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The Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LTWA) was founded by His

Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama in 1970. It was established with the aim of
preserving and propagating the rich culture of Tibet to counter the
massive destruction it had suffered after the Chinese invasion of Tibet in
1959 and the subsequent campaigns to eliminate the Tibetan culture.

The primary objectives of the LTWA are to provide a comprehensive


Tibetan cultural resources and to promote an environment that
encourages research and an exchange of knowledge between scholars
and students. These factors are of the utmost importance in a
contemporary world shaped by political and spiritual confusion. In trying
to fulfill its aims and objectives, the Librarys priorities include:

Acquiring and conserving Tibetan manuscripts, books, artifacts and


works of art;
Providing access to books, manuscripts and reference works (in Tibetan
as well as in foreign languages) in study areas within the premises;
Compiling bibliographies and documentation of the Library holdings
and related literature available worldwide;
Providing copies and prints of the resources and acting as a reference
centre for such source materials;
Publishing books and manuscripts under the LTWA imprint;
Supporting research scholars;
Offering Buddhist philosophy, Tibetan language and culture classes.

The LTWA is firmly dedicated to a threefold vision of preservation,


protection and promotion

Important changes this year: There will be a summer break from July
1731

Note:
Dates and times may change due to scheduled or unscheduled public teachings given by His
Holiness the Dalai Lama. Such changes will be announced in advance. There will be no classes on
the second and fourth Saturdays of every month, Sunday, and other official holidays. Very
occasionally, a class may need to be cancelled. Prospective students are therefore requested to
call, email or visit www.ltwa.net to confirm the schedule before coming to the LTWA.

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Time: 9:00 am to 10:15 am
Teacher: Geshe Gyaltsen Tsering
Translators: Acharya Sonam Gyatso, Tsering Norbu, Phurbu Dolma
and Dhadon

Text: Lama Tsongkhapas Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path


to Enlightenment (Lam rim chen mo)

Lama Tsongkhapa (1357-1419) was one of the greatest reformers of


Tibetan Buddhism and of Tibetan cultural heritage.

The LTWA offers daily Buddhist philosophy classes to help people


appreciate and understand truth and help them deal with daily problems.
The classes are taught by Geshes who are highly qualified in Buddhist
philosophy and have dedicated a major part of their lives to study and
practice. English translators are provided. Courses focus either on specific
Indian or Tibetan texts or on significant topics of Buddhist philosophy and
practice. The texts covered in the classes provide the foundation for a
lifetime of meditation practice. Every day fifteen minutes of the class will
be dedicated to meditation practice, and Buddhist logic and debate will be
taught every Wednesday in the classes.

founder of the Gelugpa tradition. He wrote Lamrim Chenmo to give


students a reliable guide to the stages of the path, from the very
beginning all the way through to the attainment of enlightenment itself.
This text is one of Lama Tsongkhapas greatest works. It is a commentary
to Atishas Lamp of the Path to Enlightenment (Byang chub lam sgron).

Preliminaries to the Lamrim Chenmo


(March 2 April 16)
Atisha and his teachings
How to listen to and explain the teachings:
Contemplation of their benefits
How to listen properly having rid yourself of the three faults of
a vessel etc.
Prerequisite attitudes and conduct while explaining the
teaching etc.
How a session should be concluded
How to rely on the teacher:
The necessary characteristics of the teacher and students
How to rely upon the teacher

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The benefits of the relying on the teacher and the drawbacks
of not doing so
Explanation of the meditation session
How to sustain the meditation session
Internal and external factors
Refuting misconceptions about meditation
A human life of leisure and opportunity
The three types of persons

Training in the Path Shared with Persons of Small Capacity


(April 18 May 31)

How to take full advantage of the human rebirth through being mindful
of death:
The benefits of remembering death
The faults of not remembering death
How to cultivate mindfulness of death
Reflecting on your future life:
Contemplating the suffering of hell beings
Contemplating the suffering of animals
Contemplating the suffering of hungry ghosts
Training in taking refuge in the three jewels
The refuge precepts
Reflecting on karma and its effects in general
Varieties of karma:
Non-virtuous actions and their effects
Virtuous actions and their effects
Classifications of karma
Reflecting on karma and its effects in detail
Cultivating ethical behavior

