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FactoryTalk View ME and PanelView

Plus Programming
Student Lessons
Important User Information
This documentation, whether, illustrative, printed, online or electronic (hereinafter Documentation) is intended for use only as a learning aid
when using Rockwell Automation approved demonstration hardware, software and firmware. The Documentation should only be used as a
learning tool by qualified professionals.

The variety of uses for the hardware, software and firmware (hereinafter Products) described in this Documentation, mandates that those
responsible for the application and use of those Products must satisfy themselves that all necessary steps have been taken to ensure that each
application and actual use meets all performance and safety requirements, including any applicable laws, regulations, codes and standards in
addition to any applicable technical documents.

In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc., or any of its affiliate or subsidiary companies (hereinafter Rockwell Automation) be responsible or
liable for any indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or application of the Products described in this Documentation. Rockwell
Automation does not assume responsibility or liability for damages of any kind based on the alleged use of, or reliance on, this Documentation.

No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in the
Documentation.

Except as specifically agreed in writing as part of a maintenance or support contract, equipment users are responsible for:

x properly using, calibrating, operating, monitoring and maintaining all Products consistent with all Rockwell Automation or third-party
provided instructions, warnings, recommendations and documentation;
x ensuring that only properly trained personnel use, operate and maintain the Products at all times;
x staying informed of all Product updates and alerts and implementing all updates and fixes; and
x all other factors affecting the Products that are outside of the direct control of Rockwell Automation.

Reproduction of the contents of the Documentation, in whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation is prohibited.

Throughout this manual we use the following notes to make you aware of safety considerations:

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lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.
Attentions help you:
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dangerous voltage may be present.

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IMPORTANT
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FactoryTalk View ME and PanelView Plus Programming

Pg. Day 1 Pg. Day 2

1 Course Overview 103 Creating and Manipulating Graphic


(15 Minutes) Objects in FactoryTalk View ME
Graphic Displays (100 Minutes)
9 Configuring a PanelView Plus 119 Creating and Configuring Interactive
Terminal Controls in a FactoryTalk View ME
(45 Minutes) Application (90 Minutes)
33 Creating and Customizing a 145 Configuring Security for FactoryTalk
FactoryTalk View ME Application View ME Displays
(75 Minutes) (60 Minutes)
47 Configuring RSLinx Enterprise 163 Creating and Managing FactoryTalk
Communications in a FactoryTalk View ME Runtime Files
View ME Application (40 Minutes) (60 Minutes)
59 Configuring FactoryTalk Security for a 179 Configuring Basic Animation for
FactoryTalk View ME Application FactoryTalk View ME Objects
(75 Minutes) (100 Minutes)
75 Creating and Modifying Tags for a
FactoryTalk View ME Application
(60 Minutes)
89 Adding and Configuring FactoryTalk
View ME Graphic Displays
(40 Minutes)

FactoryTalk View ME and PanelView Plus Programming

Pg. Day 3 Pg. Day 4

201 Creating and Configuring Alarms for a 283 Creating Tag Placeholders and
FactoryTalk View ME Application Parameter Files for a FactoryTalk View
(75 Minutes) ME Graphic Display (65 Minutes)
221 Creating and Configuring Macros for 293 Creating and Configuring Information
a FactoryTalk View ME Application Messages for a FactoryTalk View ME
(75 Minutes) Application (60 Minutes)
231 Configuring Recipes with the 307 Adding Global Objects to a
RecipePlus System in a FactoryTalk FactoryTalk View ME Application
View ME Application (75 Minutes)
(45 Minutes)
247 Configuring Language Switching in a 333 Inserting Faceplates in a FactoryTalk
FactoryTalk View ME Application View ME Application
(50 Minutes) (100 Minutes)
261 Creating Data Logs and Trends for a
FactoryTalk View ME Application
(75 Minutes)

2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. Rev. February2012


MMvCCV204
Course Overview

Description
Course Purpose

This course is a skill-building course that provides


you with the skills necessary to develop
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition (ME)
applications that run on the next-generation
PanelView Plus terminals.

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During class, you will gain the following hands-on skills:

Prepare a PanelView Plus terminal for operation


Create a new application and run it on a terminal
Create, configure, and animate graphic objects on graphic
displays
Configure security for granting/restricting access to certain
graphic displays or for rights to perform certain actions
Create and configure messages and alarms for alerting
operators to changes in a process

This course is intended for individuals who need to


Who Should Attend
create FactoryTalk View ME applications for use on a
PanelView Plus terminal should attend this course.

Activity:
Introduce yourself, say the company you
work for, and tell the instructor and others
what you hope to take away from this
course.

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Prerequisites
Ability to perform basic Microsoft Windows tasks
Completion of the RSLogix 5000 Level 1: ControlLogix
System Fundamentals course (Course No. CCP146)
or basic experience with ControlLogix tags and
architecture

Question: Prerequisite Skills


Do you have the prerequisite skills required for this
course?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Dont know

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Agenda

Lets look at what we will cover in this course.

Activity: Course Agenda


Review the lessons and topics for the course.

The following course structure is generally used to


Meeting Course Objectives
help you understand the content and activities:

One lesson is devoted to each task.


Typical lesson includes most or all of these
sections:
What You Will Learn -- lesson objectives
When You Will Do This -- lesson context
Before You Begin -- preparatory material
Heres How -- demonstration of procedures
Exercise -- opportunity to perform new skills, often in
a hands-on lab environment
How Did You Do? -- where to go for feedback on
performance
Answers -- answers to exercises
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Student Materials

To enhance and facilitate your learning experience, the


following materials are provided as part of the course package:
Student Manual:
Contains the topical outlines and exercises
Used to follow presentations, take notes, and work through exercises
FactoryTalk View ME and PanelView Plus Procedures Guide,
which provides the steps required to complete the tasks in
the exercises.
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition Tutorials CD-ROM, which
includes the videos for FactoryTalk View ME and the final lab
with the solutions to all the exercises in the course.

During class, you can also reference the online FactoryTalk


View Machine Edition Users Guide, a detailed manual that
ships with the software as a .pdf file.

Additional information on using FactoryTalk View ME and


RSLinx Enterprise software can be accessed during class from
both software online Help systems.

Resource:
Your instructor will show you these job aids now.

10

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Throughout this course, you will have the

Hands-On Exercises
opportunity to practice the skills you have learned
through a variety of hands-on exercises:

Exercises focus on the skills introduced in each


lesson.
Exercises are performed on PanelView Plus 1000
and ControlLogix workstations.

11

The configuration and programming examples


Configuration and
shown in this course are intended solely for purposes Programming Examples
of example.

You will have dierent requirements associated with


your application. You must verify that the necessary
steps have been taken to meet all performance and
safety requirements.

Resource: Important User Information


See the Important User Information provided
with this material for more details.

12

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Foundation
Whats Next

After completing this training, you may be

ControlLogix/Studio 5000
Logix Designer
Curriculum Map
interested in the FactoryTalk View SE Programming
course.

Resource: Curriculum Map


See the curriculum map in the front of
your Student Manual for a complete
listing of available Visualization courses.

13

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Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.
Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Configuring a PanelView Plus
Terminal

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Identify PanelView Plus terminal
hardware components
Connect communications cables
Configure startup options for a
PanelView Plus terminal
Assign an IP address to a PanelView
Plus terminal

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Before a PanelView Plus terminal
can communicate with a
ControlLogix controller via
EtherNet/IP, you need to properly
connect the correct
communication cables and assign
an IP address to the terminal.

PanelView Plus operator terminals are the next


PanelView Plus Terminal
Overview
generation of the Rockwell Automation operator
interface product line.

The terminals are optimized for use in the following


applications:
Individual machines or small processes
Machine-level monitoring and control
Operator interaction

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PanelView Plus terminals can be used in new applications or
as an upgrade for existing PanelView standard or PanelView
enhanced terminals.

PanelView Plus terminals run applications designed using


FactoryTalk View ME software.

These applications can replace the following hard-wired


panel controls:
Pushbuttons
Selector switches
Pilot lights

Question:
How many PanelView Plus terminals do you have in
your plant that have taken the place of hard-wired
panel controls?

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A PanelView Plus terminal can also be programmed to
incorporate the following features:

Data entry fields


Message displays
Alarms
Diagnostics
Screen selectors
User-level and screen-level security
Full-color graphic objects
Animation

PanelView Plus operator terminals are available in


Available Terminals
the following models:

PanelView Plus 1500

PanelView Plus 1250

PanelView Plus 1000 PanelView Plus 400


PanelView Plus 600 PanelView Plus 700

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The PanelView Plus 6 terminal is only available in the 700,
1000, 1250 and 1500 models.

Users can choose from the following input options:


Keypad
Touchscreen
Combination of keypad and touchscreen

The terminals have a similar look and feel, except for the size
of the display panel.

The PanelView Plus 400-600 family of terminals has


Identifying PanelView Plus
Hardware Components
the following components:
Integrated logic and display module
Communications module (optional)

Communications
Module

Integrated Display/
Logic Module
10

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The PanelView Plus 700-1500 family of terminals has the
following modular components:

Display module
Logic module
Communications module (optional)

11

The modular design allows for flexible configuration,


installation, and upgrade:

Communications Module

Logic Module

Display
Module

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The PanelView Plus 6 can be identified by the design of its
logic module, which is dierent from other PanelView Plus
models:

Logic Module
SD (Secure Digital) Card Slot

Display Module

The same display module is used with PanelView Plus and


PanelView Plus 6 terminals.

13

The following components can be found on the


Front Panel Components
front panel of a PanelView Plus terminal:
Function Keys: Provide user-programmable
access to application-specific tasks.
The number of available function keys depends on
the terminal model you are using.
Navigation Keys: Allow users to move around an
application, select objects, and perform other
tasks.
Numeric Keypad: Allows users to enter numeric
data when required.
Touchscreen: Allows users to interact directly
with the loaded application.

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The front panel of a PanelView Plus 1000 terminal with
keypad or keypad/touchscreen input has the following
configuration:

Touchscreen

Numeric Keypad

Navigation Keys

Function Keys
15

Activity:
Identify which PanelView Plus terminal you have
in your workstation.

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The front panel of a PanelView Plus 1000 terminal with
touchscreen input has the following configuration:

Touchscreen

17

Activity:
Back Panel Components
As your instructor explains the back panel
components, write them in your manual.

24V DC Input
10/100BaseT Ethernet Port
Compact Flash Card Slot
Default Switch
DH-485 Port
DH+ Port
Logic Module LEDs
Reset Switch
Serial Port
USB Ports 18

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The back panel of a PanelView Plus 1000 terminal with
optional DH-485/DH+ comms module has the following
configuration:

DH-485 Port DH+ Port

Default Switch 24V DC Input

Reset Switch

Logic Module LEDs


USB Ports Serial Port 10/100BaseT Ethernet Port
Compact Flash Card Slot

19

The back panel of a PanelView Plus 6 terminal has the


following configuration:

AC or DC Input
SD Card Slot

Logic Module
LEDs
Default Switch

Reset Switch

10/100BaseT
USB Ports Serial Port
Ethernet Port

20

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Dierences between PanelView Plus
and PanelView Plus 6 Hardware
You will notice the following dierences between
the logic modules found on PanelView Plus and
PanelView Plus 6 terminals:

The PanelView Plus 6 logic module is slightly


thinner.
The PanelView Plus uses internal and external
CompactFlash cards; the PanelView Plus 6 only
has an external SD card.
LEDs, the Default switch and the Reset switch are
located on the side of the PanelView Plus logic
module but on the back of the PanelView Plus 6
module.

21

The PanelView Plus 6 supports a mini-USB connection.


The PanelView Plus 6 logic module does not include
removable RAM chips.
The PanelView Plus 6 does not support Remote I/O or
DeviceNet communications.

22

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In a network connection, a PanelView Plus terminal

Connecting Communication
Cables
can be connected to PLC-5 or SLC 500 processors or
ControlLogix controllers using one of the following
protocols:

ControlNet
DH+
DH-485
EtherNet/IP
Remote I/O
RS-232
DeviceNet

23

Once the communication cables have been properly


connected, the processor can receive information from the
terminal (input) and send process status data to the terminal
(output).

Activity:
Your instructor will review the various
communication connections.

24

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The following graphic shows one possible

ControlNet Connections
configuration of a ControlNet network consisting of
a computer, multiple processors, and a PanelView
Plus terminal:
1771 Chassis with
Computer 1756 Chassis with 1756-CNB 1771-ACN Module
Module and Controller

ControlNet Network
Serial
or Ethernet
Download

1756 Chassis with


PanelView Plus PLC-5/40C 1756-CNB Module and
Terminal Processor 1756-Remote I/O
25

The following graphic shows one possible


Data Highway Plus (DH+)
Connections
configuration of a DH+ network consisting of a PC,
multiple processors and a PanelView Plus terminal:

Computer PLC-5 Processor

DH+ Cable (Direct Transfer)


1770 1770 1770
SC SC SC
SLC 500 Processor

PLC-5 PLC-5 PanelView Plus Terminal


Processor Processor
Serial or Ethernet Download

26

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A PanelView Plus terminal can be connected to

DH-485 Connections
multiple SLC 500 processors and a computer via a
DH-485 network in the following manner:

SLC 500 Processor SLC 500 Processor


Link Couplers
(1747-AIC)

DH-485
Network
Serial
Connection

1747-PIC
or
1747-UIC

SLC 500 Processor PanelView Plus Terminal Computer

27

An example of an EtherNet/IP network is shown in


EtherNet/IP Network
Connections
the following graphic:

IBM-
Logix5000 Chassis with Compatible
1756-ENBT Module at Computer
Firewall or Router
100 Mbit/s with RSLinx
EtherNet/IP Software
Network at 100 Mbit/s
100BaseT Cable
Ethernet
Switch
RJ45 Connector

PanelView
To Next Ethernet Switch EtherNet/IP SLC Plus Terminal
/05 Processor

28

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A PanelView Plus terminal is connected to a PLC-5

Remote I/O Connections


processor, 1771-ASB adapter modules and a
computer via an RIO network in the following
manner:

PLC-5 Processor 1771-ASB 1771-ASB

Remote I/O Network (Belden 9463 Cable) PanelView


Computer Plus Terminal

Pass-Through Download
DH+ Cable (Belden 9463 Cable) Upload/Download Cable

29

A terminal with an RS-232 port is connected to an


RS-232 Connections
SLC 5/04 processor and a computer in the following
manner:

SLC 5/04 Processor

DH+ Connection
to SLC Channel 1
RS-232 Connection
to SLC Channel 0

Computer PanelView Plus


Terminal

30

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An SLC 5/04 processor only has one RS-232 port.

31

An example of a DeviceNet network is shown in the


DeviceNet Connections
following graphic:

1756 Chassis with 1756-DNB


Module and Controller

871 TM Inductive E3 Motor 1734-ADN Point I/O


Proximity Switch Overload DeviceNet Adapter

1756-DNB

DeviceNet
Network
Computer
RS-232
Connection

PowerFlex 40 ArmorBlock PanelView Plus 1770-KFD


AC Drive MaXum Terminal RS-232 Interface
Input Module

32

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The first time you apply power to a PanelView Plus

Configuring Startup Options for


a PanelView Plus Terminal
terminal, once the terminal has completed its
power-up sequence, the Configuration Mode
screen appears.

The screen is used to configure terminal settings


and perform other file management tasks.

