develop host community awareness programs
D2.TCS.CL5.11 Develop, implement and evaluate regional tourism plans
D2.TCS.CL5.12 Develop, implement and evaluate sponsorship plans
D2.TCS.CL5.13 Develop, manage and evaluate local marketing strategies
D2.TCS.CL5.14 Develop/monitor ecologically sustainable tourism operations
D2.TCS.CL5.15 Establish and maintain a business relationship
D2.TCS.CL5.16 Implement/monitor event management systems and procedures
D2.TCS.CL5.17 Maintain quality customer/guest service
D2.TCS.CL5.18 Plan and implement sales activities
D2.TCS.CL5.19 Prepare and deliver a presentation
D2.TCS.CL5.20 Prepare and submit quotations
D2.TCS.CL5.21 Promote tourism products and services
D2.TCS.CL5.22 Source and package tourism products and services

CLUSTER 6 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


D2.TGA.CL6.01 Create and update a tourism website
D2.TGA.CL6.02 Produce documents, reports and worksheets on a computer
D2.TGA.CL6.03 Manage and monitor innovative tourism programs and projects
D2.TGA.CL6.04 Manage stock purchases and inventory
D2.TGA.CL6.05 Minimise theft
D2.TGA.CL6.06 Operate an automated information system
D2.TGA.CL6.07 Plan, manage and conduct meetings

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D2.TGA.CL6.08 Plan and establish systems and procedures


D2.TGA.CL6.09 Prepare business documents
D2.TGA.CL6.10 Develop and implement operational policies
D2.TGA.CL6.11 Receive and store stock
D2.TGA.CL6.12 Source and present information

CLUSTER 7 FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION


D2.TFA.CL7.01 Audit financial procedures
D2.TFA.CL7.02 Interpret financial statements and reports
D2.TFA.CL7.03 Maintain a secure financial accounting system
D2.TFA.CL7.04 Manage contractual agreements/commitments
D2.TFA.CL7.05 Manage and control operational costs
D2.TFA.CL7.06 Prepare financial statements

CLUSTER 8 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT


D2.TRD.CL8.01 Analyse competency requirements
D2.TRD.CL8.02 Coach others in job skills
D2.TRD.CL8.03 Plan, conduct and evaluate a staff performance assessment
D2.TRD.CL8.04 Prepare and deliver training sessions
D2.TRD.CL8.05 Design and establish a training system
D2.TRD.CL8.06 Plan and promote training courses
D2.TRD.CL8.07 Develop assessment tools and procedures
D2.TRD.CL8.08 Implement, monitor and evaluate a training and development program
D2.TRD.CL8.09 Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of training outcomes

CLUSTER 9 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


D2.TRM.CL9.01 Apply industry standards to team supervision
D2.TRM.CL9.02 Develop and implement a business plan
D2.TRM.CL9.03 Develop and manage business strategies
D2.TRM.CL9.04 Establish and maintain a safe and secure workplace
D2.TRM.CL9.05 Lead and manage a development team
D2.TRM.CL9.06 Lead and manage people
D2.TRM.CL9.07 Manage legal requirements for business compliance
D2.TRM.CL9.08 Manage stock purchases and inventory
D2.TRM.CL9.09 Manage financial performance within a budget

D2.TRM.CL9.10 Manage and monitor innovative tourism programs and projects


D2.TRM.CL9.11 Manage physical assets and infrastructure
D2.TRM.CL9.12 Maintain quality customer/guest service

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D2.TRM.CL9.13 Manage workplace diversity


D2.TRM.CL9.14 Manage and maintain workplace relations
D2.TRM.CL9.15 Monitor and maintain a business computer system
D2.TRM.CL9.16 Monitor staff performance
D2.TRM.CL9.17 Monitor workplace operations
D2.TRM.CL9.18 Prepare and monitor budgets
D2.TRM.CL9.19 Provide professional support to business colleagues
D2.TRM.CL9.20 Recruit and select staff
D2.TRM.CL9.21 Roster staff

CLUSTER 10 ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY


D2.LAN.CL10.01 Use English at a supervisory level
D2.LAN.CL10.02 Read and write English at a basic operational level
D2.LAN.CL10.03 Read and write English at a supervisory level
D2.LAN.CL10.04 Read and write English at an advanced level.

Benefits of the Packaging Rules


The Packaging Rules provide:
Flexibility for students to select the Units or qualification they want as opposed to them
being forced to undertake training they do not see as being relevant or beneficial to their
career
Flexibility for employers to select Units needed by their staff to support/enable the most
effective and efficient operation of their business.
A structure to, and distinct pathway for, qualifications enabling students to build to
higher (management) qualifications if required
For the delivery of industry-based training as the training is
based on Competency Standards endorsed by ASEAN
Member States
Guidance (which is not compulsory) about the Functional
Units/competencies suitable for different levels of
qualifications across a range of Job Titles to assist in
creating relevant qualifications for job positions
Additional content can be added to any Competency
Standard but nothing can be removed this allows providers
to contextualise training for individual employers, regions or areas.

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Packaging Rules
A selection of Packaging Rules is provided below to illustrate what they look like, what they
contain and how they grow as the qualification level increases. The full suite of Packaging
Rules can be found at www.ATPRS.org.
Note: the Packaging Rules provided below were correct at the time of writing but are always
subject to change by Authorities.
Packaging Rules Food and Beverage Service
Certificate II in Food and Beverage Service (Waiting) - Incorporating Certificate I
Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.06 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HBS.CL5.09 Provide a link between kitchen and service area
D1.HBS.CL5.12 Provide food and beverage services
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies, ten (10) competencies from
the Hotel Services (Restaurant Services) Competency Standards Menu with at least
eight (8) from the following Clusters:
Common Core Competencies
Food and Beverage Service
Financial Administration
And
At least two (2) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Certificate IV in Food and Beverage Service (Waiting)


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HRS.CL1.01 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.06 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.09 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HRS.CL1.11 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.13 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
D1.HRS.CL1.15 Receive and resolve customer complaints
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HBS.CL5.02 Develop and maintain food and beverage product knowledge
D1.HBS.CL5.09 Provide a link between kitchen and service area
D1.HBS.CL5.12 Provide food and beverage services
D1.HFI.CL8.07 Process a financial sale transaction
D1.HGE.CL7.11 Receive and store stock
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies eighteen (18) competencies
from the Hotel Services (Restaurant Services) Competency Standards Menu with at
least twelve (12) from the following Clusters:
Food and Beverage Service
Financial Administration
And
At least three (3) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
Human Resource Development
Management and Leadership
And
At least three (3) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Certificate IV in Food and Beverage Service (Supervision)


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HRS.CL1.01 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.06 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.09 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HRS.CL1.11 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.13 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
D1.HRS.CL1.15 Receive and resolve customer complaints
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HBS.CL5.02 Develop and maintain food and beverage product knowledge
D1.HBS.CL5.09 Provide a link between kitchen and service area
D1.HBS.CL5.12 Provide food and beverage services
D1.HFI.CL8.07 Process a financial sale transaction
D1.HGE.CL7.11 Receive and store stock
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies eighteen (18) competencies
from the Hotel Services (Restaurant Services) Competency Standards Menu with at
least eleven (11) from the following Clusters:
Food and Beverage Service
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
Financial Administration
And
At least four (4) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Human Resource Development
Management and Leadership
General Administration
And
At least three (3) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Diploma of Food and Beverage Service (Supervision & Administration)


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HRS.CL1.01 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.06 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.09 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HRS.CL1.11 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.13 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
D1.HRS.CL1.15 Receive and resolve customer complaints
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HRS.CL1.21 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations
D1.HBS.CL5.02 Develop and maintain food and beverage product knowledge
D1.HBS.CL5.09 Provide a link between kitchen and service area
D1.HBS.CL5.12 Provide food and beverage services
D1.HFI.CL8.07 Process a financial sale transaction
D1.HGE.CL7.11 Receive and store stock
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies twenty-four (24) competencies
from the Hotel Services (Restaurant Services) Competency Standards Menu with at
least eight (8) from the following Clusters:
Food and Beverage Service
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
And
At least twelve (12) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Financial Administration
Human Resource Development
Management and Leadership
General Administration
And
At least four (4) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Advanced Diploma of Food and Beverage Service (Management)


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HRS.CL1.01 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.06 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.09 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HRS.CL1.11 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.13 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
D1.HRS.CL1.15 Receive and resolve customer complaints
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HRS.CL1.21 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations
D1.HBS.CL5.02 Develop and maintain food and beverage product knowledge
D1.HBS.CL5.09 Provide a link between kitchen and service area
D1.HBS.CL5.12 Provide food and beverage services
D1.HFI.CL8.07 Process a financial sale transaction
D1.HGE.CL7.11 Receive and store stock
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies twenty-nine (29) competencies
from the Hotel Services (Restaurant Services) Competency Standards Menu with at
least eleven (11) from the following Clusters:
Food and Beverage Service
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
And
At least thirteen (13) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Financial Administration
Human Resource Development
Management and Leadership
General Administration
And
At least five (5) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Packaging Rules Food Production


Certificate III in Food Production (Cookery)
Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HRS.CL1.02 Apply standard safety procedures for handling foodstuffs
D1.HRS.CL1.03 Clean and maintain kitchen equipment and utensils
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.10 Organise and prepare food products and services
D1.HRS.CL1.11 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
D1.HRS.CL1.16 Receive and store kitchen supplies and food stock
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HCC.CL2.01 Apply basic techniques of commercial cookery
D1.HCC.CL2.11 Prepare and store foods
D1.HGE.CL7.11 Receive and store stock
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies twelve (12) competencies
from the Hotel Services (Restaurant Services) Competency Standards Menu with at
least ten (10) from the following Clusters:
Common Core Competencies
Commercial Cookery
And
At least one (1) competency from the Cluster:
Management and Leadership
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Diploma of Food Production (Supervision and Administration)


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HRS.CL1.01 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HRS.CL1.02 Apply standard safety procedures for handling foodstuffs
D1.HRS.CL1.03 Clean and maintain kitchen equipment and utensils
D1.HRS.CL1.04 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HRS.CL1.05 Comply with workplace hygiene procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.07 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HRS.CL1.09 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HRS.CL1.10 Organise and prepare food products and services
D1.HRS.CL1.11 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HRS.CL1.13 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HRS.CL1.14 Read and interpret basic instructions, directions and/or diagrams
D1.HRS.CL1.15 Receive and resolve customer complaints
D1.HRS.CL1.16 Receive and store kitchen supplies and food stock
D1.HRS.CL1.17 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HRS.CL1.18 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HRS.CL1.19 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HRS.CL1.20 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HRS.CL1.21 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations
D1.HCC.CL2.01 Apply basic techniques of commercial cookery
D1.HCC.CL2.11 Prepare and store foods
D1.HCC.CL2.19 Present and display food products
D1.HGE.CL7.11 Receive and store stock
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies twenty-three (23)
competencies from the Hotel Services (Restaurant Services) Competency Standards
Menu with eleven (11) from the following Clusters:
Commercial Cookery
Commercial Catering
Patisserie
And
At least ten (10) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Financial Administration
Human Resource Development
Management and Leadership
General Administration;
And
At least two (2) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Packaging Rules Front Office

Certificate II in Front Office - Incorporating Certificate I


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HOT.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HOT.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HOT.CL1.03 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.05 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.06 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HOT.CL1.07 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HOT.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.10 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HOT.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.13 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HSS.CL4.01 Establish and maintain a safe and secure workplace
D1.HOT.CL1.15 Converse in English at a basic operational level
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies ten (10) competencies from
the Hotel Services (Front Office and Housekeeping) Competency Standards Menu
with at least eight (8) from the following Clusters:
Common Core Competencies
Hotel Front Office
Security Services
And
At least one (2) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Common Core Competencies
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Advanced Diploma of Front Office (Management)


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HOT.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HOT.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HOT.CL1.03 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.05 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.06 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D1.HOT.CL1.07 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HOT.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.09 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D1.HSM.CL5.04 Develop and update local knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.10 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HOT.CL1.11 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HOT.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.13 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HOT.CL1.14 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations
D1.HSS.CL4.01 Establish and maintain a safe and secure workplace
D1.HOT.CL1.15 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HGA.CL6.12 Use common business tools and technology
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies twenty-eight (28)
competencies from the Hotel Services (Front Office and Housekeeping) Competency
Standards Menu with at least seven (7) from the Cluster:
Hotel Front Office
Financial Administration
And
At least fifteen (15) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
General Administration
Human Resource Development
Resource Management
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
Security Services
And
At least five (5) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Packaging Rules Housekeeping


Certificate III in Housekeeping
Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HOT.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HOT.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HOT.CL1.03 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.05 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.11 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HOT.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.13 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HOT.CL1.15 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HOT.CL1.06 Access and retrieve computer-based data
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies fourteen (14) competencies
from the Hotel Services (Front Office and Housekeeping) Competency Standards
Menu with at least eight (8) from the following Clusters:
Housekeeping
Security Services
And
At least three (3) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
General Administration
And
At least two (2) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Diploma of Housekeeping (Supervision and Administration)


Core and Generic Competencies
D1.HOT.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D1.HOT.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D1.HOT.CL1.03 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.05 Perform clerical procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.07 Communicate on the telephone
D1.HOT.CL1.08 Maintain hospitality industry knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.09 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D1.HOT.CL1.10 Promote products and services to customers
D1.HOT.CL1.11 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D1.HOT.CL1.12 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D1.HOT.CL1.13 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D1.HOT.CL1.14 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations
D1.HOT.CL1.15 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D1.HGA.CL6.12 Use common business tools and technology
D1.HSS.CL4.01 Establish and maintain a safe and secure workplace
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies twenty-four (24)
competencies from the Hotel Services (Front Office and Housekeeping) Competency
Standards Menu with at least twelve (12) from the following Clusters:
Housekeeping
General Administration
And
At least seven (7) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Customer Service, sales and Marketing
Security Services
Human Resource Development
Resource Management
Financial Administration
And
At least four (4) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Packaging Rules Tour Operation


Certificate III in Tour Operation (Guiding)
Core and Generic Competencies
D2.TCC.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D2.TCC.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D2.TCC.CL1.04 Follow safety and security procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.05 Communicate on the telephone
D2.TCC.CL1.07 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D2.TCC.CL1.10 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D2.TCC.CL1.11 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D2.TCC.CL1.13 Use common business tools and technology
D2.TCC.CL1.14 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D2.TCC.CL1.15 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D2.TTG.CL3.01 Work as a tour guide
D2.TTG.CL3.03 Conduct interpretive activities in the field
D2.TTG.CL3.04 Conduct pre-departure checks
D2.TTG.CL3.05 Co-ordinate and operate a day-tour (or short excursions)
D2.TTG.CL3.08 Develop and update local knowledge
D2.TTG.CL3.10 Establish and maintain safe touring conditions
D2.TTG.CL3.11 Lead tour groups in a responsible manner
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies fourteen (14) competencies
from the Travel Services Competency Standards Menu with at least ten (10) from the
Cluster:
Tour Guide Services
And
At least two (2) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Common Core Competencies
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
Tour Operation
Travel Agency Ticketing
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Certificate IV in Tour Operation (Guiding)


Core and Generic Competencies
D2.TCC.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D2.TCC.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D2.TCC.CL1.04 Follow safety and security procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.05 Communicate on the telephone
D2.TCC.CL1.07 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D2.TCC.CL1.09 Perform clerical procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.10 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D2.TCC.CL1.11 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D2.TCC.CL1.13 Use common business tools and technology
D2.TCC.CL1.14 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D2.TCC.CL1.15 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D2.TTG.CL3.01 Work as a tour guide
D2.TTG.CL3.03 Conduct interpretive activities in the field
D2.TTG.CL3.04 Conduct pre-departure checks
D2.TTG.CL3.05 Co-ordinate and operate a day-tour (or short excursions)
D2.TTG.CL3.08 Develop and update local knowledge
D2.TTG.CL3.10 Establish and maintain safe touring conditions
D2.TTG.CL3.11 Lead tour groups in a responsible manner
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies eighteen (18) competencies
from the Travel Services Competency Standards Menu
with at least fourteen (14) from the Cluster:
Tour Guide Services
And
At least two (2) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Common Core Competencies
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
Tour Operation
Travel Agency Ticketing
General Administration
Resource Management
And
At least one (1) competency from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Packaging Rules Travel Agencies


Certificate III in Travel Agencies (Reservations and Ticketing)
Core and Generic Competencies
D2.TCC.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D2.TCC.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D2.TCC.CL1.04 Follow safety and security procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.05 Communicate on the telephone
D2.TCC.CL1.07 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D2.TCC.CL1.08 Promote products and services to customers
D2.TCC.CL1.09 Perform clerical procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.10 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D2.TCC.CL1.11 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D2.TCC.CL1.13 Use common business tools and technology
D2.TCC.CL1.14 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D2.TCC.CL1.15 Perform basic First Aid procedures
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies fourteen (14) competencies
from the Travel Services Competency Standards Menu with at least nine (9) from the
Cluster:
Travel Agency Ticketing
And
At least four (4) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
Common Core Competencies
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
General Administration
Tour Operation
Financial Administration
Human Resource Development
Resource Management
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Advanced Diploma of Travel Agencies (Management)


Core and Generic Competencies
D2.TCC.CL1.01 Work effectively with colleagues and customers
D2.TCC.CL1.02 Work in a socially diverse environment
D2.TCC.CL1.03 Implement occupational health and safety procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.04 Follow safety and security procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.05 Communicate on the telephone
D2.TCC.CL1.06 Manage and resolve conflict situations
D2.TCC.CL1.07 Develop and update tourism industry knowledge
D2.TCC.CL1.08 Promote products and services to customers
D2.TCC.CL1.09 Perform clerical procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.10 Access and retrieve computer-based data
D2.TCC.CL1.11 Converse in English at a basic operational level
D2.TCC.CL1.12 Process a financial sale transaction
D2.TCC.CL1.13 Use common business tools and technology
D2.TCC.CL1.14 Perform child protection duties relevant to the tourism industry
D2.TCC.CL1.15 Perform basic First Aid procedures
D2.TCC.CL1.16 Develop protective environments for children in tourism destinations
Functional Competencies
In addition to the above Core and Generic Competencies twenty-eight (28)
competencies from the Travel Services Competency Standards Menu
with at least six (6) from the Cluster:
Financial Administration
And
At least fourteen (14) competencies from one or more of the following Clusters:
General Administration
Human Resource Development
Travel Agency - Ticketing
Tour Operation
Tour Guide Services
And
At least three (3) competencies from the following Cluster:
Resource Management two (2) of which must be:
o D2.TRM.CL9.06 Lead and manage people
o D2.TRM.CL9.17 Monitor workplace operations
And
At least three (3) competencies from the Cluster:
English Language Proficiency
In all cases selection of Functional Competencies must reflect the intended Job Title,
local industry requirements and the Certificate level.

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Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You
must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the
project to your Trainer by the agreed date.

2.1 Deliver a 5 to 10 minute presentation (live or recorded) which:

Provides an overview of the qualifications which exist under the Framework


explaining the structure of the Framework as well as names of each qualification
level
Describes the role of Packaging Rules using knowledge of these Packaging Rules
to describe the requirements for creating a qualification under the Framework.