Training of the Path Shared with Persons of Medium Capacity


(June 1 July 16)

Need for reflection on suffering and its origin


Different kinds of sufferings
Reflecting on the process of cyclic existence through the twelve
links of dependent arising
The nature of the path leading to liberation

Training in the Path of a Person of Great Capacity


(August 1 October 1)

The awakening mind (bodhicitta) as the entrance to the Mahayana


Generating bodhicitta by means of Atishas and Shantidevas
instructions
Sustaining bodhicitta without allowing it to decline
The method of repairing bodhicitta if it has weakened
How to train in the Mahayana precepts
How to train in the Six Perfections:

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The perfection of giving
The perfection of ethics
The perfection of patience
The perfection of joyous effort
The perfection of concentration
The perfection of wisdom
How to help others to mature

How to specifically Train in the last Two Perfections


(October 3 December 16)

Preparing for calm abiding (shamatha; zhi gnas)


Focusing your mind
Dealing with laxity and excitement
Attaining calm abiding
Calm abiding as part of the path
Why special insight (vipashyana; lhag mthong) is necessary
Identifying the object of negation
Dependent arising and emptiness
The concept of validity at the conventional level
The distinction between the Svatantrika and Prassangika schools
The selflessness of phenomena and persons and the reasons
establishing it
How to train in the unification of calm abiding and special insight

Recommended Text: Tsongkhapa's Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to


Enlightenment, Vol. IIII, translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee, Snow
Lion Publications

Additional Reading: Atishas Lamp for the Path to Enlightenment, Commentary by


Geshe Sonam Rinchen, translated by Ruth Soman, Snow Lion
Life and Teachings of Tsong Kapha, edited by Professor Robert Thurman, LTWA
The Essence of Superfine Gold, His Holiness the Third Dalai Lama, translated by Dr Chok, LTWA
The Three Principal Aspects of the Path, Je Tsongkapha with commentary by His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama,
translated by Geshe Lhakdor and Jeremy Russell, LTWA
Words of My Perfect Teacher, Patrul Rinpoche, translated by the Padmakara Translation Group, Shambhala
The Jewel Ornament of Liberation, Gampopa, translated by Khenpo Konchog Gyalsten, Snow Lion

Time: 10:30 am to 11:45 am


Teacher: Geshe Lobsang Tsondu
Translators: Julia Wilson and Tsering Norbu

Date: March 1June 30


Text: Udnavarga: Chapters 410 (ched du brjod pai tshoms)

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The Udnavarga is an early Buddhist collection of topically organized
chapters of aphoristic verses that were spoken by the Buddha and his
disciples on a range of subjects such as the afflictive emotions, mind
training, ethics, conduct, concentration and so forth. The text is included
within the Sanskrit Buddhist Canon and shares many verses and section
headings in common with the shorter length Dhammapada of the Pali
Canon, and it is for this reason that it is often referred to as the Sanskrit or
Tibetan Dhammapada. Geshe Tsondu will guide us through seven of the
thirty-three chapters of the work, chapters four through ten which explore
the themes of conscientiousness, beauty, ethics, upright conduct, speech,
actions, and faith.

Recommended Text: The Tibetan Dhammapada: Sayings of the BuddhaA Translation


of the Tibetan Version of the Udnavarga, translated by Gareth Sparham, Wisdom
Publications
(In Tibetan: Books 13 and 14 of the LTWAs Dharma Series)
Additional Reading: The Dhammapada and the Udanavarga, translated by F. Max
Muller and William Woodville Rockhill
The Sutra of the Wise and Foolish, translated by Stanely Frye, LTWA

Date: July 116 and August 1October 31


Text: The Jewel Ornament of Liberation: The Wish-fulfilling Gem of
the Noble Teachings
(dwags po thar rgyan; or dam chos yid bzhin nor bu thar pa rin po chei
rgyan)

