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Version Prepared by Contributors Reviewed by

Ahmed Al Qalam
Yousef Al Jabri
AbdulSalam Mohammed
draft 0.1
rd Planning Dept Hebah Al Maimani Tariq Riaz Khan
23 Nov 2014
Mahmound Awlad Thani
Khalil AL-Mandari
Salam Mohmd
Tariq Riaz Khan
Ahmed Al Harthy
draft 0.2 Ahmed Al Qalam
th Planning Dept Shouqi Al Balush
30 Nov 2014 Yousef Al Jabri
Said BaniOraba
Shaima AL Maani
draft 0.3 Ahmed Al Qalam Tariq Riaz Khan
th Planning Dept
11 Dec 2014 Yousef Al Jabri Hamed Al Maghderi
draft 0.4 Ahmed Al Qalam
th Planning Dept
15 Dec 2014 Yousef Al Jabri

Approval

CEO date

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Preface 0


P R E FA C E
The Rural Areas Electricity Company (RAEC) has a duty to provide electricity, and in some locations
potable water, to rural areas throughout the Sultanate of Oman. The company was established
through the unbundling of the sector in 2005, previously under the Ministry of Electricity and Water,
following Royal Decree 78/2004. RAEC operates alongside four other distribution companies, the
transmission company of Oman and several independent power and water producers.

RAEC is unique in that it covers power and water production, transmission, distribution and supply
activities in many isolated areas in various terrains and climatic conditions.

This Capability Statement provides key information on the companys networks, generation and
production facilities, current investment projects and future plans for development. It is intended
to enable the reader to gain an understanding of our activities, some of the technical parameters of
our operation, and the capability of our networks to accept new connections.

The Statement is approved by the Authority for Electricity Regulation (AER), in compliance with the
requirements of condition 35 of RAECs licence, summarised as follows:

Information on the status of existing capacity and the anticipated requirements for new
capacity addition;
Information highlighting systems most suited to new connections;
Information indicating the systems most suited to connecting to the total System;
Information on any foreseen constraints;
Information relating to current and proposed investment projects;

For further information the reader is encouraged to contact the company, particularly before making
plans for any investments relating to, or relying on, a connection to our networks.

Eng. Hamed Al Maghderi


Chief Executive Officer

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Preface 1


CONTENTS
Preface .................................................................................................................................................... 1

Executive Summary................................................................................................................................. 6
A. Current Systems .................................................................................................................... 6
B. Demand Forecast and Customer Growth ............................................................................. 8
C. System Development Plans .................................................................................................. 9
D. Assets Summary .................................................................................................................. 10

1.0 CURRENT SYSTEM ......................................................................................................................... 12


1.1 Sector Overview: ................................................................................................................. 12
1.2 Networks and Customers:................................................................................................... 13
1.3 RAEC Connections with PDO: .............................................................................................. 18
1.4 Generation and Production Assets: .................................................................................... 19
1.5 Generation Efficiency: ......................................................................................................... 23
1.6 Substations and Feeders Utilisation: .................................................................................. 24
1.7 Estimation of Distribution Network Losses: ....................................................................... 28
1.8 Technical Standards: ........................................................................................................... 31
1.81 Responsibility for Standards: .............................................................................................. 31
1.82 Network topology: .............................................................................................................. 31
1.83 Equipment ratings:.............................................................................................................. 31
1.84 System Faults Levels and Earthing: ..................................................................................... 33
1.85 System Voltage and Frequency:.......................................................................................... 33
1.86 Power Quality limits: ........................................................................................................... 34
1.87 Generation Security Standard:............................................................................................ 34
1.88 Distribution Security Standard: ........................................................................................... 34

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST ..................................................................................... 36


2.1 Profiles of Current Power Demands: .................................................................................. 36
2.2 Power Demand Forecast ..................................................................................................... 43
2.3 New Connections and Bulk Loads ....................................................................................... 44
2.4 Forecast for Substations and Feeders:................................................................................ 46
2.5 Power Plants Forecast and Constraints: ............................................................................. 51
2.6 Forecasted Water Demand and Actions: ............................................................................ 54

3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN.......................................................................................................................... 55


3.1 Overview: ............................................................................................................................ 55
3.2 Investment Initiatives: ........................................................................................................ 57
3.2.1 Rehabilitation of Power Stations: ................................................................................. 57

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Preface 2


3.2.2 Expansion of Power Plant and Water Desalination Capacities: .................................... 57
3.2.3 Reinforcement and Extension of Network Systems: .................................................... 57
3.2.4 Developing of the Metering System: ............................................................................ 57
3.2.5 Interlink Small Capacity Power Plants To Local Systems: ............................................. 59
3.2.6 132kV line from Tibat to Khassab and Dibba: ............................................................... 59
3.2.7 Renewable Energy Projects: ......................................................................................... 59

Appendices............................................................................................................................................ 62

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Preface 3


List of Tables
Table 1 : Forecast Demand Growth and Bulk Loads ---------------------------------------------------------------- 9
Table 2 : Power Generation Production Facilities 2014-2017 --------------------------------------------------- 10
Table 3 : Water Production Facilities 2014-2017 ------------------------------------------------------------------- 10
Table 4 Network Assets 2014-2017 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11
Table 5 : RAEC Networks and Customers (Musandum, Al Wusta & Sharqiah, Dhofar) Sep 2014 --- 13
Table 6: RAEC Networks, Customers & Customer Density per Circuit Length - Sep 2014 ---------------- 16
Table 7: RAEC Customer Types and Energy Consumption - Sep 2014 ----------------------------------------- 16
Table 8 : List of networks connected to PDO (Sep 2014) --------------------------------------------------------- 18
Table 9 : Customers and Energy supplied by PDO (Sep 2014) --------------------------------------------------- 18
Table 10 : Power Plants in Operation---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 20
Table 11 : Desalination Plants (Reverse Osmosis) (Sep 2014) --------------------------------------------------- 22
Table 12 : Primary Substations Capacity and Loading (2014)---------------------------------------------------- 24
Table 13: Max load and voltage drop of 33kV feeders (2014) -------------------------------------------------- 26
Table 14 : Max load and voltage drop of 11kV feeders (2014) -------------------------------------------------- 27
Table 15: sample of estimated network losses in 2013 ---------------------------------------------------------- 28
Table 16 : Summary of ETAP load flow and losses analysis ----------------------------------------------------- 29
Table 17: Power Plant equipment ratings --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 31
Table 18: Distribution equipment ratings --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32
Table 19 : System Fault levels ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33
Table 20 : Overall System Security Standard (AER) ---------------------------------------------------------------- 35
Table 21 : Actions to comply with Distribution Security Standard --------------------------------------------- 35
Table 22 : Estimated Bulk Load at RAEC up to 2017 -------------------------------------------------------------- 45
Table 23 : Demand Forecast and Utilisation for Substations --------------------------------------------------- 46
Table 24 : Demand Forecast and Voltage Drop for 33kV feeders ---------------------------------------------- 48
Table 25 : Demand Forecast and Voltage Drop for 11kV Feeders ---------------------------------------------- 50
Table 26 : Power Stations Assessment for 2014 ------------------------------------------------------------------- 51
Table 27 : Actual and Forecast MW demand for Power Plants ------------------------------------------------- 52
Table 28 : Water Demand and Capacity 2014 - 2016 ------------------------------------------------------------- 54
Table 29 : Planned Expansion of Water Production Capacity--------------------------------------------------- 54
Table 30 : List of ongoing Renewable Energy projects ------------------------------------------------------------ 60
Table 31: List of Future Renewable Energy Projects --------------------------------------------------------------- 60

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Preface 4


List of Figures
Figure 1 : Total energy generated by RAEC plants (kWh) Jan-Sept 2014 .............................................. 7
Figure 2 : Total Water Produced by RAEC desalination facilities (m3) Jan-Sept 2014........................... 7
Figure 3 : Total energy Supplied to Customers (MWh) Jan-Sept 2014 .................................................. 8
Figure 4 : RAEC Historic & Forecasted Demand ..................................................................................... 9
Figure 5 : RAEC Networks Assets ......................................................................................................... 11
Figure 6 : RAEC Power Plants Map........................................................................................................ 12
Figure 7 : Total RAEC Regions, Customers, Demand and Energy - Including PDO (Sep 2014) ............. 17
Figure 8 :Power Supplied per RAEC Customer Classes Including PDO............................................... 17
Figure 9 : Duqm Generation and Desalination Power Plant ................................................................. 19
Figure 10 : Age profile of generation units ........................................................................................... 21
Figure 11 : Power Stations Loading Factor & Fuel Efficiency Conversion ............................................. 23
Figure 12 : 11 KV Switchgear at Duqm.................................................................................................. 32
Figure 13 : Some techniques used to Satisfy Security Standard .......................................................... 35
Figure 14 : Musandam Maximum Power Demand Profile (MW) (2012-2014) .................................... 37
Figure 15 : Musandam Minimum Power Demand Profile (MW) (2012-2014) .................................... 37
Figure 16 : Al Wusta & Sharqiyah Maximum Power Demand Profile(MW) (2012-2014) ................... 38
Figure 17 : Al Wusta & Sharqiyah Minimum Power Demand Profile (2012-2014)............................... 38
Figure 18 : Dhofar Maximum Power Demand Profile (2012-2014) ..................................................... 39
Figure 19 : Dhofar Minimum Power Demand Profile (2012-2014)....................................................... 39
Figure 20 : Khasab Power Station Load Profile (2014) ......................................................................... 40
Figure 21 : Dibba Power Station Load Profile (2014) ........................................................................... 40
Figure 22 : Madha Power Station Load Profile (2014) ......................................................................... 40
Figure 23 : Duqm Power Station Load Profile (2014)........................................................................... 41
Figure 24 : Masirah Power Station Load Profile (2014) ....................................................................... 41
Figure 25 : Khuwaimah Power Station Load Profile (2014) ................................................................. 41
Figure 26 : Saih AL-Khairat Power Station Load Profile (2014) ............................................................ 42
Figure 27 : Mazyounah Power Station Load Profile (2014) ................................................................. 42
Figure 28 : Shahab Esaib Station Load Profile (2014) .......................................................................... 42
Figure 29 : Example of Development projects at Al Duqm .................................................................. 43
Figure 30 : Actual and Forecast RAEC Total number of Customers ...................................................... 44
Figure 31 : Water demand 2014 - 2017, main production facilities .................................................... 54
Figure 32 : Major Completed Projects up to Sep 2014 ........................................................................ 55
Figure 33 : On Progress Projects (By Region) ....................................................................................... 56
Figure 34 : On Progress Projects (By Type) .......................................................................................... 56
Figure 35: (2015-2017) RAEC Future Projects (by Type) ...................................................................... 56
Figure 36 : Power Quality meters in the control Panel ......................................................................... 58
Figure 37 : PQ secure (analyzing software) showing all quality parameters ........................................ 58
Figure 39 : REAC Planned Renewable Energy Projects ......................................................................... 61

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Preface 5


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
RAECs mandate is to provide electricity to those living in remote communities throughout the
Sultanate of Oman ( Musandam, Wusta , Dhofar and some areas of Al-Dhakhilah & Al-Sharqiah). As
per sector law and license conditions the Company is obligated to deliver reliable power safely,
economically and in an environmentally responsible manner. Currently, most customers within
RAECs areas of license are supplied with electricity from 35 Power Production Plants owned and
operated by RAEC. Others are remote areas where RAEC doesnt have power production facilities.

Executive Summary
Therefore, the company as per its obligations in sector law supplies these locations through power
purchase agreements with Petroleum Development of Oman (PDO). RAECs largest Power Plant has
installed capacity of 66 MW (Duqm), whilst some have a capacity below 1 MW 9 (ex. Ayoon). There
are 6 locations where RAEC produces potable water which is provided by bulk supply customers to
the Public Authority for Electricity and Water (PAEW). These are Duqm, Masirah, Al Halaniat ,
Kumzar, Abu Mudabi and Soqrah. The desalination facilities vary from 250 to 6000 m3/day.

RAEC customers are connected to around 61 power distribution and supply networks, operated
separately from each others due to their long distance between them. The networks typically
supply a few thousands customers, or less, apart from the areas of Musandum governorate, Haima,
Mahout and Masirah which have the most population.

This Capability Statement provides information on the current status and capabilities of RAEC power
generation facilities, transmission and distribution networks, and water desalination plants with data
up to the end of September 2014. The document then provides a 3 year forecast for the years
2015, 2016 and 2017 including electricity and water demand, together with brief details on
investment plans for new connections, generation expansion and possible interconnections. An
overview of the status of current investments and plans for renewable energy is included in the
section 3.2.7.

A. Current Systems

As of September 2014 there were 35 Power Plants in operation. An overview map of the location
and capacities of these plants is shown in the appendix A1, all of which consist of diesel engine
generator sets. The Figure 1 below shows the total energy generated at these sites for the 9 months
Jan-Sept. 2014. Many mobile diesel generator sets have been provided in which to satisfy generation
security standards. As mentioned above, the Company also operates 6 water desalination plants
with a total installed capacity of approximately 11,400 m3 per day. Individual water production units
range in size from 50 m3 per day to 6,000 m3 per day as from Table 13.