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Summary
Identify the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition
System

When identifying the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills recognition System:
Be aware of the Clusters which relate to various Standards Menus within the Labour Divisions
Recognise the 52 qualifications and various streams provided for across the six Labour Divisions
Know how to access and use the Packaging Rules which govern the creation of qualifications.

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Element 3:
Identify ASEAN toolbox resources
3.1 Name Labour Divisions to which ASEAN
toolboxes apply
Introduction
The Project to develop Toolboxes was tightly focussed on identified industry need deemed
important to all ASEAN Member States.
This very brief section names the Labour Divisions to which the ASEAN Toolboxes apply.

Labour Divisions
Project development and consultation was based on a suite of Competency Standards that
were provided to the project as the building blocks for the final product.
Competency Standards were provided for:
Hotel Services Restaurant Services
Hotel Services Front Office and Housekeeping
Travel Travel and Tour Services.
The proposed Curriculum Framework was required to be structured across six Labour
Divisions:
Food Production
Food and Beverage Service
Front Office
Housekeeping
Tour Operation
Travel Agencies.

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Indicative content of each Labour Division


The information below provides an overview of the content contained in each Labour
Division it is intended to be indicative only and designed to provide a general
understanding of the context for each.
Food Production
This Labour Division addresses competencies relating to:
Food hygiene and food safety
Workplace health and safety
First aid
Product knowledge
Food preparation
Cooking
Food presentation and service
Food service operations and catering
Cleaning
Business and staff management
English language.

Food and Beverage Service


This Labour Division addresses competencies relating to:
Safe food and beverage handling
Workplace health and safety
First aid
Product knowledge
Drinks preparation
Service of food and beverages
Customer relations
Bar and dining facility operations
Cleaning
Business and staff management
English language.

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Front Office
This Labour Division addresses competencies relating to:
Product knowledge
Workplace health and safety
First aid
Customer relations and service
Communication skills
Bookings and reservations management
Night audit
Business and staff management
English language.

Housekeeping
This Labour Division addresses competencies relating to:
Product knowledge
Workplace health and safety
First aid
Customer relations and service
Communication skills
Room preparation, service and cleaning
Valet
Laundry
Security
Business and staff management
English language.

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Tour Operation
This Labour Division addresses competencies relating to:
Product knowledge
Workplace health and safety
First aid
Customer relations and service
Communication skills
Bookings/reservations and information
management
Tour guiding and conducting tours
Driving and vehicle maintenance and repairs
Camping and on-tour catering
Security and risk management
Sensitivity and respect for local cultures
Business and staff management
English language.

Travel Agencies
This Labour Division addresses competencies relating to:
Product knowledge
Workplace health and safety
First aid
Customer relations and service
Communication skills
Processing bookings/reservations
Billing and settlement plans
Information management
Domestic and international ticketing
Marketing and sales
Business and staff management
English language.

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3.2 Identify unit titles of ASEAN toolboxes


Introduction
Each of the Units available under the Qualifications Framework has its own title.
This section presents the names of each of the 242 Units and introduces the concept of
Clusters.

List of Units
A total of 242 Toolboxes (plus one for Master Trainer and one for Master Assessor, and one
for National Trainer and one for National Assessor) have been developed.
The list below shows:
Names of each Unit
The Labour Divisions to which each Unit applies:
FP = Food Production
FB = Food and Beverage Service
FO = Front Office
HK = Housekeeping
TA = Travel Agencies
TO = Tour Operation.
The list (and all resources) can be accessed through www.ATPRS.org.

UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

1. Access and retrieve computer-based data X X X X X X

2. Apply standard safety procedures for handling


X X
foodstuffs

3. Clean and maintain kitchen equipment and


X X
utensils

4. Communicate on the telephone X X X X X X

5. Comply with workplace hygiene procedures X X X X X

6. Develop and update local knowledge X X X X X X

7. Implement occupational safety and health


X X X X X X
procedures

8. Maintain hospitality industry knowledge X X X X

9. Manage and resolve conflict situations X X X X X X

10. Organise and prepare food products and services X X

11. Perform clerical procedures X X X X X X

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

12. Perform basic First Aid procedures X X X X X X

13. Read and interpret basic instructions, directions


X X X X
and/or diagrams

14. Receive and resolve customer complaints X X

15. Receive and store kitchen supplies and food stock X X

16. Work effectively with colleagues and customers X X X X X X

17. Work in a socially diverse environment X X X X X X

18. Apply basic techniques of commercial cookery X

19. Establish and maintain quality control in food


X
production

20. Identify and prepare various meats X

21. Maintain strategies for safe food storage X

22. Organise food service operations X

23. Plan and manage menu-based catering X

24. Plan, prepare and display a buffet service X

25. Prepare a variety of sandwiches X

26. Prepare and cook poultry and game meats X

27. Prepare and cook seafood X

28. Prepare and store foods X

29. Prepare appetizers and salads X

30. Prepare hot, cold and frozen dessert dishes X

31. Prepare portion-controlled meat cuts X

32. Prepare soups X

33. Prepare stock and sauces X

34. Prepare vegetables, eggs and farinaceous dishes X

35. Present and display food products X

36. Select, prepare and serve special cuisines X

37. Select, prepare and serve various cheeses X

38. Apply catering control principles and procedures X

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

39. Design a concept for a major event or function X

40. Design meals to meet specific dietary or cultural


X
needs

41. Design meals to meet specific market


X
requirements

42. Operate a fast food outlet X

43. Prepare tenders for catering contracts X

44. Select catering systems X

45. Manage and operate a coffee shop X

46. Prepare and display petits fours X

47. Prepare and display sugar work X

48. Prepare and model marzipan X

49. Prepare chocolate and produce chocolate


X
products

50. Present desserts X

51. Prepare and present gateaux, torten and cakes X

52. Prepare and produce cakes and pastries X

53. Prepare and produce yeast goods X

54. Prepare bakery products for patisserie X

55. Clean and tidy beverage and food service areas X

56. Develop and maintain food & beverage product


X
knowledge

57. Manage responsible service of alcohol X

58. Operate a bar facility X

59. Operate a cellar system X

60. Prepare and serve cocktails X

61. Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages X

62. Process liquor sales at a bar facility X

63. Provide a link between kitchen and service area X


64. X
Provide advice to patrons on food and beverage

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO
services

65. Provide gueridon service X

66. Provide food and beverage services X

67. Provide room service X

68. Provide silver service X

69. Serve a range of wine products X

70. Take food orders and provide table service X

71. Develop a marketing strategy and coordinate


X X X X X X
sales activities

72. Establish and maintain a business relationship X X X X X X

73. Maintain quality customer/guest service X X X X X X

74. Develop and implement a business plan X X X X X X

75. Develop new products and services X X

76. Produce documents, reports and worksheets on a


X X X X X X
computer

77. Gather and present product information X X X X

78. Maintain a paper-based filing and retrieval system X X X X

79. Manage and implement small projects X X X X

80. Monitor and maintain a business computer system X X X X X X

81. Plan and establish systems and procedures X X X X X X

82. Plan, manage and conduct meetings X X X X X X

83. Prepare business documents X X X X X X

84. Use common business tools and technology X X X X X X

85. Work cooperatively in a general administration


X X X X
environment
86. Develop and implement operational policies X X X X X X
87. Audit financial procedures X X X X X X

88. Maintain financial standards and records X X X X

89. Manage financial performance within a budget X X X X X X

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

90. Manage payroll records X X X X

91. Monitor catering revenue and costs X X

92. Evaluate the effectiveness of an assessment


X X X X
system

93. Manage an assessment system for training


X X X X
outcomes

94. Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of training


X X X X
outcomes

95. Plan, conduct and evaluate a staff performance


X X X X X X
assessment

96. Plan and implement a series of training events X X X X

97. Prepare and deliver training sessions X X X X X X

98. Develop and supervise operational approaches X X X X

99. Lead and manage people X X X X

100. Manage legal requirements for business X X X X X X


compliance

101. Manage physical assets and infrastructure X X X X X X

102. Manage special events X X X X

103. Manage stock purchases and inventory X X X X X X

104. Manage the effective use of human resources X X X X

105. Monitor staff performance X X X X X X

106. Provide professional support to business X X X X


colleagues

107. Recruit and select staff X X X X X X

108. Roster staff X X X X X X

109. Converse in English at a basic operational level X X X X

110. Respond to instructions given in English X X X X

111. Start conversations and develop good relations X X X X


with guests

112. Communicate in English on a telephone X X X X

113. Use oral English to convey a complex exchange X X X X


of ideas

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

114. Deliver a short oral presentation in English X X X X

115. Read and write English at an advanced level X X X X X X

116. Read general information texts or media X X X X

117. Write a short message in English X X X X

118. Prepare a business letter in advanced English X X X X

119. Develop and update tourism industry knowledge X X X X

120. Promote products and services to customers X X X X X X

121. Operate a computerised reservation system X X

122. Provide accommodation reception services X

123. Maintain guests financial records X

124. Process a financial sale transaction X X X X X X

125. Conduct a night audit X

126. Provide Bell Boy/Porter services X

127. Operate a (PABX) switchboard X

128. Receive and place in-coming phone calls X

129. Facilitate out-going phone calls X

130. Provide information about in-house services X

131. Provide international (IDD) service information X

132. Provide housekeeping services to guests X

133. Clean public areas, facilities and equipment X

134. Clean and prepare rooms for in-coming guests X

135. Maintain and operate an industrial laundry X


136. Launder linen and guests clothes X
137. Provide valet services to guests X

138. Clean and maintain industrial work area and X


equipment

139. Establish and maintain a safe and secure X X X X X


workplace

140. Maintain the security of premises and property X X

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

141. Operate basic security equipment X X

142. Maintain the safety of premises and personnel X X

143. Observe and monitor people X X

144. Provide for the safety of VIPs X X

145. Manage intoxicated persons X X X

146. Escort, carry and store valuable items X X

147. Provide a lost and found facility X X

148. Plan and conduct an evacuation of premises X X

149. Organise functions X X X X

150. Prepare and deliver a presentation X X X X X X

151. Follow safety and security procedures X X

152. Access and interpret product information X

153. Administer a billing and settlement plan X

154. Apply advance airfare rules and procedures X

155. Book and co-ordinate supplier services X

156. Construct and ticket a non-air travel plan X

157. Construct and ticket domestic airfares X

158. Construct and ticket promotional international X


airfares

159. Construct and ticket regular international airfares X

160. Create promotional display stand X

161. Maintain product information inventory X

162. Operate an automated information system X X

163. Produce travel documentation on a computer X

164. Receive and process reservations X X

165. Source and package tourism products and X X


services

166. Source and provide destination information and X


advice

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

167. Work as a tour guide X

168. Allocate tour resources X

169. Conduct interpretive activities in the field X

170. Conduct pre-departure checks X

171. Co-ordinate and operate a day-tour (or short X


excursions)

172. Demonstrate/observe respect for indigenous X


cultures

173. Drive various types of service vehicles X

174. Establish and maintain safe touring conditions X

175. Lead tour groups in a responsible manner X

176. Maintain contacts with handling agents X

177. Manage and facilitate an extended tour X


experience

178. Plan, develop and evaluate interpretive activities X

179. Plan, trial and implement minimal impact X


operations

180. Prepare and present tour commentaries X

181. Provide arrival and departure assistance X

182. Research and share information on indigenous X


cultures

183. Carry out vehicle maintenance or minor repairs X

184. Clean premises and equipment X

185. Demonstrate climbing skills at a basic level X

186. Develop and implement operational plans X

187. Develop interpretive content for eco-tourism X


activities

188. Drive large tour buses or coaches X

189. Manage and execute a detailed tour itinerary X

190. Manage operational risk X

191. Monitor tourism operations X

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

192. Maintain tourism vehicles in safe and clean X


operational condition

193. Operate and maintain a 4WD vehicle in safe X


working condition

194. Operate tours in remote areas X

195. Set up and operate a camp site X

196. Provide camp site catering X

197. Apply point of sale handling techniques X X

198. Assess and plan tourism opportunities for local X X


communities

199. Build and maintain a team approach to service X X


delivery

200. Construct and apply tourism product research X X

201. Co-ordinate production of brochures and X X


marketing materials

202. Create, implement and evaluate strategic product X X


initiatives

203. Develop and monitor culturally appropriate X X


tourism activity

204. Develop conference programs X X

205. Develop host community awareness programs X X

206. Develop, implement and evaluate regional tourism X X


plans

207. Develop, implement and evaluate sponsorship X X


plans

208. Develop, manage and evaluate local marketing X X


strategies

209. Develop/monitor ecologically sustainable tourism X X


operations

210. Implement event management systems and X X


procedures

211. Plan and implement sales activities X X X X

212. Prepare and submit quotations X X

213. Promote tourism products and services X X

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

214. Create and update a tourism website X X

215. Develop and manage business strategies X X

216. Manage and monitor innovative tourism programs X X


and projects

217. Minimize theft X X

218. Receive and store stock X X X X X X

219. Source and present information X X

220. Interpret financial statements and reports X X

221. Maintain a secure financial accounting system X X

222. Manage contractual agreements/commitments X X

223. Manage and control operational costs X X

224. Prepare financial statements X X X X X X

225. Analyse competency requirements X X X X

226. Design and establish a training system X X

227. Develop assessment tools and procedures X X

228. Implement, monitor and evaluate a training and X X X X X X


development program

229. Plan and promote training courses X X

230. Apply industry standards to team supervision X X

231. Lead and manage a development team X X

232. Manage workplace diversity X X X X X X

233. Manage and maintain workplace relations X X X X X V

234. Monitor workplace operations X X X X X X

235. Prepare and monitor budgets X X X X X X

236. Read and write English at a basic operational X X


level

237. Use English at a supervisory level X X

238. Read and write English at a supervisory level X X

239. Coach others in job skills X X X X X X

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UNIT NAME FP FB FO HK TA TO

240. Design, prepare and present various types of X X X X


reports

241. Perform child protection duties relevant to the X X X X X X


tourism industry

242. Develop protective environments for children in X X X X X X


tourism destinations

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3.3 Describe assessment-related elements of an


ASEAN toolbox
Introduction
All ASEAN toolboxes are made up of five key elements:
Competency Standard
Trainee Manual
PowerPoint slides
Trainer Guide
Assessment Manual.
This section identifies and unpacks the Competency Standard and the Assessment Manual.

Competency Standard
Competency is a combination of the skill, knowledge and attitude required to perform a task
or job to the standard expected in the workplace.

If a person can do a job to the required standard they are deemed to be competent.

A Competency Standard is a description of the skills and knowledge required to perform a


task to defined standards.

They can be used within different contexts:

By an individual enterprise
By an industry
By government.
Endorsed Competency Standards form the basis which underpins all Competency Based
Training and Assessment that is, all activities undertaken by the Trainer and Assessor
must refer back to and relate directly to the relevant Competency Standard.

Competency Based Training and Assessment are processes that focus on the transfer and
validation of the competency standard.

Uses of competency based standards


Competency based standards can be used for:

Job design
Job descriptions
Performance appraisal
Selection criteria
Career path development
Identification of training needs

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Development of training programs


Certification.
The above activities in combination aim to increase customer satisfaction through better
employee performance.

About the Competency Standards which have been created


The ASEAN Competency Standards:

Are written in a format which has been endorsed by representatives from all ASEAN
Member States
Have been reviewed by, revised as necessary, and endorsed by all ASEAN Member
States
Provide the basis for the delivery and assessment of all Units under the Qualifications
Framework
Contain information and detail to help users (students, employers training providers)
select Units under Packaging Rules to create a qualification
Are all presented using the same structure
Can be located at www.ATPRS.org.
Elements of Competency Standards
All Competency Standards comprise:
Unit Title
Unit Number
Nominal Hours
Unit Descriptor
Elements
Performance Criteria
Unit Variables
Assessment Guide
Linkages to other Units
Critical Aspects of Assessment
Context of Assessment
Resource Implications
Assessment Methods
Key Competencies for the Unit.

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Unit Title
The Unit Title is the name of the competency.
It is written in such a way it indicates the general content of the competency.
The titles for all Units begin with a verb to reflect the nature of competency based training.
It is a statement about what is to be done in workplace.
There is no standard length for Unit titles they may be short or long: length of the title
bears no relationship to complexity of the Unit or Nominal Hours for the Unit.

Unit Number
Every Unit has an identifying number.
Where a Unit is allocated to more than one Labour Division it will have more than one Unit
Number which will change to reflect its location in the various Clusters.
Each Unit Title comprises four parts:
D1 refers to all the Units in the Hotel Services classifications

D2 refers to all the Units in the Travel Services classifications


The three letter code indicates the type/nature/classification of the Cluster to which the
Unit belongs:
HRS = Hotel Services, Restaurant services Common Core
HCC = Hotel Services, Restaurant services Commercial Cookery
HCA = Hotel Services, Restaurant services Commercial Catering
HPA = Hotel Services, Restaurant services
Patisserie
HBS = Hotel Services, Restaurant services Food
and Beverage Service
HCS = Hotel Services, Restaurant services
Customer Service, Sales and Marketing
HGE = Hotel Services, Restaurant services
General Administration
HFI = Hotel Services, Restaurant services Financial Administration
HRD = Hotel Services, Restaurant services Human Resource Development
HML = Hotel Services, Restaurant services Management and Leadership
LAN = English Language Proficiency
HOT = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, Common Core
HFO = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, Hotel Front Office
HHK = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, Housekeeping
HSS = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, Security Services
HSM = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, Customer Service, Sales and
Marketing

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HGA = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, General Administration


HFA = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, Financial Administration
HHR = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping, Human Resource
Development
HRM = Hotel Services, Front Office and Housekeeping,
Resource Management
TCC = Travel Services, Common Core
TTA = Travel Services, Travel Agency Ticketing
TTG = Travel Services, Tour Guide Services
TTO = Travel Services, Tour Operation
TCS = Travel Services, Customer Service, Sales and
Marketing
TTO = Travel Services, Tour Operation
TGA = Travel Services, General Administration
TFA = Travel Services, Financial Administration
TRD = Travel Services, Human Resource Development
TRM = Travel Services, Resource Management

The CL number refers to the Cluster Number the Unit is listed under. Every Cluster has a
number under each individual Competency Standards Menu.
The final two-digit number indicates the position of the Unit within the Cluster.

Nominal Hours
This figure represents indicative time required to deliver and assess the Unit.
It is not mandatory: CBT is not time-based.
A Unit may be delivered in less time than shown as the Nominal Hours, or in more time.
Primary uses of the Nominal Hours figure are:
As the basis for allocating funding which may be based, for example, on the number of
face-to-face or contact hours per Unit
To assist with rostering of staff
To enable scheduling/time-tabling of classes.
The time for each Unit was calculated based on:
Amount of content
Complexity of the Unit
Time allocated to similar Units under other vocational training Frameworks
Advice of experienced trainers and assessors who have delivered and assessed similar
Units.