The Jewel Ornament of Liberation is one the great masterworks of Tibetan


Buddhism. It was composed by Gampopa (10741153 CE), the foremost
student of Milarepa, and is considered the preeminent graduated stages of
the path to enlightenment text of the Kagyu tradition. The text is laid out
in five main sections and begins by first introducing us to buddha-nature,
the primary cause that makes it possible for us to attain enlightenment,
and the different lineages or families of spiritual practitioners. The second
part goes on to point out the value of a precious human life and how
difficult it is to attain one. In part three, Gampopa points out the
importance of being guided by and serving an authentic spiritual master.
In part four he devotes to laying out the method for attaining
enlightenment, which is encompassed in practicing the instructions heard
by the spiritual master. Here we are taught practices which act as
powerful antidotes to attachment, how to take refuge, how to cultivate the
altruistic mind of enlightenment, and how to practice the transcendent
perfections of bodhisattvas. In closing, the fifth part introduces us to the
final destination of the bodhisattva path, the attainment of the three
kayas of a perfect Buddha.

Recommended Text: The Jewel Ornament of Liberation, translated by Khenpo Konchog


Gyalsten, Snow Lion
Additional Reading:
Buddha Nature, Geshe Sonam Rinchen, Translated by Ruth Sonam, LTWA
Tibetan Tradition of Mental Development, Geshe Ngawang Dhargyey, LTWA
The Mahamudra, the Ninth Karmapa, Wangchuk Dorge, translated by Alexander Berzin,
LTWA

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The Life of Mahasiddha Tilopa, Marpa Chokyi Lodro, translated by Fabrizio Torricelli and
Archarya Sangye T. Naga, LTWA

Date: November 1December 16


Text: Konchok Jikme Wangpos Precious Garland of Tenets (grub pai
mthai rnam par bzhag pa rin po chei phrang ba) with Jetsun Chokyi
Gyalstens Necklace of Learned Explanations: Presentation of Grounds
and Paths (sa lam rnam gzhag mkhas pai mgul rgyan)

An understanding of the view of the lower Buddhist tenets systems is a


useful platform that assists one in developing an understanding of the
Madhyamika tenet system and highest view of emptiness. Geshe Tsondu
will teach Konchok Jikme Wangpos concise introduction to the four main
Buddhist tenet schools. The topics include the different schools views of
the two truths, consciousness, the obstructions to enlightenment, the
paths to liberation, and the fruits of path. Throughout the course Geshe la
will intermittently give teachings on the various levels of the Hearer,
Solitary Realizer, and Bodhisattva paths based upon Jetsun Chokyi
Gyalstens presentation of the paths and grounds.

Recommended Texts: Cutting Through Appearances: Practice and Theory of Tibetan


Buddhism, translated by Geshe Lhundup Sopa and Jeffery Hopkins, Snow Lion
Necklace of Learned Explanations:Presentation of Grounds and Paths, translated by
William Magee, Ph.D. and Lozang Zopa
Additional Reading: Appearance & Reality: The Two Truths in the Four Buddhist
Systems, Guy Newland, Snow Land.
Mind in Tibetan Buddhism, Lati Rinbochay and Elizabeth Napper, Snow Lion
The Mind and its Functions, Geshe Rabten, Edition Rabten
Buddhist Philosophy, Daniel Cozort and Craig Preston, Snow Lion
Traversing the Spiritual Path: Kn-chog-jig-may-wong-bos Presentation of the Grounds
and Paths with Dan-ma-lo-chs Oral Commentary, Elizabeth Napper, Uma Institute for
Tibetan Studies

The LTWA is now accepting applications for the three-year Bachelor


degree in Buddhist Philosophy to start on March 1, 2016. Upon successful
completion, students may continue onto a two-year Master Degree
Program. Through this program, the students will have a unique chance
to study the five major fields of Buddhist philosophy as well as Tibetan
language. Classes are taught by experienced Tibetan teachers and
qualified geshes.