RAEC network voltages range from 33kV, 11kV, 0.415 kV, and soon to be commissioned 132kV.
Statistics of RAEC total distribution network assets are provided in Table 3 & Figure 5. Most
networks operate in radial mode. RAEC implements power supply security standards as per the
approved criterion including applying the N-1 procedure and deploying mobile generators for
interrupted areas.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Executive Summary 6


(MWH)

Executive Summary
Figure 1 : Total energy generated by RAEC plants (kWh) Jan-Sept 2014
(Note: logarithmic scale)

1,000,000 951,021

800,000 692,684
Water Production (m3)

600,000

400,000

200,000
76,709
35,000 32,268 29,851
0
Masirah Duqum Kumzar Sograh Abu Mudhabi Hlaniat
AL-Halanyat
Production Facility

Figure 2 : Total Water Produced by RAEC desalination facilities (m3) Jan-Sept 2014

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Executive Summary 7


Total Energy Supplied To Customers
600,000
500,000
400,000
MWH

300,000

Executive Summary
200,000
100,000
0
Jan Feb March April may June July August sept
Monthly Supply MWh 33346 33941 38980 58034 70169 73526 84286 87696 76869
Accumulated Supply MWH 33346 67287 106267 164301 234470 307996 392282 479978 556847

Figure 3 : Total energy Supplied to Customers (MWh) Jan-Sept 2014

B. Demand Forecast and Customer Growth

RAEC networks are subjected to rapid changes in load and number of customers. The total energy
demand for RAEC networks has increased an average of 12.5% over the past 3 years as shown below
in Figure 4.
However, some small networks can experience much higher demand increase over a similar period.
The increase in number of connected customers reflects electrification of areas previously without
power as well as new customers in existing areas and the new government developments plans. The
demand forecast process is detailed in chapter 2.0 relying to some extent on historic trends but
mainly focused on new electrification and identified major loads and development projects.
Information for these is provided by the relevant ministries and authorities.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Executive Summary 8


RAEC Historic & Forecasted Demand
300

250
Demand (MW)

200

150

Executive Summary
100

50

0
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Musandam 60.5 64.3 71.82 77.1 83.8 95.3
Wusta & Sharqiyah 41.5 52.3 56.6 78.8 97 123.7
Dhofar 29.5 33.2 37.6 47.9 61 83
RAEC 131.5 149.8 166.02 203.8 241.8 302
% Demand Groth 13.9 10.8 22.8 18.6 24.9

Figure 4 : RAEC Historic & Forecasted Demand

C. System Development Plans

Chapter 3.0 of the Capability Statement providing details of future investment projects as well as
those currently in progress or recently completed. These fall under the following 3 categories:

New networks, expansion, and interlinking


New connections (including electrification of unsupplied areas)
Power and water plant expansion, new construction or rehabilitation

Table 1 below indicates a dramatic increase in the forecasted peak demand in 2017 (81% including
bulk demand) as compared with peak demand recorded in September 2014 which is driven mainly
by large loads planned in the Al Wusta area (Duqm new town, port and industrial area, and in
Masirah island), and to a lesser degree in Khasab (hospitals, hotels, etc.).

Table 1 : Forecast Demand Growth and Bulk Loads

Peak Demand in Forecasted Normal Forecasted Bulk Demand Total Demand


Region
2014 (MW) Growth by 2017 (MW) by 2017 (MW) 2017 (MW)
Musandum 71.8 85.5 10 95.5
Wusta &
56.6 67.4 64.3 123.7
Sharqiyah.
Dhofar 37.6 44.8 38 82.8
RAEC 166 197.7 104.3 302.0

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Executive Summary 9


RAEC is executing many development projects to meet anticipated growth of demands as per
applications from different customers in the areas of license such as:

1. Electricity supply to hospitals, tourist areas, governmental and other industrial applications
at Musandum area.
2. Hospitals, military camps, industrial areas, agriculture farms at Dhofar.
3. Industrial, commercial, governmental demands at Al Duqm.
4. Military camps, hospitals, other governmental demands at Al Wusta & Al Sharqiyah.

Executive Summary
RAEC also is developing projects to improve energy efficiency by supplying power from alternative
sources rather than diesel, such as renewable projects (Wind and Solar) in Dhofar and Wusta areas.
In addition, a 132 kV interconnected grid system is being constructed in Musandum to link existing
power plant locations and to procure electricity purchased from the a potential independent power
producer (IPP) at Tibat (approx. 120MW gas powered capacity). This will be in addition to RAECs
Khasab and Dibba power stations that are planned to be refurbished and expanded.

D. Assets Summary

1. Power Generation and Water Desalination Plants:


Table 2 shows existing and future production facilities and their capacity for 2014 and 2017. It can be
noted that the total capacity (MW) increases 107 % while the number of production facilities
decreases by 11 %. The same is noted with water production which is forecasted to increase by 52
%. This is due to rationalisation of power production facilities and larger facilities being built.

Table 2 : Power Generation Production Facilities 2014-2017


2014 2017*
Region Installed Capacity No. of Production No. of Production
Installed Capacity (MW)
(MW) Facilities Facilities
Al Wusta 129 14 280 10
Dhofar 60 19 157 19
Musundam 81 3 123 3
Total RAEC 270 35 560 32

Table 3 : Water Production Facilities 2014-2017


2014 2017*
Region 3 No. of Production 3 No. of Production
Installed Capacity (m ) Installed Capacity (m )
Stations Stations
Al Wusta 12,550 4 18,750 4
Dhofar 130 1 400 1
Musundam 450 1 850 1
Total RAEC 13,130 6 20,000 6

* Note: Number of power and water production facilities may fluctuate during the plan period as
plants are closed and others constructed.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Executive Summary 10


2. Power Transmission and Distribution Networks
One of the main objectives of the capability statement is to publish the main assets that the
company has. Table 3 provides details of the main networks items by each governorate for 2014 and
the asset quantities predicted by 2017. These are also illustrated in Figure 5 below.
Table 4 Network Assets 2014-2017

Al Wusta &
Dhofar Musundam
Network item Unit Sharqiyah

Executive Summary
2014 2017 2014 2017 2014 2017
1 33 kV OHL km 388 515 565 750 217 300
2 11 kV OHL km 1236 1500 676 900 437 580
3 33 kV UG cable km 411 550 9 20 29 65
4 11 kV UG cable km 322 400 75 100 144 190
5 132 kV OHL km 0 20 0 0 0 82
6 Distribution Transformers 50-1000 KVA,
No. 896 950 470 500 635 670
11/0.415 kV
7 Distribution Transformers 50-1000 KVA,
No. 13 20 58 64 30 36
33/0.415 kV
8 33/11kV Primary Substation No. 36 46 7 15 19 28
9 132/33 kV Grid Substation No. 0 1 0 0 0 2
10 132/11 kV Grid Substation No. 0 0 0 0 0 1

RAEC Networks Assets 2014 - 2017


132/11 kV Grid SS 0
1
132/33 kV Grid SS 0
3
33/11kV PSS 62
89
33/0.415 Kv Txs 101
120
11/0.415 Kv TXs 2001
2120
132 kV OHL 0
102
11 kV UG 541
690
33 kV UG 449
635
11 kV OHL 2349
2980
33 kV OHL 1170
1565

0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500


11/0.415 Kv 33/0.415 Kv 33/11kV 132/33 kV 132/11 kV
33 kV OHL 11 kV OHL 33 kV UG 11 kV UG 132 kV OHL
TXs Txs PSS Grid SS Grid SS
2014 1170 2349 449 541 0 2001 101 62 0 0
2017 1565 2980 635 690 102 2120 120 89 3 1

Figure 5 : RAEC Networks Assets

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Executive Summary 11


1.0 CURRENT SYSTEM
1.1 Sector Overview:
RAEC is a vertically integrated entity licensed in power generation, transmission, distribution and
supply; also the company is licensed to sell or purchase the power to the Oman Power and Water
Purchase Company (OPWP). By the end of September 2014, the number of connected customers in
RAEC reached around 30,294 with total peak demand of 166 MW. The company customers are
spread across the its licensed areas, with many in remote locations & very low customer density per

CURRENT SYSTEM
kilometre

Figure 6 : RAEC Power Plants Map

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 12


1.2 Networks and Customers:
RAECs networks are mostly scattered systems supplying a few hundred customers, up to a few
thousand customers in the more populous areas such as Musandum governorate. The current and
forecast numbers of assets up to 2017 are provided in Table 3 & Figure 5 .Some of the RAECs
networks are supplied from the Petroleum Development of Oman company (PDO) using power
purchase agreement.

Table 4 shows all networks and the source of power, together with the number of customers. The

CURRENT SYSTEM
smallest network is Wadi Hakka in Dhofar with only 19 connected customers, whilst the largest are
Khasab system (5,478 customers). Duqm is a new town currently under construction and with over
2,000 customers.

Table 5 : RAEC Networks and Customers (Musandum, Al Wusta & Sharqiah, Dhofar) Sep 2014

Area
Sr. No. Rural No. Power plant Source of supply Customers
Name

1 Khasab 03/005 Khasab RAEC 5478

2 Dibba 03/002 Dibba RAEC 3203

3 Bukha 03/005 Khasab RAEC 1526

4 Rawdha 03/001 Khasab RAEC 121

5 Madha 03/007 Madha RAEC 939

6 Quida 03/005 Khasab RAEC 371

7 Kumzar 03/001 Khasab RAEC 272


8 Shisha 03/002 Khasab RAEC 143

9 Al Nuzaif 03/007 Khasab RAEC 299

Total Musandum 12,352

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 13


Cont. Table 5

Rural Source of
Sr. No. Area Name Power plant Customers
System supply
Bahja, Abu Mudhabi PDO &
1 1663
Haima 02/032 Al Ajaiz RAEC

Mahoot 02/016 Hij


2927
2 Al Najdah
RAEC

CURRENT SYSTEM
Khaluf
Surab

Al Duqm 02/031 Duqm


3 2065
Ras Madrakah RAEC
Hitam

Al Jazir 02/027 Sawgrah


4 725
Al Kahal RAEC
Al Labki
5 Masirah 02/019 Masirah RAEC 2545
Kuwaimah/
6 02/006 Kuwaimah RAEC 407
Quron
7 Masrooq 02/020 Masrooq RAEC 61
8 Aswad 02/033 Aswad PDO 792
9 Zahiyah 02/012 Al Zahiyah PDO 68
10 Ras Al Jabal 02/035 Ras Al Jabal PDO 260
11 Nahada 02/035 Nahada PDO 182
12 Shibka PDO Shibka PDO 87
13 Awefia PDO Awaifa PDO 199
Al-Dhafarat/
14 02/032 Al-Dhafarat RAEC 218
AL-Shereikah
15 Qarn AL-Alam PDO Qarn Alam PDO 93
Al-Ghubra
16 South Al PDO Nimir PDO 46
Jazer

Total Al Wusta & Sharqiyah 12,338

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 14


Cont. Table 5

Rural
Sr. No. Area Name Power plant Source of supply Customers
System

1 Andat 01/025 Andat RAEC 104


2 jashool matoorah 01/024 Matoorah RAEC 60
3 Aiboot-2 01/025 Mudhai RAEC 57
4 Fatkheet 01/014 Fatkheet RAEC 33

CURRENT SYSTEM
5 Mahwees 01/019 Mahwees RAEC 34
6 Hebrot-Aiboot-1 01/025 Mudhai RAEC 27
7 Muthafah 01/002 Muthafah RAEC 30
8 Horoot 01/0167 Horoot RAEC 50
9 Maqshan 01/020 Maqshan RAEC 142
10 Herwaib 01/016 Herwaib RAEC 137
11 Metan 01/023 Metan RAEC 133
12 Wadi Hakka 01/042 Marmul PDO 20
13 Tosenat 01/040 Tosenat RAEC 50
14 Zakhar 01/044 Amal Station PDO 83
15 Barbazoom 01/008 Barbazoom RAEC 86
16 Ayoon 01/007 Ayoon RAEC 37
17 Dhaboon 01/012 Dhaboon RAEC 131
18 Rabkoot 01/026 Rabkoot RAEC 94
19 Shahb Saheb 01/035 Barbazoom RAEC 557
20 Al Halaniat 01/001 Al Halaniat RAEC 27
21 Al Shasar 01/032 S. AL Khairat RAEC1 241
22 Al Mazyuna 01/021 Al Mazeuna RAEC 987
23 Sharbatat PDO Sharbatat RAEC 174
24 Mudhai 01/025 Mudhai RAEC 152
25 Wadi Aara PDO Marmul PDO 44
26 Shawemia PDO Amal PDO 224
27 Demet PDO Demet PDO 99
28 Keboot PDO Keboot PDO 91
29 Shaleem PDO Amal Station PDO 346
30 Hasik 01/015 Hasik RAEC 384
31 Dhalkoot 01/010 Dhalkoot RAEC 679
32 Raykhuit 01/011 Dhalkoot RAEC 250
33 TIDHO 01/025 Mudhai RAEC 9
34 QAFA 01/025 Mudhai RAEC 4
35 PAITHNAH 01/025 S. AL Khairat RAEC 11
36 AL HASHMAN 01/025 S. AL Khairat RAEC 17
Total Dhofar 5,604