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Unit Descriptor
This section provides a brief description Unit giving insight into context and content.
This section of the Competency Standard is often used by training providers to describe
Units they offer in:
Media advertisements they create to promote their courses
Internal Student Handbooks or other internal course promotional materials/brochures.
Elements
All Competency Standards comprise a number of
Elements.
There is no fixed, set or required number of Elements
per Unit.
There is always more than one and three to five is a
common range.
They identify and describe:
The key tasks or activities which make up the Competency
The major building blocks of the Competency
A sequential approach to the required tasks.
Performance Criteria
All Elements comprise a number of Performance Criteria.
There is no fixed, set or required number of Performance Criteria per Element.
There is always more than one and five to eight is a common range.
They are sub-sets of an Element and prescribe action needed for competency in the
Element.
Parts of the Performance Criteria may be written in italics meaning this part is addressed
under the Unit Variables section (see below) of the Competency Standard.
Unit Variables
This section of the Competency Standard:
Provides advice to interpret the scope and context of the Unit of competence, allowing
for differences between enterprises and workplaces
Relates to the Unit as a whole and facilitates holistic assessment
Identifies the Labour Division/s to which the Unit applies
Gives detail of and presents key points relating to italicised parts of Performance Criteria
which the Trainer should cover when training delivery takes place.
Assessment Guide
This aspect of the Competency Standard lists the skills and knowledge which must be
assessed as part of this Unit.

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Linkages to other Units


This is a reference section for Trainers and shows them Titles of Units which are related to
the Competency Standard.
Trainers can refer to these Competency Standards (and the resources developed to support
them) when preparing their training in order to gain extra information relating to the Unit
being delivered.
The Units listed in this section are not pre-requisites or co-requisites for the Unit in question.
Critical aspects of assessment
Shows the evidence which is deemed essential (that is, should be captured as part of the
assessment process) in order for the Assessor to determine whether or not the candidate is
Pass Competent or Not Yet Competent.
It supports the Assessment Guide and gives it more context.
It is useful to the Trainer also as it indicates and specifies additional inclusions the training
must address.
Context of assessment
This segment of the Competency Standard provides a framework and perspective regarding
how, when and where assessment may be undertaken.
The emphasis is on Competency Based Assessment with candidates needing to
demonstrate competency in a real-life situation or under relevant simulated/mock conditions
(such as in a classroom or via a role play).
Resource Implications
Listed in this subdivision of the Competency Standard is advice regarding physical and other
resources which will be required and must be available/used to effectively deliver and
assess the Unit.
This list is supplemented in every Trainer Guide for every Unit by the Recommended
Training Equipment which provides a list of required/recommended resources in more
detail.
Assessment Methods
This area of the Competency Standard presents a range
of options for the Assessor which may be used to capture
evidence and determine the Pass Competent or Not Yet
Competent decision.
The Assessment Methods presented are suggestions
they are not mandatory requirements.
Assessors can elect use whatever assessment
techniques/tools they wish as appropriate to the individual
candidate, workplace or Unit.

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Key Competencies for the Unit


Every Competency Standard presents a set of seven agreed Key Competencies which detail
the type and level of key competencies needed by successful candidates to perform the
requirements of the Competency Standard in a workplace. They can be used to judge the
level of complexity and difficulty of a Unit.
The seven Key Competencies are:
Collecting, organising and analysing information
Communicating ideas and information
Planning and organising activities
Working with others and in teams
Using mathematical ideas and techniques
Solving problems
Using technology.
Each of the above seven Key Competencies is ranked Level 1, 2 or 3 with:
Level 1 = competence to undertake tasks effectively
Level 2 = competence to manage tasks
Level 3 = competence to use concepts for evaluating.
In some cases, with some Competency Standards in some of the Key Competency areas no
Level is shown indicating the Key Competency is deemed as not applying.

Assessor Manual
Every Unit has an Assessor Manual.
The Assessor Manual:
Is intended for use only by the Assessor and not intended for release to students
Should be used by Assessors when planning and
preparing assessment
May be released to Trainers to support the positive
relationship which should exist between Assessors
and Trainers
Should be given to Assessors by the Training
Provider when they are allocated a Unit to assess
Is available at www.ATPRS.org

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Inclusions in the Assessor Manual


Every Assessor Manual uses the same format:
Competency Based Assessment
This is an overview of CBA for Assessors giving information in relation to:
Suggested assessment methods
Alternative assessment methods
Selection of assessment methods
Assessing competency
Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition System
Recognition of Prior Learning
Code of Practice for Assessors
Instructions and Checklists for Assessors
Instructions for recording competency
Instructions for different assessment methods.
Competency Standard
The endorsed Competency Standard for the Unit is provided in full so Assessors have ready
access to the source document which must be used as the basis for assessment with
reference to:
Content covered by the Unit
Assessment Guide
Critical Aspects of Assessment.
Oral Questions
These are questions which Assessors may use as part of their evidence gathering to
determine the Pass Competent or Not Yet Competent decision.
There is at least one Oral Question for every Performance Criteria.
The allocation of Oral Questions to Performance Criteria is shown in the Assessment Matrix
at the start of the Trainee Manual.
Oral Questions are not mandatory Assessors may choose to:
Use all of them as presented, in their entirety
Use none of them
Use some of them to capture additional evidence where
required on certain Performance Criteria
Develop their own series of Oral Questions
Use them as non-assessable exercises or in-class activities
rather than as formal assessment activities to capture evidence on which the Pass
Competent/Not Yet Competent decision will be made
Convert Oral Questions to Written Questions.

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Space is provided for assessors to:


Enter student name
Enter assessor name
Enter location where assessment was done
Record answers provided by trainee in short-hand form
Record the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision for each question.
Model answers are not provided for Oral Questions as most answers will depend on the
experience of the candidates and the examples they provide in response to the questions
asked.
A section titled Specifications for Oral Question Assessment is contained at the start of
every Assessor Manual.
Written Questions
This is a set of questions designed to be distributed to students for them to answer in writing
and submit for marking.
Assessors may use these as part of their evidence gathering to determine the Pass
Competent or Not Yet Competent decision.
There is at least one Written Question for every Performance
Criteria.
The allocation of Written Questions to Performance Criteria is
shown in the Assessment Matrix at the start of the Trainee
Manual.
Written Questions are not mandatory Assessors may
choose to:
Use all of them as presented, in their entirety
Use none of them
Use some of them to capture additional evidence where required on certain
Performance Criteria
Develop their own series of Written Questions
Use them as the basis for a non-assessable exercise or in-class activity rather than as
formal assessment to capture evidence on which the Pass Competent/Not Yet
Competent decision will be made
Convert Written Questions to Oral Questions.
A section titled Specifications for Written Question Assessment is contained at the start of
every Assessor Manual.

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Answers to Written Questions


This section provides model answers for the Written Questions provided in the Assessor
Manual.
Assessors:
May use these to assist them mark the responses to Written Questions provided by
students
Must use common sense when using/referring to them the answers provided are
indicative only and discretion must be used to determine the acceptability of an answer
which has been provided.
Observation Checklist
The Observation Checklist is provided for Assessors (only) to record observations of actual
candidate performance of the required competencies for the Unit as described by the
Competency Standard.
The document is used to capture evidence of practical competency which is used to help
make the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision.
In relation to this document:
Name of student and Assessor must be entered
Location/venue where observation occurred must be entered
Dates on which observations occurred must be entered multiple observations are
required to ensure consistency of competency
The Elements and Performance Criteria for the Competency Standard are reproduced
on the form to facilitate and focus the observation
Space is provided to assist in recording evidence
Space is provided to enable feedback
Space is provided for both Assessor and student to sign the document:
The Assessor signs to authenticate the observations
The student signs to acknowledge they have received the feedback as a result of the
observations.
A section titled Specifications for Observation Checklist is contained at the start of every
Assessor Manual.
Third Party Statement
This form is provided for distribution to a designated and appropriate person in a workplace
who will use the document to provide evidence which can be used by an Assessor as part of
the evidence they use to make the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision.
An appropriate person could be a supervisor, manager, business owner or other suitable
senior/experienced person in the workplace.
The appropriate person must:
Agree to provide the required information
Have the requirements of completing the Third Party Statement explained to them

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Be supported by the Assessor in their efforts and with any questions or difficulties they
may have.
Space exists on the Third Party Statement to:
Enter student name and name of authorised/approved Third Party
Contact number for the Third Party to facilitate contact by the Assessor if there is a
query or of follow-up information is required
Indicate the relationship between the candidate the Third party competing the Statement
Room for them to indicate their opinion (Yes, No, Not Sure) regarding the competency
of the candidate for the Elements and Performance Criteria in many cases
Performance Criteria have been combined in this document to make it easier and
quicker for workplace Third Party personnel to compete the form
Space for the Third Party to provide more detailed/written feedback regarding candidate
performance if the Third Party wishes to do so
Space for the Third Party to sign to authenticate the document/their contributions.
A section titled Specifications for Third Party Statement is contained at the start of every
Assessor Manual.
Competency Recording Sheet
The final document in the assessor manual is the Competency Recording Sheet.
One Competency Recording Sheet needs to be prepared by the
Assessor for every candidate for every Unit.
This document:
Is provided in the same format for all Competencies
Provides a central location for the evidence captured during
assessments to be recorded
Is the main reference point for making the final Pass
Competent/Not yet Competent decision
Contains room to enter:
Student and Assessor name
Dates assessment commenced and was completed
Follow-up action required by student in the event they initially failed to achieve
competency
Observations made by the Assessor about the candidate and/or the assessment
process if deemed necessary/appropriate
Indication of the types of assessment used to capture evidence on a Performance
Criteria-by- Performance Criteria basis
Signatures (with dates) of:
Assessor to authenticate the document
Candidate to verify their assessment has been given to and explained to them.
A section titled Instructions for Recording Competency is contained at the start of every
Assessor Manual.

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Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You
must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the
project to your Trainer by the agreed date.

3.1 Deliver a 5 minute presentation (live or recorded) which:

Identifies the Labour Divisions to which the CATC applies and gives an overview of
the nature of the competencies provided for under each Labour Division
Explains how a new Assessor can identify/access the names of all the competency
standards under the CATC giving several examples of titles of competency
standards which exist.

3.2 Select one competency standard under the ASEAN Qualifications Framework/CATC
and for that unit/toolbox:

Interpret the Competency Standard


Identify the contents of the Assessor Manual.

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Summary
Identify ASEAN toolbox resources

When identifying ASEAN toolbox resources:


Know the six Labour Divisions to which the Toolboxes apply and gain a general appreciation for
the nature of the units which apply to each
Recognise the 242 competency standards provided for under the Qualifications Framework
Be able to access, describe and interpret elements of all ASEAN toolbox competency standards
Be able to access and describe the components of an ASEAN toolbox Assessor Manual.

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Element 4:
Implement assessment of an ASEAN
Competency Standard
4.1 Detail competency standard assessment
requirements
Introduction
It is essential for all Assessors to have a sound understand of competency standard
assessment requirements.
This section adds to previous information presented in section 1.3 on competency based
assessment.

Principles of CBA
CBA operates under the following principles:
Fairness assessment:
Must be equitable to all groups of learners
Procedure and criteria must be made clear to all learners before
Must be mutually developed
Must be able to be challenged.
Reasonable Adjustment this requires:
Measures or actions taken to provide a student with a disability the same educational
opportunities as everyone else.
Reasonable adjustments must be appropriate for the person and must not create
undue hardship.
Reliability meaning assessment:
Must be consistent
Techniques must be consistent in the results they give
Must be regularly reviewed to ensure all assessors are making decisions in a
consistent manner.
Flexibility - assessment:
Must provide for the recognition of knowledge and skills regardless of how they have
been acquired
Must be made accessible to learners through a variety of delivery modes.
Validity - assessment:
Must assess the range of skills and knowledge needed to demonstrate competency
Be based on evidence drawn from a number of occasions.
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Types of assessment
Assessment under the CATC training system is quite different from the formal examinations
and tests most people remember from their school days.
Evidence is gathered to demonstrate competence
in the skills and knowledge required by the units
of competency.
There are five types of assessment to consider:
Diagnostic undertaken before learning takes
place to evaluate/determine (diagnose) level
of learner and to help identify their training
needs. Includes actions such as TNAs and
trade tests
Formative ongoing assessment throughout the period of practice/learning
Summative assessment of performance which occurs at the end of the period of
practice/learning
Holistic an assessment approach that covers, in an integrated way, multiple elements
and/or units from the Competency Standards.

Working with others

Managing Knowledge
Attitude
the
Work Skill
flow
Transfer
Problem Solving

Recognition of prior/current learning/competency see immediately below.

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RPL
RPL stands for Recognition of Prior Learning.
RPL is the process that gives current industry professionals who do not have a formal
qualification, the opportunity to benchmark their skills and experience against the standards
set out in each Competency Standard.
This process is a learning and assessment pathway which encompasses:
Recognition of Current Competencies (RCC)
Skills auditing
Gap analysis and training
Credit transfer.
RPL acknowledges skills and knowledge can be acquired in a variety of ways other than via
formal training and gives applicants for RPL a chance to have their skills and knowledge
formally accepted and acknowledged regardless of how they were obtained.
Successful application for RPL will give a person advanced standing towards Qualifications
they are seeking to attain.

Evidence rules
Evidence/proof which is captured and used as the basis for
making the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision
must conform to the following rules it must be:
Valid that is, the evidence must:
Assess only the Elements and Performance Criteria of
the competency
Reflect only the skills knowledge and context of the
competency
Reflect demonstration and application of the standard
Reflect the Qualification level being assessed.
Sufficient that is, the evidence must:
Be enough to enable the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision to be made
Be demonstrated over a period of time
Cover all aspects of the competency.
Authentic that is, the evidence must:
Be the trainees own work
Be able to be verified as genuine.
Current that is, the evidence must:
Reflect candidate ability at this point in time
Demonstrate current skills and knowledge used in the workplace
Reflect skills and knowledge which comply with current standards.

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Types of evidence
Evidence may be seen as being:
Direct evidence this is evidence/proof gained through first-hand observation by the
Assessor
Indirect evidence this is evidence/proof obtained through other assessment activities
such as role plays, projects, assignments simulations, and third party reports
Supplementary evidence this is evidence/proof gathered (such as through third party
questions both oral and written) where additional information is required to make the
Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision.

Assessment methods
There are a variety of assessment methods to choose from. The assessment methods
selected:
Must enable the required evidence to be generated and captured to support or enable
the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision to be made
Must combine to collect sufficient evidence the candidate can perform the action/s
required to the required standard
Refers to what the candidate will be doing to demonstrate competency
Will be entered into the Assessment Matrix against the relevant content
Will dictate the assessment tool/instrument to be used in the assessment process.
Examples of assessment methods
Practical skills assessed through the following:
Real work observation, using:
Checklists
Projects
Project teams
On-the-job practical tasks.
Simulated work/demonstrations observation, using:
Checklists
Projects
Assignments
Role Plays.

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Knowledge which may be assessed using:


Written format such as:
Multiple choice questions
Short answer questions
Assignments
Projects
Essays
True/False questions.
Oral format such as:
Oral questions
Role plays
Interviews
Presentations by the learner
Discussion groups
On- and off-the-job questions.

Developing an assessment matrix


The Assessment Matrix identifies:
The Competency Standard being assessed presenting it by Element and Performance
Criteria
The name of the student being assessed
The various methods of assessment which will be used to capture the evidence which
has been identified as being necessary to support the Pass Competent/Not Yet
Competent decision.

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ASSESSMENT MATRIX
Method of Assessment for:
Unit Name: _____________________________
Student:________________________________

Oral Third party Observation Written


Case study Other
questions reports Checklist test

Element

Performance
Criteria 1.1

Performance
Criteria 1.2

Performance
Criteria 1.3

Performance
Criteria 1.4

Performance
Criteria 1.5

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Developing an assessment strategy


An assessment strategy describes how the students will be assessed for a qualification.
It is used by the assessor to guide their assessment of the student, and is a unique
document developed on a one-off basis for every student who is to be assessed.
The assessment strategy should address the following:
Name and description of the qualification
Details showing the packaging Rules for the qualification have been accessed and
complied with
Details of all the competency standards that comprise the qualification
Evidence of having interpreted the assessment-related requirements of all competency
standards for the specific situation/context
Coverage of how RPL/RCC will be included in this assessment
List of assessment methods to be used
Specification of assessment tools to be used on a unit-by-unit basis
Details of resources required for the assessments.

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4.2 Plan and prepare for assessment of an ASEAN


Competency Standard
Introduction
Implementation of assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard requires significant
planning and preparation.
This section reviews and recaps the concept of CBA and considers and discusses the wide
range of activities required in this phase of the assessment process.

Competency Based Assessment


In addition to the information provided in Section 1.3 it is
important to note the following to assist in developing a full
and proper understanding of Competency Based
Assessment:
Competency
The word competency represents an expansion of the
term skill.
Competency is a combination of the knowledge, manual
and attitudinal requirements and their application to the standard expected in the workplace.
For example in relation to a person pouring wine from a bottle to a guests glass:
Attitude = accepting the need to be courteous to the guest when pouring the wine
Knowledge = the ability to state the characteristics of the different wine varieties
Skill = pouring the wine from bottle to glass.
CBA defined
Competency based assessment is a process of systematically collecting evidence and
making a judgement of a person performance against the prescribed competency standard.
To be assessed as competent this also means the Trainee is able to:
Perform at an acceptable level of skill
Organise the required tasks
Respond and react appropriately when things go wrong
Fulfil a role in the scheme of things at work
Transfer skills and knowledge to new situations
CBA seeks evidence/proof of trainee competency, in relation to the endorsed Industry
Competency Standards against which they are being assessed.
This evidence may be obtained by:
Observing their work in the workplace or in a simulated setting
Obtaining reports of their competence from supervisors, co-workers and customers
Sighting samples of work they have done.

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Competent performance
Competent performance comprises five key elements:
Task skills which relates to performing at an acceptable level of skills.
For example, in a Front Office situation it can refer to all the tasks which have to be
undertaken to handle a reservation.
Task management skills which relates to managing a range of different tasks.
For example, in the Front Office situation it can refer to
answering a phone which is ringing, while dealing face-to-
face with a guest and checking someone in.
Contingency management skills which refers to
responding appropriately when things go wrong.
For example, in the Front Office situation it looks at being
able to handle/deal with a situation where there is a
double booking for the same room.
Job/role environment skills involving fulfilling the
responsibilities and expectations of the workplace.
For example, in the Front Office situation it may include coordinating with other staff to
ensure rooms are ready to sell.
Transfer skills which look at passing on knowledge, skills and attitudes to others.
In the Front Office this can include teaching a new staff member how to operate the
reservation system for the property.
Hospitality and Tourism performance considerations
In the industry there are five key considerations to take into account when assessing
competent performance that is, has the task been performed:
In a hygienic manner?
Safely?
With due regard to customer courtesy?
In a logical and appropriate manner?
Can the individual respond appropriately when a mistake is made?

Review of Competency Standard


Before beginning the planning of any assessment there must be a full understanding of the
Competency Standard to be assessed. This is the starting point of any assessment process.
Trainers need to review the Competency Standard before they start their training, and
Assessors need to do the same.
A key way to gain this knowledge is to review the standard by reading and analysing it.