Admission Requirements
All classes and course materials are in Tibetan and teachers use both
chen and me scripts. Therefore, applicants are required to comprehend
spoken Tibetan as well as the ability to read well both the Tibetan uchen
and ume scripts. We already have eight students who did their Diploma in
Buddhist philosophy and Tibetan language in 2015.

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Program
Over the course of this three-year program, students will attend morning
sessions consisting of one Tibetan language class and two Buddhist
philosophy classes. The classes will be held on Monday through Friday.

First year: Epistemology (Pramana) and Mind Training


Second year: Perfection of Wisdom (Prajnaparamita)
Third year: Middle Way Philosophy (Madhyamika)

The academic year


The academic year will start on March 1 and finish on December 16, 2016.
It will be comprised of two semesters with a one-month break between
them (16 July to 14 August). The first is from March 1st to July 15 and the
second semester is from August 15 to December 31..

Attendance & Examination


Students must have at least 80% attendance and must sit monthly
and semester-wise exams and hand in assignments given by the teachers
in order to be able to attend the classes and to proceed to the next year.

Tuition Fee
Please pay the tuition fee in the first month of the academic year. The fee
is ` 15,000 per academic year (10 months), which is not refundable.

Notice
The Three-Year Program is fairly demanding. Therefore, the LTWA
would like to ask only those applicants who are seriously interested in the
program to submit their applications. The program is limited for a
maximum of 25 students.
For further details please visit our website www.ltwa.net

This is the second year where the LTWA organizes a five-day evening
Buddhist philosophy class every month. It is especially aimed for the CTA
staff members and other Tibetans living in and around Gangchen
Kyishong. However, anyone who is interested can attend the classes. The
Director, Geshe Lhakdor, and two geshes will teach in turn. Our focus will
be not only on listening, but also on lively discussion. Following is the
scheduled program for the classes, but the actual announcement will be
made one week before each teaching.
Month Date Time Teacher Subject Langua
ge
4:30 to 5:30 Topic: Analytical and Single-pointed Meditation as a
January 25-29 Geshe Lhakdor English
pm Means for Training the Mind
4:30 to 5:30 Geshe Lobsang
February 22-26 Text: Nagarjuna's A Letter to a Friend Tibetan
pm Tsondu
4:30 to 5:30 Geshe Gyaltsen Text: Dzongchen Paltrul Ugen Jigme Choegyi
March 21-25 Tibetan
pm Tsering Lodro's Essence of Spirituality and Humanity
5:30 to 6:30 Text: Nagarjuna's Precious Garland, Chapter 1:
April 25-29 Geshe Lhakdor English
pm Higher Rebirth, Nirvana and Buddhahood
5:30 to 6:30 Geshe Lobsang Text: Nagarjuna's A Letter to a Friend (to be
May 23-27 Tibetan
pm Tsondu continued)

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5:30 to 6:30 Geshe Gyaltsen Text: Shantidevan's Guide to the Bodhisattvas
June 20-24 Tibetan
pm Tsering Way of Life, Chapter 6: Patience
5:30 to 6:30 Text: Arya Deva's Four Hundred Stanzas, Chapter
July 11-15 English
pm Geshe Lhakdor 6: The Means of Removing Afflictive Emotions
5:30 to 6:30 Geshe Lobsang Text: Nagarjuna's A Letter to a Friend (to be
August 22-26 Tibetan
pm Tsondu continued)
Septemb 5:30 to 6:30 Geshe Gyaltsen Text: Lama Tsongkhapa's A Song of Spiritual
26-30 Tibetan
er pm Tsering Experience
4:30 to 5:30
October 24-28 Geshe Lhakdor Topic: The Science of Mind English
pm
Novembe 4:30 to 5:30 Geshe Lobsang Text: Nagarjuna's A Letter to a Friend (to be
21-25 Tibetan
r pm Tsondu completed)
Text: Gungthang Tenpae Donme's Meditation on
Decembe 4:30 to 5:30 Geshe Gyaltsen
12-16 Impermanence, Advice by an Old Man and some of Tibetan
r pm Tsering
his other texts

The LTWA also offers daily Tibetan language classes to help people
understand Tibetan culture. The classes are taught by experienced
teachers. Tibetan language courses are taught in two semesters: March 1
to July 15, and August 1 to December 16. There are five classes of one-
hour duration each: 9:00 am to 10:00 am (two classes), 10:30 am to
11:30 am, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm and 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. There are
three regular Tibetan language classes: basic, intermediate and higher
intermediate; and two regular speaking classes: basic and intermediate.
The classes are held five times a week from Monday to Friday.