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 15


Table 6: RAEC Networks, Customers & Customer Density per Circuit Length - Sep 2014
Density of
Total 11, 33 Network Number of connected
Sr. Nr. Area customer per
Length (km) Customers
length
1 Wusta and Sharqiyah 2,357 12,338 5.23

2 Dhofar 1,325 5,603 4.23

3 Musandum 827 12,352 14.94

CURRENT SYSTEM
4 RAEC Total 4,509 30,294 6.72

Table 7: RAEC Customer Types and Energy Consumption - Sep 2014

Percentage
Average Percentage
MWh Number of from Total
Customer Class MWh per from Total
Supplied Customers Number of
Customer MWh
customer
1 Agr. & Fish. 19,379 327 59 3.5 1.1
2 Commercial 88,545 5,488 16 15.9 18.1
3 Residential 259,764 21,301 12 46.6 70.3
4 Government 121,232 3,014 40 21.8 9.9
5 Industrial 27,314 41 666 4.9 0.1
6 MOD e / SSF 23,460 70 335 4.2 0.2
7 Tourism 17,153 53 324 3.1 0.2
8 Total RAEC 556,847 30,294 18 100.0 100.0

Tables 5 & 6 as well as Figures 7 & 8 describe RAEC regions and their customers, demands and
energy per governorates. It is clear that Musandum area and Al Wusta (Al Wusta + Sharqiyah) area
are now almost with same number of customers. The total MWh supplied as well as the maximum
demand is greater in Musandum due to type of customers and high population compare to other
RAEC areas.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 16


CURRENT SYSTEM
Figure 7 : Total RAEC Regions, Customers, Demand and Energy - Including PDO (Sep 2014)

Figure 8 :Power Supplied per RAEC Customer Classes Including PDO

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 17


1.3 RAEC Connections with PDO:
As stated in the introduction, some areas are far from the nearest RAEC power stations and on the
other hand they are much closer to PDO systems. In such cases & based on technical and
commercial reasons, RAEC agreements with PDO to have a connection point which enables RAEC to
dispatch the power to its customers. The connection points with the number of customers and
energy consumption are listed in the tables 8 & 9 below.

Table 8 : List of networks connected to PDO (Sep 2014)

CURRENT SYSTEM
PDO Connection System
SR. Region RACO System RS No.
Point & System Voltage kV

1 Al Wusta Wadi Aswad 02/022 Natih 33

2 Al Wusta Al Nuhaidah 02/011 Nahaidah 11

3 Al Wusta Ras Al Jabel 02/035 Nahaidah 11


4 Al Wusta Wadi Buthaila 02/036 Qarn Alam 33
5 Al Wusta Burhan Qarn Alam 33
6 Al Wusta Gabah Qarn Alam 33
7 Al Wusta Qarat Al Melh Qarn Alam 33
8 Al Wusta Al Ghafteen Sayallah 33
9 Al Wusta Al Zamaim Qarn Alam 33
10 Al Wusta Haima 02/013 Bahjah 33

11 Al Wusta Ghobra South 02/021 Nimir 33

12 Al Wusta Gobrah North 02/026 Rima 33


(Shuw./ Shaleem /
13 Dhofar 01/045 Amal Station 33
Zakar)
14 Dhofar Dimeet 01/013 Marmul 33
15 Dhofar Kaboot 01/018 Marmul 33

16 Dhofar Wadi Arah 01/041 Marmul 33

17 Dhofar Wadi Haka 01/042 Marmul 33


18 Dhofar Wadi Rahab 01/043 Marmul 33
19 Dhofar Qatbeet Sadhoon Harweel 33
20 Wusta Zahiyah 02/012 Kauthwer 11

Table 9 : Customers and Energy supplied by PDO (Sep 2014)

Customers Energy MWh %

RAEC 25,997 478.61 86

PDO 4,297 78.16 14

Total 30,294 556.77 100

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 18


1.4 Generation and Production Assets:
All of RAECs power plants consist of diesel engines of various sizes, generating electricity. In
addition, RAEC owns and operates small desalination units for providing potable water sell to the
PAEW. The consumption of fuel is very high per kWh generated compare to other sources of fuel
(ex. Natural gas). The larger plants have a more efficient load profile and therefore better
consumption of fuel (see section 1.5). Many of the DG sets are old (1980s or earlier) and are subject
to a programme of rehabilitation as will be stated later. A number have been relocated from one site
to another over the past years as the number of customers and electricity demand changes in

CURRENT SYSTEM
remote villages and other rural areas. A programme of interlinking some of the smaller power
plants has allowed the more inefficient plants to be decommissioned as will be discussed in chapter
3. The number of operating plants in 2009 was 47 compared to 35 in 2014, a 25% decrease, as
detailed in Table 9. The age profile of these units is shown in Figure 10.

Figure 9 : Duqm Generation and Desalination Power Plant

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 19


Table 10 : Power Plants in Operation

Rural Starting No. of Installed Available


SR. No. P.P. Name Type
System operation units MW MW
1 03/002 Dibba Electricity 1978 9 22 12.8
2 03/005 Khasab Electricity 1982 12 57.4 43.5
3 03/007 Madha Electricity 2012 6 11.3 9.04
Total Musandum 27 90.7 65.34
4 02/005 Al Khaluf Electricity 2007 3 2.5 2

CURRENT SYSTEM
5 02/006 Al Khuiaima Electricity 2004 4 3.3 2.6
6 02/008 Alajaiz Electricity 2006 4 1.1 0.9
7 02/010 AlNajdah Electricity 2007 3 2.2 1.8
8 02/012 AlZhaiah Electricity 2003 Station Closed June 2014
9 02/016 Hij Electricity 1999 5 9.6 7.7
10 02/017 Hitam Electricity 2007 5 1.3 1.1
11 02/025 Ras Madraka Electricity 1999 4 1.8 1.2
12 02/030 Sarab Electricity 2006 3 2.2 1.8
13 02/031 Al Duqm Electricity 2010 9 66.3 53.1
14 02/032 Al Dhafrat Electricity 2008 4 1.9 1.5
15 02/020 Masrooq Electricity 1994 4 1.8 1.4
16 Al Khadrah Electricity 2011 5 12.7 9.1
17 02/019 Masirah Electricity 1976 12 20.3 16.7
Total Al Wusta 65 127 100.8
18 01/001 Al Halaniyat Electricity 1985 3 1.1 0.8
19 01/002 Al Mathfa Electricity 2002 3 0.34 0.27
20 01/007 Ayun Electricity 2000 3 0.7 0.6
21 01/008 Barbazum Electricity 2000 4 1.2 1
22 01/012 Dhahabun Electricity 2000 5 2.4 1.9
23 01/014 Fatkhat Electricity 2002 4 0.6 0.5
24 01/015 Hasik Electricity 2012 6 5 4
25 01/016 Hirweeb Electricity 2001 5 1.9 1.5
26 01/019 Mahwice Electricity 2002 4 0.4 0.3
27 01/020 Maqshan Electricity 2001 6 2.3 1.8
28 01/021 Mazyunah Electricity 2010 9 12 9.6
29 01/023 Mitan Electricity 2001 5 2.2 1.8
30 01/024 Mothorah Electricity 2006 3 0.6 0.5
31 01/025 Mudhai Electricity 2010 6 3.9 3.1
32 01/032 Saih Alkirat Electricity 2006 14 32.4 25.9
33 01/035 Shahb Asayb Electricity 1999 7 11.1 8.9
34 01/037 Sharbatat Electricity 1999 6 3.7 3
35 01/040 Tushnat Electricity 2001 4 0.9 0.7
36 01/004 Andat Electricity 2011 4 1.2 1
Total Dhofar 101 83.94 67.17

Total RAEC 193 301.64 233.31

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 20


Table 9 and Figure 10 show details of RAEC generation assets, either those are currently in service or
those in the closed power stations. The units in the closed power stations are intended to be
relocated or dismantled depending on their condition and potential use.

Table 13 bellow shows the desalination facilities in each location. It is clear that Masirah has the
largest desalination capacity of 6,100 cubic meters per day, followed by Duqm. This is due to high
population and demand on those areas.

CURRENT SYSTEM
Figure 10 : Age profile of generation units

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 21


Table 11 : Desalination Plants (Reverse Osmosis) (Sep 2014)

Production Region/ Total Cap. Unit Cap. Year of First


Type
Facility Governorate (m3/day) No. (m3/day) Commission

1 R.O. 1000 2001

2 R.O. 300 2002

3 R.O. 300 2002

CURRENT SYSTEM
4 R.O. 500 2005

5 R.O. 500 2007


Masirah Sharqiyah 6,100
6 R.O. 500 2007

7 R.O. 500 2007

8 R.O. 500 2007

9 R.O. 1000 2012

10 R.O. 1000 2014

1 R.O. 100 1996

Kumzar Musandum 450 2 R.O. 150 2003

3 R.O. 200 2012

1 R.O 100 1998


Sograh Al Wusta 250
2 R.O 150 2011

1 R.O 50 1985

Abu Mudabi Al Wusta 200 2 R.O. 50 2006

3 R.O 100 2012

2 R.O. 65 2009
Al Hanayat Dhofar 130
3 R.O. 65 2009

1 R.O. 2000 2010

Duqm Al Wusta 6,000 2 R.O. 2000 2010

3 R.O. 2000 2010

Total RAEC 13,130 81 13,130

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 22


1.5 Generation Efficiency:
The generation efficiency of diesel generators depends on many parameters such as the type of
engine, age, size and the loading factor. Figures below illustrate the loading factor of each plant
against fuel efficiency, highlighting the low efficiency experienced by plants that have a low loading
factor

CURRENT SYSTEM
KWh/ L
% Power Stations Loading Factor & Fuel Efficiency Conversion
100 4.50
90 4.00
80 3.50
70 3.00
60
2.50
50
2.00
40
30 1.50
20 1.00
10 0.50
0 0.00

Dhafart
R.Madrka

Khasab

Hitam
S Esaib

Sarab
Barbazum
Andat

Matafa

Tusnat

Masrooq
Hijj

Madah

Fatkeet
Mittan

Khadrah
Mothorah

Sharbatat
Dibbah

Mahwice
Saih Kirat

Mudhai

Al Duqm
Al Najda
Hirweeb

Hassik N

Maqshan
Dhaboon

Ayoon
Khuiaima

Hallaniyat

Khaloof
Masirah

Mazyunah
Alajaiz

Power Station

Loading Factor % Fuel to Energy kWh/Litre

Figure 11 : Power Stations Loading Factor & Fuel Efficiency Conversion

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 23


1.6 Substations and Feeders Utilisation:
In this section of the capability statement some important networks details are presented such as
feeders maximum load, voltage drop, feeders capacities and utilization factors for the substations.
This information is provided for 33kV feeders and 11 kV feeders above 2MVA demand.
It is important to note that the utilization factor of some S/S is more than 100 % such as Haima,
Wadi Aswad, Lima and Gumdah. In such cases, interlinks are provided to networks or mobile
generator sets are positioned at strategic locations until the relevant S/S or network can be

CURRENT SYSTEM
upgraded.