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Rationale
There is a need to do this in order to:
Find out exactly what the Unit is about learn about the details and content contained in
the Competency Standard
Become familiar with all relevant assessment-related requirements for the Competency
Standard as listed in the Standard
Make sure a copy of the Competency Standard is at hand to refer to throughout the
planning process
Ensure all aspects of the Competency Standard are assessed as required
Determine whether or not any assessments can be grouped together to save time and
money and make the process more efficient.
Keys to the review process
Essential activities include:
Obtain a:
Soft copy of the Competency Standard which can
be obtained from:
Hard copy it is always good to have a paper-
based copy to refer to.
Copies can be obtained from:
The Assessor Manual
The Trainer Guide
www.ATPRS.org
The training provider.
Read the document:
Allocate sufficient time to do this free from interruptions
Take notes of things which come to mind as the document is read:
Questions/issues which need to be followed up/clarified
Thoughts which immediately come to mind regarding possible assessment
techniques/methods/options
Possibilities for locations/venues for undertaking assessment
Ideas which occur in relation to timing of assessments.
Re-read it something more will always be gained from a second and third reading
Take the time to:
Note the correct name of the Unit/Competency Standard
Record the Unit Number/s
These will be needed for completion of assessment records
as well as (possibly) for internal reporting requirements.

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Spend some time looking at the detail provided under Unit Variables to:
Gain appreciation for how they align with Performance Criteria and Elements.
Pay special attention to requirements and suggestions listed under:
Assessment Guide
Critical Aspects of Assessment
Context of Assessment
Assessment Methods.
Contents
The following is a brief overview of the generic contents of a Competency Standard:
Unit Title: Statement about what is to be done in workplace
Unit Number: Unique number identifying the competency
Unit Descriptor: General information describing the competency
Element: What has to be achieved (there are often several)
Performance Criteria: Level of performance to be demonstrated for each element within
the unit of competency
Unit Variables: A guide to different situations and the context in which the performance
criteria applies in the workplace
Assessment Guide: Specifies the skills and knowledge required to be competent in the
unit
Linkage to other units: Identifies other units which have relevance to the unit
Critical aspects of assessment: Summary of the assessment outcome
Context of Assessment: Defines the where, how and what of assessment
Resource implications: General advice regarding the resources
needed to deliver training (and hence to conduct assessment)
Assessment methods: Suggestions as to how assessment may
be conducted
Key Competencies: Gives type and level of key competencies
needed to perform the competency. In some standards this
information is listed separately.
Keys/questions to answer as a result of reviewing the Competency Standard
As an Assessor it is important information/answers to all the
following are understood as they form the basis of necessary
preparation activities underpinning the planning for assessments:
What is a description of the work activity/duty?
What does the work involve?
What are the parts that make up this duty?
How is performance of this work measured?
What are the conditions under which the work is performed?

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What are the skills and knowledge needed to perform this work activity?
What evidence is needed to prove the work has been performed as required?
Where and/or when should evidence of competency be gathered?
What resources are required to gather the evidence?
Follow-up
When the review has taken place it is essential to:
Talk to the Training Provider:
About their expectations relating to assessments
About budgets for assessment for materials/consumables
Regarding time allocations for preparing, conducting and post-assessment
activities
To identify any requirements or preferences for where assessments need to be
conducted
To determine any requirements or preferences for the timing and/or duration of
assessments
So they can provide names and contact details of relevant Trainers and
other/previous Assessors
To identify if there are any existing assessment resources/materials available.
Meet with:
The Trainer/s for the Unit to:
Initiate the necessary relationship
Exchange contact details
Learn about content to be delivered
Share and exchange ideas about assessment.
Previous Assessors to:
Talk to them
Learn from their experience
Obtain tips and advice
Obtain resources and materials which can be used.

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Determination of assessment approach


The approach to assessment can be determined using the Assessment Checklist:
Review Competency standard
Consult the critical aspects of assessment as listed in the Competency Standards to
identify what is important for the assessment decision
Identify and align the Elements/Performance Criteria to the domains of knowledge and
skill which need to be assessed
Develop an assessment matrix
Select the appropriate mix of assessment methods from the matrix to ensure the
necessary/identified evidence is captured as a result of the assessment process
Acquire or design the assessment tools the Toolbox provides several assessment tools
but there is always opportunity (and sometimes a need) to develop others
Test the assessment tools to ensure they meet the rules of evidence.

Preparation of assessment plan


The Assessment Plan may contain/combine:
Name/title of Competency Standard being
assessed
Determination of types of assessment required
diagnostic, formative, summative, holistic, RPL
Identification of the assessment methods and
tools to be used as identified in the
Assessment Matrix
Development of an Assessment Decision Grid
Identification of the time, date and venue for the assessment
Communication of assessment arrangements with candidates and negotiation of
reasonable adjustment.
There will always be a need to liaise with the Trainer to finalise this stage of the assessment
process.

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Assessment tools
To collect evidence assessment tools will need to be used.
These tools are used to collect and interpret evidence of competence
Assessment tools can be used in combination or by themselves provided that they test,
measure the competency.
Assessment tools will reflect the nature of the assessment method/s to be used for
example:
If doing an Interview a Questionnaire might be used
If conducting an observation of learner actions, a Checklist could be used
If watching a demonstration, a Checklist would be suitable
If asking Oral Questions a sheet listing the questions and able to capture answers would
be used.
Toolbox assessment tools
All Toolboxes contain:
Oral questions
Written Questions
Work projects
Observation checklists
Third party statements.
There is no compulsion to use any or all of the above assessment tools.
Developing simple assessment tools
The following are important considerations when developing alternate simple assessment
tools to use:
The format can vary to suit individual (Assessor, candidate, Competency Standard)
requirements
It is critical the tool reflects authentic workplace activities or relevant current knowledge
The tool should include instructions for the trainee
The tool should Include how the assessment is to be conducted and recorded
Assessment Criteria should be developed
Model answers should be provided.

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Assessment Decision Grid


The Assessment Decision Grid may be developed to assist with/help demonstrate the
Critical evidence required has been obtained and the Evidence collected meet the Rules
of Evidence.

ASSESSMENT DECISION GRID

The competency standard being assessed:


__________________________________________

Critical Evidence Does it relate Is there enough Is it up to Is it the


evidence collected to the of it? (Is it date? (Is it candidates
required standards Sufficient?) Current?) own work? (Is
being it Authentic?)
assessed? (Is
it Valid?)

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Scheduling of assessment activities


Planning and preparing for assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard must address
scheduling (time-tabling) of each selected assessment method for every candidate and
needs to:
Ensure the assessment time is suitable for the candidate so they can attend the
assessment
Verify required equipment is available at the time and at the place where the
assessment is to occur.
Many assessment areas and/or resources (plant, machinery, equipment, systems,
technology and utensils) are used by multiple other users for training and for other
assessments
Fall within any budgeted constraints which might apply to the conduct of assessments.

Liaison with trainer


Planning/preparing for assessments must include communication with the Trainer who has
delivered the training for which assessment is to be conducted.
This may be done in order to:
Gain input/suggestions from the Trainer
regarding relevant assessment methods which
could/should be used
Verify the methods proposed for assessment
arte legitimate in terms of determining
competency for the individual Competency
Standard
Make sure conditions and criteria incorporated
into assessments are valid and match content
which has been delivered/is applicable in the
workplace
Check the content being assessed aligned with the material/content which was actually
delivered in the training
Identify materials (resources, consumables, equipment) which are available to use in the
assessments to be conducted
Arrange Assessor attendance at training sessions so they can:
Gain a better understanding/appreciation of the skills being taught
Meet the learners/candidates
Explain assessment requirements (methods, schedules) to candidates.

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Organisation of assessment environment


Most assessment activities require assessors to take some form of action to organise the
assessment environment.
Generally speaking more action is required to organise the environment where a practical
skill is being assessed.
Organisational requirements may include:
Booking the room/area so there are no clashes between use of the location for
assessment and any other activity
Ordering consumables required for the assessment
tasks to be undertaken and:
Making sure they have been delivered/are
available as ordered
Checking to make sure they are sufficient and
suitable to be used for the assessment tasks to
be applied
Laying them out ready for use by the candidate.
Preparing assessment tools as required for the assessment and ensuring they are
available for use in sufficient numbers as required
Cleaning the area if required
Setting-up equipment and other items especially where practical tasks are being
assessed there can be a need for the Assessor to prepare items to be used so they are
ready for use by the candidate
Taking action to ensure:
Distractions are eliminated to the best extent possible
Privacy is optimised for the candidate
Access to the areas by others is restricted
Safety is guaranteed which will require checking equipment/machinery and the
environment itself.

Communication and confirmation of assessment requirements


When all arrangements for assessment/s have been finalised there is a need to
communicate and confirm these with relevant others.
Relevant others
In this context relevant others can include:
The candidates
Trainers
Other Assessors/Co-assessors
Employers
Nominated personnel within the Training Provider organisation.

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Ways to communicate
The following are all acceptable ways of notifying relevant others regarding final assessment
arrangements:
Meeting face-to face at scheduled meetings
Using hard copy advice/notification
Using emails.
Information to be communicated
These notifications need to address:
Names of candidates to be assessed
Details of the Competency Standard to be
assessed including details of:
Elements and/or Performance Criteria as appropriate
Other Competency Standards to be assessed/co-assessed at the same time
Assessment venue, date and time
Expected duration of assessment.
Identification of materials/items candidates are required to bring with them
Description and details of the assessment method/task
Explanation of relevant conditions and criteria which will form the basis of the
assessment.

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4.3 Conduct assessment of an ASEAN Competency


Standard
Introduction
When the assessments have been prepared they need to be implemented/applied as
planned.
This section highlights the need to gather quality evidence during assessment (with
reference to the Principles of CBA and the Rules of Evidence for CBA) emphasises the need
to support candidates during their assessment, looks at the use of assessment
methods/tools contained in the Toolboxes and discusses the making of the assessment
decision.

Verification of assessment with candidate/s


Before assessment commences there is a need to prepare the candidates for the
assessment and this may require the Assessor to:
Make candidate feel at home in the assessment location because many learners feel
threatened/uneasy about being assessed
Confirm candidate is ready to be assessed
Advise candidate of applicable Appeals Processes
available to them as developed by the Training
Provider
Explain the assessment in relation to:
What is to be assessed
How it will be achieved
Why the assessment is being done/why the candidate is being assessed.
Provide the candidate with the standard against which they will be assessed this will
help prove to them their assessment is going to reflect exactly what they have been
taught
Explain the concept of evidence
Outline any other persons who may be involved in the assessment process so
candidates fully understand who is to be involved and what everyone is doing in relation
to the assessment
Give them confidence for the assessment process
Allow the candidate to ask questions about the assessment
Help set the scene for the assessment and discuss the assessment process
Begin/develop the process of creating a relationship/rapport between the candidate and
the Assessor.

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The need to gather quality evidence


Principles of CBA revisited
It is necessary to ensure assessment conforms with the five principles of Competency Based
Assessment.
It is useful to refresh what they are.
Fairness
Assessments applied must be equitable to all groups of learners
Assessment procedure and criteria must be made clear to all learners before
assessments are undertaken
Assessments must be mutually developed
Assessment must be able to be challenged.
Reasonable Adjustment
Refers to measures or actions taken to
provide a student with a disability the same
educational opportunities as everyone else.
To be reasonable, adjustments must be
appropriate for that person, must not create
undue hardship.
Reliability
Means the results/outcomes (evidence)
must be consistent
Techniques must be consistent in the results they give
Activities/assessments must be regularly reviewed to ensure all assessors are making
decisions in a consistent manner.
Flexibility
Must provide for the recognition of knowledge and skills regardless of how they have
been acquired
Must be made accessible to learners through a variety of modes/options.
Validity
Must assess the range of skills and knowledge needed to demonstrate competency
Must provide evidence drawn from a number of occasions.
Rules of Evidence revisited
It is also useful to refresh the Rules of Evidence.

Evidence gathered as part of the assessments must comply


with the four Rules of Evidence that is, evidence must be:

Valid
Sufficient
Authentic

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Current.
Assessment under the CATC training system is quite different from the formal examinations
and tests most people remember from their school days.

Evidence is gathered to demonstrate competence in the skills and knowledge required by


the units of competency.

Valid that is, the evidence must:


Assess only the Elements and Performance Criteria of the competency
Reflect only the skills knowledge and context of the competency
Reflect demonstration and application of the standard
Reflect the Qualification level being assessed.
Sufficient that is, the evidence must:
Be enough to enable the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision to be made
Be demonstrated over a period of time
Cover all aspects of the competency.
Authentic that is, the evidence must:
Be the trainees own work
Be able to be verified as genuine.
Current that is, the evidence must:
Reflect candidate ability at this point in time
Demonstrate current skills and knowledge used in the workplace
Reflect skills and knowledge which comply with current standards.

Need to support candidates


Assessors are expected to support candidates who are being assessed.
This means:
It is acceptable to communicate with candidates during the assessment process such
as:
Verbally giving feedback Yes, thats correct, or You are doing well
Providing non-verbal feedback by way of nodding or smiling.
It is acceptable to give candidates a break during their assessment if they ask for one
or if it seems appropriate to do so
It may be necessary to take action to maintain safety such as adjusting the
environment (temperature, lighting, noise) or helping the individual (by getting them a
drink of water, a tissue)
It could be necessary to remind candidates they have more opportunities to demonstrate
competency/undertake assessments thereby removing perceived pressure they must
succeed.

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Use of Work Projects


At the end of each Element there are Work Projects.
These:
Are suggested/optional assessment items for the Element they are not mandatory and
Trainers/Assessors can elect:
Not to use them at all and advise students of this in order learners do not assume
they are requirements for the course
To use only some of them and incorporate them as necessary in their Assessment
Matrix
To re-word or change them in any way deemed appropriate for the needs of
learners, workplaces and/or the focus of other assessments.
May be used as non-assessable exercises or in-class activities rather than as formal
assessment activities to capture evidence on which the Pass Competent/Not Yet
Competent decision will be made.
The allocation of Work Projects to Performance Criteria is shown in the Assessment Matrix
at the start of the Trainee Manual.

Use of Assessor Manual and implementation of selected


assessment items
Oral Questions
These are questions which Assessors may use as part of
their evidence gathering to determine the Pass
Competent or Not Yet Competent decision.
There is at least one Oral Question for every
Performance Criteria for each Unit.
The allocation of Oral Questions to Performance Criteria
is shown in the Assessment Matrix at the start of the
Trainee Manual.
Oral Questions are not mandatory Assessors may choose to:
Use all of them as presented, in their entirety
Use none of them
Use some of them to capture additional evidence where required on certain
Performance Criteria
Develop their own series of Oral Questions
Use them as non-assessable exercises or in-class activities rather than as formal
assessment activities to capture evidence on which the Pass Competent/Not Yet
Competent decision will be made
Convert Oral Questions to Written Questions.
Space is provided for assessors to:
Enter student name
Enter assessor name
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Enter location where assessment was done


Record answers provided by trainee in short-hand form
Record the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision for each question.
Model answers are not provided for Oral Questions as most answers will depend on the
experience of the candidates and the examples they provide in response to the questions
asked.
A section titled Specifications for Oral Question Assessment is contained at the start every
Assessor Manual.
Written Questions
This is a set of questions designed to be distributed to students for them to answer in writing
and submit for marking.
Assessors may use these as part of their evidence gathering to determine the Pass
Competent or Not Yet Competent decision.
There is at least one Written Question for every Performance
Criteria.
The allocation of Written Questions to Performance Criteria is
shown in the Assessment Matrix at the start of the Trainee
Manual.
Written Questions are not mandatory Assessors may choose
to:
Use all of them as presented, in their entirety
Use none of them
Use some of them to capture additional evidence where
required on certain Performance Criteria
Develop their own series of Written Questions
Use them as the basis for a non-assessable exercise or in-class activity rather than as
formal assessment to capture evidence on which the Pass Competent/Not Yet
Competent decision will be made
Convert Written Questions to Oral Questions.
A section titled Specifications for Written Question Assessment is contained at the start
every Assessor Manual.
Answers to Written Questions
This section provides model answers for the Written Questions provided in the Assessor
Manual.
Assessors:
May use these to assist them mark the responses to Written Questions provided by
students
Must use common sense when using/referring to them the answers provided are
indicative only and discretion must be used to determine the acceptability of an answer
which has been provided.

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Observation Checklist
The Observation Checklist is provided for Assessors (only) to
record observations of actual candidate performance of the
required competencies for the Unit as described by the
Competency Standard.
The document is used to capture evidence of practical
competency which is used to help make the Pass
Competent/Not Yet Competent decision.
In relation to this document:
Name of student and Assessor must be entered
Location/venue where observation occurred must be entered
Dates on which observations occurred must be entered multiple observations are
required to ensure consistency of competency
The Elements and Performance Criteria for the Competency Standard are reproduced
on the form to facilitate and focus the observation
Space is provided to assist in recording evidence
Space is provided to enable feedback
Space is provided for both Assessor and student to sign the document:
The Assessor signs to authenticate the observations
The student signs to acknowledge they have received the feedback as a result of the
observations.
A section titled Specifications for Observation Checklist is contained at the start every
Assessor Manual.
Third Party Statement
This form is provided for distribution to a designated and appropriate person in a workplace
who will use the document to provide evidence which can be used by an Assessor as part of
the evidence they use to make the Pass Competent/Not Yet Competent decision.
An appropriate person could be a supervisor, manager, business owner or other suitable
senior/experienced person in the workplace.
The appropriate person must:
Agree to provide the required information
Have the requirements of completing the Third Party
Statement explained to them
Be supported by the Assessor in their efforts and with any
questions or difficulties they may have.

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Space exists on the Third Party Statement to:


Enter student name and name of authorised/approved Third Party
Contact number for the Third Party to facilitate contact by the Assessor if there is a
query or of follow-up information is required
Indicate the relationship between the candidate the Third party competing the Statement
Room for them to indicate their opinion (Yes, No, Not Sure) regarding the competency
of the candidate for the Elements and Performance Criteria in many cases
Performance Criteria have been combined in this document to make it easier and
quicker for workplace Third Party personnel to compete the form
Space for the Third Party to provide more detailed/written feedback regarding candidate
performance if the Third Party wishes to do so
Space for the Third Party to sign to authenticate the document/their contributions.
A section titled Specifications for Third Party Statement is contained at the start every
Assessor Manual.

Recognition of Prior Learning


Legitimate assessment includes use of RPL.
Recognition of Prior Learning (or Recognition of Current Competency) is an assessment
method requiring a candidate to provide evidence that through life, education and/or work
experience they can demonstrate the requirements of the competency.
For the Assessor RPL can be seen as comprising five steps:
Determine the information required
Determine types of evidence required
Review evidence presented against the Rules of
Evidence
Develop RPL competency interview questions
Determine competence.
A Case Study will be provided to demonstrate application
of RPL as an assessment tool.
RPL
Recognition of Prior Learning involves a formal recognition of the skills and knowledge that a
person has gained through previous studies, work and life experiences.
The assessment determines the extent to which the individual has already achieved some or
all of the required competencies for a particular qualification.
RPL may also be known as Skills Recognition.
Candidates for RPL may be awarded full or part qualifications on the basis of RPL
assessment.
Candidates/applicants for RPL will have their existing skills and knowledge assessed so
previous studies, work and/or life experiences can count towards all or part of their
qualification and shorten the period of training.