Show & Tell:


Your instructor will show you and explain the
buttons on the Configuration Mode screen,
including the Reset button.

33

From the main menu, a user can perform the following tasks:

Load an application
Run an application
Configure or view application settings
Configure or view terminal settings
Delete log files before running
Reset the terminal

34

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Before running an application, you will need to

Initial Terminal Configuration


configure several non-application-related terminal
settings.
These settings are accessed from the Terminal
Settings screen:

35

At minimum, you will need to configure items from the


following submenus:

Diagnostics Setup
Networks and Communications
Startup Options
Time/Date/Regional Settings

36

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Some networks automatically assign IP addresses

Assign an IP Address to a
PanelView Plus Terminal
to Ethernet devices if DHCP is enabled. If DHCP is
not enabled, you can manually enter an IP address
for the terminal.

37

Question:
What is an IP address?

38

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For certain configuration settings (i.e., IP
address), the terminal must be reset for the
changes to take eect.

39

Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Identify PanelView Plus terminal
hardware components
Connect communications cables
Configure startup options for a
PanelView Plus terminal
Assign an IP address to a PanelView
Plus terminal

40

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Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

41

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Do you know where the
communications module is
located on the PanelView
Plus terminal?
Did you instructor show you
how to move around an
application using the
navigation keys on the
PanelView Plus terminal?
Continued

42

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
How is the PanelView Plus
terminal in your workstation
connected to the network?
Did your instructor show you
how to access the Startup
Options screen on the
PanelView Plus terminal?
Where do you assign an IP
address in a PanelView Plus
terminal?

43

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Identify PanelView Plus terminal
hardware components
Connect communications cables
Configure startup options for a
PanelView Plus terminal
Assign an IP address to a PanelView
Plus terminal

44

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

45

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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32
Creating and Customizing a
FactoryTalk View ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Identify FactoryTalk View Studio
software components
Open an existing FactoryTalk View
ME application
Create a new FactoryTalk View ME
application
Configure project settings

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It is a good ideal to become
familiar with FactoryTalk View
Studio software components
before you create an application.
Before running your FactoryTalk View ME application on
a PanelView Plus terminal, you need to configure
settings on how your application will appear and
behave during runtime.

FactoryTalk View ME software is part of the


FactoryTalk View ME Software
Overview
Rockwell Automation ViewAnyWare visualization
hardware and software development eort.

FactoryTalk View ME software provides a human/


machine interface for individual machines or small
processes in a manufacturing environment.

The FactoryTalk View ME application communicates


with programmable logic controllers using
FactoryTalk (RSLinx Enterprise) and OPC (OLE for
Process Control) servers.

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Question:
What software does the term FactoryTalk View
Enterprise Series refer to?

FactoryTalk View ME includes two products:


Identifying FactoryTalk View
Studio Software Components

FactoryTalk View Studio: Contains the tools for


creating machine-level monitoring and control
applications, including real-time animated
graphic displays, trends, and alarm reporting.

FactoryTalk View ME Station: Provides the run-


time environment for your FactoryTalk View
Studio-designed project.

Use FactoryTalk View ME Station to run the


applications you develop in FactoryTalk View
Studio.
6

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When you start FactoryTalk View ME software, you

Opening an Existing FactoryTalk


View ME Application
are prompted to either open an existing application
or create a new application.

By default, the New/Open Machine Edition


Application dialog box opens with the Existing tab
in view.

The New tab allows you to generate a new


Creating A New FactoryTalk
View ME Application
FactoryTalk View ME application:

Application Name (32


Characters Maximum)

Description of
Application

Create PanelView Plus


Compact Application

Default Language for


Application

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In Windows XP new projects are saved on your computer
using the following path: C:\Documents and Settings\ All
Users\Documents\RSView Enterprise\ME\HMI Projects.

In Windows Vista new projects are saved on your computer


using the following path: C:\Users\Public\Public
Documents\RSView Enterprise\ME\HMI Projects.

FactoryTalk View ME software also allows you to import the


following types of existing files:
PanelBuilder32 applications (.pba)
PanelBuilder 1400e applications (.pvc)
Applications downloaded from PanelView standard
terminals (.pva)
Legacy FactoryTalk View ME applications (.med)

Imported applications will require modification


of existing components. See the online
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition Uses Guide for
more details.

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The Application Manager is the development tool

Application Manager
that FactoryTalk View Studio software uses to:
Copy an application
Delete an application
Backup an application
Rename an application
Restore a previously backed up project or
application
Restore a design (.med) file from a runtime (.mer)
file

11

Runtime files must be saved at version 5.0 or


above for this feature to be available.

Show & Tell:


Your instructor will show you and explain the
Application Manager.

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After creating a new application or opening an

Main Screen Components


existing application, the main software screen is
displayed:
Graphics
Toolbar
Standard
Toolbar
Object
Toolbar
Explorer
Window Graphic
Display

Display
Window

Status Diagnostics
Bar List

13

The main software screen can display the following


components:
Diagnostics List: Continually records information about
system activity for the local computer such as command
and macro usage, operator comments, subsystem-related
warnings and errors, and communication errors.
Display Window: Presents a work space for components
selected from the Application Explorer window.
Explorer Window: Provides access to the components of
the open application.
Graphic Display: Provides space for users to design
application screens.
Status Bar: Displays information about selected items.

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As you work with an application, you will access the

Explorer Window
necessary application components and editors
using the Explorer window:

Folder

Editors

Project
Component
Sub-Folders

15

Commonly used application components include:


Graphic displays
Global objects
Graphic libraries
Images
Data log models

Show & Tell:


Your instructor will show you and explain these
application components in the Explorer window.

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Commonly used editors include:
Tags editor
Project Settings editor
Startup editor
Global Connections editor
Alarm Setup editor
Macro editor
RecipePlus editor

17

Each application requires specific project settings


Configuring Project Settings
to ensure that the size of the graphic display
matches the available screen area for the
application. These settings are accessed using the
Project Settings editor:

18

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The Project Settings editor contains the following two tabs:
General Tab: Allows user configuration of the project
window size.

The project window size must match the


resolution of the PanelView Plus terminal you are
using.

Runtime Tab: Allows user configuration of the following


features that are displayed when the application is running:
Title bar text
Border for the application screens
Project window position
Ability to log a user out of an application after a defined period of
inactivity 19

The following are the best practices for configuring


Best Practices
project settings:
Project settings aect how your graphic displays
look. Specify project settings before you create
graphic displays.
If you choose to scale displays, changing the
project settings back to their original settings
may not return the project to its original
condition. If you may need to restore the
application, be sure you make a backup copy
before scaling.

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Identify FactoryTalk View Studio
software components
Open an existing FactoryTalk View ME
application
Create a new FactoryTalk View ME
application
Configure project settings

21

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Multimedia:
The instructor will now show a video.

23

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
What FactoryTalk View ME
software component allows
you to create the application?
Ensure your instructor has
shown you how to open an
existing FactoryTalk View ME
application.
You want to create an application in Spanish.
Where would you do this in FactoryTalk View
ME Studio software?
Where would you access components of an
open application?
24

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Identify FactoryTalk View Studio
software components
Open an existing FactoryTalk View
ME application
Create a new FactoryTalk View ME
application
Configure project settings

25

Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

26

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Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.
Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Configuring RSLinx Enterprise
Communications in a
FactoryTalk View ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Add a driver for design or runtime
communications
Add devices and device shortcuts for
RSLinx Enterprise communications

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Before a FactoryTalk View ME
application running on a PanelView
Plus terminal can communicate with
a ControlLogix controller or SLC 500
processor, an RSLinx Enterprise
driver needs to be added

Definition:
RSLinx Enterprise Software
Overview
RSLinx Enterprise: A FactoryTalk-enabled
communications server that is bundled
with FactoryTalk View ME software. It links
networks and devices to the following
applications:

Microsoft Windows 2000


Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows CE

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Question:
Do any of your applications require a third-party
communications server?

By default, FactoryTalk View ME communications are handled


using RSLinx Enterprise software. The software is accessed
from the Explorer window of an open application:

RSLinx
Enterprise Icon

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RSLinx Enterprise software is not a replacement for

Comparing RSLinx Enterprise


and RSLinx Classic Software
RSLinx Classic software. Each package serves a
specific purpose:

RSLinx Enterprise software


Collects runtime data for FactoryTalk View ME
applications from a specific processor or controller
Provides optimized communications with Logix5000
controllers
RSLinx Classic software
Provides the network connections necessary to upload
and download logic files to processors or controllers
Optimized for use with PLC-5 and SLC processors

RSLinx Classic software and RSLinx Enterprise


software cannot share the same driver.

To run both applications on the same computer,


RSLinx Classic software and RSLinx Enterprise
software must share the same COM port. See the
online RSLinx Enterprise Help system for more
information.

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Activity:

Key Terms
As a group, define the following terms:
device, driver and tag.

Definition:
Design Configuration: A communications
path between a development computer
running FactoryTalk View Studio software
and the processor(s) controlling an
application.

Creating a design configuration allows users to test


applications from the development computer
before downloading the application to a PanelView
Plus terminal.
9

Definition:
Runtime Configuration: A communications path
between a PanelView Plus terminal running
FactoryTalk View ME Station software and the
processor(s) controlling an application.

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By default, the RSLinx Enterprise network

Adding a Driver for Design or


Runtime Communications
configuration in a FactoryTalk View ME application
is blank. Initiate communications setup using the
RSLinx Enterprise Configuration Wizard:

Communications
Configuration
Options

11

Show & Tell:


Your instructor will show you and discuss other
RSLinx Enterprise drivers.

The workstation configuration can be used for downloading


applications to a PanelView Plus terminal.

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The Communication Setup editor is used to create both

Adding Devices and Device


Shortcuts for RSLinx
Enterprise Communications
design (local) and (runtime) target configurations:

Network
Configuration
Tabs

Device Shortcut
List
Preconfigured
Drivers
Device

Network Mode
Indicator

Oine Tag File


(ControlLogix
Controllers Only)

13

The following features aid in network configuration:

Device Shortcut: A communications path from the


development computer (Design tab) or PanelView Plus
terminal (Runtime tab) to a selected processor or
controller.

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Question:
Have any of you created topics in RSLinx Classic
software?

15

Device Shortcut List: Displays a list of user-generated


shortcuts.
Network Configuration Tab: Displays the active network
configuration (Design or Runtime).
Network Mode Indicator: Helps the user determine
network status.

The network mode indicator also helps you identify the active
network configuration tab. The Design tab is usually
configured online, while the Runtime tab is always configured
oine.

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Oine Tag File: Allows you to browse ControlLogix tags
oine using the appropriate .acd file.

Preconfigured Drivers: Lets users choose from one of the


following default drivers:
Ethernet and EtherNet/IP combination
Virtual Backplane (used with SoftLogix controllers and ControlNet
communications)

17

Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Add a driver for design or runtime
communications
Add devices and device shortcuts
for RSLinx Enterprise
communications

18

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Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

19

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Where do you add an RSLinx
Enterprise driver in
FactoryTalk View Studio
software?
Do you know the dierence
between using RSLinx
Enterprise and RSLinx Classic
software?
Did your instructor show you
where to add device and
device shortcuts?

20

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Add a driver for design or runtime
communications
Add devices and device shortcuts
for RSLinx Enterprise
communications

21

Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

22

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Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.
Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Configuring FactoryTalk Security
for a FactoryTalk View ME
Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create FactoryTalk users and groups
Setup system and product policies

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Being able to properly configure
security is important when:
Securing access to certain graphic
displays of your FactoryTalk View
ME application.
Setting up password character
length and complexity
Setting up log on frequency

FactoryTalk Security is a part of FactoryTalk


FactoryTalk Security
Directory, which is installed with the FactoryTalk
Services Platform.

Activity:
As your instructor explains centralization,
access control, and windows integration
features, write them down in your manual.

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Centralization:
Centralized Authentication of User Credentials
Centralized Access Control
Centralized Management of System-Wide Policies
All Rockwell Software products that are part of the system
share those same policies.
Access control:
Line-of-Sight Access Control
Role-Based Access Control
Windows integration:
Integration with Windows Security
No Dependence on Windows Domains
Single Sign-on Support
Disconnected Operation
5

To set up security for a FactoryTalk View ME


Security System Basic Element
Setup
application, you must log on as a user with
administrative privileges to the FactoryTalk
Directory server.

If you have administrative privileges on a computer


which FactoryTalk View ME software has been
installed, you can use that user name and password
to log onto the FactoryTalk Directory.

When FactoryTalk View ME is installed on a


computer, the FactoryTalk Local Directory is
automatically created.
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Use one of these methods:

Logging onto the FactoryTalk


Directory
Start a FactoryTalk View ME software component,
such as FactoryTalk View Studio.
Use the Log On to FactoryTalk utility.

Single sign-on allows one user to access multiple


products in a FactoryTalk-enabled system without
having to log on separately to each product.

As long as FactoryTalk Security Services authorize


the single sign-on user, there will be no further
prompts to log on in the current Windows session.

In FactoryTalk Security CPR 9, single sign-on is enabled by


default, so users are not prompted to log onto FactoryTalk
Security. If you are upgrading from CPR 7, or if you changed
the default FactoryTalk security configuration, you may be
prompted to log on.

FactoryTalk Security allows you to reference user accounts


that have already been set up in Windows. These are called
Windows-linked users.

The link symbol in the Explorer window indicates that a user is


a Windows-linked user.

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During the FactoryTalk View ME installation, the
FactoryTalk Services Platform install grants the
Windows Administrators and Authenticated User
groups full rights to FactoryTalk security aware
products.

For the FactoryTalk Local Directory, the Windows-linked


Administrator group and a Windows-linked group called
Authenticated Users is added to the FactoryTalk Directory.

By default, the desktop Windows user will be logged in when


FactoryTalk View Studio opens.

Before you can add users and user groups to a


Creating FactoryTalk Security
Users and Groups
FactoryTalk View ME application, the user and users
groups have to be added or created in FactoryTalk
Security.

An administrative account has full access and is


allowed to create users and groups, assign
permissions, and set up system policies for an
application.

It is recommended that you create FactoryTalk Security


native user groups and setup security permissions for
them. You can then populate the FactoryTalk native
groups with FactoryTalk native user or Windows-linked
users or Windows-linked user groups.
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Permissions determine which users can perform

Permissions
which actions on specific resources in the system.

There are two kinds of permissions that you can set


on resources:

Allow Permissions: Grant users permission to


perform actions on resources from all computers
or only from certain computers on a network.

Deny Permissions: Prevent users from


performing actions on resources from all
computers or only from certain computers on a
network.
11

Question:
Can you name some resource examples that
maintainers should not have access to?

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You can also remove all permissions from an object by
clearing both the Allow and Deny check boxes. This allows
the object to inherit permissions assigned at a higher level:

13

These permissions are required for a user to be able


Required Security Permissions
to modify security policies:

Common > Configure Security


Common > Create Children
Common > List Children
Common > Read

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15

Users are added to FactoryTalk Security through the Users and


Groups folders in the System folder at the bottom of the
Explorer window:

For more information on creating users and user groups,


refer to your Job Aid.
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One of the first tasks you should perform when

Specifying Which Users Can Set


up Security
setting up security is to ensure that only a group of
authorized, trusted users is able to change security
settings in the FactoryTalk Directory.