Important changes this year: The three terms are changed to two
semesters of four and half months each; and there will be a summer break
from July 1631.

Note:
1. Serious students who wish to receive LTWA certificate on completion of
a semester must sit monthly tests.
2. New students who wish to study basic Tibetan language will be
admitted for the Basic Tibetan Language Course at any time during a
semester. For other Tibetan language and speaking classes, the
students are not admitted after the third week of a semester.

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1. Basic Tibetan Language Course:

Beginning with the alphabet, vowels and combinations of letters, students


learn the fundamental structure of the language, how to make simple
sentences, how to use tenses and so forth. The aim at this level is to train
students in reading and simple conversation.

Time: 9:00 am to 10:00 am


Teacher: Acharya Ani Norzom
Substitute: Dr. Chok and Dhadon
Textbooks: 1. Tsetan Chonjores Colloquial Tibetan: A Textbook of the
Lhasa Dialect Pages: XXIX to LV (LTWA publication)
2. Tashis A Basic Grammar of Modern Spoken Tibetan (LTWA
publication)
3. Dr. Chok's A Standard Tibetan Pronunciation (not yet
published)

2. Intermediate Tibetan Language Course:

The intermediate course is a stepping-stone to the upper intermediate


course. Students in this course reinforce and extend their command of
Tibetan grammar and idioms. The main aim of this class is to help
students become confident in Tibetan.

Time: 9:00 am to 10:00 am


Teacher: Nyima Dekyi
Substitute: Acharya Pema Khando and Dhadon
Textbooks: 1. Lobsang Thondens Modern Tibetan Language, Vol. 1
(LTWA publication)
2. Tsetan Chonjores Colloquial Tibetan: A Textbook of the
Lhasa Dialect (LTWA publication)
3. Yangchen Drupe Dorjee's Legs bshad ljon dbang

3. Higher Intermediate Tibetan Language Course:

In this course, Tibetan grammar and honorific words are taught. The class
also touches on aspects of Tibetan culture and religion to provide students
with a basis for discussing Buddhism in Tibetan.

Time: 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm


Teacher: Acharya Pema Khando
Substitute: Nyima Dekyi and Acharya Sonam Gyatso
Textbooks: 1. Thupten Chokdrups Bod kyi sgra rig pai gnas la dpyod
pa bsal bai me
long (LTWA publication)

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2. Geshe Thupten Sopa's Lectures on Tibetan Religion and
Culture
(LTWA publication)
3. Ngeton Gyatso' bsTon pa'i mdzad rnam gsal ba'i me long
4. Byis pa dag yig (An Orthography for Children)

1. Basic Tibetan Speaking Course:

This course is aimed at assisting our students to communicate in Tibetan,


thereby enriching their knowledge of the feelings and basic way of life of
Tibetans. The main aim of this class is to help students become more
confident in spoken Tibetan.

Time: 10:30 am to 11:30 am


Teacher: Nyima Dekyi
Substitute: Dr. Chok and Phurbu Dolma
Textbook: Dr. Choks Speak Fluent Tibetan (LTWA publication)

2. Intermediate Tibetan Speaking Course:

Students will reinforce and extend their command of spoken Tibetan,


thereby enriching their knowledge of the feelings and basic way of life of
Tibetans. The main aim of this class is to help students become more
confident in speaking Tibetan.