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RPL can fast track applicants through competencies quickly so they can concentrate on
gaining new skills in other areas avoiding the need to repeat undertaking training for things
they already know/can do.
As part of the assessment the following may be taken into account:
Work-related training courses
On-the-job skills and work experience
Volunteer and community work
A combination of all of the above.
A cost may apply to RPL applications to cover the cost of time involved in completing the
assessment process.
For RPL to be a useful and/or successful means of assessment/assessment option it needs
to be effectively promoted to students and costs associated with it need to be controlled so
they are kept at affordable rates.

Making the assessment decision


When the assessment has been completed the assessment decision
needs to be made.
This is the decision deciding if the candidate is Pass Competent or
Not Yet Competent.
There is a non-negotiable need to ensure and retain the integrity of all
assessment decisions made to help achieve this it is important when
making the decision to take all of the following into account:
The decision must be made by a qualified Assessor under the
ASEAN training system this person can seek input from relevant
others when making their decision such as:
Trainers
Workplace supervisors and co-workers.
The decision must be made on the evidence which was gathered as part of the
assessment process a key in this decision making process is another Assessor should
be able to:
View the evidence captured
Compare it to the requirements of the Competency Standard
Come to the same conclusion/decision.
The assessor can defer their decision to capture additional evidence where there is
uncertainty about the decision/about certain aspects of the candidates performance
An objective decision must be made Assessors must never allow personal feelings or
bias to influence their interpretation or analysis of the evidence which has been obtained
The Assessor verifies to themself:
The Rules of Evidence haven been complied with
The principles of CBA have been observed.

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The assessment should reflect actual workplace/industry practice or requirements


The Competent decision can only be made when the candidate has provided evidence
all aspects of the Competency Standard are held and can be demonstrated/applied in an
industry context
The decision must be communicated to:
The Trainer
The Candidate.
When communicating Not Yet Competent decisions to candidates this process should
include:
Discussing, identifying and organising follow-up additional training
Deciding and arranging on additional assessment required
Accessing and reviewing the assessments which were undertaken and the evidence
obtained as a result
Notifying the candidate of any Appeals Process the Training Provider has in place
allowing the student to contest/challenge the decision or in the event they have a
complaint about how the assessment was conducted
Agreeing on the decision made by the Assessor.
Validation processes (internal meetings between Assessors, Moderation, Engagement
with industry groups and similar other activities) should be established and implemented
to maintain the quality and consistence of assessment and decisions made
The decision made must be recorded and the assessment process/procedures also
need to be reviewed with a view to continual improvement.
Providing feedback to candidates
After assessments have been undertaken it is standard practice for the Assessor to meet
with each candidate and present and discuss their result.
The following provides a basis for conducting these sessions:
Welcome the candidate to the session
Ask the candidate how they feel they performed those who
achieve a NYC outcome usually know this and asking this
question allows them to acknowledge their deficiencies without
the Assessor having to point them out.
What the candidate says can provide a useful starting point for
the support/discussion which follows generally speaking, candidates tend to be more
critical about their performances than the evidence suggests.
Reinforce positive aspects of their performance it is important for this feedback session
to be a positive experience for the students so it is important Assessors are able to point
to the encouraging and up-beat
Ask where they think they can improve again, candidates are often well aware of
where they need extra work, practice, training or study.
The fact the candidate identifies these deficiencies helps invest them in the work
necessary in the process of gaining the competencies still required.
Discuss specific problem areas and identify why they are an issue in relation to the
PC/NYC decision and in terms of what is required by industry/workplaces

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If necessary, discuss further evidence required and negotiate when and how this is to
be obtained
Inform the candidate of the decision with reference to the evidence which is available
and gain their agreement or note their comments regarding the decision
Discuss gaps in relation to the NYC decision discussing possible training solutions to
address these gaps
Arrange a training plan to reflect the agreed/required training
Review the assessment process with the candidate
Ask for feedback from the candidate about issues such as:
Types of assessment methods used
Timing of and venues for the assessment activities
Role of the Trainer and the Assessor
Any topics deemed relevant by the candidate.
Close on a positive note which can entail:
Mentioning the good work they have demonstrated
Encouraging them in their future endeavours
Advising of the action the assessor will take after the meeting to facilitate/enable the
decisions agreed on
Thanking the candidate for their attendance.

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4.4 Evaluate an ASEAN assessment


Introduction
Professional Assessors need to evaluate their assessments in order to learn lessons for
future reference and to assist in validation procedures.
This section looks at activities required following assessment including completion of
paperwork, identifies and discusses the areas which need to be evaluated and talks about
the need to share results and findings of the evaluation process.

Completion of required assessment records


All assessments require completion of a range of
documentation.
Assessors will be required to complete the Competency
Recording Sheet and may be required to complete internal
and/or external reports as required by the Training Provider
and/or authorities or employers.
Competency Recording Sheet
The Competency Recording Sheet is the final document
provided in every Assessor Manual.
It is used to record the assessment which has been undertaken/completed for each
candidate.
One Competency Recording Sheet needs to be prepared by the Assessor for every
candidate for every Unit.
This document:
Is provided in the same format for all Competencies
Provides a central location for the evidence captured during assessments to be recorded
Is the main reference point for making the final Pass Competent/Not yet Competent
decision
Contains room to enter:
Student and Assessor name
Dates assessment commenced and was completed
Follow-up action required by student in the event they initially failed to achieve
competency
Observations made by the Assessor about the candidate and/or the assessment
process if deemed necessary/appropriate
Indication of the types of assessment used to capture evidence on a Performance
Criteria-by- Performance Criteria basis
Signatures (with dates) of:
Assessor to authenticate the document
Candidate to verify their assessment has been given to and explained to them.

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A section titled Instructions for Recording Competency is contained at the start every
Assessor Manual.
Internal and/or external documentation
The Training Provider may require completion of internal reports which can ask the Assessor
to provide:
Numbers of candidates assessed
Names of the Competency Standards and Qualifications involved
Names of candidates
Outcomes of the assessments
Details of issues/problems encountered as part of the
assessment procedures
Suggestions to enhance/improve the assessment
process such as:
Topics for investigation
Recommendations for additional/different resources and/or support.
Details of resources used which can relate to:
Time needed by the Assessor for the assessment process (planning, conduct and
post- assessment activities)
Budget/s
Consumables.
Attendance rolls
In some cases there may be a need for the Assessor to complete an internal Attendance
Roll showing attendances and/or absences of candidates in relation to scheduled
assessment sessions.
Possible external requirements
External authorities, agencies and/or employers can also require Assessors to provide
information.
The information they require will be similar to the details
identified above with employers often making
enquiries/asking about:
The attitude, motivation, behaviour of their staff who are
engaged with the training/assessment
Trainer and Assessor input regarding the suitability of
certain employees for things such as:
Ongoing work for example, converting staff from casual to full-time or converting a
staff member from probationary to permanent
Promotion to different roles and responsibilities.
Attendance in terms of attending for training and for assessments.

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Processing of documents
Completed records may need to be:
Filed for future reference
Shared with others Trainers, other Assessors, administrators, nominated others
Forwarded to a designated person or department for their use or processing.

Evaluation of assessment environment used


Assessors should reflect on the assessment environments used by asking a series of
questions such as:
Did the assessment environment match the training environment?
Did the assessment environment reflect the workplace environment?
Was the assessment environment safe?
Was the location of the assessment environment convenient and accessible?
Were there any problems accessing assessment environments when required?
Did the assessment environment provide a secure/private location for the candidate?

Evaluation of resources used


Assessors must also spend time considering the resources they used to conduct the
assessments they applied.
Again the process needs to revolve around a series of relevant questions.
This consideration needs to take into account:
Were there sufficient resources available to enable the assessment to occur as planned?
Did Trainers allow Assessors access to resources used as part of the training process?
Did the resources reflect those used as part of the training process?
Were the resources reflective of what is used in industry?
Were the resources safe?
Was the budget sufficient to support the required level of assessment and, where
necessary, extra training where NYC decisions were made?

Evaluation of personal approach and orientation


This focuses on the Assessor and their performance in the total
assessment process.
Examination of this aspect must look at:
Was there sufficient communication with:
Trainers?
Other Assessors?
Employers?

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Did the Assessor communicate well with candidates and advise them suitable regarding
all relevant elements of the assessment process?
Did the Assessor create a safe and positive assessment environment for the
assessments which encouraged and supported candidate work?
Was the Assessor fair, approachable, honest and respectful when dealing with
candidates? Or was the Assessor biased, vindictive or prejudiced in the way they
handled the assessment of and/or dealings with certain candidates?
Was the Assessor professional in their approach in terms of:
Did they set up and prepare properly for each assessment?
Was sufficient time allocated to planning for assessments?
Did they use professional language when interacting with candidates?
Was their personal presentation and appearance appropriate and professional?

Evaluation of assessment activities/items and procedures used


Analysis/evaluation should consider:
Assessment methods used:
Were they appropriate to what needed to be assessed and the evidence which had
to be obtained in order to make the PC/NYC decision?
Were the methods cost-effective and time-effective?
Did the assessment methods used reflect what the candidates were told to expect?
Did they generate evidence which aligned with the Rules of Evidence and Principles
of CBA?
What aspects of the items used can be re-used next time or used elsewhere (or
modified) for use in the assessment of other Competency Standards?
Paper-based resources/assessment tools:
Were there sufficient copies of tests, written questions, assignments and similar to
ensure all candidates received a copy at the appropriate time?
Were there spelling mistakes or errors which need attention?
Did these documents genuinely reflect what the Trainer and Assessor told the
candidates they could expect in relation to the assessment that would be applied to
them?
Did the documents really assess the requirements of the Competency Standard as
identified in the planning stage of the assessment process?
Did the resources capture the evidence expected in order to allow/enable the
PC/NYC decision?

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Evaluation of assessment decisions


The evaluation needs to address
Was the correct decision made? Why, why not?
Would another Assessor come to the same
decision using the same evidence which was
captured?
Would the Assessor make the same decision in
12 months time when faced with the same
evidence? Why. Why not?
Is there a need to use alternative assessment strategies/methods to better obtain
evidence of competency on which to make the decision?
Was the PC/NYC decision communicated in a timely manner to relevant stakeholders?
Could the PC/NYC decision be justified when challenged/questioned? Why, why not?
Did employers/Trainers agree with the PC/NYC decision? Why, why not?

Communication of results and findings


Reasons to communicate
Findings and results are shared in order to:
Advise others of relevant issues identified during the process so:
Action can be taken to address them
Lessons can be learned for future reference.
Avoid making the same mistakes again it is
imperative any identified deficiency in
assessment is addressed and rectified next time
Demonstrate professionalism in the process by
engaging in self-reflection and evaluation of
personal performance which is indicative of
professionalism
Comply with policies requiring evaluation of assessments which may be imposed by
the Training Provider or external authorities
Maintain integrity of the evaluation process:
By scrutinising it and holding Assessors accountable for their decisions and for their
actions
In terms of supporting and informing the validation process.
Relevant persons
The results and findings of assessment evaluations may need to be shared with:
Trainers
Other Assessors
Employers.
The sharing process

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Where outcomes and findings need to be communicated the traditional ways of doing this
are:
Writing/publishing a report and disseminating among peers
Talking about the evaluation at staff and management meetings
Holding information sessions for groups of Assessors in which:
The methodology of the evaluation are described
Outcomes/findings are explained
Lessons learned as they will/might apply to practice are shared.
Conducting small group or one-on-one sessions with interested parties who have a
special interest in the findings or who have expressed interest in learning more and/or
applying what has been learned.

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Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You
must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the
project to your Trainer by the agreed date.

4.1 For a given ASEAN CATC Toolbox Competency, using provided templates, compile a
Master Assessor Assessment Portfolio to include:

1. Copy of the competency or evidence of where to locate a copy of the competency


2. Evidence that you understand the construction of an ASEAN competency standard,
and can identify what to assess in a competency standard
3. Evidence that you have knowledge of the difference between assessment methods
and an assessment tool
4. Evidence of your knowledge of the principles of assessment
5. Evidence of your Knowledge of the rules of evidence
6. Evidence of your ability to distinguish between Direct, Indirect and Supplementary
evidence
7. Copy of an assessment matrix for a given competency standard
8. A completed assessment strategy map
9. A completed recognition of prior learning (RPL) case study.
10. Evidence that you have conducted an assessment (within a time frame of between
20-30 minutes) to include:
A completed Assessment Decision Grid
Copy of 6 to 8 oral interview questions to be asked of the candidate
Copy of 6 to 8 written interview questions and answers to be asked of the
candidate
An Observation Checklist.

4.2 For the Competency used as the basis for Work Project 4.1 evaluate the assessment
and provide evidence you have:

Evaluated the assessment environment used


Evaluated the resources used
Evaluated the your personal approach and orientation
Evaluated the assessment activities/items and procedures used
Evaluated the assessment decision/s made.

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Summary
Implement assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard

When implementing assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard:


Recap the learning process
Obtain, review and learn about the Competency Standard to be assessed
Confirm the requirements of the Competency Standard to be assessed
Liaise with the Trainer/s
Determine the assessment approach to be taken and the assessment methods and tools to be
used
Develop an Assessment Plan, an Assessment Matrix and an Assessment Decision Grid as
appropriate
Use the assessment tools provided in the Toolbox or develop suitable alternatives
Schedule the assessment activities
Organise the assessment environment
Communicate and confirm assessment requirements with candidates and Trainers
Gather quality evidence during assessments
Observe the principles of CBA
Abide by the Rules of Evidence for Competency Based Assessment
Verify assessments with candidates before starting
Support candidates during assessments
Follow the Assessment Plan
Apply RPL where applicable
Make the assessment decision based on objective evidence
Capture additional evidence if required
Communicate and discuss the assessment decision providing feedback to candidates
Evaluate the assessment process and share the findings to learn lessons for future reference,
support validation processes and avoid repetition of previous mistakes.

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Element 5: Train National Assessors


5.1 Discuss the learning process
Introduction
An understanding of training/learning theory needs to underpin training of National
Assessors.
This section looks at essential elements those who are to implement this training need to be
aware of and apply in their practice.

Learning as voluntary behaviour


All Trainers must bear in mind learning is really voluntary behaviour.
People cannot be forced to learn.
For Trainers this means:
National Assessors will learn more effectively (quicker, deeper, better) if they want to
learn this means they have a need to learn
Trainers must motivate learners to learn if they do not voluntarily want to learn Master
Assessors must give National Assessors a reason to learn to stimulate this voluntary
behaviour.

The learning/training process


Learning/training can be seen as a process.
There are various ways to view and describe this process for example, in a work context:
1. Person has a need to learn
The individual has a need (motivation) to seek change.
They could be motivated by:
Money
Status
Knowledge
Survival
Promotion
Job enrichment.

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2. Person seeks a solution to their need to learn


The solution may require a change in:
Skill
Knowledge
Attitude.
3. Person learns
They may:
Engage in self-directed learning
Learn by reading, watching, doing and/or talking to others
Seek intervention/help from others.
A work colleague
A friend outside the workplace
A workplace Trainer
A teacher in formal training institution.

Learner characteristics and learning styles


Master Assessors must be aware of the fact National Assessors are individuals and
therefore unique.
Inherent in this orientation is realisation people can have different learning
styles/preferences.
Training delivery to adults is certainly not a case of one size fits all.
Training/learning theory stresses the need to:
Get to know the learner/s and their learning styles and preferences
Select and apply a range of different delivery strategies which match the identified
individual needs of the learner/s.
Over time various formal theories have emerged to assist Trainers achieve effective
outcomes.
At this stage it may useful to visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ek-i8NIYi_g (Kolbs
Learning Style Inventory & How To Use It Effectively: 8 mins 29 secs) to:
Identify Kolbs Experiential Learning Model and what it is based on
Learn about the four learning styles he identified in his inventory:
Accommodating
Assimilating
Converging
Diverging
Assist with completion of the Kolb Learning Style Profile.

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Barriers to learning
All training/learning situations may be impacted by barriers to learning.
Common barriers which need to be taken into account include:
The Trainer:
Trainer attitude is critical when delivering National Assessor training it is important
to be:
Positive
Approachable
Supportive
Open
Honest
Unbiased and unprejudiced.
Trainers must also be properly prepared:
Preparation for training is like an iceberg people only see the third above the
waterline, the other two thirds are below the water line
Lack of adequate planning and preparation by the Trainer is one of the biggest
barriers to learning.
The training environment:
The place where National Assessor training occurs must be appropriate
The venue must be appropriately equipped
Lighting must be adequate
Temperature must be comfortable
Distractions must be eliminated or minimised
The National Assessors:
Must have the necessary English language and
literacy skills and suitable numeracy skills
Must be ready, willing and motivated to learn
Needs to attend when required.

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5.2 Plan and prepare for delivery of National


Assessor training
Introduction
Implementation of all training can be seen as a three-stage process and the delivery of
National Assessor training is no different:
Planning and preparing the training covered in this section
Conducting the training covered in section 5.3
Evaluating training delivery covered in section 5.4
This section emphasises the importance of proper preparation identifying and discussing
and describing actions which need to be addressed.

The importance of this step


The first requirement when seeking to implement National Assessor training is to undertake
necessary planning preparation activities.
Proper planning and preparation is the basis of all successful and effective training.
Keys and important points to remember are:
It must precede all National Assessor training without exception
It must never be overlooked or ignored
The success or failure of training is determined before the Trainer even enters the
training environment
Proper Preparation Prevents Poor Performance
If you fail to plan, you plan to fail
Planning and preparation allows Trainers to:
Factor into their next session whatever
happened (or did not happen) in their last or
previous session
Accommodate legitimate feedback and
evaluation results into future training
Ensure all required content is covered
Sufficient and professional planning and preparation
for training gives the Trainer full knowledge about and immense confidence in relation to:
What they are going to deliver
What they are going to do
What they are going to say
How they are going to do things
How long things will take
What resources and materials they will need
How training will be assessed.

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Review of the Competency Standard


An important starting point prior is to review the Competency Standard for National Assessor
training.
Rationale
There is a need to do this in order to:
Confirm what the Unit is about refresh about the details and content in the Competency
Standard.
Ensure all aspects of the Competency Standard are covered
by the training provided
Identify and determine delivery of National Assessor training
to incorporate existing training and assessment qualifications
in own country.
Keys to the review process
Essential activities include:
Obtain a:
Soft copy of the Competency Standard which can be
obtained from www.ATPRS.org
Hard copy it is always good to have a paper-based copy
to refer to. Hard copies may be obtained from:
o The National Assessor toolbox Trainer Guide, Assessor Manual
o The training provider.
Read the document:
Allocate sufficient time to do this free from interruptions
Take notes of things which come to mind as the document is read:
Questions and issues which need to be followed up
References or contacts which immediately come to mind as being useful and
relevant
Content which is new, unknown or anticipated to be somewhat difficult to
research and or deliver.
Re-read it something more will always be gained from a second and third reading.
Note the nominal hours 35 hours
Spend some time looking at the detail provided under Unit Variables to:
Gain appreciation for how they align with Performance Criteria and Elements
Identify what is provided for and what is not there is a need to develop all content
where there is no entry for Performance Criteria under the heading of Unit Variables.