You can do this by allowing only members of the


Administrators group permission to perform the
Configure Security action on the FactoryTalk
Directory.

17

Definition:
Setting Up System and Product
Policies
Policies: Security and audit specifications
stored by the FactoryTalk Directory service.

Policies apply to any FactoryTalk-enabled product


that a Local or Network Directory manages. You can
set up the following policies:
User Rights Assignment Settings: Determine
which users can backup and restore FactoryTalk
Directory contents.
Audit Settings: Determine what security
information is recorded while the system is in
use.
Example: Whether to log an audit message to
FactoryTalk Diagnostics when a user attempts an
action and is allowed or denied access.
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Security Settings: Determine general features of user
accounts and passwords and whether single sign-on is in
use. Examples of security policies include:
How frequently passwords must be changed
How many times a user can attempt to log on before the account is
disabled.

19

The File menu allows you to log o or log on to FactoryTalk


View Studio:

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Use the Policy Settings tab to specify security policies that
aect the following:

User, computer, and group accounts:


Length of time for a valid session
Whether deleted user accounts appear in user lists
Number of failed log-on attempts before account is locked out
Whether the system keeps a record of deleted accounts

21

Passwords:
Password complexity
Password life (days)
Password character length
Number of previous user passwords remembered
Time in advance to warn user to change expiring password

Log on frequency:
Single log on to access multiple parts of the system
Log on to access each part of system

22

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The File menu allows you to log o or log on to FactoryTalk
View Studio:

23

When you LogOn, you will get a prompt to enter the


FactoryTalk user name and password:

24

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The following are best practices for configuring

Best Practices
FactoryTalk security:

Windows CE supports FactoryTalk native users


and groups but not Authenticated users. On
Windows CE terminals, Windows-linked users
must be added to the FactoryTalk Directory
before they can be logged in.

If you expect the need to move Windows


accounts from one domain to another, avoid
using individual, Windows-linked user accounts
as much as possible.

25

Use Windows-linked user group accounts instead.

Windows-linked user group accounts can be moved from


one domain to another, while keeping security permissions
for the group accounts intact.

Always have more than one user account that is a member


of the FactoryTalk Administrators group.
Assign permissions to groups rather than to users.
Assign permissions at as high a level as possible.

26

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create FactoryTalk users and groups
Setup system and product policies

27

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

28

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Has your instructor shown
you how to assign
permissions to a user group?
How do you assign a user
group to a new user?
Has your instructor shown
you how to setup a user so
that his or her password
never expires?

29

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create FactoryTalk users and groups
Setup system and product policies

30

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

31

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Creating and Modifying Tags for
a FactoryTalk View ME
Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create HMI tags and folders
View HMI tags in the Tags editor
Import and export HMI tags
using .csv files
Create and modify HMI tags and
folders using Microsoft Excel
software

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When creating a FactoryTalk View
ME application, tags should be
created in order for the application
running on a PanelView Plus
terminal to communicate with a
controller or processor.

Question:
Is anyone familiar with tags?

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Definition:

Key Terms
Direct Reference Tag: A data source that
resides within a controller or processor.
Changes to a direct reference tag are
immediately reflected in a FactoryTalk View
ME application.

The FactoryTalk Directory component built into


FactoryTalk View ME software lets users browse
directly to a tag in a processor or controller.

Definition:
HMI Tag: A data source that resides within
a FactoryTalk View ME tag database. HMI
tags can reference either a physical device
or a location in local memory (RAM).
5

HMI folders and tags are created and viewed using


Creating and Viewing HMI Tags
and Folders
the Tags editor, which also is called the Tag
Database. HMI folders can be used to organize tags
into logical groupings, such as for a machine or for
a packaging process.

It is not necessary to create HMI tag folders.


However, if you want to use tag folders, they
must be created before you create the tags that
are stored in that folder.

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If your application contains multiple machines that reference
the same tags, you can duplicate an existing HMI folder.

Renaming the folder renames the tags within the folder.

The Tags editor is divided into the following sections:


Form View: The section of the Tags editor reserved for
entering and modifying tag data.
Spreadsheet View: The section of the Tags editor that
provides a listing of the existing HMI tags and folders.

Form View

Spreadsheet
View

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The Search For: text box in the spreadsheet view can be
used to find specific tags in the database.

Buttons located above the Tags editor can be used to


perform a number of tag creation and modification tasks:

Delete Insert Delete Create


Row Row Folder Folder

Refresh
Tags Editor DB
Duplicate Duplicate Browse
Tag Folder

For most application needs, the use of direct


Uses for HMI Tags
reference tags is preferred. However, HMI tags must
be used for the following situations:

When values from a direct reference tag require


scaling or osetting, the resulting value must be
stored in an HMI tag.
When a tag being referenced requires specific
minimum and maximum values, an HMI tag is
required.

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HMI tags are classified based on the type of

HMI Tag Types


information received from a data source. Users can
choose from the following tag types:

Analog Tags: Store a numeric value based on a


range of values defined for the tag.

11

Question:
Can anyone give an example of what an analog tag
can be used for?

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Digital Tags: Store a numeric value of either 0 or 1. They
are used to store a devices on or o state.
String Tags: Store ASCII characters, including whole words.
The maximum allowable string size is 82 characters.

13

In the Tags editor, the form view of a tag changes


Tag Data Sources
based on the selected data source. HMI tags can be
classified as follows:

Memory Tags: Reference a memory location


within the FactoryTalk View data table.
Device Tags: Reference data stored in external
controllers or processors.

Show & Tell:


Your instructor will explain and show you
where the system tags are located.

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System tags are specialized read-only memory tags that are
created automatically along with a new application. These
tags reference information such as system time and date or
the logged-in user.

If the tag references a memory location, users can define a


starting value for the tag and whether the tag value is
retained when an application is closed and reopened:

Starting Tag
Value
Tag Value
Retention
15

Users can select the data source for a device tag using the Tag
Browser:

Tag Address

16

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Keep the following points in mind when creating

Analog Tag Creation Tips


analog tags:
Choose from the following data types:
Unsigned integer (16 bits)
Integer (16 bits)
Long integer (32 bits)
Floating point (32 bits)
Byte (8 bits)
Three-digit BCD (binary-coded decimal)
Four-digit BCD

17

BCD data types are reserved for


Allen-Bradley devices that use
direct driver nodes. Using this
data type with an OPC server (i.e.,
RSLinx Classic software) can
produce unexpected results.

18

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For analog tags that use Device as the data source, select
the data type that matches the format stored in the
controller or processor.
When entering scale and oset values, use the decimal
point (.) as the decimal symbol, regardless of the symbol
specified in the Regional Settings of the Windows Control
Panel.
Use the following formulas when scaling data:
FactoryTalk View value = (data source value X scale) + oset
Data source value = (FactoryTalk View value -- oset) / scale

19

If you are using HMI tags from a previously created


Importing and Exporting HMI
Tags using .csv Files
application, use the Tag Import and Export Wizard
to manipulate tag database files:

Import and
Export Options

20

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Show & Tell:
Your instructor will explain and show you how to
access the Tag Import and Export Wizard.

When merging HMI tag databases, you must


open two instances of FactoryTalk View ME
software. For additional help, see the FactoryTalk
View ME and PanelView Plus Procedures Guide or
the online FactoryTalk View ME Help system.

21

Certain tag properties can be modified using the


Creating and Modifying HMI Tags
and Folders using Microsoft
Excel Software
Tags editor; however some properties (i.e., tag
name) can only be modified by exporting the HMI
tag file and opening the corresponding .csv file
using Microsoft Excel software:

Folders
Section

Tag
Section

22

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create HMI tags and folders
View HMI tags in the Tags editor
Import and export HMI tags
using .csv files
Create and modify HMI tags and
folders using Microsoft Excel
software

23

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

24

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Do you know where to
create HMI tags and folders?
Do you know where to view
a listing of existing HMI tags
and folders?
Has your instructor shown
you the import and export
options in the Tag Import
and Export Wizard?
How can you modify an
existing tag name?
25

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create HMI tags and folders
View HMI tags in the Tags editor
Import and export HMI tags
using .csv files
Create and modify HMI tags and
folders using Microsoft Excel
software

26

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

27

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Adding and Configuring
FactoryTalk View ME Graphic
Displays

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Add an existing graphic display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Add a new graphic display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Configure graphic display settings
Customize the layout of FactoryTalk
View ME software

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You will perform these tasks in the
following situations:
To speed the overall development
process
To help ensure an application has
a consistent look and feel
To help programmers more easily
access common development
tools

Accessing the Displays folder from the Explorer


Adding New and Existing
Graphic Displays
window allows users to create new graphic displays,
add existing graphic displays, or import/export a
display to an application:
New Display Existing Display Export/Import
Display

Displays
Folder

Graphic displays are identified by a .gfx extension.


4

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The Standard toolbar provides shortcuts to creating a new
graphic display as well as performing other application-wide
tasks:

Create Show/Hide
New Print Explorer
Display Display Open Window
Application

Create New
Application Open File Transfer
Save Test Utility
Display
Application

The General tab of the Display Settings dialog box


Configuring Graphic Display
Settings
allows users to define how the graphic display will
look during runtime:

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Other graphic display settings on the tab
become active or inactive based on the display
type selection.

The Behavior tab allows users to define how a


display will behave at runtime:

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Keep the following points in mind when

Display Setting Best Practices


configuring the maximum tag update rate (how
often tag data is sent from a processor or controller)
for a graphic display:
The default update rate is 1 second.

Question:
What are some factors that would lead to an update
rate longer than 1 second?

The update rate should not be faster than a controller or


runtime device can respond.
For most applications, an update rate of 0.5 seconds is
acceptable.

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FactoryTalk View Studio provides several features that

Customizing the Layout of


FactoryTalk View ME Software
can aid in the development of graphic displays. Users
can choose from the following options:

Enabling or disabling the status bar, diagnostics list,


or Workbook mode
Viewing graphic displays in grayscale
Floating or docking toolbars
Showing or hiding the Application Explorer
window
Configuring grid settings

11

By default, the status bar and the diagnostics list at


Status Bar and Diagnostics List
the bottom of the FactoryTalk View Studio screen
are enabled when the software opens.

Question:
Why would you want to close the status bar
and the diagnostics list at the bottom of the
screen?

12

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Users can also undock the diagnostics list, creating a floating
dialog box that can be moved to any location within the
software window:

Floating
Diagnostics List

The Diagnostics list can be configured using the Diagnostics


List Setup editor. 13

When Workbook mode is enabled, users can


Workbook Mode
navigate between multiple open graphic displays
by clicking the appropriate tab at the bottom of the
project window:

Workbook Mode Tabs


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The PanelView Plus 400 and PanelView Plus 600

Grayscale Displays
terminals display graphics in grayscale. If you are
developing an application for one of these
terminals, you can configure FactoryTalk View
Studio for grayscale display.

15

In addition to the standard toolbar, FactoryTalk


Docked and Floating Toolbars
View ME software provides a number of toolbars
that can speed up the creation of graphic displays:
Graphics
Objects
Alignment
States
Pattern styles
Back styles
Foreground and background colors

The available toolbars vary based on whether or


not you have an open graphic display.

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Depending on your preference, toolbars can be docked
above the project window or float anywhere within the
window:
Docked Toolbar

Floating
Toolbar

17

Closing the Application Explorer window can


Application Explorer Window
Closing
provide a larger area in which to view and develop
graphic displays:

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Enabling a grid for FactoryTalk View ME graphic

Grid Configuration
displays provides a reliable method for lining up
graphic objects on the display:

Grid Lines

19

Question:
Does anyone know what the snap-to-grid feature
does?

20

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Add an existing graphic display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Add a new graphic display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Configure graphic display settings
Customize the layout of FactoryTalk View
ME software

21

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these procedures,
follow along in the associated job aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
How do you add an existing
graphic display to a
FactoryTalk View ME
application?
Did your instructor show you how to add a new
graphic display to a FactoryTalk View ME
application?
Has your instructor shown you how to add a title
bar to a graphic screen?
Do you know how to float or dock toolbars?
Do you know how to turn the grid on and o?
23

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Add an existing graphic display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Add a new graphic display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Configure graphic display settings
Customize the layout of FactoryTalk
View ME software

24

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

25

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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102
Creating and Manipulating
Graphic Objects in FactoryTalk
View ME Graphic Displays

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create and configure graphic objects
Add graphic library objects
Manipulate graphic objects
Arrange graphic objects
Rotate graphic objects
Modify object properties using the
Property Panel and Object Explorer
Convert graphic objects to wallpaper

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You will perform these tasks in the
following situations:
Create and configure graphic
objects to customize graphic
displays for an operator.
Manipulate graphic objects to
improves user interaction with a
FactoryTalk View ME application.
Eectively use Property Panel and Object Explorer to save
development time since you can perform edits to
multiple graphic objects at the same time.
Convert static graphic objects to wallpaper to reduce the
amount of memory needed to run an application on a
PanelView Plus terminal. 3

Definition:
Key Terms
Drawing Objects: Lines and geometric
shapes (i.e., ellipses, polygons) that can be
added to graphic displays.

Definition:
Graphics Library: A collection of files that
contain pre-designed graphic objects that
can be incorporated with existing graphic
displays.

Users can modify items in the Graphics Library or


create new library files.

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Text and graphic objects are used to provide

Creating and Configuring


Graphic Objects
operators with an accurate representation of the
machine or process they are controlling and
monitoring.

Question:
Does anyone have previous experience working with
HMI development software?

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The Objects menu provides a list of available tools.

Objects Menu
The drawing objects submenu is used when
creating text and graphic objects:

Drawing Objects
Submenu

The Objects toolbar provides shortcuts to creating


Objects Toolbar
basic graphic objects:

Basic Drawing
Objects

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Users can access a graphic objects Properties

Object Properties Dialog Box


dialog box to modify an objects size, color, position
on the graphic display and other features.

The options available from the dialog box change


based on the graphic object you are working with:

Text Properties
Dialog Box

Adds Numeric,
String, or Time and
Date Variables

Graphic library files can be accessed from the


Adding Graphic Library Objects
Application Explorer window:

Objects from an open library file can be dragged (or


copied and pasted) to another graphic display. 10

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Individual images in the Graphics Library can be

Available Graphics Types


created or imported from the following file types:
Bitmap files (.bmp)
JPEG files (.jpg)
AutoCAD files (.dxf )
Windows metafiles (.wmf )

Use .bmp files whenever possible, because the files


remain a static size at runtime. Using a compressed
file (such as a .jpg file) can result in unexpected
memory use at runtime.

11

The Graphics toolbar, the Arrange menu, and the


Manipulating Graphic Objects
Objects menu all perform specific tasks when
manipulating graphic objects.

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Question:
How many of you have used the graphics tools in
Microsoft Oce?

13

One key component to manipulating graphic objects is the


ability to resize them.

The following tools are available for resizing graphic objects:


The Common tab of a graphic objects Properties dialog box
lets users change the object size using pixel measurements.
Selected graphic objects are surrounded by handles, which
can be dragged to create the desired size.

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The Graphics toolbar provides shortcuts to performing the
following graphic manipulations:

Space Flip
Vertical Vertical
Cut Copy Paste Duplicate Space
Horizontal Flip Horizontal

Show/Hide
Send To Object Explorer
Group Zoom Undo Redo
Back In
Ungroup Bring To Zoom Show/Hide
Front Out Property
Panel

15

When working with complex graphic objects, the following


commands are commonly used:
Space Vertical and Space Horizontal provide a uniform
distance between graphic objects.