Time: 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm


Teacher: Nyima Dekyi
Substitute: Acharya Pema Khando and Tsering Norbu
Textbook: Nyima Dekyi's Speak Tibetan the Tibetan Way (LTWA
publication)

The course is specially meant for students who have either completed
their elementary education in the Tibetan language or who have strong
background knowledge of Tibetan language and culture. The class is
taught in Tibetan and covers a wide range of topics including Tibetan
language, literature, culture, history and religion. Students, mostly Tibetan
graduates from colleges and universities, are introduced to a higher level
of Tibetan studies.

Time: 8:00 am to 9:00 am


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Teacher: Acharya Sangye Tandar Naga

Availability of this course and textbooks will be announced in advance.

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Since 2010, the LTWA has been offering a basic Hindi language course. At
least twenty students are needed for this course to be held.

1. Basic Hindi Language Course:

Beginning with the alphabet, vowels and combinations of letters, students


learn the fundamental structure of the language, how to make simple
sentences, how to use tenses and so forth. The aim at this level is to train
students in reading and simple conversation.

Time: 10:00 am to 11:00 am


Teacher: Shastri Chemi Tsering
Substitute: Dr. Jampa Dawa
Text: Rupert Snell's Beginner's Hindi

The LTWA has organized two intensive learning programs. A three-month


Intensive Translation Program was started in 2006 and a two-month
Intensive Tibetan Studies Program was started in 2011. This year, the
Intensive Tibetan Studies Program is tentatively fixed from 1st April
to 31st May, and the Intensive Translation Program is from 1st July
to 30th September. Around thirty students are admitted in each
program. The programs are for Tibetans and others from Himalayan
regions and foreigners who understand Tibetan language well and can
attend all the classes.

In the Intensive Tibetan Studies Program, students are taught Tibetan


language and literature, Buddhist philosophy and practice, and Tibetan
history. In the Intensive Translation Program, students are taught Tibetan
language and literature, Buddhist philosophy and practice, English
language and literature, and translation methodology.

Geshe Lobsang Tsondu was born in Reting, Tibet. He began his religious
studies at the age of twelve at Sera Monastery in Tibet where he
continued to study Buddhist philosophy until he was forced to flee Tibet in
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1985. He received his Geshe degree from Sera Monastic University in
south India in 2003. Then he studied at Gyutoe Tantric University for one
year. He taught Buddhist philosophy to the nuns of Kopan Monastery in
Nepal before he joined the LTWA in 2005.

Geshe Gyaltsen Tsering was born in Kham Drango, Tibet. He began his
religious studies at the age of eighteen with his uncle at Rasang Mountain
Retreat in Tibet. He then continued to study Buddhist philosophy in
Drango Monastery for five years. He fled Tibet in 1988 and studied
Buddhism for the next 25 years in Drepung Monastic University in south
India. He received his Geshe Lharampa degree from the same university
in 2013. After that he studied at Gyume Tantric University for one year. He
was invited to teach at the LTWA in 2014.

Acharya Sonam Gyatso holds an Acharya degree in Tibetan studies and


Buddhist philosophy from the Central University of Tibetan Studies,
Varanasi. He joined the Research and Translation Department of the LTWA
in 2005.

Tsering Norbu holds an Uma Rabjampa degree (MA equivalent) in


Tibetan studies and Buddhist philosophy from the Institute of Buddhist
Dialectics, Dharamsala. He joined the LTWA in 2010.

Phurbu Dolma holds a Bachelors degree in Tibetan studies from the


College for Higher Tibetan Studies, Sarah and a Bachelors degree from
Delhi University. She joined the Research and Translation Department of
the LTWA in 2012.

Julia Wilson holds a Bachelors degree from California State University,


San Francisco in comparative cultural studies. She studied Tibetan
language and culture at the College for Higher Tibetan Studies, Sarah
from 2006-2008. She has been studying and translating at the LTWA since
May 2008.

Dhadon holds a Bachelors degree in Tibetan studies from the College for
Higher Tibetan Studies, Sarah and a Bachelors degree from Delhi
University. She joined the Research and Translation Department of the
LTWA in 2014.

Acharya Sangye Tandar Naga is the head of the Cultural Research


Department and the editor of gTam-tshogs, a journal in Tibetan. He taught
Tibetan language and literature in the National Institute of Oriental

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Language and Civilizations (INALCO), Paris for the academic session 2014-
1015. He teaches the morning special class and other academic
workshops at the LTWA. He joined the LTWA in 1991.