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Note the requirements and suggestions listed for assessment under:


Assessment Guide
Critical Aspects of Assessment
Context of Assessment
Assessment Methods.
Reflect on the Resources required:
To get a feel for where the training may need to take place
To start to understand what resources may be needed.
Think about the information presented in relation to Key Competencies:
To grasp the level of complexity of the Unit
To see how these key competencies might apply.
Follow-up
When the above has taken place it can be useful to:
Talk to the Training Provider/those organising the training:
About what their expectations and requirements are
To show interest in the work and professionalism in the approach.
Ask the Training Provider/those organising the training to:
Answer questions identified when reading the Competency Standard
Clarify queries about numbers and English language competency
Identify where training is to be delivered
Identify delivery parameters such as days, dates, hours, budget and other relevant
factors: see below
Provide names and contact details of other/previous Trainers who have conducted
National Assessor training
Identify resources and materials available to support/enable delivery.
Meet with previous Trainers who have delivered National Assessor training to talk to
them, learn from their experience, obtain tips and advice, and obtain resources and
materials which can be used.

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Identification of resources required


Classification of resources required
In terms of planning and preparation for delivery of National Assessor training it is worth
considering resources as being classified as:
Generic resources
Generic resources are those which exist in a normal classroom situation/standard training
environment.
They include:
Furniture, fixture and fittings
Desks and chairs
White boards and chalk boards
Data projectors and overhead projectors and screens
Computers and printers with relevant software/programs
Photocopiers
Consumables paper, ink, pens, whiteboard markers, overhead pens.
Competency-specific resources
These are resources specific to the National Assessor Competency Standard.
Examples include:
National Assessor toolbox materials
Notes and handouts for use during training
Blank forms/documents to be used by learners as the basis for creating their own, for
example, training plans and session plans
Samples such as examples of completed plans, assessment items and evaluations.
Determining the resources required for Toolbox delivery
The National Assessor Competency Standard has a very general overview of resources
required under the heading Resource implications.
In addition Trainers are advised to:
Read the Recommended training equipment section of the National Assessor Trainer
Guide
Visit the identified training room/location and view the facilities and equipment available
in those training rooms
Request copies of handouts and other paperwork used by previous Trainers who have
delivered National Assessor training
Check the library to see what other learning resources are available
Read the National Assessor Competency Standard again with a focus of trying to
better determine the resources required.

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Important further considerations


It is important to ensure:
Sufficient resources are available there will nearly always be
some need for learners to share certain resources and this
requirement needs to be factored into the session plans which
are developed but there will also always some basic minimum
number of items which are essential and without which the
training cannot take place
All resources are safe to use this is the single most critical
element relating to physical resources used for training
Resources are current they need to reflect the items used by Assessors in their
workplaces
Where an absence or shortage of necessary resources has been identified this must be
raised at the earliest opportunity with the Training Provider/those organising the training
to seek their help and advice about addressing the situation.

Identification of training methods/strategies


Trainers have the right and freedom to choose whatever training methods/strategies they
want when delivering National Assessor training.
Important issues
Important considerations when selecting training methods/strategies are that the options
chosen:
Should reflect any known learning preferences of the
learners this is ideally the case but often not
possible
Need to be appropriate to the content as it changes
throughout the Competency (that is, between
different Elements and Performance Criteria)
Must enable delivery to occur within known
parameters especially in relation to budget and
time
Should address and reflect the known assessment requirements
Should introduce diversity into the training and help motivate learners to help avoid
boredom
Must be able to be accommodate all the learners and not just some/a selected few
Have to reflect the availability of supporting physical resources
Will often be selected to best fit with individual Trainer:
Personality
Preference for teaching methods.

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Examples of options for training delivery


The following may be useful methods that can be used when delivering National Assessor
training.
Demonstration
This is a very popular method for practical tasks
It is very successful in situations where learners have to learn a new skill that can be
broken down into steps.
Standard advice to implement this training option is:
1) Give a short spoken overview of the whole skill
2) Demonstrate the whole skill silently and at normal speed
3) Demonstrate again, slowly, and describe each step
4) Check that the learners understand any new information
5) Observe the learners as they perform the skill
6) Check the learners performance meets the appropriate standards.
Note
Before beginning a demonstration ensure everything has been properly prepared for the
demonstration
Ensure personal competence in the skill being demonstrated so the skill will be
demonstrated correctly/properly
It is important to get it right first time the skill is demonstrated to:
Optimise learning
Enhance learner confidence in the Trainer
Build Trainer credibility.
Brainstorming
A very effective method to generate ideas about a
topic or for problem solving
Requires someone to function as a recorder
All ideas are recorded so the participants can see
them
There is no judgment of the ideas generated
Engages all participants.

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Role plays
Involve acting out a situation
They are a great learning tool for training where there is interaction between people
Role plays can be structured and non-structured
Observers are often provided (by the Trainer) with checklists to help provide constructive
feedback on the exchange/s and interaction/s
A debrief should be held to highlight the learning points of the role play.
Group discussion
This is a conversation between learners around a
set topic or issue
Learners discuss and record the groups
thoughts and answers to questions asked
Group may have a recorder and a
spokesperson
Good for increasing understanding of content
and concepts
Trainer needs to take care to ensure the activity involves all persons and is not
dominated by some or excludes others.
Questioning
Questions may be:
Asked by the Trainer a good Trainer asks more
questions than their learners
Asked by learners of the Trainer and of each other
Oral or written
Planned and structured to probe understanding of
identified issues and content
Used for clarification, understanding and assessment.
Techniques in effective questioning:
Ask the correct question
Ask the question correctly:
Put the question to the whole group
Pause
Nominate someone to answer
Pause
Respond warmly and encouragingly, or
Redirect the question.

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Use a mix of question types:


Open questions:
Assess understanding
Allow learners to give opinions
Start with how, what, why.
Closed questions:
Require only one word or very short answers
Used to check direct knowledge.
Target questions to elicit information about past experiences
Probe questions to probe for and seek more information on the topic
Hypothetical questions to:
Deal with made-up situations
Assist in case study work.
Settler questions to:
Settle learners at the start of a session
Set learners at ease.
Avoid:
Asking multi questions ask one question at a time
Asking leading questions do not indicate the answer required; do not give the
answer in the question.
Information in the Trainer Guide
It is useful to remember the Trainer Guide for National Assessor contains a brief explanation
of the following delivery methods:
Lecture and tutorial
Demonstration
Group discussions
Role play
Simulation games
Individual and group exercises
Case study
Field visit
Group presentation
Practice sessions
Games
Research.

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Establishment of delivery parameters


Overview
There are always delivery parameters applicable to the delivery of training.
These need to be identified as part of the planning process so they can be
accommodated by the preparations which are put in place.
Commonly advice and direction about these parameters will come from:
The Training Provider
Whoever is organising the training
The learners who are being trained to a far lesser extent.
Examples of training parameters
Training Provider/whoever is organising the training
They will set limitations and or requirements regarding the training delivery in terms of issues
such as:
Number of learners to be trained in the group
Number of hours allocated for delivery of the
training including assessment: this is necessary
for time-tabling, staff rosters (for Trainers and
Assessors) and for payroll purposes
Location where the classes are to be provided
Budget for:
Purchasing the resources to support delivery
Staffing.
Documentation to be used and or completed as part of:
Planning and preparation
Training delivery
Assessment
Reporting
Reviews and evaluations.
Need for Trainers and learners to align with:
Legislated requirements
ASEAN training protocols
Internal codes of practice.

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Learners
Learners may influence training parameters with reference to their:
Previous levels of skills, knowledge and experience
Preferences for learning
Individual differences and special needs training requirements
Availability to attend training (and assessment)
Capacity to pay.

Determination of learner numbers and profiles


Learner numbers
Need to identify expected numbers
Trainers must identify expected learner numbers as part of the planning process before
training delivery commences.
This must be done because:
It will impact the delivery techniques used
It will affect the quantity of resources required
It will influence the venue used for training delivery more learners will require more
room
It helps mentally prepare the Trainer for the amount of learners they will be dealing with.
Relevant issues
Remember:
Training Providers (or those who arrange the training) will usually set maximum numbers
for classes
They will often set a minimum number of learners required for a session without this
minimum number they will not be prepared to authorise delivery (usually because it is not
viable to do so)
Numbers in National Assessor classes can be expected to be in the range of 12 20 but
these may vary depending on circumstances.
Ways to identify numbers
The following generally applies:
Training Provider/the organisation arranging the
training will advise Trainers of numbers
Trainer may be required to recruit learners which
may involve:
Placement of advertising in the media
Undertaking promotional talks at NTOs
Meeting with organisations to encourage them
to send Assessors to training.
Learner profiles

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Learner profile refers to the overall composition of individual learners which will impact
training delivery it embraces:
Age and gender of learner
Language skills of the person
Experience and ability of the learner
Individual preferences for learning
Special needs.
Ways to identify learner profiles
The following options exist:
Undertake pre-entry testing the pre-entry testing (assessment or evaluation) can
address:
Theory
Practical
Meet with and interview individual learners as part of SOP and talk to them, asking
relevant questions to elicit information which will create the required profile
Talk to relevant others in the workplace where the Assessor is employed to obtain input
from them
Include questions on enrolment forms for applicants to present details of their personal
requirements and issues.

Preparation of relevant plans


Standard practice when planning for the delivery of training requires the preparation of
relevant plans.
There can be a need to prepare:
A learning/training plan
A learning/training program
Session plans.
Learning/training plan
The learning/training plan:
Draws together relevant information from different sources (Training Provider/whoever is
organising the training, Competency Standard, employer/s, learners) into one document
for ease of reference.
Provides a checklist to ensure all necessary information about proposed training delivery
for the Unit has been determined, has been obtained and can be used by the Trainer for
further planning and preparation
Is a summary document providing an overview of important details relating to the
delivery of the training, such as:

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Program name
Name of
(National Assessor Number of learners Purpose/aim/objectives
Organisation
training)

Qualification Competency Standard Learner profiles Program duration

Assessment Pre-requisites Resources Venue information

Administration People to be informed Safety Support required

Learning/training program
A Learning/training program is:
A series of individual training sessions
A sequence of training events.
The document will contain headings/sections as follows to help direct the thinking of the
Trainer as they plan and prepare for delivery:
Delivery schedule identifying number of training sessions/events
Content giving overview of what will be covered in each training session
Delivery method/s to be used attention should be paid to:
Varying strategies used to introduce interest and diversity into training
Ensuring they are relevant to and support learning of the content
Making sure resources exist to underpin/allow the selected delivery method to be
used
Assessment indicating activities to be used
Resources available/to be used listing resources, training materials and references
which can/will be used as part of the delivery.
Session plan
Key points about a session plan:
May be known as a lesson plan
A detailed description of each delivery session as identified in the training program
Each session shown in the learning/training program should have a session plan
prepared for it
Is a planning document developed by the Trainer, for the Trainer the learners do not
see them: the Trainer should develop whatever they want which suits their personal
needs and teaching style best
There are templates which can be used to develop these plans but the layout and
content of these plans is at the discretion of the Trainer.
Trainers should feel free to put whatever they want in these plans as they are only for
their personal use/reference.

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Integration of learning principles


Trainer must focus their planning and preparation for National Assessor training on
designing learning experiences integrating the principles of adult learning which:
Help learners become motivated
Build on existing knowledge and skills
Help learners effectively handle course information and experiences
Refer/relate to the previous experience/s of the learner
Help learners develop knowledge, skills, values and/or creative ideas
Explain rather than impose
Help learners transfer their learning to the application environment
Are relevant to their known/expected work
Are active rather than passive
Match the identified learning styles/preferences of learners
Reflect workplace operations, standards, practices, materials and parameters
Are safe and legally complaint
Feature practice and reinforcement
Allow for and provide feedback
Give reward for competency/success
Reduce or eliminate barriers to learning
Relate directly to:
The Competency Standard
The assessment which will be applied.
It is useful to bear in mind the following applies to how individuals learn:
They start by thinking to themselves
about a topic, issue or problem
They progress to exploration which
involves talking, discussing and active
listening
This then moves to crystallisation which
involves reading, writing and watching
The next stage is action characterised by
doing and practice.

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Scheduling of training
Scheduling of training refers to time-tabling the delivery of training.
Scheduling of training:
Refers to the dates and times of delivery of content as identified in the planning
documents (Learning/Training Plan and Training Program) the duration of the
scheduling must ensure the required content of the training can be delivered within the
scheduled time.
Remember, however:
CBT is not time-based
Training Providers may not allow the time indicated as Nominal Hours (35 hours) in
the National Assessor Competency Standard.
Gives starting and finishing times of
sessions/classes also (usually gives a venue for
the training as ability to deliver training is often
dependent on having access to certain
resources/rooms, equipment)
May be conducted any time on any day late at
night, early in the morning, on weekends, public
holidays, weekdays
Will wholly or in part be determined (or influenced) by:
Availability of resources, training spaces/rooms/venues
When learners can attend
Learner preferences for attending
Preferences of whoever is paying for the training to be provided/delivered
Public holidays, staff holidays, religious occasions and festivals
Levels of other business where learners are also employees: employers are
reluctant to release staff for training during busy times.

Preparation of resources for delivery


Basic options
Readying resources and materials to support training may necessitate:
Generating them from scratch
Revising existing materials that is, materials which have previously been used for
National Assessor training
Using again items which have been previously used and are suitable for re-use without
the need to make changes to them.

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Essential standards
It is vital to ensure in all of the above situations the resources/materials:
Reflect individual learner need learning style/preference and/or requirement for extra
content
Are current, comprehensive and accurate
Respond to special needs of different learner groups
Cover the specifics of the National Assessor Competency Standard
Can be created within the allowable budget
Wherever possible, can be re-used in other sessions and/or by other Trainers.
Advice by item
Resources which may need to be prepared will reflect the planning which has gone into the
training/session plan and could raise a demand to prepare:
Chalk boards or white boards in readiness for class/session use. This may require:
Obtaining and positioning boards
Cleaning them
Writing up (and covering) material
Obtaining chalk and/or markers
Obtaining dusters and/or cleaning materials.
Overhead projectors and acetate/overhead sheets
which may require:
Obtaining and positioning projector and screen
Obtaining spare globe and testing projector
Focussing projector to suit acetate sheets and position of projector
Preparing acetate sheets
Developing a stand-by plan in case OHP does not work
Practising with the OHP.
Also note:
Use of OHPs allows use of colour
Acetate sheets featuring fold out disclosures can be produced to enhance display
Choose from permanent or non-permanent marker pens
Frames can be bought or made to protect acetate sheets these are a good idea if
the plan is to use one/several sheets regularly as the frames stop them curling up
It is possible to photocopy onto acetate sheets and then project these images be
sure to use the correct type of OHP/acetate sheet or there may be damage to the
photocopier
Trainers may hand draw their own OH sheets, or computer-generate them and then
photocopy them onto an acetate sheet
They are very handy as Trainers can prepare acetate sheets at home/in advance and
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Ensure print is large enough for learners to read


Do not try to fit too much on the one OH/acetate sheet this is probably the most
common fault with overheads, especially where people photocopy a page of text from
a book/manual onto an overhead sheet.
Actual examples/samples:
These are very effective as training tools try to use the real thing whenever
possible
Make sure everything is known about it (whatever it happens to be) names of
parts, how things work and fit together, what buttons are used for, what is written in
all sections of a form/document
If it is a document there is a need to find out what all the parts, headings and
abbreviations mean, who fills in what, what goes where, where the document comes
from and where it goes to next in the sequence of things
Projects and exercises keys are:
Can be used as in-class reinforcement and
drill
Develop them to progress from simple
exercises to complex ones
Make sure all questions/exercises have
already been worked through and the
Trainer has sample answer/s together with
details of the working out for each
Must be relevant and not just a time-filler
Use known terms, names, abbreviations, policies, SOPs wherever possible to give
projects, practices and exercises relevance and realism
Use actual workplace documents, forms, reports and similar as the basis for what is
produced
Consider whether group or individual work on these is best both have a place, but
beware the learner who is prepared to let the others do the work but take the credit
Exercises are useful to fill in otherwise idle time when Trainer is spending time with
one learner and others have nothing to do having some sort of bank of exercises
constantly available for learners to work on is a good thing to have and obviously a
consideration when planning/preparing for sessions.
Videos/DVDs considerations are:
Consider commercially produced ones or make them in-house
Know how to use the VCR/DVD player in the training room and check to see it is
actually working
Position monitor/screen so everyone can see and have volume pre-set to what is
required
Cue video/DVD before class arrives to either the real start of the film or the particular
part of the DVD
It is OK to only show part of a video/DVD and not all of it
Ensure video/DVD has been pre-viewed so it can be properly introduced and to
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Consider preparing and distributing a question sheet to guide viewers through


it/focus their attention on what is being screened.
Demonstration in addition to what has already been provided and/or to reinforce it:
Make sure all the necessary items are available for the proposed demonstration so
learners have ready access to what they need
Check the equipment works and is safe
Consider providing a written set of instructions to supplement the demonstration.
Handouts:
Are useful when Trainers need to be sure learners go away with certain information
The Trainee Manual for National Assessor is essentially a mass of handouts
Computers have made this a very popular medium as they facilitate initial
production and allow easy updating and ease of printing
Consider using skeletal handouts where learners fill in missing words/steps
Keep the language appropriate to the knowledge level and language capability of the
learner
Be on guard for literacy problems that may impede things
Up-date handouts as the need dictates and/or on a regular basis.
Guest speakers points to note are:
These can be extremely useful they provide a new and knowledgeable face for the
learners to listen to, and a new and different learning resource
Be aware they can be an absolute disaster there are some very, very
knowledgeable, experienced and competent people who simply go to pieces when
asked to be a Guest Speaker: they can sometimes:
Wander all over the place in terms of what they say/present
Get flustered and lose focus
Lack credibility by virtue of their lack of presentation skills
Simply freeze in front of an audience/class.
They can be in-house personnel or people from anywhere outside as a Trainer
never be afraid of using a guest speaker because they are a valuable and legitimate
training technique.
Guest speakers do not just happen Trainers have to arrange them and:
Notify date, time and where to attend
Discuss with them how long they are expected to talk/demonstrate
Discuss what is to be covered by their attendance/participation never just leave
it to chance, or up to them to decide what to do, say or cover
Set the format of the session for example:
o Introduce them
o They talk/demo for 45 minutes
o Then there is a 30 minute Q & A session.

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Development and acquisition of training materials


The following options exist:
Produce them yourself as above
Purchase them from professional suppliers of training support materials
Use the National Assessor toolbox
Share them with other organisations
Seek government funding for their acquisition
Partner with industry and ask them to donate money/items.