You must have a minimum of three graphic


objects selected to use these commands.

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Group and Ungroup help combine individual graphic
objects into a single unit (or break a previously grouped
object into its individual components).

It is not necessary to ungroup a grouped graphic object to


modify the properties of a single component of the group.

Bring to Front and Send to Back help organize graphic


objects that are stacked on top of one another.

Flip Vertical and Flip Horizontal change the orientation


of a graphic object.

17

The Arrange menu can also be used to manipulate


Arranging Graphic Objects
graphic objects:

Alignment Tools Available


from Arrange Menu

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The Rotate tool on the Objects menu allows users

Rotating Graphic Objects


to rotate selected graphic objects:

Rotates
Graphic
Object

19

The Rotate tool works with all drawing objects


except text, images, panels, and rounded
rectangles.

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Modifying Object Properties Using the
Property Panel and Object Explorer
The Property Panel and Object Explorer provide
advanced graphics modification and
troubleshooting techniques. Both tools can be
accessed from the Graphics toolbar.

21

The Property Panel can be used as an alternative to an


individual graphic objects Properties dialog box, or it can be
used to modify properties of multiple graphic objects at the
same time:

Name of Selected
Graphic Object(s)

Graphic Object
Properties

Description of
Selected Property
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The Object Explorer can be used to access properties of
individual graphic objects that have been grouped. Selecting
an object from the Object Explorer activates the handles
surrounding the selected graphic object:

Handles Around
Selected Object
Filler Capper

23

When creating complex graphic displays, a


Converting Graphic Objects to
Wallpaper
common best practice is to convert some graphic
objects to wallpaper in an eort to reduce the size
of a graphic display.

Do not convert a graphic object to wallpaper if you


plan to animate the object.

If you convert multiple graphic objects to wallpaper


and later decide to animate one of the objects, you
must first unlock all wallpaper objects and then
reconvert the static graphics back to wallpaper.

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create and configure graphic objects
Add graphic library objects
Manipulate graphic objects
Arrange graphic objects
Rotate graphic objects
Modify object properties using the
Property Panel and Object Explorer
Convert graphic objects to wallpaper

25

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

26

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Has your instructor shown you
the Objects menu and the
Objects toolbar?
Do you know how to add a
graphic from the Graphics
Library?
How do you know when a graphic
object is selected?
Has your instructor shown you how
to arrange graphic objects?
Continued

27

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Can you name several drawing
objects that cannot be
rotated?
Why would you want to use
the Property Panel and Object
Explorer?
Why would you want to
convert graphic objects to
wallpaper?

28

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create and configure graphic
objects
Add graphic library objects
Manipulate graphic objects
Arrange graphic objects
Rotate graphic objects
Modify object properties using the
Property Panel and Object Explorer
Convert graphic objects to
wallpaper
29

Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

30

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Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.
Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Creating and Configuring
Interactive Controls in a
FactoryTalk View ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create and configure pushbuttons
Assign function keys to interactive
objects
Create and configure indicators
Create a gauges, bar graphs and
scales
Create and configure numeric and
string displays
Test graphic displays and FactoryTalk
View ME application 2

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Properly adding and configuring
interactive controls in a
FactoryTalk View ME application
is important when:
Users want to control
applications on a keypad-only
PanelView Plus terminal.
Operators want to be able to tell at a glance if a machine or
process is operating normally
Testing graphic displays and the entire application is a good
ideal when you want to identify potential programming errors
and be able to fix them before the application is downloaded
to a PanelView Plus terminal.
3

Pushbutton creation relies on the use of the Objects


Creating and Configuring
Pushbuttons
menu or Objects toolbar.

Objects menu
provides choice of
button types.

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The Objects toolbar provides shortcuts to creating
pushbuttons:

Latched Multistate
Pushbutton Pushbutton Ramp
Momentary Pushbutton
Pushbutton

Interlocked
Pushbutton
Maintained
Pushbutton

Pushbuttons are configured using the Properties


Configuration Dialog Boxes
dialog box. The configurable properties vary based
on the pushbutton being created:

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Show & Tell:
Your instructor will show you and explain the
dierent tabs in the Properties dialog box.

When configuring parameters in the Connections tab, the


Tag Browser will help assign direct-reference, HMI, or system
tags to a pushbutton:

Direct-Reference Tags
HMI Tags
System Tags

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When assigning a connection to a pushbuttons
Value control, you must use a valid tag.

Each available pushbutton operates in a slightly


Pushbutton Types
dierent manner. The pushbutton you choose for
an application is based on the expected behavior of
the pushbutton.

Do not use a pushbutton within


your FactoryTalk View ME
application as an emergency stop.
An emergency stop button should
always be physically wired to the
machine.

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Momentary pushbuttons change from an initial

Momentary Pushbuttons
state to a new state when an operator presses the
pushbutton.

When the pushbutton is released, it returns to the


initial state.

FactoryTalk View ME software users can choose from


the following three momentary pushbutton types:
Normally Open
Normally Closed
Value

11

Activity:
As your instructor reviews the momentary
pushbutton types, write down the functions of
each in your manual

12

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A maintained pushbutton acts like a hard-

Maintained Pushbuttons
wired switch.

The pushbutton changes from its initial state to a


new state when it is pushed and released.

When the pushbutton is pushed a second time, it


changes back to the initial state.

13

A latched pushbutton changes from its initial


Latched Pushbuttons
state to a new state when the button is pressed.

The pushbutton holds this value until it is


unlatched by a separate handshake (read or write
acknowledge) control.

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Question:
What is the dierence between a maintained
pushbutton and a latched pushbutton?

15

A multistate pushbutton changes from state to


Multistate Pushbuttons
state with each press of the pushbutton.

When the pushbutton reaches its last configured


state, the next pushbutton pressed returns to the
initial state.

Users can assign up to 256 unique states to a


multistate pushbutton.

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Interlocked pushbuttons are a group of

Interlocked Pushbuttons
buttons that share the same control tag.

When one pushbutton is pushed, its new value is


sent to the tag.

If a second pushbutton in the group is pushed, its


value is sent to the tag, and the first pushbutton
returns to its initial state.

Even though interlocked pushbuttons work as a


group, each pushbutton must be created
individually.

17

Ramp pushbuttons change the value of a tag


Ramp Pushbuttons
by a given increment.

These pushbuttons can be configured to allow a


continuous value change when the pushbutton is
held down.

Ramp pushbuttons are typically used in pairs.

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Display navigation pushbuttons allow users of a

Display Navigation Objects and


Shutdown Pushbuttons
FactoryTalk View ME application to view graphic
displays on an as-needed basis:

19

Display navigation objects and the Shutdown pushbuttons


have the following uses:
Goto Display Pushbuttons
Display List Selectors
Close Display Pushbuttons

The Close Display pushbutton should only be


used with On Top displays. Adding a Close
Display pushbutton to a Replace display will
cause an error at runtime.

Configuring display navigation objects is similar to


configuring pushbuttons.
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Shutdown Pushbuttons

If a Shutdown pushbutton is not created for a


FactoryTalk View ME application, users will not be
able to modify configuration settings on the
PanelView Plus terminal.

Shutdown pushbuttons and Close Display pushbuttons are


configured in a similar manner.

21

Activity:
As your instructor reviews the display navigation
objects and shutdown pushbuttons, write down
the functions for each in your manual.

22

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Adding key navigation pushbuttons to a display list

Key Navigation Pushbuttons


selector can help the operator more eciently use
the object.

These key navigation pushbuttons are typically


used with display list selectors:
Move up
Move down
Enter

The properties used to configure key navigation


pushbuttons are similar to those used to configure
pushbuttons or display navigation objects.

23

Numeric input enable pushbuttons are specialized


Numeric Input Enable
Pushbuttons
pushbuttons that allow operators to write numeric
data directly to a specified tag. When an operator
pushes the pushbutton, a data entry pad appears:

Operator
Pushes
Button

Data Entry
Pad Opens

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When creating a numeric input enable pushbutton, you can
choose one of the following data entry pads:

A keypad, which can be used with touch-enabled


PanelView Plus terminals. When this option is selected, a
numeric pad appears on the terminal screen.

A scratchpad, which can be used with keypad-only


PanelView Plus terminals. When this option is selected, a
window opens that does not contain a keypad.

25

Question:
What type of data entry pad is shown in the previous
graphic?

26

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The numeric input enable pushbutton can also be
programmed as a ramp pushbutton, which automatically
increases the corresponding tag value without opening a
keypad or scratchpad.

27

If you are developing a FactoryTalk View ME


Assigning Function Keys to
Interactive Objects
application that will run on a keypad-only
PanelView Plus terminal, you can assign a function
key to operate a pushbutton, display navigation
pushbutton, or Shutdown button.

You can assign the same function key (i.e., F1) on


multiple graphic displays. However, you cannot
assign the same function key to multiple graphic
objects on the same display.

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Indicators provide operators with visual clues as to

Creating and Configuring


Indicators
how a machine or process is operating.

29

Question:
Are you familiar with types of indicators?

30

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FactoryTalk View ME software provides the following
indicator types:

Multistate: Displays the current state of a process or


operation by showing a dierent color, caption, or image
for each assigned state.

Multistate Indicator

31

Symbol: Shows the state of a process or operation at a


glance, without the use of additional text:
Can be configured to have a similar appearance to multistate
indicators.
Dierent properties for each state (i.e., color, blinking) can be
configured to alert operators to changes that have occurred.

Symbol Indicator

32

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List: Displays all assigned states within a process or
operation and highlights the current state.

List Indicator

33

Gauges and bar graphs provide a way to estimate


Creating and Configuring
Gauges, Bar Graphs, and Scales
machine or process values in situations where a
precise measurement is not necessary.

Similar to indicators, the use of color in gauges and


graphs can assist the operator in spotting abnormal
values.

By default, gauges include a numeric scale. If you


want to add a scale to a bar graph, you must use
the scale graphic object and add the scale values
manually using the text object.

34

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One advantage to using bar graphs and gauges is

Threshold Values
that you can use color to define specific threshold
values for the graphic object.

35

Question:
What other uses can you think of for setting threshold
values?

36

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For example, the color of a gauge can change from green to
red when the associated tag reaches 90 percent of its
maximum value:

Bar Graph and Scale Gauge

Threshold Value

37

If you want the gauge to display threshold


values, you must use the Fill gauge needle
sweep style.

38

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Numeric and string display objects present

Creating and Configuring


Numeric and String Displays
operators with data stored in direct-reference, HMI,
or system tags.

Numeric displays can be used to provide data such


as the temperature of an oven. String displays can
show text messages that provide operator
instructions when a specified event occurs:

String Display Numeric Display

39

FactoryTalk View ME software provides built-in tools


Testing Graphic Displays and
FactoryTalk View ME Applications
that you can use to test individual graphic displays
as they are created.

Testing the graphic display ensures that interactive


objects are connected to the appropriate tag.

If you forget to assign a tag to a graphic object, the


unexpected behavior seen while testing the
graphic will alert you to a potential issue:

Numeric Display with


Unassigned Tag

40

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When you test the entire FactoryTalk View ME application, it
will run exactly as it would if it were downloaded to a
PanelView Plus terminal. This allows you to test features (i.e.,
display navigation buttons) that cannot be tested from a
single graphic display.

Testing an application is not the same as testing


a display. A test application will run according to
the settings found in the Startup editor.

41

It is necessary to assign an initial graphic that will


Configuring an Initial Graphic
be displayed when an application is run on a
terminal or station. The initial graphic is assigned
within the Startup editor:

42

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create and configure pushbuttons
Assign function keys to interactive
objects
Create and configure indicators
Create a gauges, bar graphs and
scales
Create and configure numeric and
string displays
Test graphic displays and FactoryTalk
View ME application
43

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

44

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140
Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Did your instructor show you
the Objects menu and the
Objects toolbar when
creating and configuring
pushbuttons?
Why would you want to
assign function keys to
interactive objects?
Why would you want to
create and configure
indicators in your
Continued
application?
45

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Do you know how to create
and configure gauges, bar
graphs, and scales?
Did your instructor show you
how to create and configure
numeric and string displays?
Why is it a good idea to test
graphic displays and the
entire application?

46

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create and configure pushbuttons
Assign function keys to interactive
objects
Create and configure indicators
Create a gauges, bar graphs and
scales
Create and configure numeric and
string displays
Test graphic displays and
FactoryTalk View ME application
47

Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

48

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Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.
Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. Rev. February 2012
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143
144
Configuring Security for
FactoryTalk View ME Displays

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Configure FactoryTalk View ME
runtime security
Secure FactoryTalk View ME graphic
displays
Create and configure login and
logout buttons

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It is a good idea to apply security to
users and graphic displays when
you want to prevent unauthorized
access to an application.

Creating and configuring login and


logout buttons is important when
you want to ensure a more secure
application.

Setting up security for a FactoryTalk View ME


Security Implementation in
FactoryTalk Directory Software
application involves the following basic tasks:

Planning security for the application


Setting up basic elements of the security system
Setting up access to application resources
secured at the FactoryTalk Directory
Setting up access to HMI project components
secured in FactoryTalk View ME software

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When designing a complete control system,

Security Planning for an


Application
consider which parts of the application you want to
secure and to what extent.

Before you begin setting up security, consider the


following:
The roles that participating users, groups of
users, software, computers, and network devices
are to play in the application
The types of user groups for which you want to
set up accounts

Question:
Why might you want to set up group accounts?

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The levels of access you want to allow to the FactoryTalk
Directory, the application, and areas within the application
Whether some user groups should have access to resources
only from specific computers or groups of computers
Which HMI project components you want to secure,
including graphic displays
Which groups of users or individual users should be able to
set up security for the application
Which system-wide security policies are appropriate for the
control system

For applications requiring password-protected


Configuring FactoryTalk View
ME Runtime Security
screens at runtime, there are two ways you can
create user names and passwords:

Create user names and passwords in your


FactoryTalk View ME application
Activate existing users and passwords from a
Windows domain or group

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The Runtime Security editor is used to configure

FactoryTalk View ME Security


Setup
user accounts:

16 Security Codes
(A through P)

You can configure up to 255 unique user accounts. Each


FactoryTalk View ME application is created with a Default
account that has access to all security codes (A-P).

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Question:
How do you deactivate the Default account?

11

You cannot delete the Default account. If you do


not want the Default account to have access to
some security codes, once you have created your
user accounts, deactivate the Default security
codes.

You must leave at least one security code active


in the Default user.

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These same codes are used when configuring security on
graphic displays.

The value of each security code is defined by the user.


Therefore, a graphic display with security code P is not
necessarily more secure than a graphic display with security
code D.

13

To prevent unauthorized access to specific displays,


Securing FactoryTalk View ME
Graphic Displays
you can set up screen security codes. Access to
screen security codes is provided from the Display
Settings dialog box:

Asterisk allows
any user to
access the
graphic
display.

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When defining security codes for graphic
displays, make sure that the assigned code
matches the code of the user(s) who are
permitted to access the display.

Assign the security code for the startup display to


the DEFAULT user, or else the startup display
wont open. If the startup display uses the *
security code, you can assign any code from A to
P to open the display.
15

At runtime, if a logged in user does not have access to a


selected graphic display, the display is not shown and an
error message is written to an activity log:

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When designing your application, make sure that
the graphic display that opens at application
startup is accessible for the Default user.
Otherwise, the application will not operate.