Table 12 : Primary Substations Capacity and Loading (2014)

Sr. Installed Utilization


Substation Area Max Load MW
No. Capacity MVA factor %

1 Saih Al Khairat Step-up SS Dhofar 2x20 13.7 85.6

2 Hanfeet & Safa farms Dhofar 2x10 4.5 56.3

3 Shaser Dhofar 1X3 1 41.7

4 Bithanah and Al hasman Dhofar 1X3 0.6 25.0

5 Shuwaymia Dhofar 1x3 1.5 62.5

6 Shab Esaib Step-up SS Dhofar 2x10 2.7 33.8

7 Dhalkut Dhofar 2x6 2.5 52.1

8 Hiij Step-up SS Al Wusta 1x6 2.2 45.8

9 Khadrah Al Wusta 2x6 2.2 45.8

10 Nafoon Al Wusta 1X3 0.6 25.0

11 Al Duqm Main step-up SS Al Wusta 4x31.5 16.5 32.7

12 Old Al Duqm Al Wusta 1x6 1.53 31.9

13 Al Duqm Port Al Wusta 2x20 1.42 8.9

14 Al Duqm Beach Al Wusta 2x20 2.1 13.1

15 Al Duqm Town 1 Al Wusta 2x20 0.01 0.1

16 Al Duqm Town 2 Al Wusta 2x20 3.37 21.1

17 Al Duqm South Al Wusta 2X 10 0.2 2.5

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 24


Cont. Table 16

Sr. Installed Utilization


Substation Area Max Load MW
No. Capacity MVA factor %

18 Al Duqm Dry Dock Al Wusta 2x20 7 43.8

CURRENT SYSTEM
19 Al Duqm Airport Al Wusta 2X 10 0.5 6.3

20 Duqm Frontier Town Al Wusta 2x10 0.44 5.5

21 Nahdah Al Wusta 2X10 3.5 43.8

22 Muderah Al Wusta 1x6 2.2 45.8

23 Haima Al Wusta 2x10 9 112.5

24 SSF at Sahmah Al Wusta 2x6 2.5 52.1

25 MOD Camp at Haima Al Wusta 1x6 2.6 54.2

26 Awaifiah Al Wusta 1x3 1.2 50.0

27 Wadi Aswad Al Wusta 2x3 3.2 133.3

28 Al Ghafteen Al Wusta 1X3 0.4 16.7

29 Al Zamaim Al Wusta 1X3 0.036 1.5

30 Ghobra North Al Wusta 1x3 1 41.7

31 Lima Musandam 1X3 2.6 108.3

32 Al-Jerry Musandam 1x10 4 50.0

33 Gumdha Musandam 1x10 9.7 121.3

34 Khasab Industrial Area. Musandam 1x3 + 1x 6 2 27.7

35 Sibi Musandam 1X3 1.6 66.7

36 Mahas Musandam 1x3 0.6 25.0

37 Dibba Musandam 1x6 2.5 52.1

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 25


Table 13: Max load and voltage drop of 33kV feeders (2014)

Max.
Sr. Length Max.
Area Feeder Name Area supplied Type Load
No. (Km) V.D %
MW
1 Wusata/ Hiij 1 Mudeera Feeder Medeerah S/s. 45 OHL 2.2 1.5
2 PDO (Natih) Wadi Aswad Wadi Aswad S/s 51 OHL 4.3 4.4
3 Wusata/ Haima Haima Fr 1 RAEC S/s at Haima 26 OHL 9 5
4 Wusata/ Haima Haima Fr 2 RAEC S/s at Haima 26 OHL 8 5

CURRENT SYSTEM
5 Al Duqm Al Duqm Old S/s at Aduqum Old PS. 1 U/G 2.8 0.8
6 Al Duqm Port 1 feeder Al Duqm port 7.5 U/G 0.5 0.7
7 Al Duqm Port 2 feeder Al Duqm port 14.1 U/G 0 0
8 Al Duqm Beach feeder Al Duqm beach 9.5 U/G 2.3 1
Al Duqm Frontier Town commercial & 12 U/G 0.6 0.7
9
governmental berth
10 Al Duqm Town 1 Town 1 6 U/G 0.3 0.1
11 Al Duqm Town2 Town 2 4.5 U/G 2.1 0.9
12 Al Duqm Al Duqm Air Port Airport 1.8 U/G 0.05 0.2
13 Al Duqm Dry Dock Dry Dock 4.5 U/G 8.5 2
14 Al Duqm South South 19.8 U/G 0.5 0.1
15 Al Duqm New Gantry S/S New Gantry S/S 24.25 U/G 0 0
16 Al Duqm Nafoon Village Nafoon 24 OHL+UG 0.65 1.8
Saih Al Khairat Hanfeet Al Safa Hanfeet S/s1 39.5 OHL 4.5 5
17
Farms
18 Saih Al Khairat Hanfeet Farms Hanfeet S/s2 43 OHL Under construction
Saih Al Khairat Baithanah & Shaser , Baithanah & 110 OHL 1.4 3
19
Hishman Hishman
Saih Al Khairat Hanfeet Shasir Shasir 35 OHL 0 0
20
Farms
21 Sahab Esaib Dhalkut Dhalkut 30 OHL 2.7 3.3
PDO(Amal) Shaleem Shaleem/Zakar/Shuw 71.3 OHL 4.8 4
22
aimiah
23 Khasab Feeder 1/ Lima Lima Area 39.2 OHL 3 3
24 Khasab Feeder 2/ Al Jarry Al Jary Area 11.3 OHL 4.1 3.6
Khasab Feeder 3/ Gumdhah Area 16.5 OHL 9 5
25
Ghumdah
26 Khasab Feeder 4/ Kumzar Kumzar Area 33.5 OHL 3 3.5
27 Dibba Zaghi Feeder Zaghi Resort 6 U/G +OHL 4.2 3.8

Note: some 33kV feeders are not included above since these are very lightly loaded
and voltage drop can be assumed to be within limits

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 26


Table 14 : Max load and voltage drop of 11kV feeders (2014)

Max. Max. V.D


Sr. No Area Feeder No. Area supplied
Load MW %
F1 Khasab Town 1.5 2
F2 Khasab Town 4.5 2.6
F3 Khasab Town 5 3.5
F4 LULU 5 4.5
1 Khasab
F5 Khasab Town 3 2.4

CURRENT SYSTEM
F6 Khasab Town 5.3 4
F7 Air Port 2 2.2
F8 Khasab Town 2 2.3
F1 Dibba Town 4.4 1.3
F2 Dibba Town 4.7 1.2
2 Dibba
F3 Dibba Town 2.2 1.3
F4 Dibba Town 2.6 1.6
F1 Madha Town 2.3 1.3
3 Madha F2 Madha Town 1.2 1.1
F3 Madha Town 2 1.6
F2 Mahot Area 3.5 4
4 Hiij
F1 Jubba 3.3 2.2

RAS F1 Ras Madrakah 1.2 2.1


5
Madrakah F2 Dhahar 0.9 5.6
F1 Khuwaimah 1.1 1
6 Khuwaima
F2 Qaroon, Suqlah, 0.8 4
F1 Masirah Town 7 3.2
7 Masirah
F2 Nahda Town 5.4 4.1

Wadi F1 Wadi Aswad 0.7 2


8
Aswad F2 Wadi Aswad 2.5 4
F1 Saih Al Khairat 2.5 5
Saih Al
9 F2 Shasir Farms 3.5 4.2
Khairat
F3 Sih Alkhairat 1.8 2.4

Al F1 Industrial area, etc 2.5 1.6


10
Mazyunah F2 RO Plant and others 3.2 2.1
F1 Sahba Saib 1.8 4.5
Shab F2 Rakhyot 1.3 4
11
Asaib
F3 Ardeet 1.1 3
F1 Khadrah 0.3 2.2
F2 Kahal 1.5 1.6
12 Al Jazir
F3 Lakbi 2.1 3.5

Note: individual feeders with demand less than 1MW are not included above,
as voltage drop can be assumed to be within limits

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 27


From the above tables, it will be worth to note that 11 & 33 KV feeders indicate high voltage drop
closed to 6 %. This is clear in PDO Natih, Saih AL-Khairat & Gumdah in Khasab for the 33 KV feeders
and Ras Madrakah and Saih AL-Khairat F1 for the 11 KV feeders. It is important to note that full load
of all feeders will not be at the same time in a specific power station, the actual voltage drop may be
less than the stated above .

However, in those locations with high voltage drop, some solutions are under progress such as new
feeders at Saih AL-Khairat and Nahidah Feeder at Wadi Aswad and so on..

CURRENT SYSTEM
1.7 Estimation of Distribution Network Losses:
The difference between total energy billed to customers and energy generated at all power plants is
generally considered to represent losses. This difference covers technical loses (lossed energy in the
distribution lines and transformers as a heat) as well as non-technical losses, such as metering and
billing inaccuracy, non-alignment of the billing period.

A number of initiatives are planned by the company to improve metering, billing, and output
measurement at power plants as will be presented in chapter 3.

For the purpose of this statement a small number of sample networks have been reviewed where
good metering systems and records exist. These are presented below.

Table 15: sample of estimated network losses in 2013


Sr. Rural System Power System Metered Units Sent Units from Supply
Area
No. No. Name kWh P.S. kWh Losses %

1 Khasab 03/005 Khasab 170,156,672 193,470,282 12.05

2 Dibba 03/002 Dibba 67,128,387 74,848,610 10.31


3 Madha 03/007 Madha 18,673,250 20,307,230 8.05
4 Haima 02/008 Al Alajaiz 1,759,714 1,955,238 10.00
5 Mahoot 02/016 Hij 36,631,850 40,624,519 9.83
6 Duqm 02/031 Duqm 70,700,004 80,292,111 11.95
7 Al-Dhafarat 02/032 Al-Dhafarat 1,961,199 2,419,370 18.94
8 Andat 01/025 Andat 2,059,072 2,359,311 12.73
9 Neyaba Maqshan 01/020 Maqshan 1,668,641 2,035,447 18.02
10 Nayaba Tosenat 01/040 Tusnat 950,814 1,120,499 15.14
11 Al Shasar 01/032 S. Al Khairat 56,935,570 65,971,050 13.70
12 Al Mazyonah 01/021 Al Mazyonah 14,907,941 17,802,192 16.26
13 Sharbatat N/A Sharbatat 3,894,522 4,543,034 14.27
Total 544,928,632 617,969,102 11.82

As a comparison to taking a sample of meter readings the load analysis on a number of networks to
compare the theoretical calculated loss. The results of the load flow analysis are provided in
appendix A8 and a summary is given in Table 19 above.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 28


Table 16 : Summary of ETAP load flow and losses analysis
Voltage Feeder Load Voltage loss % KW
Region Power System Feeder
kV (MW) drop % (kW) loss
Lima 33 4.336 3.91
Gumdha 33 8.735 3.83
Musandam Khasab 33KV 408 2.4%
Al-Jerry 33 3.637 2.41

CURRENT SYSTEM
Kumzar 33 0.523 0.91
Wadi Aswad &
33 3.42 3.1
Zubra 150 2.90%
Al-Dahra Wadi Aswad and Zubra Alorf 33 0.47 3.8
Awifiah 33 1.28 3
Qaroon 11 1.5 2.98 22 1.97%
Qaroon and Al Khuwaima
Kuwamah 11 0.34 1.38
Al-
Sharqiah Feeder 1 11 6.012 3.38 217 1.97%
Masirah Feeder 2 11 2.588 2.98
Feeder 3 33 2.418 0.06
Ras Madraka 11 0.903 1.08 15 0.88%
Ras Madraka
Daher 11 0.806 2.37
Hijj 11 2.518 5.99
300 3.85%
Hij Jooba 11 3.425 5.5
Sail & Mudairah 33 1.853 4.64
Duqm old 33 1.53 0.07
Duqm Beach 33 4.2
Al Wusta
Duqm Port 33 1.42
456 2.43%
Town 1 33 0.1
Duqm Town 2 33 3.37
Duqm Air Port 33 0.05
Dry Dock 33 7
Frontier Town 33 0.44
Duqm Nafoon 33 0.66
Feeder 1 11 0.721 1.46
Al Mazyuna Feeder 2 11 5.14 1.93
3.42 1%
Feeder 3 11 0.006 0.03
Dhofar Shab Esaib 11 1.373 4.67
Rakhyut 11 1.103 4.79 456 7.88%
Shab Esaib
Ardeet 11 0.963 5.09
Dalkut 33 2.347 3.76

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 29


Cont. Table 16
Voltage Feeder Load Voltage loss % KW
Region Power System Feeder
kV (MW) drop % (kW) loss
Feeder 1 11 1.87 2
Feeder 2 11 1.276 3
Feeder 3 11 1.083 2 900 9.30%
Dhofar Saih Al Kairat

CURRENT SYSTEM
Feeder 4 33 4.4 3

Feeder 5 33 1.053 0.5

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 30


1.8 Technical Standards:
1.81 Responsibility for Standards:
RAEC currently runs 35 power plants along with 61 networks which have been constructed in line
with Oman Electrical standards (OES). Other relevant standards are referred where required (such
as for contract specifications) and these are predominantly IEC (International Electrotechnical
Commission) or BS (British Standards). OES details are available on the AER website (http:
//www.aer-oman.org).

CURRENT SYSTEM
1.82 Network topology:
Networks operated by RAEC are typically based on isolated diesel generation plants supplying
directly connected feeders at 33kV or 11kV levels. These feeders are operated radially. Pole
mounted distribution transformers are connected via drop-out fuses. Others (ground mounted)
transformers may be connected through ring main unit (RMU). Overhead lines may extend over
long distances, where air break switches are used to sectionalise the line, and in some cases in-line
voltage regulators (booster transformers) may be required. A number of larger systems exist, based
on 33kV/11kV substations (generation connected by step-up transformers) and ring type 11kV
distribution systems. These cover mainly the areas of Khassab, Dibba and Duqm. AIS (Air Insulated)
switchgear is used for all new substations, and GIS (gas-insulated) single busbar arrangements are
used for 33kV switchboards.

1.83 Equipment ratings:


The ratings of key distribution and power plant equipment are given bellow.