Organisation of training environment


The physical environment and equipment needs to be prepared prior to training delivery to
create an environment conducive to learning. The following may need to be addressed:
Book the training venue if this is required to ensure availability as required
Ensure it is ready for use and is clean, attractive and inviting.
The Trainer may need to spot-clean and tidy after a
previous session.
Tables and chairs have been organised and arranged to
suit the needs of the session to reflect the
training/session plan
Air conditioning has been adjusted, where possible to
optimise comfort
Lights are operational and location of switches are known
Globes in overhead projectors are working and there is a spare globe
Video-tapes/DVD are cued and extension cords are available for items if needed and
the screen is placed where everyone can see it
As much as possible has been done to eliminate/minimise interruption and distractions
from outside sources so learner attention remains focussed on the training
Catering, where/if required, has been arranged tea, coffee, water: meals or
refreshments may be required in some cases/for lengthy training sessions
Checks have been made to ensure other required equipment and other resources are
present and in working order. A test run/operational check may be required.
If delivering training in a new, unfamiliar site try to visit the site beforehand to:
Determine what equipment and facilities are there and what will need to be provided
Ascertain physical location of things
Get a feel for the area to help visualisation of the actual delivery.
Never assume even the basics will be there, or be operational, in a different/someone elses
environment.

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5.3 Conduct National Assessor training


Introduction
Conducting National Assessor training should follow thorough planning and preparation as
described in section 5.2.
This section emphases the need to follow the plans which were prepared for the training,
looks at the use of resources provided as part of the National Assessor Toolbox, discusses
application of effective facilitation skills, and considers learner support and monitoring of
delivery.

Following plans
Reasons to follow the plans
The plans which were prepared for the National Assessor
training must be followed for the reasons given below doing
so means:
The Trainer will have confidence in the presentation and
delivery because they have planned and prepared and
know what they will be doing, what they are going to say
and where and when things are going to take place
The trainer can arrive at the training venue early and set up the area in advance for the
training and this will:
Instil even more confidence in the Trainer
Prove to the learners their training is important and effort has been put into it
Demonstrate to the learners the Trainer is ready and prepared
Allow the session to start on time.
The learners will benefit because the Trainer is more self-assured, confident and aware
of what is happening learners will sense the belief the Trainer has in themselves and in
the people they are training and this positive energy is contagious
The training will be delivered:
On time by the planned/required completion date/within the allocated hours
Within budget the preparation undertaken will have ensured all resources,
materials and consumables fit within the allocation of funds for the training.
All necessary content will be covered this may address:
Requirements as listed in the National Assessor Competency Standard
Obligation to include certain/nominated additional information, protocols,
documentation or terminology to make the training reflect workplace-specific needs,
wants and preference.

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Sufficient and required resources will have been ordered and/or will be available to
support the training this can relate to:
Infrastructure to enable chosen delivery methods to be used if the session plan was
to use a DVD then it stands to reason the DVD, the player and a screen will have
been available
Training materials for example:
If the plans identified there would be 20 learners then sufficient handouts would
have been prepared for this number
If plans identified practical work for 15, then the plans would have identified and
arranged for materials and consumables to cater for this amount.
Any arrangements made with other people (such as other Trainers and/or Assessors,
Guest Speakers) can be honoured because the plans will have indicated what is
required/what is going to happen.
Need to remain flexible
Even though the intention for Trainers is to deliver the training as planned there will
ALWAYS be situation where this is not possible.
A range of unpredictable issues can impact planned activities and cause a revision of plans
and/or other action to address/redress what has taken place.
Examples of issues
Actual delivery can be affected by:
Late or non-arrival of learners
Equipment breakdown or power failure
Learners having difficulty with the content being
presented
Plans not working as intended or expected for
example:
Learners not responding to or liking a particular
delivery method
An activity running over time
A Guest Speaker failing to arrive, or not covering the content they were asked to
Materials/consumables which were ordered for the class not being delivered for the
session
Negative interpersonal relationships between learners causing disruptions to the
training.

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Examples of action in response


Trainers must never ignore factors which impact on their delivery of this session.
They must always take whatever action is needed before the next session to effectively
address and resolve the situation. Solving these matters cannot be left to the Stage
3/Evaluation phase.
Depending on the issues the following may provide a suitable response often a
combination of responses is required:
Spend extra time out-of-class with learners to catch up on missed content and help
with understanding of certain topics or provide more one-on-one training or give an
opportunity for additional supervised practice
Schedule another training session this can require cooperation and goodwill from all
involved (and time provided free-of-charge by the Trainer) but is often a very effective
way of bringing plans back on track.
Generally speaking Training Providers/those who organise training will not pay for extra
time for Trainers to deliver make-up, remedial or catch-up classes. Employers are
likewise commonly reluctant to release employees for additional hours during their paid
working time.
Adjust subsequent plans which may (for
example) entail:
Altering original delivery technique to a
more time-effective method such as:
Replacing demonstration and practice
with lecture
Not using a Guest Speaker (which
traditionally occupies a deal of time) and
delivering the content they would have covered using handouts or chalk and talk
Limiting non-essential delivery methods which may allow reducing time
allocated for discussions, in-class research or group work.
Eliminating or reducing non-essential content listed in the session plans as being
planned for delivery content can often be classified as:
Must know content which MUST be delivered regardless of any factors or
constraints
Should know content which it is important for learners to be aware of
Nice to know content which can be presented if time allows: it is this area of
content which may be able to be removed from the plans.

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Use of Trainer Guide


The Trainer Guide can be used by the Trainer in the delivery of National Assessor training in
a limited manner.
It is of more use in the planning and preparation stage.
It can be used in training delivery to:
Remind Trainers in relation to critical Competency Based information such as details
regarding:
Relevant definitions competency, CBA, CBT
Active learning.
Provide alternatives for training methods if Trainer believes the planned strategies:
Cannot be applied due to issues arising/unexpected issues
Are not working such that learners appear to not be engaging with the planned
learning strategy listed in the session plan
Need to be changed to adjust the pace of delivery to keep the session running in
accordance with the plan for the class.
Give a reference point in relation to requirements of the Competency Standard to help
keep the class on topic
Assist in relation to use of the PowerPoint slides provided as part of all Toolbox
resources by:
Giving a hard copy presentation of all slides in terms of:
Public view as seen by learners on the screen
Presenter view the section of the slides only visible to the Trainer when using
the slide show
Providing instructions in how to use/operate the PowerPoints.

Use of Trainee Manual


Trainee Manuals need to be provided to all
learners as part of their National Assessor training
all trainees are entitled to a hard copy of their
own TM for them to keep and use as their own.
Copies can be obtained from:
www.ATPRS.org
The Training Provider/whoever is funding or
organising the training.

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The first session


The Manual could be distributed to learners as part of the first session when distributed the
Trainer should:
Give learners several minutes to look through it and get a general feeling for the contents
and layout
Tell learners the TM belongs to them and is theirs to keep
Provide an overview of the contents of the Unit as presented under Unit Descriptor in
the TM
Explain how learners can use the Assessment Matrix to help them reference content
when studying and preparing for assessments
Take time to explain the terms, phrases and acronyms as presented in the Glossary
Highlight the Recommended Reading section which learners can elect to use if they
want extra information from various sources.
On-going use of the TM
The Trainee Manual can be used by the Trainer when conducting training in the following
ways:
As a sole reference when conducting the training that is the Trainer may choose not to
use the PowerPoints which are provided and deliver training using the TM as the central
source and reference point this approach may be suitable where facilities for using
PPTs do not exist and/or in circumstances where the Trainer has decided chalk and talk
delivery is appropriate
To support the use of the Toolbox PPTs this approach can be used where:
The Trainer uses the PPTs as the primary method of delivery of content, screening
the slides as provided
The Trainer makes in-class reference to pages of the TM which learners can refer to
in- or out-of-class to gain additional information.
It can be reserved for private individual study for learners and not used at all during
classes while Trainer delivers the training using the PPTs
To explain assessment requirements in relation to the Work Projects listed in the TM.
When training delivery has been completed the Trainer should encourage learners to
complete and return the Trainee evaluation sheets which are situated at the rear of the TM
Trainer may choose to photocopy these pages and distribute them as handouts rather than
have learners tear them out of their own TMs.

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Use of PowerPoint presentations and Classroom Activities


Background to use of the PPTs
PowerPoint slides have been developed to support
delivery of National Assessor training.
The use of PPTs is optional but it is compulsory to
delivery all the content listed in the Competency
Standard this means Trainers can decide to:
Use none of the slides and use an alternative
delivery methods such as lecture, demonstrations,
and/or primary focus on and use of the TM as the
training reference
Use all of the slides as they are presented without change
Modify slides on the basis of:
Personal knowledge and or teaching style
Need for local and or workplace-specific content.
Use some of the slides but not others.
General use of the slides
Prior to training sessions
If using the PPT slides Trainers should:
Obtain the PPT slide presentation which can be obtained from:
www.ATPRS.org
The training provider/whoever is organising the training.
Pre-read and screen the slides so they are familiar with their content and decide which
slides will be used, create any new slides which are required and insert them into the
presentation
Take action to prepare for the Activities which are provided so they can be used during
sessions (if required).
Preparation in this regard may involve:
Developing exercises, role plays and specific activities as explained in the
Presenters view
Organising Guest Speakers
Obtain data projector and screen to enable showing of slides.
A pointer is also useful to indicate various sections on slides.
Practice using the data projector to gain competency in:
Changing slides
Moving between slides
Moving back and forwards
Focussing the slides
Reading the Presenters view.

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During training sessions


When using the slides during training Trainers should:
Arrive in advance of the learners and:
Set up the data projector and screen
Test run the data projector
Focus the image.
Screen the selected slides in the order determined in the planning stage standard
practice would be to:
Show the slides as provided in the Toolbox starting at Slide 1 and moving though
each consecutive slide until the end of the session is reached
Screen new slides which have been created to supplement those provided in the
Toolbox (where applicable)
Verbally explain the points shown on the slides which can be done by:
Referring to personal experience
Using the material provided in the Presenters view of the slides
Referring learners to nominated pages of the TM
Taking the points on the slides as the basis for class discussion.
Use of Classroom Activities listed in PPTs
Trainer can choose to:
Use the Activities as presented adapting and or interpreting them as best suits
particular needs
Ignore Activities as they see fit it some cases the Activities provided for may not be
able to be accommodated due to availability of resources, personnel or time
Add extra Activities to reflect additional content which has been added, or to provide
extra practice or learning opportunities for learners
Replace or substitute Activities with a different Activity which is more appropriate for
the group
Change or modify Activities again to better suit the needs of the situation or class
Re-locate position of Activities and use suggested Activities in a different position when
presenting the training.
Classroom Activities commonly include but are not restricted to:
Discussions
Guest Speakers
Handouts
Demonstrations
Practical Work
Role plays
Group work
Internet Research.

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Application of effective facilitation skills


Facilitation skills are the skills required by a Trainer to create and maintain a positive
learning environment which will encourage and optimise learning.
In relation to conducting training the following (may)
need to be considered:
Creating a positive and comfortable learning
environment which is conducive to learning
Involving and including the learners in decisions
made about the conduct of the class where
practicable to do so in order the learners feel
important, relevant and central to the process
Explaining the training and assessment plans so learners know at the outset what is
planned for them and what they are being expected to do
Setting and advising boundaries for the group in terms of what is acceptable and what
is unacceptable in relation to participation, language, behaviour, commitment,
submission of work
Expressing expectations for the group in terms of their attendance, engagement,
outcomes, results
Providing relevant motivation to learning at the outset of the program and individual
sessions
Engaging with and working with learners before, during and after training sessions
Developing rapport and good working relationships with the group
Monitoring group participation and interaction with:
Each other
Training content
Training methods and activities.
Intervening as required when sub-optimal conditions/circumstances are identified
which may require:
Altering planned delivery, activities, timing or other factors
Talking to, warning, or separating learners who are creating disruption for others or
who are causing a problem for training delivery
Modifying the training conditions or environment.
Controlling the delivery of the session so that:
Identified content is covered
Training finishes on time
Learners feel safe, respected, challenged and engaged.

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Learner support
There is a strong link between facilitation skills; (above) and learner support described here
in many cases there is a blurring of boundaries between these concepts.
Learner support differs from facilitation as it is targeted at an individual learner (or group/sub-
set of learners) rather than something undertaken to support the entire group of learners, as
a whole.
Examples of activities which can provide learner support therefore could be:
Determining individual leaner characteristics, styles
and preferences and responding to them/including
them as part of training delivery
Preparing individual learning plans for certain
learners who have been identified as having
special needs or a particular need for extra attention
Providing one-on-one additional training for
individuals in situations (for example) where:
Learners have missed a session
Learners appear to be struggling with content
Learners have requested extra help.
Supplying regular/ongoing verbal and non-verbal feedback to individuals in- and out-of-
class on their progress, success and effort/s.

Monitoring of delivery
Monitoring of actual training delivery must include a combination of all of the following on a
regular and ongoing basis:
Checking timing/pacing of delivery against session plan in order to:
Finish session on time
Cover content identified for the session.
Observing the learning environment to:
Maintain safety
Keep it conducive to learning.
Watching interpersonal relationships between learners so action can be taken as
appropriate/required to:
Defuse problems
Facilitate positive connections.
Controlling the process by:
Managing access to resources
Administering/supervising activities and practice
Directing and limiting actions.
Determining learning of individuals through:

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Observation
Questioning
Testing.
Assessing suitability of:
Training resources used
Teaching methods employed.
Seeking feedback from learners on:
Their individual requirements current and future
Issues arising
Their thoughts on the relevancy, effectiveness and appropriateness of the training
Readiness for assessment.

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5.4 Evaluate National Assessor training


Introduction
Professional delivery of National Assessor training does not end when delivery of the
sessions has finished.
This section indicates the need for completion of relevant documentation, underscores the
need for and importance of undertaking evaluation of the training highlighting the areas
which need to be addressed and provides examples of how evaluation may be approached.

Completion of required training records


Context
Training records may include documentation relating to:
Delivery of the National Assessor training
Assessment of National Assessors who have been trained.
Documentation may need to be completed:
By the Assessor on their own
In conjunction with the Trainer
After each session
At the end of each training program/course.
Completed records may need to be:
Filed for future reference
Shared with others Trainers, Assessors, administrators, nominated others
Forwarded to a designated person or department for their use or processing.
Documentation
On finalisation of training there can be a need to complete the following:
Budget-related documents identifying:
Materials, resources, consumables used in a class/program
Expenditure on other items to support delivery of a class/program
Attendance rolls to record names of learners and their attendance at each session.
Rolls should also be marked to indicate:
Late arrival of learners
Learners who departed before class finished/was dismissed.
Staffing documentation for specific classes/programs identifying:
Hours worked start and finish times
Days/dates worked
Overtime.

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Workplace training reports where training occurs in a workplace there can be a need to
complete a standard report which details issues such as:
Material/content covered
Progress of individual learners
Problems encountered with learners in terms of issues
including:
Attendance
Behaviour
Motivation
Performance
Attitude.
Availability of equipment and supporting materials/resources
Assistance received from employees/the organisation in
relation to facilitating training delivery
Identification of:
Future training-related needs including need for TNAs to be conducted, need
for cross-skilling/multi-skilling, need for refresher training and/or top-up training,
need for purchase of significant resources
Topics for future training
Problems/issues arising.
Trainer reports there can be a need for a regular report to be completed which:
Addresses resource requirements and condition/state of existing resources
Suggests changes to improve training delivery
Identifies additional training opportunities
Provides statistical data on:
Numbers trained
Number of hours delivered
Number of programs delivered
Start and completion rates
Ratio of Pass Competent to NYC achieved.

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Evaluation of training environment used


Trainers should consider the questions set out below:
Was there an appropriate level of assistance in terms of:
Administration support?
If not, perhaps Trainer needs to do more, or obtain extra administrative help.
Provision of information/data on which to develop training, training plans and
programs?
If not, action needs to be taken to ensure future sessions are underpinned by
sufficient detail so there may be a need to:
Ask more questions about learners
Add more/different questions to enrolment forms for applicants to respond to
Interview future participants.
Funding, staffing and physical resources?
If not this might indicate a need to:
Seek more funding
Apply for grants
Ask for donations
Share resources with others.
Were the physical facilities:
Appropriate to the type of training being delivered?
If not, there may be a need to:
Acquire more resources and/or up-date the
resources
Change training venue to a more suitable one.
Large enough?
If not, it may be possible to:
Train learners in smaller groups
Re-locate to a larger place.
Conducive to learning?
If not, it may be possible to:
Make the location quieter
Adjust lighting and/or heating/air conditioning
Restrict access by others to the training area.
Able to support the training required strategies and/or preferred learner learning
preferences?
If not it may be possible to:
Change training methods
Obtain necessary infrastructure.

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Evaluation of resources used


In this context resources refers to materials used by the Trainer to facilitate the learning
process such as:
Trainee Manuals
PowerPoints
Handouts used/developed by the Trainer
Guest Speakers chosen/used by the Trainer
Activities (such as role plays, case studies and exercises) developed and used by the
Trainer as part of demonstrations, practice/drill.
Attention needs to focus on:
Making sure information/data contained is
accurate
Ensuring content is comprehensive
Checking there are no spelling or grammatical
errors
Making sure content of resources remains legal
(that is, information has not been rendered illegal as a result of new/changed legislation)
Verifying users/stakeholders deem the resources suitable and appropriate.
Any problems or discrepancies in resources need to be addressed which may mean:
Up-dating notes/resources in terms of relevant issues
Correcting mistakes and omissions
Revising content on basis of:
Legitimate feedback received
Changed legislation
New/different industry or workplace practice.
Changing the type of resources to better represent
requirements of training delivery/strategy and/or
learner preferences
Obtaining new or additional resources.

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Evaluation of personal approach and orientation


This focuses on the Trainer and their performance.
Examination must look at:
Training methods, in-class strategies and styles:
How effective were they?
Did learners like them or detest them?
Were they conducive to learning?
With the benefit of hindsight, were they really appropriate?
Did sessions try to cover too much? Or not enough?
Personal subject knowledge and skill levels of the Trainer:
Are they sufficient/appropriate?
Do they reflect current practice/competency?
Does the Trainer need training?
Should a Guest Speaker/Trainer/Lecturer be used?
Personal enthusiasm and interest levels of Trainer:
Do they remain passionate?
Is motivation required?
What is causing the lack of zeal?
Relationship and rapport of Trainer with learners:
How did they relate to individual learners?
Were they fair?
Were they approachable?
Did they respect and value learners?
General professionalism of the Trainer in terms of:
Did they set up and prepare properly for each session?
Was sufficient time allocated to preparation and planning for training?
Did they use professional language when interacting with learners?
Was their support for employers and their objectives?
Was their personal presentation and appearance appropriate and professional?

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Evaluation of content
It is important to review the content that has been delivered and feed the findings through to
appropriate country bodies so future National Assessor training can be amended to better
reflect emerging ASEAN need as relevant issues are identified.
To evaluate content the following can be useful:
Undertake regular analysis of content at least every
three years is considered a standard
Use of a representative cross-section of trainers and
assessors as the reference point for determining
relevancy, currency, legitimacy and other applicable
factors
Liaise with industry (individual employers, employer
groups, peak industry bodies, government agencies)
on an on-going basis to stay in touch with
current/changing practice for example through bodies such as:
Industry Reference Groups
Industry Advisory Boards.
Conduct practical comparisons (say, every three years) between the National Assessor
Competency Standards and training and assessment curriculum documentation from
other countries which also use CBT.