If the initial graphic display is used to log users into and out of
the application, make sure the security code is set to the
asterisk (*).

17

The following types of security can be configured


Graphic Display Security
Configuration
for FactoryTalk View ME graphic displays:

Security by Exclusion: Access to the system for


all users (except a system administrator) is
restricted to a few specific screens.

When utilizing security by exclusion, be sure to


assign security codes only to the restricted displays.
The corresponding codes for the restricted displays
are assigned only to a system administrator (or
other designated individual).

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Security by Inclusion: Access to nearly the entire system is
provided to the operators. Use this method when all users
will be accessing the majority of a system.

When utilizing security by inclusion, assign security codes to


all displays, using dierent codes for the system segments
that are protected. Then, make sure the user account access
codes match the graphic display codes.

19

Login and logout buttons help control access to


Creating and Configuring Login
and Logout Buttons
protected applications and graphic displays.

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Login and logout buttons can be accessed from the Objects
toolbar or from the Advanced submenu of the Objects menu:

Login and Logout Button Options

21

If you are using security by inclusion, a common way to


control user login and logout is with a dedicated screen.

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Question:
How are Login and Logout buttons configured?

23

At runtime, clicking the login button opens a pop-up menu.


From here users can click either the User or Password
buttons:

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When a button is clicked, a pop-up keyboard opens that can
be used to enter user name and password information:

At runtime, the logout button resets the current user to


Default.
25

The following are the best practices for configuring


Best Practices
security for FactoryTalk ME displays:

For the CPR 9 version of FactoryTalk View ME


software, users are no longer associated with
applications; they are associated with the
FactoryTalk Directory.
If you are deploying a FactoryTalk View ME application,
be sure to back up and restore both the application
and the FactoryTalk Directory or you will have to
recreate the users on the runtime machine.

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Before creating a new application, back up the Local
FactoryTalk Directory System folder as Default.bak.
You will restore and use this default FactoryTalk Directory file each
time you create a new application.
This provides you a method to restore the default FactoryTalk
Directory configuration before starting a new project.

Be sure to restore the Default back up of the Local


FactoryTalk Directory any time you are creating a new
application.
This ensures that a known Administrator account exists and that
you start with a clean directory (no other users have been added).

27

Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Configure FactoryTalk View ME
runtime security
Secure FactoryTalk View ME
graphic displays
Create and configure login and
logout buttons

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Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

29

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:

Do you know how to turn on


and o security codes for a
user?
When securing FactoryTalk
View ME graphic displays, do
you know what the asterisk
(*) indicates?
Do you know how to configure a FactoryTalk
View ME graphic display for security by
exclusion?
Did your instructor show you how to create
and configure Login and Logout buttons? 30

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Configure FactoryTalk View ME
runtime security
Secure FactoryTalk View ME graphic
displays
Create and configure login and
logout buttons

31

Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

32

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Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.
Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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162
Creating and Managing
FactoryTalk View ME Runtime
Files

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Download a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Load and run a FactoryTalk View
ME application using a PanelView
Plus terminal

Continued

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Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Back up a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Compare remote and local
FactoryTalk View ME runtime
applications
Restore a runtime application file

You need to successfully


download a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application to a
PanelView Plus terminal before
the application can be run on the
terminal.
A runtime application needs to be converted to a
development file before modifications to the
FactoryTalk View ME application can be made.

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Before you download a FactoryTalk View ME

Creating a FactoryTalk View ME


Runtime Application
application, you must create a runtime file. A
runtime file can be identified by its .mer extension.

Question:
What is a .mer file?

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During the creation of a runtime file, a progress bar keeps you
informed of key events in the process:

Once a runtime file has been created, The file


File Transfer Utility
transfer utility is used to perform the following
tasks:

Download files to a PanelView Plus terminal


Upload files from a PanelView Plus terminal
Compare remote and local versions of .mer files

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When downloading a file to a PanelView Plus

Downloading a FactoryTalk View


ME Runtime Application
terminal, the File Transfer Utility provides the
following user-configurable options:
Location Application
of .mer File Options

The download configuration must be created


before launching the File Transfer Utility.

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After you have selected the file to be downloaded, you can:
Rename the .mer file
Choose a storage location on the PanelView Plus
terminal:
Internal storage (terminal memory)
External storage (optional Compact Flash card) Guideline

For improved performance, it is recommended that you run


applications from the internal storage location.

Run the application when the download is complete


Replace the existing communications configuration

11

FactoryTalk View ME applications can be downloaded to a


target terminal in one of the following two ways:
Direct network connection to a terminal
Remote download to a Compact Flash memory card

When downloading a FactoryTalk View ME


application, a progress window opens on the
development computer but not on the target
terminal.

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A direct network connection requires the use of

Direct Network Connection


RSLinx Enterprise software.

If you are connecting to a network other than


Ethernet or EtherNet/IP, be sure that the
appropriate network driver has been created. See
the procedures guide or the online FactoryTalk
View ME Help system for more details.

13

When using a direct connection, make sure that the


PanelView Plus terminal(s) you will be downloading to are
added to the Communications tab of the Explorer window:

PanelView Plus Communications


Terminal Tab
on Network

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If a direct connection between the development

Remote Download
computer and the target terminal is not available,
you can save the runtime file to an external Flash
memory card.

The card can then be used to load the application


directly to the terminal.

When transferring an application from a


development computer to an external memory
card, you must save the .mer file to the following
directory:
\Rockwell Software\RSViewME\runtime.
15

Rockwell Automation oers external memory cards in the


following sizes:
128M
256M
512M

The 2711P-RCH Compact Flash to PCMCIA Adaptor is used to


load runtime applications from a PC to the Compact Flash
memory card.

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Once a .mer file has been downloaded to the

Loading and Running a FactoryTalk


View ME Runtime Application
PanelView Plus terminal, the application can be
loaded into the terminals active memory and run.

Downloading an application only puts the file in


a storage location on the terminal; loading adds
the file to the terminals active memory.

Only one application can be running at a given


time.

17

When backing up a file to a PanelView Plus


Backing up a FactoryTalk View
ME Runtime Application
terminal, the File Transfer Utility provides the
following user-configurable options:

Current
Location
of .mer File

Name of File
to Back Up
New File Name
(Optional)

Storage Location
for Backup File

Download
Configuration

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Keep the following points in mind when backing up .mer files:

If you do not want to replace an existing .mer file on your


computer with the uploaded file, use the Upload As
feature.
The backed up file can then be downloaded to a dierent
terminal or converted to a development file for further
editing.

19

The file comparison feature is used to determine


Comparing Remote and Local
FactoryTalk View ME Runtime
whether a .mer file stored on a PanelView Plus Applications
terminal is identical to a .mer file stored on your
computer:

Storage Location
of Remote File

Name of
Remote File

Name and Storage


Location of Local
File

Download
Configuration

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The Application Manager is used to convert a

Restoring a Runtime Application


File
runtime (.mer) file to a development (.med) file:

21

Keep the following points in mind when restoring a runtime


application:
This feature can only be used with .mer files created in
version 5.0 or later of the software.
Files created with earlier versions cannot be restored using
the Application Manager.
Developers can choose to prevent users from restoring a
runtime file, or the runtime file can be password-protected.

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Download a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Load and run a FactoryTalk View ME application
using a PanelView Plus terminal
Back up a FactoryTalk View ME runtime
application
Compare remote and local FactoryTalk View ME
runtime applications
Restore a runtime application file
23

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

24

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Do you know what the file
extension is for a runtime
file?
Do you know what tool is
used to download files to a
PanelView Plus terminal?
Has your instructor shown
you how to load and run an
application using a
PanelView Plus terminal?
Continued

25

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Has your instructor shown
you where to back up a
runtime application?
Why would you want to
compare remote and local
runtime applications?
What happens when you
restore a runtime application
using the Application
Manager?

26

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Download a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Load and run a FactoryTalk View ME
application using a PanelView Plus
terminal

Continued

27

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Back up a FactoryTalk View ME
runtime application
Compare remote and local
FactoryTalk View ME runtime
applications
Restore a runtime application file

28

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

29

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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178
Configuring Basic Animation for
FactoryTalk View ME Objects

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Configure visibility animation for
graphic objects
Configure fill animation for graphic
objects
Configure height or width animation
for graphic objects
Configure position animation for
graphic objects
Continued
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Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create an expression within an
animation
Configure color animation for
graphic objects
Configure rotation animation for
graphic objects
Configure slider animation for
graphic objects

Configuring basic animation for


FactoryTalk View ME objects is
important when wanting to
provide a visual representation of
a process based on a dynamic
tag value or a tags value that
results from an expression.

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Animation can be used to aect how a graphic

Animation Configuration
Overview
object behaves at runtime. It allows programmers
to change the appearance of an object based on
the evaluation of a selected tag or a created
expression.

Drawing objects (i.e., rectangles, ellipses,


freehand drawings) can be configured with a
range of animation types. Interactive objects (i.e.,
pushbuttons, indicators) only support visibility
animation.

You can assign multiple types of animation to the


same graphic object.
5

Once a graphic object is selected, the Animation menu lists the


available options:

You can also copy and paste animations from one graphic
object to another.
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The copy and paste feature applies to all
animations applied to a graphic object; you
cannot choose to copy individual animation
configurations.

Question:
What is the most commonly used type of animation?

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The tabbed Animation dialog box lets you assign multiple
animation types to the same graphic object. Although each
animation is configured in a slightly dierent manner, the
following features are found on each animation tab:

Button to Launch
Tag Browser

Expression
Box

Button to Launch
Expression Editor

You can then either type an expression in the expression


box or use the Tag Browser and Expression editor features to
populate the expression box.

To reduce the likelihood of errors, it is recommended you


use the Tag Browser and Expression editor when
configuring animation.

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Definition:

Configuring Visibility Animation


for Graphic Objects
Visibility Animation: Lets users show or
hide a graphic object when the value of a
tag or expression changes.

Invisible objects cannot be selected, and mouse


clicks on the object pass through to any object
underneath.

11

The Visibility tab of the Animation dialog box lets users decide
when objects are visible or hidden:

Determines Behavior of
Graphic Object When
Expression Is True

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Definition:

Configuring Fill Animation for


Graphic Objects
Fill Animation: Changes the fill level of a
graphic object when a tag or expression
changes.

The objects fill level is proportional to the


minimum and maximum values assigned to an
expression.

13

The Fill tab of the Animation dialog box lets users configure
the following properties:

Minimum and
Maximum Values

Fill Direction Fill Percentage Inside Only


Check Box

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Activity:
As your instructor explains the function of the
Inside Only check box, write it down in your
manual.

15

Definition:
Configuring Height or Width
Animation for Graphic Objects
Height/Width Animation: Changes the
size of a graphic object when a tag or
expression changes.

The objects height or width is proportional to the


minimum and maximum values assigned to an
expression.

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The Height tab of the Animation dialog box lets users
configure the following properties:

Change
Percentage

Minimum and
Maximum Anchor
Values Point

17

Activity:
As your instructor explains the dierences
between the Height and Width tabs, write them
down in your manual.

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Definition:

Configuring Position Animation


for Graphic Objects
Position Animation: Used to simulate
movement of a graphic object along a
horizontal and/or vertical axis as a tag
value or the result of an expression
changes.

19

FactoryTalk View ME software provides the Object Smart Path


feature, which lets users drag a graphic object to the starting
and ending point, rather than having to set the objects oset
in pixels:

20

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The Horizontal Position tab of the Animation dialog box lets
users configure the following properties:

Minimum and
Maximum Values

Oset

21

Activity:
As your instructor explains the dierence
between the Horizontal Position and Vertical
Position tabs, write it down in your manual.

22

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In addition to controlling animation with tags, the

Creating an Expression within


an Animation
Expression editor can be used to add more
precision to your animation control by specifying
conditions under which animation occurs:

Syntax
Validation

Available
Functions Provides Access to
Tag Browser

23

Use the Expression editor to create:


If-Then-Else statements
Logical statements (i.e., AND, OR, NOT)
Relational statements (i.e., greater than, less, than, etc.)

If you are combining relational statements and


logical statements in an expression, be sure to
enclose the complete relational statements in
parentheses.

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Arithmetic statements (i.e., addition, subtraction, etc.)
s statements (i.e., AND, OR, XOR, bit shift instructions, etc.)
Functional statements (i.e., advanced mathematical
functions, security codes)

The syntax validation feature will check to see if the


expression you created is valid. If an expression is not valid,
the software indicates the location(s) of the invalid
information.

25

Definition:
Configuring Color Animation for
Graphic Objects
Color Animation: Used to make a graphic
object change color as a tag value, or the
result of an expression evaluation, changes.

Keep the following points in mind when working


with color animation:
You can specify up to 16 color changes for any
object.
Colors can be solid or blinking.
Configurable options include:
Value (or threshold) at which the color changes
Foreground and background colors
Blink rate
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The Color tab of the Animation dialog box lets users
configure the following properties:

Number of
Thresholds

Threshold Value Blink Rate

27

Definition:
Configuring Rotation Animation
for Graphic Objects
Rotation Animation: Used to make an
object rotate around an anchor point.

Keep the following points in mind when working


with rotation animation:
The amount of rotation is based on a tag value or
the result of a logical expression.
The angle of rotation of the object is proportional
to the value of the expression.
The anchor point of an object can be located
inside or outside of an object.

28

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The Rotation tab of the Animation dialog box lets users
configure the following properties:

Minimum and
Maximum Values

Center of Rotation Rotation Angles

29

Definition:
Configuring Slider Animation
for Graphic Objects
Slider Animation: Creates a graphic object
that can control the value of a specified tag.

You define a path for the object, then use the mouse
to move the object along its path.

The pixel position of the object is translated into a


value that is written to the tag. If the tag value is
changed externally, the position of the slider will
change as well.

A tag that has values controlled by slider animation


can be used in an expression to attach animation to
another object or group of objects.
30

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The Vertical Slider tab of the Animation dialog box lets users
configure the following properties:

Oset

Minimum and
Maximum
Values

31

The following are best practices for configuring


Best Practices
basic animations for a FactoryTalk View ME
application:
Limit the use of enhanced animation to whats
required:
Enhanced Animation: Positions, slider, height, width,
rotation, visibility.
A lot of processing power is used for animation
that is continuously moving.
Extensive animation usage will slow display
updates.
Using large complicated expressions with
animations can be a problem:
Expressions need to be evaluated before the object is
drawn and animated.
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Wire framed boxes will be displayed until the expression is
evaluated.
Tag expressions wait for all the tag information before
evaluating the expression.
Maximum compiled size for a single expression is 8 KB.
Displays with extensive expressions may load and update
slower due to calculation time.
Limit animation to objects that require it.
Limit the use of multiple animation features on a single
object.
Use device tags for faster performance.
Trade o between Application Looks and Performance.
Minimize expression complexity.