Table 17: Power Plant equipment ratings

Equipment Size / load rating

Different Ratings at different output voltages


0.415, 3.3 &11 kV. Operating speed ranging
Diesel Generator Sets
from 600 RPM up to 1500 RPM. Output power
Frequency is 50 Hz.
0.415 kV switchgear Rating Up to 3500 A
0.415 /11 kV Step Up Transformer rating 600-2000 kVA
11 /33 kV Step up Transformer rating 1,3, 6,10 ,20 &31.5 MVA
1250A (Incomer & Bus section), 400 / 630A
11 kV switchgear rating
(Feeder)
33 kV switchgear rating 1250 A & 630A

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 31


CURRENT SYSTEM
Figure 12 : 11 KV Switchgear at Duqm
Table 18: Distribution equipment ratings

Equipment Size / load rating

33 /11 kV step-up / step-down transformers


1,3, 6,10 &20 MVA
(Ground Mounted)
1250A (Incomer & Bus section) 400 / 630A
11 kV switchboards
(Feeder)
11 kV RMU / OLU / TFU 400/200 A.
33 kV switchboards 1250 A & 630A
33/0.415 kV Transformers P/M 200, 315 kVA
11/0.415 kV Transformers P/M 50, 100, 200, 315 kVA
11/0.415 kV Transformers G/M 500, 1000 kVA
Wolf (150mm2 ACSR), AAAC 95, AAAC 195, &
11kV Overhead lines
Dog (100mm2 ACSR)
LV Overhead lines 200 mm2 AL conductor XLPE Insulated
LV Overhead lines 120 mm2 AL conductor XLPE Insulated
Panther (200mm2 ACSR), Wolf (150mm2
33kV Overhead lines
ACSR), AAAC 240
11 &33 kV Auto-Reclosers Range of Ratings
11&33 kV D/O fuse units Range of Ratings
33 kV Underground Cables 3C 300 mm2 CU XLPE
3C 240, 185, 120, 70, 50 mm2 & 1C x 500
11 kV Underground Cables
mm2 CU XLPE
LV Underground Cables 4CX 240,185,120,70,50,35 &1CX630 CU XLPE

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 32


1.84 System Faults Levels and Earthing:
RAEC power plant DG sets are generally earthed via low impedance systems and harmonic currents
through the common neutral point need to be considered in the supply arrangements to customers.
LV generators are solidly earthed, whilst generators of Medium Voltage output are generally earthed
through common neutral earthing. Step-up transformers are earthed through the star point.

Substations supplying the distribution network at 11kV are solidly earthed whilst those operating at
33kV are earthed via a 12.5 ohm neutral resistor (for each transformer).

CURRENT SYSTEM
The fault level ratings at the various system voltages is summarised in the Table 19 bellow.

Table 19 : System Fault levels


Short circuit level Short circuit level
System voltage Time (seconds)
kA MVA

415/240 V 40 29 1

11 kV 18.4 350 3

33 kV 25 1429 3

132 kV 31.5 7193 2

1.85 System Voltage and Frequency:


The voltage on the 33kV and 11kV sides of distribution transformers at connection points with the
distribution system users shall normally be controlled within the limits +/-6.0% of the nominal value.
During system disturbances such as where short circuits occur, the voltage may collapse transiently
to zero at the point of fault until the fault is cleared. Under fault and circuit switching conditions, the
50 Hz frequency component of voltage may fall or rise transiently. The fall or rise in voltage will be
affected by the method of earthing of the neutral point of the distribution system and this variation
in voltage should be taken into account in selecting apparatus for customer connections.

The voltage at the customer connection point shall not vary from the system nominal voltage by
more than +6.0% to 6.0% in 33, 11kVand 415/240V systems.

The frequency of the RAEC Systems shall be nominally 50.00 Hz with system frequency set points
between 49.95 Hz and 50.05 Hz. Normal control deviations will not exceed 49.90 Hz to 50.10 Hz.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 33


1.86 Power Quality limits:
All apparatus connected to the RAEC distribution system should be capable of withstanding possible
distortions of the voltage waveform in respect of harmonic content and phase unbalance. The
maximum total level of harmonic distortion at 33 and 11kV shall not exceed 2.0% with no individual
harmonic greater than 1.5%. At LV, the maximum total levels of harmonic distortion from all
sources shall not exceed 2.5%. The maximum negative phase sequence component of the phase
voltage should remain below 1.0% (unless abnormal conditions prevail). A maximum value of 2.0%
is permitted for phase unbalance.

CURRENT SYSTEM
1.87 Generation Security Standard:
RAEC operates its generation facilities to supply a wide range loads and customer types. In order to
provide power at an affordable cost a reasonably standard must adopted when designing for
security of supply. A study was undertaken in 2007 to consider the most optimum approach to
providing generation capacity at the wide range of locations.

a) For all new power plants the generation security standard is planned to N-1 i.e. the power
plant can satisfy the maximum demand after loss of the largest DG set;
b) In the event of a generation shortfall demand control may be implemented by disconnecting
non-essential loads until mobile generator units become available.
c) In case of loss of in-feed from non-RAEC sources such as PDO, the company follows the
following arrangement to satisfy the power security standards:
i. The company provides mobile DG sets with capacities sufficient to cover the margin
shortfalls with suitable connection arrangements. The mobile DG sets are
strategically located within the areas of license at Al Wusta and Dhofar in such a way
that it can be put in operation within the criteria of class of demand shown below.
ii. In the event of a generation shortfall demand control is being implemented by
disconnecting non-essential loads until supplies from replacement reserve mobile
generator units become available.

1.88 Distribution Security Standard:


The overall system security standard is defined by the Authority for Electricity Regulation, as shown
in Tables 24 & 25 below. To comply with this standard, RAEC puts in places proactive and reactive
measures which may include provision of local emergency response teams1, together with a suitable
level of spares and repair equipment.

The first demand class applies to many 11kV and 33kV feeders and although there is no specific
response time given in RAEC security standard, the actual time achieved is normally within a few
minutes or hours. The second demand class would normally be satisfied by manual switching from

1RAEC currently has in place 22 emergency response offices throughout its Authorized areas

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 34


alternative sources, but in practice this covers situations where faulty apparatus is quickly
disconnected from the system and the main feeder is restored by manual switching. The third
demand class applies to primary substation groups where N-1 contingency is provided and a time of
15 minutes is allowed for switching to be carried out (by local operators).

Table 20 : Overall System Security Standard (AER)

Demand Class First Outage (Forced Outage) Second Outage (Planned + Forced Outage)

CURRENT SYSTEM
Less than 2MW Repair Time No Requirements

2 to 6MW 3 hours No Requirement

6 to 20MW Within 15 minutes Restoration Time of Planned Outage

Table 21 provides an explanation of actions and contingency measures adopted by RAEC for each of
the demand class groups.

Table 21 : Actions to comply with Distribution Security Standard

First Outage
Demand Class First Outage (Forced Outage)
(Forced Outage)

Emergency response offices located to cover all customers. Sufficient


Less than
Repair Time spares for main items of equipment (HV fuses, overhead line components,
2MW
cable repairs, etc)

Manual disconnection or removal of faulted equipment; restoration of


2 to 6MW 3 hours
healthy feeder

Use mobile generators or alternative feeders connections until the cause of


6 to 20MW Within 15 minutes
fault is cleared

Figure 13 : Some techniques used to Satisfy Security Standard

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | CURRENT SYSTEM 35


2 . 0 L O A D A N A LY S I S A N D D E M A N D F O R E C A S T
2.1 Profiles of Current Power Demands:

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


The demand profile of RAEC systems is driven mainly by residential sector customers, which
contribute to around 47% of energy supplied as in Figure 8. There is also a strong seasonal variation
in the demand due to weather and environment factors, which are markedly different in the various
regions of Oman .

It can be seen that demand decreases sharply in January and February, and then it starts increasing
to reflect the climate temperature. In Dhofar governorate, demand reduces again during July and
August (Khareef season) and then increases as temperature increases again till October when it
starts decreasing. Some areas of Wusta Region experience the same climate as that in Dhofar desert
regions. In addition there is a seasonal migration of residents to other areas which has a
characteristic reflection in the demand profile demand at the area.

Some power plants in Dhofar area are not affected by the above climate phenomena; therefore the
type of demand profile is different from the others. These include remote desert locations such as
Al Mazyunah, or stations that supply non-residential demand, such as Saih Al Khairat.

The new port and development at Al Duqm has started to affect the demand in Al Wusta and the
total demand of RAEC. Khasab Region does not have the same climate phenomena as in Dhofar and
Wusta regions therefore the demand profile shows increase from February and continues close to
the maximum from May up to October when it starts to reduce as seen on Figures 16 & 17 bellow.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 36
Musandam Maximum Power Demand Profile ( 2012-2014)
80,000
70,000

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


60,000
Demand (kW)

50,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2012 23,000 22,200 35,200 44,000 53,800 56,600 62,400 62,300 56,140 47,340 35,100 25,400
2013 24,905 25,172 32,573 51,112 57,465 59,430 64,300 62,420 60,390 54,210 44,580 29,320
2014 26,100 26,090 34,120 55,110 64,710 68,200 71,820 69,460 64,980

Figure 14 : Musandam Maximum Power Demand Profile (MW) (2012-2014)

Musandam Minimum Power Demand Profile ( 2012-2014)


60,000

50,000
Demand (kW)

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2012 11,100 7,400 13,200 19,700 27,000 30,600 36,500 36,820 29,480 18,550 15,330 13170
2013 12,390 9,414 16,305 17,913 23,238 33,810 41,350 30,990 32,630 27,560 14,960 13,540
2014 11,640 13,580 15,550 21,750 30,650 38,180 49,360 45,100 40,730

Figure 15 : Musandam Minimum Power Demand Profile (MW) (2012-2014)

As normal, the peak demand (max of maximum) for Musandam over the last three years occurred
between July and August. While on the other hand the minimum demand occurred between January
to March and November to December.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 37
AL Wusat & Sharqiah Maximum Power Demand Profile ( 2012-2014)
60,000

50,000

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


Demand (kW)

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2012 23,306 26,515 31,898 40,454 44,229 39,694 32,864 36,665 39,558 38,981 34,792 31,692
2013 27,157 29,984 38,245 46,070 52,145 46,188 37,423 37,572 45,919 45,643 39,300 31,977
2014 28933 31729 41761 52745 55289 50982 45626 47158 51713

Figure 16 : Al Wusta & Sharqiyah Maximum Power Demand Profile(MW) (2012-2014)

AL Wusat & Sharqiah Minimum Power Demand Profile (MW) ( 2012-


25,000
2014)
20,000
Demand (kW)

15,000

10,000

5,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2012 8,057 8,132 8,182 11,463 13,570 9,405 13,221 12,233 15,751 13,336 13,426 11,389
2013 9,947 11,562 14,059 16,250 20,600 12,659 16,095 10,328 18,079 18,254 15,209 12,880
2014 12139 12695 15055 19090 21339 17824 16694 17159 20269

Figure 17 : Al Wusta & Sharqiyah Minimum Power Demand Profile (2012-2014)

The situation in both Al Sharqiah and Al Wusta as in Figures 16 & 17 is a little different from
Musandam area, since the peak of maximum demand may happen twice, April to May and August
to September .The same behaviour is seen for the minimum demand. In addition, the differente of
demand between months is not as much as Musandam since Al Wusta has an industrial load with
almost fixed demand.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 38
Dhofar Maximum Power Demand Profile ( 2012-2014)
40,000
35,000

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


30,000
Demand (kW)

25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2012 13,021 14,441 17,601 21,707 23,304 25,083 22,655 23,818 26,178 24,778 21,195 18,747
2013 17,314 19,264 23,664 28,269 31,218 31,653 28,444 27,979 29,701 28,052 23,803 20,041
2014 17821 19469 25494 31207 33405 35857 33013 32177 33569

Figure 18 : Dhofar Maximum Power Demand Profile (2012-2014)

Dhofar Minimum Power Demand Profile ( 2012-2014)


18,000
16,000
14,000
Demand (kW)

12,000
10,000
8,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2012 4,096 5,014 6,164 7,124 9,619 10,696 9,721 10,584 11,164 10,455 9,883 6,288
2013 6,420 6,795 10,467 10,760 15,662 14,055 12,983 14,296 14,271 12,309 8,438 10,134
2014 7465 7219 11504 8943 13381 11521 16960 14934 15814

Figure 19 : Dhofar Minimum Power Demand Profile (2012-2014)

The behaviour of demand as in Figures 18 & 19 in Dhofar region has some similarities with that for Al
Wusta as the demand during the months does not vary dramatically. However, since Khareef season
affects some parts of Dhofar, then in those areas, the maximum demand is predicted to not be in
July and August.