Dr. Chok Tenzin Monlam is the head of the Research and Translation
Department. He has done research on teaching-learning methods for
Tibetan as a foreign language since 2001, and has been using his findings
to teach foreign students since he joined the LTWA in 2007. In 2012, he
taught Tibetan language at the Summer Language Program at the
University of Virginia.

Nyima Dekyi studied Tibetan and Buddhist philosophy in Tibet until she
escaped to India in 1997. She continued to study Tibetan and Buddhist
philosophy in Dolmaling Nunnery and the College for Higher Tibetan
Studies, Sarah. She taught Tibetan as a foreign language at Thosamling
Nunnery for more than three years before joining the LTWA in 2009.

Acharya Ani Norzom holds an Acharya degree in Tibetan Studies and


Buddhist Philosophy from the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies,
Varanasi. She joined the LTWA in 1999 and has been teaching the basic
Tibetan language course since then.

Acharya Pema Khando holds an Acharya degree in Tibetan studies and


Buddhist philosophy from the Central University of Tibetan Studies,
Varanasi. She also did her B.Ed. from the same university. She taught
Tibetan language in the Central Schools for Tibetans, Mundgod for three
years before joining the LTWA in 2015.

Dr. Jampa Dawa is the head of the Hindi Section of the Research and
Translation Department. He joined the LTWA in 2006. Since then, he has
been working as a managing editor for the LTWA Hindi publications.

Shastri Chemi Tsering holds a Shastri degree in Tibetan studies and


Buddhist philosophy from the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies.
He also did his B.Ed. from the same university. He taught in Sambhota
Tibetan School for six years before joining the LTWA in 2014.

Students are required to register and obtain a registration slip from the
Library office before attending any course. Fees are nominal and they are
only meant to defray the running cost of the courses. Therefore, course
fees should be paid at the time of registration, either for a whole course or
on a monthly basis.

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Registration: ` 50 (one time)
Buddhist Philosophy: ` 300 per month for each class
Language Course: ` 500 per month for each class

A limited number of semi-furnished rooms with attached kitchen and


either attached or common bathrooms with hot water are available for
research scholars and students enrolled in two or more courses. Rents
range from ` 140 to ` 160 per day subject to periodic revision. No advance
bookings are accepted. Rooms are rented to students only on arrival and
after registration. If no rooms are available at the time of arrival, the
students name will be placed on a waiting list.

Research scholars are those scholars who come with a letter of


recommendation from their university or institution and who need to use
the books, manuscripts and other facilities available at the LTWA during
their research period. Research scholars are required to subscribe to
library membership. The membership fee is ` 300 per month, the annual
membership fee for institutions is ` 1,500 and ` 100 per month for general
readers.

Tibetan Books & Manuscripts Library: This library holds more than
122,000 Tibetan titles (manuscripts and books) dealing with Tibetan
culture, history, Buddhist philosophy, psychology, medicine, astrology,
Tibetan language, folklores and so forth.
Foreign Language Library: This library contains more than 15,000
books concerning Buddhism and Tibet related subjects, as well as
reference materials in English and other languages.
Chinese Library: This library holds more than 5,500 publications in
Chinese concerning Buddhist philosophy and Tibet related subjects.
Public Library: Unlike the two libraries located in the institute's main
building, which exclusively hold reference resources on Tibet,
Buddhism and relevant subjects, this newly opened public library
houses general reading materials on a variety of subjects like any other
public library to cater to the wider needs of the general public. It has
over 2,250 books.
Hindi Library: This library holds more than 700 publications in Hindi
concerning Buddhist philosophy and Tibet related subjects.
Multimedia Library: With the setting up of a new multimedia
library, one can listen to, watch, read or even study any of the
resources available, which include Tibetan documentary films, movies,
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oral histories, songs and dances, speeches, spiritual discourses, e-
books, etc.
Museum: The museum exhibits more than 1,000 sacred
objects from Tibet.
Publication Sales: A bookstall located at the library reception area
sells books and journals published by the LTWA in Tibetan, English and
Hindi.
Recording Studio: A state-of-the-art recording studio provides full
audio support.
Translation: Written and oral translation services are available.
Special Classes: Special Buddhist philosophy and Tibetan language
classes are provided when requested.
Photocopy: Photocopying and binding services are available.
Conference halls and classrooms: Multipurpose conference halls
and classrooms are available
Canteen: In between classes, relax over a cup of tea and chat with
your classmates at our canteen. You can also order a variety of simple
vegetarian dishes at reasonable prices.