33

Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Configure visibility animation for
graphic objects
Configure fill animation for graphic
objects
Configure height or width animation for graphic
objects
Configure position animation for graphic objects
Create an expression within an animation
Configure color animation for graphic objects
Configure rotation animation for graphic objects
Configure slider animation for graphic objects
34

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Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

35

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Did your instructor show you
how to configure visibility
animation for graphic objects?
Do you know how to configure
fill percentages when
animating the fill level for
graphic objects?
Do you know how to configure
the anchor points when
animating the height or width
of graphic objects?
(Continued)

36

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Did your instructor show you
how to use the Object Smart
Path feature when configuring
position animation for graphic
objects?
Can you configure an
expression within an
animation?
Do you know how to configure
thresholds when configuring
color animation for graphic
(Continued)
objects?
37

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Did your instructor show you
how to configure rotation
angles when configuring
rotation animation for graphic
objects?
Can you configure horizontal
or vertical slider animation for
graphic objects?

38

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Configure visibility animation for
graphic objects
Configure fill animation for graphic
objects
Configure height or width
animation for graphic objects
Configure position animation for
graphic objects

Continued
39

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create an expression within an
animation
Configure color animation for
graphic objects
Configure rotation animation for
graphic objects
Configure slider animation for
graphic objects

40

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

41

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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200
Creating and Configuring
Alarms for a FactoryTalk View ME
Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create and configure alarm triggers
Create alarm messages
Configure alarm display settings

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It is a good idea to configure
alarm display settings when
operators need to see and react to
alarms in a consistent manner.
Creating concise alarm messages
is important when operators need
to quickly respond to changes in
the condition of a machine or
process.

Question:
Alarm System Overview
What types of events in your plant require
alarm notification?

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The FactoryTalk View ME alarm system notifies an operator
when a situation requiring immediate attention occurs.

FactoryTalk View ME software can be configured to perform


the following tasks when an alarm occurs:
Open an alarm graphic display
Set o an audible signal

The PanelView Plus terminal does not include


built-in audio capabilities. If an audible signal is
required, it must be triggered by a connection
between your processor or controller and a horn
or other signal.
5

Send a message to a printer


Send the alarm trigger value to a processor or controller
Perform any combination of the above tasks

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The following events occur as part of the FactoryTalk

Alarm Sequence of Events


View ME alarm system:
1. The software enters alarm state when a trigger
from a processor or controller matches a value
configured in the Alarm Setup editor:

Alarm Setup
Editor

2. The default [ALARM] graphic display (or user-created


custom display) opens.
3. A custom message appears for the alarm.
4. The operator acknowledges or silences the alarm.

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Definition:

Creating and Configuring Alarm


Triggers
Alarm Trigger: A tag or expression that
controls the display of an associated alarm
message.

The same alarm trigger tag or expression can be


associated with multiple messages.

It is recommended that you create alarm triggers


and messages before configuring alarm display
settings.
9

Alarm triggers are created and configured in the Triggers tab


of the Alarm Setup editor:

Triggers
Trigger Label

Trigger Type
Optional Trigger
Connections

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Each trigger has its own set of optional
connections. Be sure that any connections are
assigned to the corresponding tag.

Clicking the Add... or Edit... buttons from the Trigger


tab opens a pop-up dialog box where the desired tag
or expression can be assigned.
Once a selection is made, trigger configuration can be
continued from the Trigger tab.

11

Question:
Where have you seen similar dialog boxes?

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When configuring alarm triggers, you will typically

Alarm Triggers
select the following trigger settings:
Trigger type
Trigger label
Optional trigger connections

13

From the Trigger type drop-down list, you can choose from
the following trigger types:

Value: An integer or floating point entry.

Floating point values are rounded to the nearest integer.

Bit: Array consisting of one or more bit positions. Bit


triggers generate multiple alarm messages using a single
tag or expression.

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Chalk Talk:
Draw and discuss the dierences between a
single bit and an array.

Each bit in the array whose value changes from 0 to 1


triggers an alarm.

LSBit (Least Significant Bit): Array consisting of one or


more bit positions. This trigger generates alarms in a
priority sequence based on the triggers bit position.

When multiple bits in an LSBit array change from


0 to 1, only the alarm with the lowest bit position
is triggered.
15

Trigger labels are used to provide additional information


about the trigger being created.

These labels are also used to help filter the alarms that are
displayed on the [ALARM] and [STATUS] default graphic
displays.

Activity:
As your instructor explains optional controls,
write them down in your manual.

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The following optional controls can also be assigned to an
alarm trigger:
Handshake
Ack (Acknowledge)
Remote Ack
Remote Ack Handshake
Message

The Message control only works if the Message


to Tag option is enabled in the Messages tab.

17

Definition:
Creating Alarm Messages
Alarm Message: An alert to an operator
regarding the status of a machine or
process. A message can be up to 256
characters long.

Create alarm messages for events that require


immediate operator attention.

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From the Messages tab of the Alarm Setup editor, you can
create messages, associate them with a trigger and trigger
value, and more:

Message
Destination

<All Triggers>
Option

The <All Triggers> option lets you create a message that


appears with any alarm that is generated.
19

In addition to the message, each alarm trigger can be


customized based on the following available options:

Activity:
As your instructor explains each alarm trigger
option, write it down in your manual.

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Trigger Value

Trigger values can be positive or negative


numbers, but they cannot be zero. If you are
using a bit or LSBit trigger, you cannot assign a
trigger to bit 0.

Message Destination
Message to Tag
Foreground and Background Colors

21

FactoryTalk View ME software provides a library of


Configuring Alarm Display
Settings
pre-designed alarm displays.

All default alarm displays are designed for use on


a 640 X 480 terminal screen. If your application is
for a dierent screen size, you will have to resize
and reposition the default displays accordingly.

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You can choose from the following default graphic display
options:

The [ALARM] display is automatically created in your Display


folder. The remaining displays are stored in the Graphics
Library.

[ALARM]: Lists alarms one at a time in a graphic display


anchored to the bottom of the screen:

23

[ALARM BANNER]: Lists alarms one at a time in a smaller


graphic display anchored to the top of the screen:

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[ALARM MULTI-LINE]: Lists multiple alarms in a graphic
display anchored to the bottom of the screen:

25

[HISTORY]: Lists all triggered alarms in a full-screen graphic


display:

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[STATUS]: Lists the status and frequency of alarms in a full-
screen graphic display:

27

From the Advanced tab of the Alarm Setup editor, you can
choose the display you want opened when an alarm is
triggered:

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Other key features accessible from this tab include:
Hold time for acknowledge and silence controls
Maximum tag update rate
Number of alarms to hold in memory

29

From the Startup editor, you can enable the alarming


Alarm Enabling
feature:

Alarming Enabled

The alarming feature is enabled by default when you


create a new application.

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It is recommended that once the alarm system has

Alarm Testing
been configured, it is tested on the development
computer.

You must test the entire application to verify the


alarm system operation. Simply testing a graphic
display will not be sucient.

31

The following are the best practices used to


Best Practices
configure Alarms for a FactoryTalk View ME
application:
Optimizing Performance and Memory
Minimize the number of trigger tags by implementing
arrays
Group consecutive trigger tags to minimize
communication overhead
Only use embedded alarm messages when required
Keep alarm messages descriptive but short
The maximum update rate should be set at a rate such
that the HMI will still continue to provide optimal user
performance even though running any additional
background tasks
Unless immediate alarm response is demanded by the
operator the Maximum Update Rate should be set to 1
second or higher for good performance 32

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create and configure alarm triggers
Create alarm messages
Configure alarm display settings

33

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Did your instructor show you
how to create a trigger type
and label?
Do you know how to
associate an alarm message
with a trigger and trigger
value?
Can you configure alarm
display settings?

35

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create and configure alarm triggers
Create alarm messages
Configure alarm display settings

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

37

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

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220
Creating and Configuring
Macros for a FactoryTalk View
ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create a macro file
Create and configure macro buttons

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It is a good idea to configure
macros when you want:
Key events in an application to
be consistently performed
An interactive way for operators
to run macros at any given time
during an application

Macros are text files that create a one-to-one


Creating a Macro File
relationship between tags used in an application
and their initial values.

The Macros editor is used to create macro files:

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Question:
Is anyone familiar with using macros?

The Macros editor opens a spreadsheet that can be


populated with the necessary tags and corresponding values:

Tag Name Expression

The expression can be a numeric value, another tag, or a


more complex expression created with the Expression editor.

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If you are creating a macro that will be run from
the Global Connections editor, then the macro
name must match the global connection name
(i.e., Macro1, Macro2, etc.).

Macros can be triggered under the following conditions:


Any time a macro button is present on a graphic display
When the application starts up or shuts down (assigned in
the Startup editor):

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When a user logs in to or logs out of an application
(assigned in the Runtime Security editor):

When a graphic display starts up or shuts down (assigned


in the Behavior tab of the screens Display Settings dialog
box):

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From a remote global connection.

Triggering remote macros too frequently can


result in an application running out of memory. If
possible, do not execute macros using a remote
tag more frequently than once every 5 seconds.

11

Macro buttons can be created on any graphic


Creating and Configuring Macro
Buttons
display from which you want to provide operators
with the ability to run a macro.

Macro buttons can be accessed from the Objects


toolbar:

Macro
Button

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Or they are available from the Advanced submenu of the
Objects menu:

Macro Button

Configuring a Macro button is similar to configuring a Goto


Display button or Shutdown button. 13

The following are the best practices for creating


Best Practices
macros:
Do not execute remote macros too fast. If you
execute macros too fast, macros will be queued
and screen changes will be slower.
Allow enough time for the macro to complete
before it is executed again.
Communications may bottle up over slower
networks.
Split up macro files if needed.
Lengthy macro files will reduce performance when
executed.
Do not rely on the order of execution to control
your process.
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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create a macro file
Create and configure macro
buttons

15

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Has your instructor shown
you how to create a macro
file?
Do you know the conditions
that can trigger macros?
Do you know where macro
buttons can be accessed
from?

17

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create a macro file
Create and configure macro buttons

18

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

19

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Configuring Recipes with the
RecipePlus System in a
FactoryTalk View ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create and configure recipes
Compare recipes in the RecipePlus
system
Create and configure RecipePlus
tables
Create and configure RecipePlus
buttons
Create and configure RecipePlus
selectors
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Being able to create and configure
recipes with the RecipePlus System
is important when you want to
write a set of values to a set of tags
in a single operation.

The RecipePlus system allows ingredient data


RecipePlus System Overview
values of a recipe to be saved into a recipe file,
which can be downloaded to or uploaded from a
controller in a single action.

Activity:
As your instructor explains each RecipePlus
system component, write it down in your
manual.

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RecipePlus Setup
RecipePlus Editor

RecipePlus Setup
RecipePlus Editor

RecipePlus Button Object


RecipePlus Selector Object
RecipePlus Table Object

Selector Object Button Objects

Table Object

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The RecipePlus table object is also used to modify the recipe
data values during runtime. The values of the data set and tag
set can be compared within the table.

The RecipePlus table can be set as view-only to prevent


modifications during runtime.

Three items must be defined when configuring a


Creating and Configuring
Recipes
recipe:
Tags
Ingredients
Units

Recipes have two tag settings that are used to


determine the results of various recipe operations
during runtime.

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Activity:
As your instructor explains the two tag settings,
write them down in your manual.

Status Tag
Percent Complete Tag

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Ingredients are set up with the corresponding data

Ingredients
sets and tag sets and can be either string or
numeric tags.

Activity:
As your instructor explains the string and
numeric tags, write them down in your
manual.

11

Numeric
String

One recipe can have up to 15,000 ingredients.

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Definition:
Data Set: Each recipe can contain up to 50 data sets:
Each data set represents the set of data values
where each data value is associated with a specific
ingredient.
The data sets are downloaded (or uploaded) to a
controller.
The data in the data set is saved in the recipe file
with the extension .rpp.

13

Definition:
Tag Set: Each recipe can contain up to 50 tag sets:
Each tag set represents the set of tags to write to
during a download (or read during an upload)
operation.
Each tag name is associated with a specific
ingredient.

Definition:
Units: A unit is a data set paired with a tag set:
You can have 10 data sets all paired with a single tag
set.
A single recipe can contain up to 2,500 recipe units.

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The Compare Recipes dialog box can be used to

Comparing Recipes in the


RecipePlus System
generate a report of the dierences between the
following:

15

Two tag sets and/or two data sets within a single recipe
A data set and/or tag set in one recipe and a data set and/
or tag set in another recipe:

Comparison Options

Items Being
Compared

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A UNICODE text file called CompareReport.txt is displayed
in Windows Notepad and saved in the same folder as the
recipe file. If a comparison report already exists, it will be
overwritten.

17

After a recipe is configured, a display must be


RecipePlus Display Tool
Configuration
configured to view and modify the recipes during
runtime.

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A pre-designed RecipePlus display (available for import into an
application) is included in the library files of FactoryTalk View
Studio software:

19

RecipePlus tables are used to display and edit


Creating and Configuring
RecipePlus Tables
recipes at runtime. They are configured using
RecipePlus Table properties dialog box:

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The RecipePlus system includes a button with

Creating and Configuring


RecipePlus Buttons
seven dierent action properties:

RecipePlus
Buttons

21

A RecipePlus button can be configured to have one of the


following action properties:

Option Action
Writes the ingredient values in the data set of the
Download recipe unit currently selected in the selector
object to the tags in the units tag set.
Reads the tag values in the tag set of the recipe
Upload unit currently selected in the selector object and
saves those values to the units data set.
Reads the tag values in the tag set of the unit
currently selected in the selector object and
Upload and Create
creates a new recipe unit by writing those values
to a new data set.
Saves the values in a recipe table object to a recipe
Save
file.

Continued
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Option Action
Loads the values from a recipe unit to a recipe
Restore
table object.
Deletes the recipe unit currently selected in the
Delete
selector object.
Renames the recipe unit currently selected in the
Rename
selector object.

23

The RecipePlus Selector is a list of recipe files and


Create and Configure
RecipePlus Selectors
recipe units available in the application.

There can only be one RecipePlus selector on a


graphic display.

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When a recipe file is selected in the RecipePlus selector and a
RecipePlus button with the Restore operation assigned to it is
pressed, the following items are listed in the recipe table:

Ingredients and their corresponding recipe values


Controller values
Tags
Visual comparison indicator between the recipe data values
and controller tag values

25

The definitions of what each column represents during


runtime of a RecipePlus table is summarized below:

This column Displays the . . .


Ingredient Name Ingredient name.
Current value in the tag associated with the
Current Value
ingredient.
Recipes data value for the ingredient. This is the
data in the data set. When this recipe value is
Recipe Value
modified and saved the values are stored in the
data set and in the RecipePlus file (.rpp).
Compare Status An X if the tag value and recipe data value dier.
Name of the tag associated with the ingredient in
Tag Name
the tag set.

After the value of an ingredient is changed, the Recipe


column will update to the new data value.
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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create and configure recipes
Compare recipes in the RecipePlus
system
Create and configure RecipePlus
tables
Create and configure RecipePlus
buttons
Create and configure RecipePlus
selectors

27

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

28

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Did your instructor show you
the three items that must be
defined when configuring a
recipe?
Do you know the conditions
that can trigger macros?
Do you know where macro
buttons can be accessed
from?

29

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create and configure recipes
Compare recipes in the RecipePlus
system
Create and configure RecipePlus
tables
Create and configure RecipePlus
buttons
Create and configure RecipePlus
selectors

30

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

31

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Configuring Language
Switching in a FactoryTalk View
ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Add languages to a FactoryTalk View
ME application
Export text strings for translation
Import translated text strings
Create and configure Language
Switch buttons

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Configure language switching
when you want to develop a single
application that can be translated
into the local languages of the
facilities where your application will
be implemented.