The monthly demand profile of some RAEC main power plants is shown in the next charts:

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 39
60,000 Khasab Power Station Load Profile (2014)
50,000
40,000

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


Demand (KW)

30,000
20,000
10,000
-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Khasab Max. 17,400 17,100 23,300 38,300 43,500 45,900 47,700 47,700 44,500
Khasab Min. 7,200 8,700 10,400 14,300 20,900 25,600 32,800 30,500 26,400
Figure 20 : Khasab Power Station Load Profile (2014)

20,000 Dibba Power Station Load Profile (2014)

15,000
Demand (KW)

10,000

5,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Dibba Max 6,700 7,000 8,300 12,600 16,100 16,800 18,400 16,600 15,400
Dibba Min 3,600 4,000 4,100 6,000 7,400 9,800 13,000 11,900 12,000
Figure 21 : Dibba Power Station Load Profile (2014)

Madha Power Station Load Profile (2014)


7,000
6,000
Demand (KW)

5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Madha Max 2,000 1,990 2,520 4,210 5,110 5,500 5,720 5,160 5,080
Madha Min 840 880 1,050 1,450 2,350 2,780 3,560 2,700 2,330
Figure 22 : Madha Power Station Load Profile (2014)

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 40
20,000
Duqum Power Station Load Profile (2014)

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


15,000
Demand (kW)

10,000

5,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Al Duqum PS Max 14,610 15,250 15,370 16,970 19,040 17,470 18,150 17,200 18,570
Al Duqum PS Min 5,680 5,400 5,760 6,210 7,300 7,920 6,300 6,850 7,380

Figure 23 : Duqm Power Station Load Profile (2014)

16,000 Masirah Power Station Load Profile (2014)


14,000
12,000
Demand (kW)

10,000
8,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Masirah PS Max 5,300 5,700 9,500 13,150 13,400 12,370 11,600 10,500 11,650
Masirah PS Min 2,900 3,100 3,950 5,590 6,400 4,650 5,250 5,000 5,700
Figure 24 : Masirah Power Station Load Profile (2014)

Khuwaimah Power Station Load Profile (2014)


2,500

2,000
Demand (kW)

1,500

1,000

500

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Kuwaimah PS Max 960 1,040 1,440 1,910 1,830 1,490 820 1,550 1,630
Kuwaimah PS Min 300 380 540 690 800 320 270 420 460

Figure 25 : Khuwaimah Power Station Load Profile (2014)

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 41
16,000
Saih Al Khairat Power Station Load Profile (2014)
14,000

12,000

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


Demand (kW)

10,000

8,000

6,000

4,000

2,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Saih Al Kairat PS Max 8,200 9,200 10,350 11,500 12,300 12,950 12,700 13,350 13,850
Saih Al Kairat PS Min 3,160 3,000 6,000 1,800 4,800 3,600 7,500 7,700 8,200

Figure 26 : Saih AL-Khairat Power Station Load Profile (2014)

Mazounah Power Station Load Profile (2014)


7,000

6,000
Demand (kW)

5,000

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Al Mazuyna PS Max 1,555 1,587 3,110 3,996 4,620 5,426 5,870 5,180 4,890
Al Mazuyna PS Min 663 654 872 1,400 2,015 2,580 3,210 2,560 2,200

Figure 27 : Mazyounah Power Station Load Profile (2014)

8,000
Shahab Esaib Power Station Load Profile (2014)
7,000

6,000
Demand (kW)

5,000

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

-
Jan. Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep
Shahba Esaib PS Max 3,710 3,930 4,800 6,080 6,440 7,320 4,920 4,740 5,110
Shahba Esaib PS Min 1,900 1,760 2,400 2,760 3,240 2,400 2,600 1,750 2,300

Figure 28 : Shahab Esaib Station Load Profile (2014)

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 42
2.2 Power Demand Forecast
The demand forecast process for RAEC networks and power plants consists of data gathering from
all local and government sources to ascertain plans for new developments and their impact on

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


demand. Estimates of connected load vary widely from different developers and RAEC applies its
own demand factors to arrive at realistic load expectations. In addition to the above bulk load
estimates the expected level of smaller new connections is determined based on known applications
as well as recent trends.

Annual growth in peak demand (MW) has averaged 12.4 % over the past 3 years, starting at 120MW
in 2011. Forecast demand is planned to be 302 MW by the end of 2017 (a 82% increase from the
current year) but the majority of this arises from Duqm and significant government projects in
Khasab. The underlying growth over the coming 3 years is around 22 % per.
One can notice that during the last three years, Khasab demand was the largest. This situation is
expected to change by the end of 2017 so that Al Wusta & Sharqiah region power demand will be
greater than that for Musandam. In addition, the load at Dhofar is increasing rapidly, especially at
Saih Al Khairat which has lots of governmental agriculture projects.

Figure 29 : Example of Development projects at Al Duqm

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 43
2.3 New Connections and Bulk Loads
The number of customer connections has increased by around 60 % per year over the past 4 years
(18,851 customers in 2009 compared with 30,294 in Sept 2014). The forecast growth in connections

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


is estimated to be at a more modest rate through the coming next three years (rising to 37,500 in
2017).

40000
RAEC Customers 2013-2017 37,500
35,250
35000 33,250
31,000
30000 28,287

25000

20000

15000

10000

5000

0
2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Figure 30 : Actual and Forecast RAEC Total number of Customers

New connections applications of significant size (over 1MW for this statement purpose) are classified
as bulk loads and are forecasted separately as shown in Figure 30.

Table 22 provides a list of bulk loads; currently being planned are in the Al Wusta region. In
addition. As per plans received from investors as well as government plans, it is estimated that by
the end of 2017, 104.3 MW will be added to the system as a bulk load.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 44
2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST
Table 22 : Estimated Bulk Load at RAEC up to 2017

Sr. Demand
Scope of Demand Area Proposed Action
No MW
Musandam/ Extension of 33 kV feeders from Khasab to the hospital
1 New Hospital at Khasab 4
Khasab with 2x10 MVA, 33/11 kV S/S.
Industrial facilities Musandam/ Extension of 33 kV feeders from Khasab to the hospital
2 3
at Khasab Khasab with 2x10 MVA, 33/11 kV S/S.
Musandam/ Extension of 33 kV feeders from Bukha feeder to the
3 New Hospital at Bukha 3
Khasab hospital with 2x6 MVA, 33/11 kV S/S.
4 Locations for MOTC Al Duqm 4 Extension of 33 kV U/G cable feeders with S/S.
5 Locations for Fortune Town Al Duqm 2 Extension of 33 kV U/G cable feeders with S/S.
6 Hotels and tourist facilities Al Duqm 2 Extension of 33 & 11 kV U/G cable feeders
7 Agriculture and Fisheries Al Duqm 2 Extension of 11 kV U/G cable feeders
8 ROP buildings Al Duqm 1 Extension of 11 kV U/G cable feeders
9 New airport Al Duqm 1.5 Extension of 11 kV U/G cable feeders
10 Al Duqm Industrial area Al Duqm 5 Extension of 33 & 11 kV U/G cable feeders
11 Al Duqm Terminal Al Duqm 19 Extension of 11 kV U/G cable feeders
12 SEZAD HQ Al Duqm 1.8 Extension of 33 & 11 kV U/G cable feeders
13 SEZAD (150) houses Al Duqm 9 Extension of 11 kV U/G cable feeders
14 New Renaissance PAC Al Duqm 12 Extension of 33 & 11 kV U/G cable feeders & SS
Ruba Al Khali & Masrooq
15 Dhahirah 5 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s
Farms
16 Hanfeet Farms S. AL Khairat 3 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s.
17 Doka farm Dhofar S. AL Khairat 1 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s
18 Khwatir farm Dhofar S. AL Khairat 2 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with
19 Farms S. AL Khairat 2 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s
20 free Zone at Al Mazyunah Mazyunah 7 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s.
new Hospital at Al
21 Mazyunah 3 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s.
Mazyunah
22 MoD Camp at Al Mazyunah Mazyunah 4 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s.
New health centre at
23 Hilaniyat , Hirweeb, Mitan Hilaniyat 2.5 Extension of 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s
and Maqshin
24 MoD Camp at Mittan Mittan 0.5 Extension of 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s
Shahab
25 new Hospital at Dhalkut 3 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s.
Esaib
Sultan Qaboos Military Shahab
26 2 Extension of 33, 11 kV U/G & OHL with s/s.
College Camp at Adaidam Esaib
Total RAEC 104.3

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 45
2.4 Forecast for Substations and Feeders:
Table 23 shows 33/11 kV S/S maximum demands in 2014 and the next three years. Again, from the
utilisation factor, it can be seen that most of the S/S are capable of meeting the predicted demand.

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


However, some of them like Haima, Wadi Aswad, Lima & Gumda need to have actions to solve the
overloading as per stated earlier in the 33 KV feeders loading in Tables 16 & 17.

Table 23 : Demand Forecast and Utilisation for Substations

Capacity Load
Sr. Utilization MW MW MW
Substation Area MVA MW
No. factor % (2015) (2016) (2017)
(2014) (2014)
Saih Al Khairat Stepup
1 Dhofar 2x20 13.7 85.625 17.8 closed Closed
SS
Saih Al Khairat Stepup
2 Dhofar 4X20 0 0 2 19.5 25.2
SS
3 Hanfeet & Safa farms Dhofar 2x10 4.5 56.3 5.8 6.0 7.0

4 Shaser Dhofar 2X3 1 41.7 1.2 0.0 0.0

Bithanah and Al
5 Dhofar 2X3 0.06 2.5 0.7 0.8 0.9
hasman
6 Shuwaymia Dhofar 2x3 1.5 62.5 1.6 1.7 1.9
7 Shab Esaib Stepup SS Dhofar 2x10 2.7 33.8 3.0 5.2 5.4
8 Dhalkut Dhofar 2x6 2.5 52.1 2.7 2.9 3.1
9 Hiij Stepup SS Al Wusta 1x6 2.2 45.8 2.6 2.8 Closed
10 Hiij New PS Stepup SS Al Wusta 2x10 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.0
11 Najdah new SS Al Wusta 2x6 0 0.0 0.0 2.5 2.7
12 Khadrah Al Wusta 2x6 2.2 45.8 2.4 2.6 3.2
13 Nafoon Al Wusta 2X3 0.6 25.0 1.2 1.5 1.6
Al Duqm Main stepup
14 Al Wusta 4x31.5 16.5 32.7 33.0 48.0 60.0
SS
15 Old Al Duqm Al Wusta 2x6 1.53 31.9 2.0 2.2 2.4
16 Al Duqm Port Al Wusta 2x20 1.42 8.9 4.0 8.2 8.4
17 Al Duqm Beach Al Wusta 2x20 2.1 13.1 5.0 5.5 7.5
18 Al Duqm Town 1 Al Wusta 2x20 0.01 0.1 3.0 3.5 5.0
19 Al Duqm Town 2 Al Wusta 2x20 3.37 21.1 4.0 4.5 6.0

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 46
Cont. Table 23

Capacity Load
Sr. Utilization MW MW MW
Substation Area MVA MW

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


No. factor % (2015) (2016) (2017)
(2014) (2014)
20 Al Duqm South Al Wusta 2x10 0.2 2.5 7.0 8.0 9.0

21 Al Duqm Dry Dock Al Wusta 2x20 7 21.9 7.5 8.0 9.0

22 Al Duqm Airport Al Wusta 2X 10 0 0.0 2.0 4.0 5.0

23 Duqm Frontier Town Al Wusta 2x10 0.44 5.5 2.0 3.0 5.0

24 Dhahar new Al Wusta 2x6 0 0.0 3.0 3.3 3.5


25 Al Ajaiz new Al Wusta 2x3 0 0.0 2.0 2.5 2.7

26 Nahdah Al Wusta 2X10 3.5 43.8 5.0 6.5 7.5

27 Muderah Al Wusta 2x6 2.2 45.8 2.3 2.4 2.5

28 Haima Al Wusta 2x10 9 112.5 7.0 7.5 8.0

29 SSF at Sahmah Al Wusta 2x6 2.5 52.1 2.8 closed Closed


132/33 Kv Grid at SSF
30 Al Wusta 2x90 0 0.0 0.0 34.0 34.0
camp
31 MOD Camp at Haima Al Wusta 2x6 2.6 54.2 3.0 3.2 3.5
32 Awaifiah Al Wusta 2x3 1.2 50.0 1.4 1.6 1.8
33 Wadi Aswad Al Wusta 2x3 2.8 116.7 3.0 3.2 3.4
34 Al Ghafteen Al Wusta 2X3 0.4 16.7 0.5 0.5 0.6
35 Al Zamaim Al Wusta 2X3 0.01 0.4 0.01 0.01 0.01
36 Ghobra North Al Wusta 2x3 1 41.7 1.2 1.3 1.4
37 Lima Musandam 2X3 2.6 108.3 2.8 3.0 3.2
38 Al-Jerry Musandam 2x10 4 50.0 4.4 4.8 5.3
39 Gumdha Musandam 2x10 9.7 121.3 closed closed closed
40 Khasab Industrial Area Musandam 2x3 2 83.3 2.1 2.3 2.5
41 Sibi Musandam 2X3 1.6 66.7 1.8 2.0 2.2
42 Mahas Musandam 2x3 0.6 25.0 0.7 0.8 0.9
43 Dibba Musandam 2x6 2.5 52.1 2.8 3.0 3.3

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 47
Table 24 : Demand Forecast and Voltage Drop for 33kV feeders

Actual Actual. Predicated Max. Voltage


Forecasted load MW
Sr. Feeder Name/ MW V.D % drop at 0.85 PF %
From
No. No.