Methods of evaluation
The total evaluation process will embrace both the 'process' of the training itself (the nuts
and bolts of the actual training process) as well as the 'product' of the training (the results of
the training).
The sources of information which will form the basis for the evaluation, and the techniques
used to capture it, will vary depending on the aim of the evaluation.
In addition to what has been identified above the following provide valid and valuable
sources of relevant feedback for the purposes of evaluating training delivery.
Trainee Feedback form
The following form can be used (or adapted) to capture feedback from learners. It may be
applied:
At the end of every session
On completion of selected classes
Following completion of a training program.

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Feedback Form

Session: Date:

Please tell us how you rate your training experience ranking in order 1 (below expectations) to 6
(exceeded expectations). Please feel free to add comments or suggestions. Thank you for your
feedback.

Area Comments or suggestions

Relevance of the training to the company


1 2 3 4 5 6

Relevance of the training to your position


1 2 3 4 5 6

Relevance of the training to your career


1 2 3 4 5 6

Quality of the material presented


1 2 3 4 5 6

Trainer demonstrated good knowledge


1 2 3 4 5 6

Trainer developed good rapport with you


1 2 3 4 5 6

Were training objectives achieved?


1 2 3 4 5 6

Will the learning be of benefit to you In what ways?


1 2 3 4 5 6

Overall satisfaction with the training


1 2 3 4 5 6

Most useful part of the training:

Least useful part of the training:

Most useful part of the training:

Least useful part of the training:

Other comments or suggestions:

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Observation Checklist
This can be used by a trusted friend, colleague or another Trainer to provide feedback on
listed aspects of the training.

Observer Checklist

Trainer: Date:

Observer: Session:

Preparation and set-up Y N Comments

Was a session plan prepared that was clear with a learning


outcome, sequence and timing of activities, method of
delivery, resources and handouts?

Was a task breakdown prepared showing a clear, step-by-



step description of the procedure?

Did the trainer set-up the environment, equipment and


other resources so that safety was ensured and the learner

could easily see what the trainer was doing throughout the
session?

Structure

Introduction Did the trainer:

Clarify the purpose of training and the learning outcome/s

Check the foundation knowledge and needs of the learner



using an appropriate choice of questions or other strategies

Give an session overview

Provide housekeeping information appropriate to the



session

Body Did the trainer:

Demonstrate a skill professionally (silently, at normal



speed)

Demonstrate step-by-step, clearly explaining each step,



without going back

Let the learner practice the skill, giving guidance only as



necessary

Let the learner practice at least once independently

Summarise key learning points and discuss readiness for



assessment

Assess learners achievement of learning outcome

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Conclusion: Did the trainer:

Revisit the learning outcome?

Give encouraging feedback?

Clarify the future: what happens next?

Delivery

Throughout the training session did the trainer manage the learning environment by:

Speaking clearly using plain English, no slang or



unnecessary jargon?

Use questions effectively and appropriately?

Listen actively and respond appropriately?

Give clear, specific feedback?

Support the learner throughout the session, identifying and



responding to needs where appropriate?

Monitor learning throughout the session and modify the



plan where appropriate to ensure effective learning?

Monitor OH&S issues to ensure safety throughout the



session?

In general

Did the trainer manage time well to cover planned



activities?

Was the training approach appropriate for the learner?

Did the trainer use resources and props effectively?

Feedback to trainer

Trainer signature: Date:

Observer signature: Date:

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Self-Evaluation and Reflection


The following (or some alternative with a different focus set) can be used to assist Trainers
evaluate and reflect on their own training delivery:

Self evaluation and reflection

Name:

ASEAN Competency

Explain how you felt


about your performance
in the trainer/facilitation
role.

What benefits have you


gained from the role/s?

What aspects of the


session did you feel went
well?

What aspects of your


delivery do you feel need
attention?

Explain the ways in


which you could improve
the session for next time.

What have you learned


from your experience?

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In addition Trainers could consider:


Using the Trainee Evaluation Sheets provided at the end of every National Assessor
Trainee Manual
Undertaking self-evaluation by keeping a journal/diary of individual training practice
and reflecting on what is recorded
Asking for personal feedback from other Trainers, from learners or from another trusted
friend
Video/audio-taping in-class performance for later analysis
Getting other Trainers to sit in on sessions and verbally give their opinion without using
a formal/structured feedback sheet or checklist
Analysing the results of assessments to identify whether or not there is a consistent
problem with learner competency in one area which may indicate a deficiency/issue with
training provision on that topic.

Communication of outcomes and findings


In some/many cases Trainers will keep the results/findings of evaluations to themselves as
they often have utility only to the Trainer who performed the evaluation.
In other cases lessons will be learned which can and should be shared with others.
Where outcomes and findings need to be communicated the traditional ways of doing this
are:
Writing/publishing a report and disseminating among peers
Talking about the evaluation at staff, management and other meetings
Holding information sessions for groups of Trainers in which:
The methodology of the evaluation are described
Outcomes/findings are explained
Lessons learned as they will/might apply to practice are shared
Conducting small group or one-on-one sessions with interested parties who have a
special interest in the findings or who have expressed interest in learning more and/or
applying what has been learned.

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Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You
must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the
project to your Trainer by the agreed date.

5.1 Prepare and present a 10 minute verbal presentation which presents an overview of
adult training/learning theory.

5.2 Provide nominated simulated training for National Assessors including, as agreed with
the Trainer:

Preparation of nominated planning documents


Prepare two Session Plans
Deliver a 45 60 minute training session demonstrating training plan
methodology and providing examples of incorporation of the National Assessor
ASEAN Toolbox Resource into training delivery
Supply an evaluation of the training session by providing completed feedback
forms from participants, a completed observer checklist and a completed self-
evaluation and reflection sheet.

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Summary
Train National Assessors

When training National Assessors:


Recap the learning process
Review the Competency Standard
Identify, prepare and/or acquire resources required
Select a mix of suitable training strategies
Preview the National Assessor Toolbox resources
Establish delivery parameters
Determine learner numbers and profiles
Prepare a learning/training plan
Develop a learning/training program
Create sessions plans for every training session
Integrate adult learning principles into training delivery/practice
Organise the training environment
Conduct training as planned but remain flexible
Use National Assessor Toolbox resources to support delivery as preferred/planned
Apply effective facilitation skills
Provide learner support
Monitor actual training delivery
Complete necessary training documentation and records
Evaluate all aspects of training provision and delivery.

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Presentation of written work

Presentation of written work


1. Introduction
It is important for students to present carefully prepared written work. Written presentation in
industry must be professional in appearance and accurate in content. If students develop
good writing skills whilst studying, they are able to easily transfer those skills to the
workplace.

2. Style
Students should write in a style that is simple and concise. Short sentences
and paragraphs are easier to read and understand. It helps to write a plan
and at least one draft of the written work so that the final product will be
well organised. The points presented will then follow a logical sequence
and be relevant. Students should frequently refer to the question asked, to
keep on track. Teachers recognise and are critical of work that does not
answer the question, or is padded with irrelevant material. In summary,
remember to:
Plan ahead
Be clear and concise
Answer the question
Proofread the final draft.

3. Presenting Written Work


Types of written work
Students may be asked to write:
Short and long reports
Essays
Records of interviews
Questionnaires
Business letters
Resumes.

Format
All written work should be presented on A4 paper, single-sided with a left-hand margin. If
work is word-processed, one-and-a-half or double spacing should be used. Handwritten
work must be legible and should also be well spaced to allow for ease of reading. New
paragraphs should not be indented but should be separated by a space. Pages must be
numbered. If headings are also to be numbered, students should use a logical and
sequential system of numbering.

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Presentation of written work

Cover Sheet
All written work should be submitted with a cover sheet stapled to the front that contains:
The students name and student number
The name of the class/unit
The due date of the work
The title of the work
The teachers name
A signed declaration that the work does not involve plagiarism.

Keeping a Copy
Students must keep a copy of the written work in case it is lost. This rarely happens but it
can be disastrous if a copy has not been kept.

Inclusive language
This means language that includes every section of the population. For instance, if a student
were to write A nurse is responsible for the patients in her care at all times it would be
implying that all nurses are female and would be excluding male nurses.
Examples of appropriate language are shown on the right:

Mankind Humankind

Barman/maid Bar attendant

Host/hostess Host

Waiter/waitress Waiter or waiting staff

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Recommended reading

Recommended reading
NCVER PUBLICATIONS
The following are available from the National Centre for Vocational Education Research at
NCVER, All publications, 2014,
http://www.ncver.edu.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/pubs/menu/search/!ut/p/a1/04_Sj9CPykssy
0xPLMnMz0vMAfGjzOI9DY2cPTxMDLwszB3NDDzNTQ1DDQIMDAxCTYEKIoEKAjzczYyc
QAo8fA0MPP2Cg9x8XYONDQzMiNNvgAM4GhDSH64fBVaCywVm5lAFuMzwNSVgAsgPY
AV4HFmQGxphkOmZDgCzBoES/dl5/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh/?hitstart=682&term=all
viewed 27th of May, 2014
See also www.ncver.edu.au/.
(1) Competency Based Training

Structures in tertiary education and training: a kaleidoscope or merely fragments?


Research readings 24 Jun 2013

In this eclectic collection of papers, 13 essayists and four high-profile discussants consider
the complexity of the tertiary education system and its underlying structures.

VET and the diffusion and implementation of innovation in the mining, solar energy
and computer games sectors 30 Aug 2011

This report examines the linkages between innovation and skills development in vocational
education and training (VET) across three industry sectors: mining, solar energy and
computer gaming.
Using a case study approach, the research finds that each of the industry sectors differs in
their relationship between innovation and the education and training system. However, the
formal VET system is seen as being very important in teaching the underlying skills and
knowledge of a vocation.
In contrast, informal on-the-job learning imparts the actual skills for innovation, but based on
what was learnt formally. The VET system is seen as being slow in responding to new skills
needs; however, whether this represents a bad thing is debatable.

Responding to changing skill demands: training packages and accredited courses 2


Dec 2010

This report looks at whether vocational education and training (VET) is equipped to meet the
changing needs of the modern workplace.

Some ideas from England: A practitioner's perspective 9 Jul 2009

This paper was presented by Robin Shreeve at the NCVER Research on Toast seminar in
March 2009.
It briefly compares the vocational education and training (VET) sector in Australia with its
equivalent in England, which is known as the skills or further education sector.
The paper then outlines two key aspects of the English VET sector which might be of use to
Australia: using course completion rates as a key performance measure at all levels of the

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VET sector; and using vocational 'foundation degrees' as a way for students to articulate
between the VET and higher education sectors

Competence and competency-based training: What the literature says 12 Jun 2009

This literature review provides a historical account of the development of competency-based


training in Australia and summarises the issues arising from the range of reviews conducted
on elements of the national training system.
The review was commissioned by the National Quality Council and originally published on its
website.

Employer engagement with the vocational education and training system in


Australia 9 Apr 2009

This paper is a review of literature on employer engagement with vocational education and
training (VET).
The main conclusion is that the major form of engagement is through the competency-based
training system, which is manifested through training packages. Another way employers are
encouraged to engage with VET is through competition amongst training providers. This
provides employers with greater responsiveness and choice.

Getting the knowledge-skills mix right in high-level vocational education and training
qualifications 12 Feb 2009

This paper aims to contribute to the discussion on the quality and accessibility of
underpinning knowledge in competency-based training. It uses the Vocational Graduate
Certificate and the Vocational Graduate Diploma in Education Design in a Queensland TAFE
institute to examine how the 'traditional' knowledge and theory associated with higher-level
qualifications can be accommodated within the framework of competency-based training and
assessment.
The paper raises some interesting, and provocative, questions about the status and value of
these qualifications by comparison with their university counterparts.

Creating place: Design education as vocational education and training 16 Sep 2008

Design is an increasingly important component of our world-at-work. This project reveals the
views of design educators working within vocational education and training (VET).
Research participants called for a review of design education teaching methods in the VET
context, with a particular focus on promoting innovation and creativity in diploma level
programs.

Accelerated apprenticeships: Apprentice, employer and teaching staff perceptions 8


May 2008

This research examined recent pilots of accelerated apprenticeships in the automotive


industry in Queensland.
Interviews with apprentices, employers and teachers showed that the traditional model is still
well regarded. It is not failing, but does require evolutionary change.

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Effective models of employment-based training 8 May 2008

Australia needs highly skilled workers to sustain a healthy economy. Current employment-
based training models have limitations in meeting the demands for highly skilled labour
supply.
The research explored current and emerging models of employment-based training to
propose more effective models at higher VET qualifications that can maintain a balance
between institution and work-based learning.
(2) Competency Based Assessment

Lessons and challenges: Vocational education in schools - Research overview 21 Dec


2005

A stocktake of issues and activities in vocational education and training in schools through
the perspectives of the published literature and policy documentation between 1997 and
2003 is the subject of this report.
It identifies progress made and concludes that vocational programs in schools are meeting
expectations and have achieved a legitimate place in the school curriculum, but that several
implementation issues remain

Assessing and certifying generic skills: What is happening in vocational education


and training? 5 Sep 2003

Assessing generic skills in a selection of training packages is the focus of this report. Based
on case studies, the authors also examine how these skills are understood by trainers and
learners. The report contains a comprehensive literature review of assessment of generic
skills.

The development of quality online assessment in vocational education and training:


Volume 1 13 May 2003

The use and potential of online assessment is investigated in this report. It identifies: *the
principles of quality assessment *assessment practices that can be supported with online
technologies *methods and tools that work *factors that influence choice and design on
online assessment methods.
The report is published in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main report and volume 2 contains
the appendices and is available in PDF format only.

Graded assessment in vocational education and training: An analysis of national


practice, drivers and areas for policy development 14 Jan 2003

Graded assessment in Australian vocational education and training has developed a range
of practices.
This study examines the current practice for graded assessment and identifies policy issues
that need to be addressed. Areas studied include validity, reliability and consistency,
associated costs, and cross-sectoral concerns.

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Improving the validity of competency-based assessment 15 Aug 2001

This study considers the status of validity in the context of the assessment of VET in
Australia.
The project has involved reviewing the literature, reporting the outcomes of case studies,
presenting the key findings and developing a diagnostic tool to guide assessors.

The changing role of staff development for teachers and trainers in vocational
education and training 5 Jul 2001

This report analyses the changing parameters of staff development that are emerging from
the changing environment of VET in Australia.
It illuminates the changed structure of the VET workforce and the differentiation of the roles
of practitioners across different types of registered training organisations and it identifies the
implications of such changes for the future design of staff development.

Not just falling over the line? A snapshot of competency-based assessment 11 Jun
1999

This report explores whether competency-based assessment is meeting the needs of its
users. The researchers found that a number of issues were raised by those consulted in the
project.
These included grading (the need to bridge the gap between competence and excellence),
the quality of competency standards and their treatment of underpinning knowledge, who are
appropriate assessors, and what resources are needed to support assessment. The report
puts forward strategies to improve competency-based assessment. These strategies are
directed at policy-makers, ITABs and registered training organisations.

Assessing in VET: Issues of reliability and validity - Review of research 11 Jun 1999

This review of research reviews both the Australian discussion papers on reliability and
validity of competency-based assessment as well as international empirical research in this
field.
The review discusses two types of competency-based assessment - paper-based objective
testing techniques and performance assessments as well as the implications for validity and
reliability of each type of assessment. The review includes guidelines for establishing
procedures to enhance reliability and validity.

The 'grade' debate: Should we grade competency-based assessment? 11 Jun 1996

Deals with the pros and cons of 'grading', that is, assessing and reporting levels of
performance in competency-based VET.
Existing policies and practices are examined in the light of current practices. A must for all
those involved in competence-based assessment.

Key aspects of competency-based assessment 11 Jun 1995

A collection of papers for a wide audience within the VET sector who are tackling the issue
of assessment and RPL in the workplace.
Includes: research in competency-based assessment (CBA); assessment of knowledge,
attitudes and values; peer; self- assessment; and needs of special workers.

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OTHER RESOURCES
http://lrrpublic.cli.det.nsw.edu.au/lrrSecure/Sites/Web/13289/resources/competency_based.h
tm - Containing lists and links of useful publications and websites
http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/funded-agency-channel/management-toolkit/workforce/education-
and-training/types/competency-based-training-and-assessment - What is Competency
Based Training? What is a unit of competency? What is Competency Based Assessment?
http://www.training.qld.gov.au/resources/employers/pdf/competency-based-guide.pdf -
Competency Based Training and assessment: A guide for employers, apprentices and
trainees
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/training/employers/apprentices/pages/competencyfaq.aspx -
Competency Based Completion: FAQs
http://www.avetra.org.au/abstracts_and_papers_2000/rb_full.pdf - Abstracts and papers on
CBT and CBA
Rothwell, W.J., & Graber, J.M., 2010, Competency-Based Training Basics, ASTD Press,
Alexandria, VA.

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Trainee evaluation sheet

Trainee evaluation sheet


Train the Trainer ASEAN Master Assessor
The following statements are about the competency you have just completed.

Dont Do Not Does Not


Please tick the appropriate box Agree
Know Agree Apply

There was too much in this competency to cover


without rushing.

Most of the competency seemed relevant to me.

The competency was at the right level for me.

I got enough help from my trainer.

The amount of activities was sufficient.

The competency allowed me to use my own


initiative.

My training was well-organised.

My trainer had time to answer my questions.

I understood how I was going to be assessed.

I was given enough time to practice.

My trainer feedback was useful.

Enough equipment was available and it worked well.

The activities were too hard for me.

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Trainee evaluation sheet

The best things about this unit were:

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

The worst things about this unit were:

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

The things you should change in this unit are:

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

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Trainee self-assessment checklist

Trainee self-assessment checklist


As an indicator to your Trainer/Assessor of your readiness for assessment in this unit please
complete the following and hand to your Trainer/Assessor.

Train the Trainer ASEAN Master Assessor

Yes No*

Element 1: Identify operational context

Explain background of the ASEAN Mutual Recognition Arrangement on


1.1
Tourism Professionals (MRA-TP)

1.2 Describe elements of MRA-TP

1.3 Define Competency Based Training and Assessment

1.4 Characterise role of ASEAN assessor

Element 2: Identify the ASEAN Regional Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition
System

Identify Qualifications available under the ASEAN Regional


2.1
Qualifications Framework and Skills Recognition System

2.2 Explain concept of Packaging Rules to develop ASEAN qualifications

Element 3: Identify ASEAN toolbox resources

3.1 Name Labour Divisions to which ASEAN toolboxes apply

3.2 Identify unit titles of ASEAN toolboxes

3.3 Describe assessment-related elements of an ASEAN toolbox

Element 4: Implement assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard

4.1 Detail competency standard assessment requirements

4.2 Plan and prepare for assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard

4.3 Conduct assessment of an ASEAN Competency Standard

4.4 Evaluate an ASEAN assessment

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Yes No*

Element 5: Train National Assessors

5.1 Discuss the learning process

5.2 Plan and prepare for delivery of National Assessor training

5.3 Conduct National Assessor training

5.4 Evaluate National Assessor training

Statement by Trainee:
I believe I am ready to be assessed on the following as indicated above:

Signed: _____________________________ Date: ____________

Note:
For all boxes where a No* is ticked, please provide details of the extra steps or work you
need to do to become ready for assessment.

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