Language switching allows operators to view user-


Language Switching Overview
defined text strings in an application in up to 20
dierent languages.

At runtime, FactoryTalk View ME stations can switch


between any language the application supports.

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With language switching you can:

Develop an application in one language, export the user-


defined text strings for the application, and then import
translated strings for up to 20 languages into the same
application
Enable operators in multilingual countries to use the
language of their choice
Import application components developed in dierent
countries into a single application that supports multiple
languages

To configure multiple languages for an application:


Language Configuration Steps

1. Create the application components in a


language of your choice.
2. Export the applications text strings for
translation.
3. Import the translated text files for each
language you want the application to support.

When you save components, the text strings


associated with them are saved in the current
application language.

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Question:
What happens if a text string is unavailable in the
current language during development or runtime?

When creating a new application, you can select a base


application language from the full list of languages that
Windows supports.

When opening an existing application in which languages


are already defined, you select a current application
language from the list that the application supports:

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Available
Languages

The Language Configuration dialog box is used to


Adding Languages to a
FactoryTalk View ME Application
add languages an application will support:

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When text in an application is exported, it is saved

Exporting Text Strings for


Translation
to tab-delimited text files in Unicode format. These
files can be translated and then imported back into
the application.

Before exporting text in an application, ensure that


the HMI components containing the text to be
exported are not in use. If components are being
modified and have not been saved, the exported
file might not contain the unsaved changes.

11

The Language Configuration dialog box is used to add


languages:

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Activity:

Translated Text Strings


As your instructor lists the text strings that
allow language switching, write them in
your manual.

13

Text strings that do not allow language switching include:

Text that is part of the FactoryTalk View graphic user


interface (e.g., error messages, text in dialog boxes, etc.)
Text that is used to operate an application at runtime, (e.g.,
graphic display titles)
Tag descriptions
String constants in expressions and in all components that
use expressions
Information from system tags
Recipe file strings

You can use Notepad or Microsoft Excel to edit the text file.

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In the translated text file, the only text that needs to be
modified is the text inside the quotation marks in the string
definition column.

For example, translated into German, the file would look like
this:

English:

German:

15

To import text strings from a file into an application,


Importing Translated Text Strings
the file must be saved in Unicode text format. Text
files exported from a FactoryTalk View ME
application are saved in Unicode format by default.

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When you create a FactoryTalk View ME

Creating and Configuring


Language Switching Buttons
configuration file, you select one of the application
languages as the initial run-time language.

Once the station is running, operators can switch


from the initial language to any other application
language using a Language Switch button.

17

An advanced graphic object uses the Language


Example: Create and Configure
Language Switching Buttons
command if the press action is configured:

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When a FactoryTalk View ME runtime (.mer) file is created, the
languages available to that application must be selected:

Selected Languages

19

Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Add languages to a FactoryTalk View
ME application
Export text strings for translation
Import translated text strings
Create and configure Language
Switch buttons

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Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

21

Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
When adding languages to a
FactoryTalk View ME
application, what is the
maximum number of
languages that one application
When exporting text strings for
translation, what format is it saved in?
Do you know how to import translated
text strings?
Did your instructor show you how to
create and configure language
switching buttons?
22

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Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Add languages to a FactoryTalk View
ME application
Export text strings for translation
Import translated text strings
Create and configure Language
Switch buttons

23

Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

24

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Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.
Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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260
Creating Data Logs and Trends
for a FactoryTalk View ME
Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create and activate a data log
Add and configure trends

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Creating and activating a data log
is ideal when you want to obtain a
hard-copy record of data from an
application.

Correcting configuring a trend is


important when you want to track
and view real-time and historical
data for an application.

Definition:
Creating a Data Log
Data Logs: Used to identify tags within
your application that will be displayed
using a trend.

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Question:
Where can data log files be stored?

Data log files are only used to populate a trend. The data log
model file (.mdf extension) is only editable in FactoryTalk
View Studio software.

The Data Log editor is used to create and configure data logs:

Data Log Editor


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The following data must be included when creating a data log:
General setup information
Path for storing the data log
Data log triggers
Tags included in the data log model

The data log file retains data when an application


is restarted after shutdown or power loss. You
can delete the log file from the runtime
computer at application startup.

Use the Setup tab of the Data Log Models dialog


Setup Information
box to provide general information about the log:

Description
(50 Characters Log up to 300,000
Maximum) Data Points

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Use the Paths tab of the Data Log Models dialog

Data Log Path Creation


box to provide a location for data log storage on a
runtime computer or terminal:

Custom Path
Text Box

Activity:
As your instructor lists the available locations for
storing data logs when using a PanelView Plus
terminal, write them in your manual.

If data is being logged to a shared folder, use the


UNC (Uniform Naming Convention) style when
creating your path. Files named using the UNC
style begin with \\.

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Use the Log Triggers tab of the Data Log Models

Data Log Triggers


dialog box to specify how often data is stored.

You can choose from the following options:


Periodic
On Change

11

Question:
Which option would you most likely choose if you
were recording quality data from a machine?

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The Periodic option lets you log data at a regular interval, from
10 hundredths of a second to 999 days:

Integer
Required

13

The On Change option lets you log tag values when they
change by an assigned percentage:

Maximum
Update Rate

Change Heartbeat
Percentage

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Activity:
As your instructor explains the parameters that
must be assigned when logging data, write them
in your manual.
Maximum Update Rate
Change Percentage

If you are using a direct-reference tag in the data


log model, any change to the tag (regardless of
the assigned change percentage) will be logged.

Heartbeat
Specify a value of 0 for the heartbeat if you do not want
to use this feature. 15

Use the Tags in Model tab of the Data Log Models


Data Log Tag Selection
dialog box to select the tags that will be recorded in
the log:

Tag Browser Button

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You can log up to 100 numeric (analog or digital)
tags for use in multiple trend objects.

17

The Tag Browser associated with the Data Log editor allows
you to choose multiple tags at the same time:

Standard Tag Browser

Selected Tag List Box

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Before creating a historical trend, you must activate

Activating a Data Log


your data log.

You can activate a data log for your FactoryTalk


View ME application by accessing the Startup
editor:

Activates
Data Log

19

At runtime, only one data log can be activated


for your application. The active data log cannot
be changed while the application is running.

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Trending, or plotting data points, in FactoryTalk

Trend Use
View ME software is performed by an ActiveX
control called RSTrendX. This feature supports both
real-time and historical trend creation.

Because it is installed as part of the software,


RSTrendX is the only ActiveX control that runs on
PanelView Plus terminals.

21

You can create a customized trend, or you can use the pre-
designed trend objects found in the Graphics Library:

Vertical
Trend
Controls
Pens (With
Trend Associated
Object Numeric
Displays)

Horizontal
Trend Controls

Using the trend objects from the Graphics Library helps speed
application development.
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Activity:

Available Trend Objects


As your instructor explains the objects that
a trend can include, write them in your
manual.

Horizontal Trend Controls


Pens
Trend Object
Vertical Trend Controls

23

The Trend Object Properties dialog box consists of


Adding and Configuring Trends
the following user-configurable tabs:

Connections
Pens
General
Display
X-Axis
Y-Axis
Common

It is recommended that the tabs in the Trend Object


Properties dialog box be configured in the order
they are presented.
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From the Connections tab, users can assign a tag or

Connections Tab
expression to as many as eight pens. The tab also
allows users to assign tags or expressions to the
minimum and maximum values displayed on the Y-
axis:

Tags
Assigned
to Pens

25

From the Pens tab, users can assign a variety of


Pens Tab
properties to individual pens or multiple pens:

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Be sure to assign tags in the Connections tab
before configuring the Pens tab; otherwise, the
tag name field will be blank.

27

Available pen options include:


Color
Visibility
Width of pen line
Type of pen line
Line style
Data point marker (symbol)
Y-axis minimum and maximum values
Link data (disables the user-configure minimum and
maximum values and replaces them with the tags assigned
values)

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A historical data log can only be assigned from
this tab.

29

From the General tab, users can configure the


General Tab
appearance and behavior of the trend chart:

Chart
Appearance

Chart
Behavior

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Activity:
As your instructor explains the appearance
options, write them in your manual.

Standard
XY Plot

31

Behavior options let you choose the following update


modes:

Automatic: The trend is updated continuously in intervals


from 50 milliseconds to 596 hours.
On Change: The trend is updated as data changes.

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From the Display tab, users can configure

Display Tab
properties that apply to the overall trend display:

Scrolling
Features

Scroll
Mode

Data
Buer

33

Activity:
As your instructor explains the choices that
determine how operators view trend data, write
them in your manual.

Scrolling Features
Scroll Mode
Continuous Scroll
Half Scroll
Full scroll
Data Buer

Each data point stored in the buer requires 58


bytes of memory.
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From the X-Axis tab, users can select the charts

X-Axis Tab
starting point and control the amount of data
shown on the trend:

Starting
Point Data

Time
Span

35

If the automatic scrolling feature has been


enabled on the Display tab, the starting point
data is not available.

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From the Y-Axis tab, users can configure how the

Y-Axis Tab
trends Y-axis is viewed:

Minimum/
Maximum
Value Options

37

From the Common tab, users can configure the


Common Tab
properties (i.e. size, highlight focus, name) that are
applicable to all graphic objects.

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create and activate a data log
Add and configure trends

39

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
What is the data that must
be included when creating a
data log?
Where would you activate a
data log?
Has your instructor shown
you how to add and
configure a trend?

41

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create and activate a data log
Add and configure trends

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

43

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Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

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Creating Tag Placeholders and
Parameter Files for a FactoryTalk
View ME Graphic Display

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Add tag placeholders
Create parameter files

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Adding tag placeholders and
creating parameter files is a good
idea when you want to save overall
application memory, because
fewer graphic displays are
generated.

Question:
Key Terms
What is a tag placeholder?

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Use tag placeholders anywhere you would normally use a
tag.

Definition:
Parameter File: A document that associates tag
placeholders with the tags it is replacing.

Definition:
Parameter List: Allows the object on the display to
define the parameters without requiring a separate
parameter file.

Tag placeholders can be assigned to any graphic


Adding Tag Placeholders
display or expression that normally would include a
tag name.

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For example, a tag placeholder can be used when establishing
a connection to a momentary pushbutton:

Tag Replaced by Tag Placeholder

Best Practice: Be sure to keep careful track of where you use


tag placeholder values in a graphic display. If you forget to
associate a tag placeholder with a tag in a parameter file, the
application will mistake the placeholder for a non-existent tag.

Question:
How would you know that you have an unused tag
placeholder?

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Parameter files are created and saved in the

Creating Parameter Files


Parameters editor of the Application Explorer:

Parameters
Editor

Parameter files are stored in a document that looks similar to


a Notepad file:

Entries to the parameter file can be added to the empty


space at the bottom of the document.
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Keep the following tips in mind when working with
parameter files:

In a parameter file, tag placeholders are associated with


tag names using the following format:
#tag placeholder = tagname
You can add comments to your parameter file by starting
the line with an exclamation point (!). These lines will be
ignored at runtime.
The Tag Browser should be used when adding tag names
to the parameter file.

11

Activity:
Parameter File Assignment
As your instructor lists the locations for
assigning parameter files, write them down
in your manual.

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A Parameter List allows for tag substitution without

Parameter List Assignment


the need for a separate parameter file by including
the tag(s) to be substituted within the button
object.

13

The first tag name in the list would replace all occurrences
of the #1 placeholder.

The second tag name would replace #2.

Tag names in the list must be separated by a comma.

Parameter lists may be used with:


Goto Display Button
Display List Selector
Start-up Options
Logout Button
Automatic Logout
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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Add tag placeholders
Create parameter files

15

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Can you define a tag
placeholder?
Where could you use tag
placeholders?
What should be used when
adding tag names to the
parameter file?

17

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Add tag placeholders
Create parameter files

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

19

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Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

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Creating and Configuring
Information Messages for a
FactoryTalk View ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Create local messages or information
messages
Create and configure local message
displays
Configure information displays

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Creating information messages is a
good idea when you want to
provide operators with information
about the application or
instructions on how to handle a
given condition.
When you want to provide ongoing information
about the application, you can create and configure
local messages displays.

Both local and information messages can be used


Creating Local Messages or
Information Messages
to provide operators with key details relating to an
application.

The main dierence is in how operators respond to


messages that are displayed at runtime:

Local message displays typically do not require


operator acknowledgement.
Information message displays are typically
separate graphic displays that require the
operator to acknowledge the message and/or
close the display before continuing.

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Use information messages to give the operator information
no matter which display is open.

To give the operator information only within a specific


graphic display only while the display is open, use local
messages.

Question:
Do you have any processes that would use local
messages or information messages?

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Both types of messages are configured using a similar editing
tool:

Information messages are created using the Information


Messages editor; local messages are created using the Local
Messages editor.

Trigger values are associated with a specific tag at runtime.


When the trigger tag matches an assigned value, the
corresponding message is displayed.

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Keep the following points in mind when creating

Message Creation Tips


local or information messages:
Trigger values do not have to be assigned in
sequential order, but each value must be unique.
Trigger values can be positive or negative, but
not zero.
Tag values can be embedded into a message.
Messages can be up to 256 characters long.
The new line character (\n) can be used to display
a long message on multiple lines of a display.

You must create local messages or information


messages before creating and/or configuring the
corresponding display.

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Use local message displays when you are displaying

Creating and Configuring Local


Message Displays
messages that do not require formal
acknowledgement. Local message displays can be
part of a larger graphic display or can be built as
standalone graphic displays.

If the local message display is used as a


standalone graphic display, it must be an On Top
display. Buttons should also be created to
acknowledge messages and close the display.

11

Local message displays help configure user-defined


messages. The local message display graphic object can be
accessed from the Advanced submenu of the Objects drop-
down menu:

Local Message
Display

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Or, it is available from the Objects toolbar:

Local Message Display

Local message display objects are configured in the same


manner as other display objects.

13

Message files and tags are assigned to the local


message display using the Properties dialog box.

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Activity:

Local Message Display Creation


and Configuration Tips
As your instructor explains the key points to
keep in mind when creating a local message
display, write them in your manual.

15

Use information displays when you need to display


Configuring Information Displays
information messages that require formal operator
acknowledgement.

New FactoryTalk View ME applications include a


default [INFORMATION] graphic display when
created:

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Using the default graphic display can speed development
time. However, programmers have the option of building a
custom display.

The appearance of the information message display object


(i.e., color, font size, border) can be configured in a manner
similar to other display objects.

17

Unlike local messages, programmers must use a


Information Setup Configuration
separate Information Setup editor to configure the
behavior of the information display:

Assigned
Information
Display
Assigned
Information
Message File

Assigned Tags or
Expressions

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Keep the following points in mind when

Information Display
Configuration Tips
configuring an information display:
Only one tag or expression can be associated
with an information display.
If your message data is coming from more than
one source tag, you will need to use tag
placeholders and parameter files.
The information message display closes when
the value of the assigned tag is equal to zero.
If the value of the tag or expression assigned to
an information display is an unassigned value,
the display will fill with question marks.
The graphic display can be configured to close
when the operator acknowledges a message.
19

You can enable information messages in the Startup


Information Message Enabling
editor:

Information Messages Enabled

Information messaging is enabled by default when


you create a new application.