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


2014 2015 2016 2017 2014 2015 2016 2017

Mudeera
1 Hij PS 2.2 2.8 3 3.2 1.5 1.821 1.95 2.07
Feeder
2 Najdah feeder Hij PS 0 0 2.2 2.31 0 0.000 4.00 4.19
3 Wadi Aswad PDO (Natih) 4.4 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.4 3.106 3.29 3.46
PDO
4 Awaifa /Urf 0 1.8 2 2.2 0 2.100 2.33 2.55
(Nihayda)
5 Haima Fr 1 PDO (Bahja) 9 10 8 8.2 5 5.500 4.40 4.51
6 Haima Fr 2 PDO (Bahja) 8 10 8 8.2 5 5.500 4.40 4.51
7 Al Duqm Old Duqm DNSS 2.8 3.00 3.21 3.43 0.8 0.852 0.91 0.97
8 Port 1 Duqm DNSS 0.5 7.5 8.2 8.4 0.7 1.353 1.48 1.51
9 Port 2 feeder Duqm DNSS 0 3 3.5 5 0 2.000 2.33 3.03
10 Beach feeder Duqm DNSS 2.3 5 5.5 7.5 1 1.540 1.69 2.15
Frontier Town -
11 Duqm DNSS 0.6 1 3 3.5 0.7 0.980 2.94 3.36
1
12 Town 1 Duqm DNSS 0.3 3 3.5 5 0.1 0.190 0.22 0.29
13 Town2 Duqm DNSS 2.4 2.8 4 4.5 0.9 1.029 1.47 1.63
Al Duqm Air
14 Duqm DNSS 0 5 5.1 5.5 0 2.100 2.14 2.30
Port
15 Dry Dock Duqm DNSS 8.5 8.7 9.2 9.5 2 2.046 2.16 2.23
16 South Duqm DNSS 0.5 11 11 8 0.1 0.195 0.20 0.12
Duqm South
17 New Gantry 0 2 4 4.5 0 1.800 3.60 4.00
SS

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 48
Cont. Table 24
Actual Actual. Predicated Max. Voltage

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


Sr. Feeder Name/ Forecasted load MW
From MW V.D % drop at 0.85 PF %
No. No.
2014 2015 2016 2017 2014 2015 2016 2017
18 Nafoon feeder Duqm PS 0.6 1.2 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.700 3.38 3.77
Saih Al
19 Al Safa Farms 4.5 2.8 3 3.5 5 1.964 2.10 2.41
Khairat PS
Saih Al
20 Hanfeet Farms 0 4 4.5 5 0 4.000 4.50 4.95
Khairat PS
Baithanah & Saih Al
21 1.4 0.5 0.7 0.8 3 3.300 4.62 5.20
Hishman Khairat PS
Saih Al
22 Shasir Farms 0 1.2 2 2.3 0 2.400 4.00 4.52
Khairat PS
Shahab Esaib
23 Dhalkut 2.7 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.3 3.516 3.76 4.01
PS
24 Shaleem PDO (Amal) 4.8 5.0 5.5 0.0 4 4.160 4.58 0.00
25 Feeder 1/ Lima Khasab PS 3 4.4 4.8 5.3 3 3.955 4.35 4.75
Feeder 2/ Al
26 Khasab PS 4.1 5.5 5.8 6.0 3 3.764 3.97 4.10
Jarry
Feeder 3/
27 Khasab PS 9 9.5 6.0 6.5 5 5.263 3.32 3.58
Ghumdah
Feeder 6
28 Khasab PS 0 0.0 6.0 6.5 0 3.100 3.40 3.66
/Gumdha new
Feeder 4/
29 Khasab PS 3 3.2 3.5 1.0 3.5 3.719 4.09 1.20
Kumzar
30 Feeder 5 Khasab PS 0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0 0.000 0.00 2.70
31 Zaghi Feeder Dibba PS 4.2 4.6 5.1 5.6 3.2 3.491 3.84 4.19

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 49
Table 25 : Demand Forecast and Voltage Drop for 11kV Feeders
Feeder Max. Max.
Sr. Forecasted
Area / Plant Name/ Load V.D Forecasted Load MW
No Max. V.D %
No. MW %

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


2014 2014 2015 2016 2017 2015 2016 2017

F1 1.5 2 1.61 1.72 1.84 2.14 2.29 2.45


F2 4.5 3.3 4.82 5.15 5.51 3.53 3.78 4.04
F3 5 4 5.35 5.72 6.13 4.28 4.58 4.90
F4 5 4 5.35 5.72 6.13 4.28 4.58 4.90
1 Khasab
F5 3 2.4 3.21 3.43 3.68 2.57 2.75 2.94
F6 5.3 4.2 5.67 6.07 6.49 4.49 4.81 5.15
F7 2 2.6 2.14 2.29 2.45 2.78 2.98 3.19
F8 2 2.5 2.14 2.29 4.00 2.68 2.86 5.00
F1 4.4 3.8 4.71 5.04 5.39 4.07 4.35 4.66
F2 4.7 3.6 5.03 5.38 5.00 3.85 4.12 3.83
2 Dibba
F3 2.2 4 2.35 2.52 2.70 4.28 4.58 4.90
F4 2.6 4.2 2.78 2.98 3.19 4.49 4.81 5.15
Madha F1 2.3 3.9 2.46 2.63 6.00 4.17 4.47 4.78
3
F2 1.2 3.6 1.28 1.37 1.47 3.85 4.12 4.41
F3 2 3.3 2.14 2.29 2.45 3.53 3.78 4.04
F2 3.5 4.3 3.75 4.01 7.00 4.60 4.92 8.60
3 Hiij
F1 3.3 2.5 3.53 3.78 4.04 2.68 2.86 3.06
F1 1.2 2.2 1.28 1.37 1.47 2.35 2.52 2.70
4 Ras Madrakah
F2 0.9 4.8 0.96 1.03 8.00 2.78 2.98 3.19
F1 1.1 1.3 1.18 1.26 1.35 1.39 1.49 1.59
5 Khuwaima
F2 0.8 4 0.86 0.92 0.98 4.28 4.58 4.90
F1 7 3.2 7.49 8.01 9.00 3.42 3.66 4.11
6 Masirah
F2 5.4 4.3 5.78 6.18 6.62 4.60 4.92 5.27
F1 0.7 3.6 0.75 0.80 0.86 3.85 4.12 4.41
7 Wadi Aswad
F2 2.5 4.5 2.68 2.86 10.00 4.82 5.15 5.40
F1 2.5 4 2.68 2.86 3.06 4.28 4.58 4.90
8 Saih Al Khairat F2 3.5 5.5 3.75 4.01 4.29 1.57 1.89 2.02
F3 1.8 3.6 1.93 2.06 2.21 3.85 4.12 4.41
F1 2.5 1.6 2.68 2.86 3.06 1.71 1.83 1.96
9 Al Mazyunah
F2 3.2 3.3 3.42 3.66 3.92 3.53 3.78 4.04
Shabsaib F1 1.8 4.5 1.93 2.06 2.40 4.82 5.15 5.00
11
F2 1.3 4 1.39 1.49 1.59 4.28 4.58 4.90
F3 1.1 3 1.18 1.26 1.35 3.21 3.43 3.68
Al Jazir F1 0.3 2.2 0.32 0.34 0.37 2.35 2.52 3.00
12
F2 1.5 1.6 1.61 1.72 3.40 1.71 1.83 3.63

F3 2.1 3.5 2.25 2.40 2.50 3.75 4.01 3.90

Load flow analysis results are provided for a sample of networks in appendix A8

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 50
2.5 Power Plants Forecast and Constraints:
This section will consider the current power stations situation and their utilizations. In cases of the
generation capability of the power station not satisfying the peak demand, some mitigation actions

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


are in place, as is illustrated in Table 26.

Table 26 : Power Stations Assessment for 2014


Peak Demand
Net Power
Reserved Utilizatio Loading Load is is above
SR. Available available Demand Actions in
P.P. Name as (N-1) n Factor Factor above (N-1) MW
No. MW Capacity 2014 2014
MW % % availabl
MW MW
e MW
1 Dibba 12.8 3.6 9.2 18.4 144 80 X X Mobile DG sets
2 Khasab 43.5 7.1 36.4 47.7 110 62 X X Mobile DG sets
3 Madha 9.04 1.9 7.14 5.72 63 33
4 Al Khaluf 2 0.8 1.2 0.72 36 16
5 Al Khuiaima 2.5 0.9 1.6 1.91 76 37 X Mobile DG sets
6 Alajaiz 0.9 0.37 0.53 0.8 89 35 X Mobile DG sets
7 AlNajdah 1.8 0.8 1 0.97 54 23
8 Al Zhaiah Station Closed
9 Hij 7.7 2.8 4.9 9.1 118 52 X X Mobile DG sets
10 Hitam 1.1 0.37 0.73 1.9 169 41 X X Mobile DG sets
11 Ras Madraka 1.2 0.35 0.85 2.2 182 93 X X Mobile DG sets
12 Sarab 1.8 0.8 1 1.4 76 35 X Mobile DG sets
13 Al Duqm 53.1 6.4 46.7 19 36 20
14 Al Dhafrat 1.5 0.37 1.13 1.1 72 25
15 Masrooq 1.4 0.42 0.98 0.3 21 8
16 Al Khadrah 9.1 2 7.1 3.9 43 25
17 Masirah 16.7 3.6 13.1 13.4 80 43 X Mobile DG sets
18 Al Halaniyat 0.8 0.28 0.52 0.3 39 23
19 Al Mathfa 0.27 0.13 0.14 0.2 84 28 X
20 Ayun 0.6 0.26 0.34 0.18 30 12
21 Barbazum 1 0.41 0.59 0.68 69 35 X Mobile DG sets
22 Dhahabun 1.9 0.8 1.1 1.35 71 33 X Mobile DG sets
23 Fatkhat 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.2 44 21
24 Hasik 4 0.8 3.2 1.4 35 16
25 Hirweeb 1.5 0.4 1.1 0.86 57 26
26 Mahwice 0.3 0.13 0.17 0.22 73 33 X Mobile DG sets
27 Maqshan 1.8 0.41 1.39 0.59 33 15
28 Mazyunah 9.6 1.6 8 5.9 61 29
29 Mitan 1.8 0.8 1 0.9 50 28
30 Mothorah 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.35 70 27 X Mobile DG sets
31 Mudhai 3.1 0.8 2.3 1.64 53 25
32 Saih Alkirat 25.9 5 20.9 13.8 53 33
33 Shahb Asayb 8.9 1.6 7.3 7.3 21 16
34 Sharbatat 3 0.8 2.2 0.62 82 41
35 Tushnat 0.7 0.32 0.38 0.3 47 24
36 Andat 1 0.4 0.6 0.69 69 34 X Mobile DG sets

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 51
Table 27 describes the actual and forecasted status (up to 2017) for each RAEC power stations. In
addition, it provides a view about the companys position in expanding, relocating or/and closing
power stations. However, in some cases, due to new information and updates as per government
plans, some power station plans may be subject to change.

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


Table 27 : Actual and Forecast MW demand for Power Plants

Net
Reserved for
Rural Available Available
SR. No. P.P. Name GSS (N-1) Peak Demand (MW)
No. (MW) Capacity
(MW)
(MW)
2014 2015 2016 2017
1 03/002 Dibba 12.8 3.6 9.2 18.4 18.5 20 22
2 03/005 Khasab 43.5 7.1 36.4 47.7 53.3 58 67
3 03/007 Madha 9.04 1.9 7.14 5.72 5.3 5.8 6.3
Total Musandam 65.34 12.6 52.74 71.82 77.1 83.8 95.3
4 02/005 Al Khaluf 2 0.8 1.2 0.72 1.2 1.3 1.4
5 02/006 Al Khuiaima 2.5 0.9 1.6 1.91 2.1 2.5 3.8
6 02/008 Alajaiz 0.9 0.37 0.53 0.8 PS shall be Closed
7 02/010 AlNajdah 1.8 0.8 1 0.97 1.8 2 Closed
8 02/012 AlZhaiah PS been Closed on jun 2014
9 02/016 Hij 7.7 2.8 4.9 9.1 10 11 13
10 02/017 Hitam 1.1 0.37 0.73 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.4
11 02/025 Ras Madraka 1.2 0.35 0.85 2.2 PS shall be Closed
PS
12 02/030 Sarab 1.8 0.8 1 1.4 1.51
Closed
13 02/031 Al Duqm 53.1 6.4 46.7 19 35 50 62
14 02/032 Al Dhafrat 1.5 0.37 1.13 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.6
15 02/020 Masrooq 1.4 0.42 0.98 0.3 0.8 0.9 1
16 Al Khadrah 9.1 2 7.1 3.9 4.5 5 6
17 02/019 Masirah 16.7 3.6 13.1 13.4 16 18 28
Rub Al Khali New Power station 3.5 5.5
Total Al Wusta & Al-Sharqiah 100.8 19.98 80.82 56.7 75.41 97 123.7
18 01/001 Al Halaniyat 0.8 0.28 0.52 0.3 0.7 0.9 2.6
19 01/002 Al Mathfa 0.27 0.13 0.14 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
20 01/007 Ayun 0.6 0.26 0.34 0.18 0.5 0.6 0.7
21 01/008 Barbazum 1 0.41 0.59 0.68 0.74 PS shall Closed
22 01/012 Dhahabun 1.9 0.8 1.1 1.35 1.8 1.93 2.2
23 01/014 Fatkhat 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.7
24 01/015 Hasik 4 0.8 3.2 1.4 2.2 2.5 2.7
25 01/016 Hirweeb 1.5 0.4 1.1 0.86 0.9 1.2 1.4