The Office Secretary


Library of Tibetan Works & Archives
(Centre for Tibetan Studies)
Gangchen Kyishong
Dharamsala-176215, HP, India

Main office: +91 9218422467


Reception: +91 9882255047
Fax: 91-1892-229106
Email: ltwa1970@gmail.com
Website: www.ltwa.net
Facebook: Library of Tibetan Works and Archives

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2015 DAILY CLASS SCHEDULES
March 9 to December 31

Buddhist
Time Language Textbooks
Philosophy
Tsetan Chonjores Colloquial Tibetan
Basic Tibetan
9:00 am - 10:00 Tashis A Basic Grammar of Modern Spoken Tibetan
Acharya Ani
am Dr. Chok's A Standard Tibetan Pronunciation
Norzom
(unpublished)
Intermediate Lobsang Thondens Modern Tibetan Language, Vol.
9:00 am - 10:00
Tibetan 1 Tsetan Chonjores Colloquial Tibetan
am
Nyima Dekyi Yangchen Drupe Dorjee's Legs bshad ljon dbang
First Buddhist
9:00 am - 10:15 March 1 to December 16: Lama Tsongkhapas Great Treatise on the
Philosophy
am Stages of the Path to Enlightenment
Geshe Gyaltsen Tsering
Basic Hindi Course
10:00 am - 11:00
Shastri Chemi Rupert Snell's Beginner's Hindi
am
Tsering
Basic Tibetan
10:30 am - 11:30
Speaking Dr. Choks Speak Fluent Tibetan
am
Nyima Dekyi
March 1 to June 30: The Buddha's Udnavarga: Chapters 410
July 1 to Oct 31: Gampowa's The Jewel Ornament of Liberation
Second Buddhist
10:30 am - 11:45 Nov 1 to Dec 16: Konchok Jikme Wangpos Precious Garland of Tenets
philosophy
am and
Geshe Lobsang Tsondu
Jetsun Chokyi Gyalstens Necklace of Learned Explanations: Presentation
of Grounds and Paths
Intermediate
12:00 pm - 1:00
Tibetan Speaking Nyima Dekyi's Speak Tibetan the Tibetan Way
pm
Nyima Dekyi
1:00 pm - 2:00
L U N C H B R E A K
pm
2:15 pm - 3:15
pm
Thupten Chokdrups Bod kyi sgra rig pai gnas la
Higher
dpyod pa bsal bai me long
Intermediate
Geshe Thupten Sopa's Lectures on Tibetan Religion
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Tibetan
and Culture
Acharya Pema
Ngeton Gyatso' bsTon pa'i mdzad rnam gsal ba'i me
Khando
long and Byis pa dag yig

January 1 New Year


January 26 Republic Day of India
February 9-11 Tibetan New Year
February 22 Day of Great Miracles (Choetrul
Duechen)
March 10 Tibetan Uprising
May 21 Buddha's Birth, Enlightenment and
Passing Away
July 6 Birthday of His Holiness the Dalai
Lama
July 19 Universal Prayer and Purification Day
(Zamling Chisang)
August 6 Buddhas First Teaching (Choekhor
Duechen)
August 15 Independence Day of India
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September 2 Democracy Day of Tibet
October 2 Gandhi Jayanti (Birthday)
November 20 Buddhas Descent from Heaven
(Lhabab Duechen)
December 10 Commemoration of Nobel Peace Prize
to His Holiness

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