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Create local messages or information
messages
Create and configure local message
displays
Configure information displays

21

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Why would you want to
create an information
message vs a local message?
What should you do if you
want to display a long
message on multiple lines of
a local message display?
When configuring
information displays, what
should you do if your
message data is coming
from more than one source
tag? 23

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Create local messages or
information messages
Create and configure local message
displays
Configure information displays

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

25

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Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

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306
Adding Global Objects to a
FactoryTalk View ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Add a global object display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Modify default global object link
properties
Add global objects to a graphic
display
Substitute tags in a reference object
Assign global object parameters

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Adding global objects to a graphic
display is ideal when you want to:
Reduce modification time, since
changes to the base object are
reflected in all the references to
that object.
Increase consistency between
applications, since you can add I
previously created global objects.

Definition:
Global Objects Overview
Global Object: An object that is created
once and can be referenced multiple times
on multiple displays in an application.

When the global object is modified, all of the


objects that reference it will reflect the
modification(s).

It is possible to specify whether or not size,


connections, and animations can be modified at
the reference location.
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There are two types of global objects:

FactoryTalk View Global Object


Types
Base Object: A common graphic object that can
be reused on various displays in an application:
It is a single object or a group of objects
All FactoryTalk View ME objects except ActiveX controls
can be base objects.
There is no limit on the number of times a base object
can be reused in an application.

Reference Object: An object that is tied to a base object. It


is the location where the non-linked properties and
attributes of the object are edited.
For FactoryTalk View ME applications, reference objects can only
refer to base objects contained within the same application.

There are two types of reference objects:


Those that reference a single object
Those that reference a grouped object

A reference object that refers to a grouped object is known as


a grouped reference object and has some unique behavior.

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A global object display behaves like a standard

Global Object Display


graphic display with regard to the editing.

Activity:
As your instructor explains the functions/
items that are disabled when using global
object displays, write them in your manual.

Global object graphic displays are the only displays


that contain base objects. Any valid object placed
on a global display becomes a base object.

Global object displays are saved in the Global


Global Objects Folder
Objects folder located at the root of the
applications directory:

Global Objects
Folder

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A Global Objects folder is automatically created when a
FactoryTalk application is created

Example: An application named App1 will contain a folder in


this location: C:\Documents and Settings\All Users
\Documents\RSViewEnterprise\ME\HMIProjects\App1\ Global
Objects

Global object displays are saved in the Global Objects folder


with a .ggfx extension.

Adding a Global Object Display to a


Activity: FactoryTalk View ME Application
As your instructor explains the editing
options in the Global Objects folder, write
them down in your manual.

New
Add Component into Application
Import and Export:

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When an object is added to a global object graphic display, it
becomes a base object that can be referenced in a standard
graphic display:

11

When you create a global object, make sure all


connections and expressions are working as
intended before creating multiple reference
objects.

Activity:
As your instructor lists the base global objects that
can be added to a standard display, write them in
your manual.

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Groups are a way to organize global objects:

The group can be easily selected from the base object.


Use drag and drop or copy and paste functions to make
reference objects in a standard graphic display.
When the reference object is linked to a group in the base
object, an object can be added within the base object
group and the reference object will include the newly
added base object.

13

Ungrouping and regrouping objects will cause


the group name to change. Using the same
group name is important to ensure all the linked
objects stay linked. If you ungroup and regroup a
base global object, use the same name so the
reference objects will not be broken (i.e., lose the
connection to the base object).

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The default FactoryTalk View Studio configuration

Modifying Global Object Link


Properties
used when a global object is placed onto a display
can be set using the Global Object Defaults dialog
box.

15

The Edit menu and the Global Object Defaults option becomes
available when a display, global object, or library display is
opened in FactoryTalk View Studio software:

Global Object
Defaults

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These settings can be changed at any time, but they are only
referenced at the time the object is placed onto the screen
within FactoryTalk View Studio software.

17

The following global object default properties can


be configured:
LinkAnimation
LinkConnections
LinkSize

LinkAnimation

LinkConnections

LinkSize

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The settings will have the following impact:

Animations are linked back to the base object.


Tag connections are linked back to the base object.
The object is the same size as the base object.

19

The LinkAnimation property determines whether or


LinkAnimation Property
not the animation assigned to a base object will be
used by the reference object and, if the animation is
used, whether or not the expressions assigned to
the base object will be used.

Activity:
As your instructor explains the three
LinkAnimation property values, write them
in your manual

Do Not Link
Link With Expressions
Link Without Expressions
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For grouped reference objects, the LinkAnimation property
will be displayed using the string (GroupLinkAnimation) on
the Property Panel.

Any changes to the expressions used by


animations at the reference object will not get
picked up by the base object and any changes to
expressions used by animations at the base
object will not be picked up by the reference
object.

Changes to non-expression settings used by animations at


the base object will be picked up by the reference object.
21

The LinkConnections property determines whether


LinkConnections Property
or not the connections assigned to the base object
will be used by the reference object. It has two
values:
True: When set, the reference objects
connections will be read only and will use the
base objects assignments:
Any changes to the base objects connections will be
picked up by the reference object.
False: When set, the reference objects
connections can be edited at the reference
location:
Any changes to the reference object will not get picked
up by the base object and any changes to the base
objects connections will not be picked up by the
reference object.
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LinkConnections properties are added to the following:

All reference objects that have connections. A


LinkConnections property will also be added to all objects
that are part of a grouped reference object that have
connections but will not be added to the grouped
reference object itself.

All reference objects including grouped reference objects


and objects that are part of a grouped reference object.

23

The LinkBaseObject property determines the base


LinkBaseObject Property
object that the reference object is linked to and will
be a read-only property.

The LinkBaseObject property will use the following


syntax:

Objects that are part of a grouped reference object


will not have a LinkBaseObject property.

DisplayName.BaseObjectName

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If the DisplayName portion of the
LinkBaseObject property does not match the
name of a global objects display, the link
between the base and reference objects will be
broken and the reference object will be displayed
as a broken link object.

25

If the DisplayName portion of the


LinkBaseObject property is valid, but the
BaseObjectName portion does not match an
object on the global objects display, the link
between the base and reference objects will be
broken and the reference object will be
displayed as a broken link object.

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If the DisplayName portion of the
LinkBaseObject property is valid, the
BaseObjectName portion matches an object on
the global objects display, but the object is a
dierent type than the one that was originally
linked, the link between the base and reference
objects will be broken and the reference object
will be displayed as a broken link object.

For grouped reference objects, the LinkBaseObject property


will be displayed using the string (GroupLinkBaseObject)
on the Property Panel.
27

When a global object is added to a graphic display


Adding Global Objects to a
Graphic Display
it is referred to as a reference object.

For FactoryTalk View applications, a reference


object can be added to a standard display in the
following ways:

By dragging a base object from a Global Objects


display to a standard display, as long as both
displays are in the same ME application.
By copying and pasting a base object from a
Global Objects display to a standard display, as
long as both displays are in the same ME
application.
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By dragging a reference object from one standard display
to another standard display, as long as both displays are in
the same ME application.
By copying a reference object from one standard display
and pasting it to another standard display, as long as both
displays are in the same ME application.
By copying a reference and pasting it to the same display.
By duplicating a reference object on a standard display.

29

There is some other editing behavior related to


Editing Reference Objects
reference objects:
If a reference object is selected, there will be an
Edit Base Object menu item on Edit menu and
the Object right-click menu:
When selected this will open the global object display
containing the base object the reference object is
linked to with the object selected.
If one or more reference objects are selected,
there will be an Break Link menu item on the
Edit menu and the Object right--click menu:
When selected, this will break the link between the
base object and reference object and will convert the
reference object into a standard object.
If you accidentally break a link, the Undo command can
be used to relink the reference object to the base
object. 30

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Reference objects do not have property pages. Therefore,
double-clicking a reference object will not invoke a
Property Page dialog box, but will instead invoke the
Property Panel:
All editing of the reference objects properties and connections has
to be done from the Property Panel.
Any properties of a reference object that are not editable will be
disabled in the Property Panel.

The following limitations apply to grouped reference objects:


They can only be moved or resized as a whole.
Additional objects cannot be added into a grouped
reference object.
Objects cannot be deleted from a grouped reference
object.
They cannot be ungrouped. 31

When multiple objects reference the same base


Substituting Tags in a Reference
Objects
global object and a placeholder is used, tag
substitution may need to be performed in the
reference object.

Tag substitution can only be performed if the


reference global object has LinkConnections set
to False or LinkAnimation set to Link without
expressions.

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When performing tag substitution in a standard graphic
display containing a reference object, note the following:

When LinkConnections is set to True, the connections will


not appear in the tag substitution dialog box.
When LinkAnimation is set to Link with expressions, the
expressions will not appear in the tag substitution dialog
box.
If you know that you will want to use tag substitution, set
your global object defaults before adding the reference
object in your standard graphic display.

33

When a reference object has a LinkBaseObject


Broken Links
property referring to a base object that no longer
exists or is the wrong type of object, it becomes a
broken link object.

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Question:
How is a broken link object indicated?

35

Broken Link

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The following rules apply to broken link objects:

A broken link object can be moved and deleted, but no


other editing is allowed.
If a broken link object refers to a base object that has been
restored, it will become a reference object.

This section does not apply to reference objects whose links


have been broken using the Break Link menu item.

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A reference object will update to match the base


Changes to Base Objects
object under the following conditions:

When a standard display containing a reference


object is opened, the object will update to match
the base object.

The update cannot be undone.

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If a display is open and a reference objects LinkSize
property is changed to True, the reference object will
update to match the base object.
If a display is open and a reference objects LinkAnimation
property is changed to Link with expressions, the reference
object will update to match the base object.
If a display is open and a reference objects LinkAnimation
property is changed to Link without expressions, the
reference object will update itself from the base object.
If a display is open and a reference objects LinkConnections
property is changed to True, the reference object will
update to match the base object.

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As an alternative to using tag substitution, you can


Assigning Global Object
Parameters
use global parameters to assign multiple tags to
global objects without disabling the
LinkConnections property.

Instead of assigning tags to animation or


connections in a base object, you can use tag
placeholders (#1 to #500). When reference objects
are added to graphic displays, tags or values can be
assigned to all parameters at one time.

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Question:
What is an advantage of using global parameters?

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As base objects are created and modified, tag placeholders


can be assigned to animation and/or connections. Once the
placeholders are assigned, the corresponding data is entered
in the Global Object Parameter Definitions dialog box:

Parameter Definition
(Optional)
Tag
Placeholder

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As base objects are added to a FactoryTalk View ME
application, the Global Object Parameter Values dialog box
is used to assign tags or constant values:

Assigned
Parameter
Name Description
(From Parameter
Definitions Data)

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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Add a global object display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Modify default global object link
properties
Add global objects to a graphic
display
Substitute tags in a reference object
Assign global object parameters

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Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Once a global object display
has been added to a
FactoryTalk View ME
application, it is saved in the
Global Objects folder with
what file extension?
Did your instructor show you
where to configure Global
object default properties?

Continued

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Can you name several ways a
reference global object can be
added to a standard display?
What must be configured
before you can perform tag
substitution in reference
objects?
Do you know how to assign
global object parameters?

47

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Add a global object display to a
FactoryTalk View ME application
Modify default global object link
properties
Add global objects to a graphic
display
Substitute tags in a reference object
Assign global object parameters

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

49

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Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

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Inserting Faceplates in a
FactoryTalk View ME Application

Overview

After completing this lesson and


associated exercise, you should be
able to:
Insert faceplates into a FactoryTalk
View ME application
Configure faceplates in a FactoryTalk
View ME application

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Inserting faceplates is ideal when
you want to quickly load,
configure, and use pre-
configured status and diagnostic
displays for a FactoryTalk View
ME application.

FactoryTalk View ME Faceplates are pre-configured


Inserting Faceplates into a
FactoryTalk View ME Application
graphic displays and global object displays that
interact with Logix5000 controllers.

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Faceplates contain graphic objects that display values from
a Logix5000 controller and allow operators to interact with
the controller.

EtherNet/IP
Diagnostics Faceplate

Question:
Is anyone familiar with using faceplates in an
application?

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Process Faceplates can be added to the FactoryTalk View ME
application by right-clicking the application name in
FactoryTalk View ME studio and selecting the option Add
Process Faceplates.

The only process faceplate supported at this time


is the Phase Manager faceplate.

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Adding faceplate displays to an application
aects the license count. Each added faceplate
display (.gfx file) counts as one display for
activation purposes. The corresponding global
object display (.ggfx file) does not add to the
total license count.

All the process faceplates, except for the Phase


Manager faceplate, that get installed with
RSLogix 5000 software are not currently
supported in FactoryTalk View ME. Using these
faceplates could cause unexpected results.

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Only the faceplates that are available in the
sample code library located at http://
samplecode.rockwellautomation.com are
currently supported with FactoryTalk View ME
along with the Phase Manager faceplate.

11

Faceplates can be used in FactoryTalk View ME software for


easy operator monitoring and control.

The PowerFlex 70/70 EC illustration below is a pre


configured FactoryTalk View ME Goto Display button that will
launch the on--top display just below it.

This is the initial display that provides operator monitoring


and control.
The toolbar buttons on that display let you navigate
through the additional status, configuration, and
diagnostic displays provided in this faceplate.

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13

To use a faceplate, you must add it to your


Configuring Faceplates in a
FactoryTalk View ME Application
application and specify the path to the Logix5000
controller instructions or tags used by the faceplate.

The faceplates are set up so that you can specify the


path to the instructions using parameter files.

Your Logix5000 application may also require


modification depending on which faceplate is used.

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Activity:
As your instructor lists the modifications, write
them down in your manual.

15

Instructions on how to apply, add and configure faceplates


to your application are found within the faceplates
downloadable .zip file found on the
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support/
downloads.html website.

Implementing
ENet Faceplate
Instructions
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Demonstration

Heres how to perform the


following task(s):
Insert faceplates into a FactoryTalk
View ME application
Configure faceplates in a
FactoryTalk View ME application

17

Activity:
As your instructor demonstrates these
procedures, follow along in the associated job
aid(s).

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Demonstration Checklist:
After the demonstration, make
sure you understand:
Do you know where to
obtain faceplates for adding
them to your FactoryTalk
View ME application?
Did your instructor show you
how to configure faceplates?

19

Summary

Having completed this lesson, you


should now practice how to:
Insert faceplates into a FactoryTalk
View ME application
Configure faceplates in a FactoryTalk
View ME application

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Practice

Perform the associated


exercise in your lab book.

21

Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.


Connect with us on LinkedIn.
www.rockwellautomation.com

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The following are trademarks of Rockwell Automation, Inc.:
1336 FORCE 1336 IMPACT
1336 PLUS CompactLogix
ControlBus ControlLogix
Data Highway Plus DH+
DriveTools FactoryTalk
Flex FlexLogix
Logix5000 Logix5550
Micro800 Micro850
PanelBuilder PanelView
PLC5 PHOTOSWITCH
PowerFlex RediSTATION
RSBatch RSLinx
RSLogix RSNetWorx
RSView SCANPort
SLC SoftLogix
Studio 5000 Studio 5000 Logix Designer
Ultra

ControlNet, EtherNet/IP and DeviceNet are trademarks of the Open DeviceNet Vendor
Association, Inc. (ODVA).

The following are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation:


MSDOS PowerPoint
Windows Windows NT

IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.

Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.

All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders and are hereby
acknowledged.
Catalog Number ABTCCV204-TSL - February 2012 E 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in USA