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 52
Continue Table 27
Net
Reserved for
Rural Available Available
SR. No. P.P. Name GSS (N-1) Peak Demand (MW)
No. (MW) Capacity
(MW)

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


(MW)
2014 2015 2016 2017
26 01/019 Mahwice 0.3 0.13 0.17 0.22 0.4 0.7 0.8
27 01/020 Maqshan 1.8 0.41 1.39 0.59 1 1.07 1.2
28 01/021 Mazyunah 9.6 1.6 8 5.9 7.5 13 15.5
29 01/023 Mitan 1.8 0.8 1 0.9 1.2 1.3 2.2
30 01/024 Mothorah 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.5 0.6
31 01/025 Mudhai 3.1 0.8 2.3 1.64 2 2.7 2.9
Saih
32 01/032 25.9 5 20.9 13.8 16.4 18 26
Alkhairat
33 01/035 Shahb Asayb 8.9 1.6 7.3 7.3 8.8 9 14
34 01/037 Sharbatat 3 0.8 2.2 0.62 1.4 2 2.2
35 01/040 Tushnat 0.7 0.32 0.38 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7
36 01/004 Andat 1 0.4 0.6 0.69 0.7 1 1.1
Farshat Q New Power Station 3 5
Total Dhofar 67.17 15.34 51.83 37.48 47.84 61 83
Total RAEC 233.31 47.92 185.39 166 200.35 241.8 302

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 53
2.6 Forecasted Water Demand and Actions:
As stated in the previous sections, RAEC owns and operates water desalination plants at 6 sites,
using reverse osmosis technology, which is then sold to the Public Authority of Electricity & Water

2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST


(PAEW) for local distribution. The water demand forecast is mainly driven by growth in Al Duqm
and Masirah Island. In Al Duqm, the production capacity is planned to be increased to 6000 m3 RO
units to cater for the predicted demand. Some details of the 2014 production is given in Figure 2.
The forecasted water demand as well as annual consumption for 2014 to 2017 is given bellow in
Figure 31 and Tables 28 and 29.

4,455
4500

3,790
4000
3500 3,125
2,605

3000

2,200
1,850
1,800
2500

1,615
1,405
1,400

2000
1,220
1,100

1500
1000

405
375
320
285

500
0
2014 2015 2016 2017

Others Masirah Aduqum RAEC

Figure 31 : Water demand 2014 - 2017, main production facilities


Table 28 : Water Demand and Capacity 2014 - 2016

2014 2015 2016 2017


Water
Desalination Annual Installed Annual Installed Annual Installed Annual Installed
Plant Consumption , Capacity Consumption Capacity Consumption Capacity Consumption Capacity
3 3 3 3
x10 m3 M3/Day x10 m3 M3/Day x10 m3 M3/Day x10 m3 M3/Day
Masirah 1220 6100 1405 6300 1615 6300 1850 6300
Abu Mudhabi 40 200 43 200 46 200 48 200
Suqrah 47 250 50 250 52 250 54 250
Halaniat 43 200 48 200 65 400 73 400
Kumzar 155 450 179 450 212 850 230 850
Al Duqm 1100 6000 1400 6000 1800 12000 2200 12000
Total RAEC 2605 13,200 3,125 13,400 3,790 20,000 4,455 20,000

Table 29 : Planned Expansion of Water Production Capacity

Desalination Consumptio Existing Cap.


Sr. No. Planned Action
plant Facility n 000 m3 (m3/day)
Project of adding 2000 m3/day production capacity is
1 Masirah 1220 4300
being implemented at the area
Project of adding 400 m3/day production capacity is
2 Kumzar 155 450
being implemented at the area

5 Halanaiat 43 200 New 2x100 m3 desalination plant is planned.


Project of adding 6000 m3/day production capacity is
6 Al Duqm 1100 6000
planned to be implemented.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 2.0 LOAD ANALYSIS AND DEMAND FORECAST 54
3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN
3.1 Overview:
RAEC is engaged in a varied portfolio of capital projects to enhance the networks it operates, increase
power plant capacity and efficiency, and recently to install HV interconnections (132kV) linking isolated
networks (Musandum).

Capital investment projects are proposed to address demand forecast and system constraint issues as

3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN


discussed in the previous chapters of this Capability Statement. The planning process includes evaluation
of technical options to arrive at the most economical solution to satisfy network requirements and enable
connection of new customers. The procurement process includes rigorous bidding for projects, using
consistent technical standards and specification which promote faster turnaround of work and
competitive prices for equipment.

The main categories of investment include:

Electrification of new areas as prescribed in the sector law.


Standard customer connections to existing network as per the connection conditions.
Reinforcement of substations and networks to cater for indigenous growth.
Network enhancement and refurbishment to address reliability issues.
End of life asset replacement.
New power plants.
Replacement / rehabilitation of power plants (e.g. to improve fuel efficiency).
Interlinking of isolated networks to improve power plant utilisation or decommission aging units.
Upgrading of Desalination Plants.

Funding for capital projects is provided either through the regulatory price controlled allowance,
dedicated electrification funding, or direct sponsored projects (government of other development
agencies).

The following graphs show some information about current projects, types and regions. More details of
those projects listed in the appendixes A5 to A7.

Completed Projects (up to Sep 2014)


60

50

40

30

20

10

0
Dhofar Al Wusta Musandam Total
Nu. of Projects 14 31 4 49

Figure 32 : Major Completed Projects up to Sep 2014

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN 55


On progress Projects (By Region)
90
80
70
60
50
40

3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN


30
20
10
0
Dhofar Al Wusta Musandam Muscat RAEC Total
Nu. of Projects 27 32 14 2 2 77

Figure 33 : On Progress Projects (By Region)

On progress Projects (By Type)


90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Offices Bulidings Desalination Distribution Generation Total
Nu. of Projects 5 4 40 28 77

Figure 34 : On Progress Projects (By Type)

Future Projects
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Transmission &
Generation Common Asset Desalination Rehabilitation
Distribution
Nu. Of Projects 29 37 8 3 9

Figure 35: (2015-2017) RAEC Future Projects (by Type)

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN 56


3.2 Investment Initiatives:
Information highlighted in this statement indicates that improvements can be made in the operational
efficiency of power plants as well as the distribution networks operated by RAEC. In particular, the
utilisation and fuel efficiency of number power plants is very low. These issues are considered in future
plans and initiatives described in the following sections.

3.2.1 Rehabilitation of Power Stations:

3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN


It is considered that the practical operation life of a diesel engine is not more than 20 years, after which
the engine becomes unreliable and inefficient, leading to high fuel costs as well as operation and
maintenance costs. The rehabilitation programme is expected to make a major contribution to future
operation of the companys activities, for which the planned projects are listed in appendix A5.

3.2.2 Expansion of Power Plant and Water Desalination Capacities:

As shown in sections related to forecasted power and water demands 2014-2017, areas within RAECs
license show significant growth in demand, requiring expansion of the existing power stations and
desalination plants. Tables A5.0 to A5.3 in appendix A5 summarize the development plan through 2014-
2017 for future power generation plants.

3.2.3 Reinforcement and Extension of Network Systems:

RAEC serves Customers at remote areas through different climate conditions from coastal areas where air
high humidity at high temperature and salt nature to mountainous and sandy areas. These climate and
environment conditions influence the performance, security and quality of power supplied to customers.
To do its duties in supplying electricity to customers as per obligations in sector law and license
conditions, RAEC scheduled reinforcement and extension works to its existing electricity networks or
adding new networks to satisfy areas demand at the specified security and quality factors.

3.2.4 Developing of the Metering System:

Accuracy of energy metering depends on the type of meters used. The accurate metered units are inputs
for calculating the power system losses and its efficiency, and determining the quality of power supplied
to customers. RAEC has recently implemented a trial roll-out of Smart Meters with remote
communications in Masirah Island, for customers, together with distribution substation and 11kV feeder
metering. The system, when fully integrated, will enable accurate measurement of distribution loses.

RAECO has also installed more than 100 of Power Quality meters in selected power plants and main
feeders. One of the characteristic of these meters is the ability to store all the data related to the system
quality in the internal memory. In addition, the data is saved in another database unit inside the station.
The main system in RAECO Head Office brings the data to the server room from all meter locations and it
is saved daily. The main system carries out analysis of all the data received as per power quality
international standards, as well as providing the user with various power quality reports: daily, weekly,
monthly and annually. In addition, the system sends an alarm if there is an interruption where the meter
located.

These initiatives will help RAECO to move forward to improve and deliver the best service for its
customers.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN 57


3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN
Figure 36 : Power Quality meters in the control Panel

Figure 37 : PQ secure (analyzing software) showing all quality parameters

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN 58


3.2.5 Interlink Small Capacity Power Plants To Local Systems:

Small power stations have low efficiency with high operation cost, therefore RAEC started the
implementation of interlinking of small and inefficient power station to the nearest one and forming local
power system (distribution system operation DSO) or to the nearest MIS such as interlinking Al Zahaia
areas to PDO system, interlink Khasab and Dibba to Tibat PS through the 132 kV Grid being constructed at
the area , interlink Ras Madrakha , Dhahar and Alajaiz areas to Aduqum Power Plant and interlink Najdah
to Hiij Power plant. The interlinks projects aimed to reduce power losses, maintenance and operation

3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN


costs and increase efficiency and reduce governmental subsidy. Through this proces the number of the
operating power plants has decreased from 56 (in 2009) to 35 (in 2014).

3.2.6 132kV line from Tibat to Khassab and Dibba:


The objectives of the above project are of technical , economic and environmental nature: the
integrated power system is more reliable, giving higher level of service quality to consumers, and more
economical, with lower overall investment and operation costs, compared to corresponding costs of
diesel units. The new power plant at Tibat will be expected to use natural gas, instead of distillate oil, with
lower heat consumption per generated kWh. The final system will interlink Tibat, Khassab and Dibba
power station.

3.2.7 Renewable Energy Projects:

Rural Areas Electricity Company (RAEC) was requested to implement Stage 1 of the Renewable Energy
Strategy (the implementation of Small Scale Pilot Projects and Further Feasibility Studies) as determined
by the Authority for Electricity Regulation, Oman The Authority in accordance with the
recommendations of the Renewable Energy Study issued by the Authority in June 2008. RAEC has
received proposals from international developers who are interested in implementing renewable energy
pilot projects in different locations of RAEC`s areas of license. The proposed projects are either
Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) types, or (Power Purchase Agreement) PPA types. RAEC
is working closely with the Authority for Electricity Regulation (AER) in finalizing the evaluation of the
received proposals. AER has appointed a specialist consultant to support in evaluating the proposals. A
PPA agreement with a local investor was signed to develop a solar pilot project in Al Mazyunah with
305 kW production capacity and about 550 MWh annual supplied energy. RAEC also has been authorised
by the public authority and AER to represent the government of Oman with MASDAR representing the
government of Abu Dhabi with the development of a 50 MW wind farm project in Harweel, Dhofar. A
Joint Development Agreement (JDA) was signed between RAEC and MASDAR in which, RAEC shall
participate in developing, own and operate the project. The power produced shall be supplied to OPWP
through a 132 kV grid system constructed by OETC. The project is planned to be due in service by 2017.
Table 34 presents the list of renewable energy projects that have been signed with investors and
execution started.

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN 59


Table 30 : List of ongoing Renewable Energy projects

Planned
Project Location Land Permit Completio Status
n
PPA agreement was signed; the investor has started
303 kW Al Mazyonah- Location agreed by
May 2015 execution subject to company registration / approvals
Solar Dhofar Ministry of Housing
by the relevant authorities
Land has been secured

3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN


Dhofar- JDA agreement was signed between RAEC /Oman &
50 MW and plot Krooki issued by 2017
Harweel Masdar/ Abu Dhabi
Ministry of Housing

In addition to the renewable projects presented in Table 30 above, RAEC is studying the deployment of
other renewable energy projects in many areas for the purpose of decreasing consumption, increase
energy efficiency of its system, and reducing impact on the environment as seen from Table 31 and Figure
40.

Table 31: List of Future Renewable Energy Projects

Project Status Type Site

2000 Kw Solar power Preparing scope of work 2015 Budget Ebri - Saudi border

2000 Kw Solar power Preparing scope of work 2015 Budget AL- Shargiah

2000 Kw Solar power Preparing scope of work 2015 Budget Mudhai - Dhofar

500 Kw Solar power Preparing scope of work 2015 Budget Fatkhait- Dhofar

500 Kw Solar power Preparing scope of work 2015 Budget Harweeb - Dhofar

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN 60


3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN

Figure 38 : REAC Planned Renewable Energy Projects

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | 3.0 INVESTMENT PLAN 61


Appendices
APPENDICES

RAEC Capability Statement 2014 - 2017 | Appendices 62