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How do other countries view

police?
Analyzing how other communities view their police force versus Americas
public view of the Boys in Blue.

By: Olivia McMaster

W
hen our American society thinks of police, there
are many different opinions, ranging anywhere
from respect to neutrality to fear. Most of the
resentment towards the American police force
can be derived from pop-culture, socioeconomic standing, and
general distaste due to current events involving the murders and
beatings of unarmed African-Americans. While police are viewed
negatively in primarily African-American neighborhoods across the
United States, White neighborhoods view their police forces with
high respect and trust, due to the lack of racial profiling. But how
do other countries around the world view their police forces, and
how does that affect the overall opinion of social justice?

In other countries similar to the United States, such as England


and a majority of the UK, the police are viewed in a positive light,
with good approval ratings and a general neutrality. According to
Her Majestys Inspectorate of Constabulary, HMIC, The majority
of people say that police have their support (61%), have their
respect (56%), and act with integrity (51%) all or most of the
time.(HMIC 2016). This being said, the consensus is that
generally, the police in the UK can be seen in a relatively positive
light. It should also be noted that many police in the UK do not
carry firearms, even though it is a hot topic of discussion. This
may be reason why residents in the UK do not fear their local law
enforcement as much as those living in the United States do. Law
enforcement in the UK and Great Britain use similar methods as
the United States, but other countries in the world have some
different methods.

In the Middle Eastern countries, such as Egypt, Iran, Saudi


Arabia, and much of Northern Africa, views on police are varied
and undefinable. With religious issues within the Islamic Church
and the Morality Police, women seem to be the victims of Police
Brutality rather than African-Americans like in the United States.
There is no police fundamentals in these countries, unlike in our
country and the UK. But with the socioeconomic level of the
Middle East, their police and law enforcement is not directly
comparable to our law enforcement expectations, though there is
gender profiling and immoral police activity.

In China, the view of police is neutral, with the majority of


residents in Guangzhou [holding] generally positive attitudes
toward the police (Jiang, S., Sun, I.Y. and Wang, J. (2012). But,
police in China have only recently been permitted to carry
firearms. Many police fear carrying firearms, due to social views of
guns and distrust of weapons that can do as much damage as
firearms can. From an article from The Washington Post, Ive
never liked guns, said one nine-year veteran. Until this year,
guns were forbidden to most police -- except for SWAT units
and teams on special missions. Even in past special operations,
when we were ordered to have guns, I let co-workers take them
instead. You have to worry about it misfiring, about it getting
stolen or someone dying improperly. (Washington Post, 2014).
That being said, though, Police Brutality in China is still an issue,
due to social class and societies views on lower income and
classist ideals still predominantly controlling Chinas modern
culture.
Works Cited:

Jiang, S., Sun, I.Y. and Wang, J. (2012) Citizens satisfaction with police in
Guangzhou, china, Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies &
Management, 35(4), pp. 801821. doi: 10.1108/13639511211275733.

"Public views of policing in England and Wales." HMIC. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Mar. 2017.

Wan, William, and Xu Jing. "Newly armed police in China say they fear their guns as
much as public." The Washington Post. WP Company, 26 Sept. 2014. Web. 02 Mar.
2017