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ORAL PRESENT TIME TABLE POSTER TIME TABLE

Room Foyer 3rd floor


Time 305 306 403 404 405 Time: 17.15-18.45
13.45-14.00 T-SET02-O22 T-CRE01-O24 I-PM01-O27 I-PSC01-O53 I-BFT01-O33 T-SET06-P77 I-PM05-P44
14.00-14.15 T-SET03-O62 T-CRE02-O70 I-PM02-O28 I-PSC02-O65 I-BFT02-O41 T-SET11-P135 I-PM12-P139
14.15-14.30 T-SET04-O64 T-CRE03-O74 I-PM03-O29 I-PSC03-O84 I-BFT03-O46 T-SET12-P136 I-PM13-P141
14.30-14.45 T-SET10-O120 T-CRE04-O68 I-PM04-O30 I-PSC04-O113 I-BFT04-O87 T-SPT01-P78 I-IA01-P97
27 OCTOBER 2016

14.45-15.00 T-SET13-O145 T-CRE05-O58 I-PM06-O49 I-PSC05-O117 I-BFT05-O106 T-PM01-P38 I-ESH03-P86

27 OCTOBER 2016
15.00-15.15 T-SET14-O148 T-CRE06-O81 I-PM07-O55 I-PSC08-O42 I-BFT08-O133 T-PM03-P61 I-ESH04-P114
15.15-15.30 T-SET15-O166 T-CRE07-O82 I-PM08-O71 I-BFT07-O126 T-IA03-P98 I-CRE01-P25
15.45-16.00 T-SPT02-O99 T-CRE08-O79 I-PM09-O115 I-PSC09-O57 I-BEB01-O118 T-ESH13-P158 I-CRE03-P37
16.00-16.15 T-SPT03-O169 T-CRE11-O111 I-PM10-O119 I-PSC11-O154 I-BEB02-O67 T-ESH14-P159 I-CRE04-P39
16.15-16.30 T-IA01-O50 T-CRE12-O122 I-PM11-O129 I-PSC12-O160 I-ESH01-O34 T-ESH15-P170 I-CRE09-P103
16.30-16.45 T-IA02-O17 T-CRE13-O32 I-PM14-O162 I-PSC13-O165 I-ESH02-O47 T-CRE09-P104 I-CRE10-P116
16.45-17.00 T-IA04-O69 T-CRE14-O152 I-PM15-O172 I-PSC14-O168 T-BFT03-P100 I-CRE15-P138
17.00-17.15 T-PSC06-O157 T-CRE17-O177 I-PM16-O173 I-PSC15-O51 T-BFT05-P176 I-BFT06-P108
10.45-11.00 T-ESH01-O15 T-PM02-O60 T-BFT01-O26 I-SET01-O19 I-CRE11-O121 T-BEB01-P45
11.00-11.15 T-ESH02-O56 T-PM04-O109 T-BFT02-O92 I-SET02-O18 I-CRE02-O31
11.15-11.30 T-ESH03-O73 T-PM05-O124 T-BFT04-O150 I-SET03-O21 I-CRE05-O40 ITIChE & TIChE Program
11.30-11.45 T-ESH04-O102 T-PM08-O153 T-PPT01-O96 I-SET04-O14 I-CRE06-O23 BEB Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials
28 OCTOBER 2016

11.45-12.00 T-ESH05-O105 T-PM09-O161 I-SET05-O35 I-CRE07-O59 BFT Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology
13.00-13.15 T-ESH06-O107 T-SET01-O16 T-PSC01-O90 I-SET06-O36 I-CRE08-O91 CRE Catalyst and Reaction Engineering
13.15-13.30 T-ESH07-O127 T-SET05-O75 T-PSC02-O93 I-SET07-O63 I-CRE12-O125 ESH Environmental, Safety, Health & Risk Management
13.30-13.45 T-ESH09-O130 T-SET16-O175 T-PSC03-O101 I-SET08-O66 I-CRE13-O131 IA Innovation in Chemical Engineering & Applied
13.45-14.00 T-ESH10-O132 T-SET08-P88 T-PSC04-O155 I-SET09-O76 I-CRE14-O137 Chemistry for Industrial Development
14.00-14.15 T-ESH11-O80 T-PSC05-O156 I-SET10-O94 I-CRE16-O140 PM Polymers and Materials
14.15-14.30 T-ESH12-O151 I-SET11-O95 I-CRE17-O48 PPT Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology
14.30-14.45 I-SET12-O134 I-CRE18-O171 PSC Process Design, Simulation and Control
SET Sustainable Energy Technology
SPT Separation and Purification Technology
The 26th National Thai Institute of Chemical Engineering and
Applied Science Conference (TIChE2016)
The 6th International Thai Institute of Chemical Engineering and
Applied Science Conference (ITIChE2016)

"Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development"

ABSTRACTS

by

(i) Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering


(ii) Chemical & Process Engineering Division, The Sirindhorn International
Thai-German Graduate School of Engineering
(iii) Chemical Process Engineering Technology Division, Faculty of Engineering
and Technology

King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok

In collaboration with

The Thai Institute of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

October 26-28, 2016


Thailand Science Park Convention Center, Bangkok, Thailand
CONTENTS
Message from The President of the Thai Institute of Chemical Engineering and
Applied Chemistry 1
Message from The President of King Mongkuts University of Technology North
Bangkok 2
Message from Conference Chair 3
Steering Committee 4
International Advisory Board 5
Conference Scientific Committee 6
Local Organizing Committee 13
Conference Program 15
Keynote Speakers 39
Plenary Speakers 43
Abstracts ITIChE 2016
Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials 45
Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology 49
Catalyst and Reaction Engineering 61
Environmental, Safety, Health & Risk Management 81
Innovation in Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry for Industrial
Development 87
Polymers and Materials 91
Process Design, Simulation and Control 109
Sustainable Energy Technology 125
Abstracts TIChE 2016
Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials 139
Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology 143
Catalyst and Reaction Engineering 151
Environmental, Safety, Health & Risk Management 167
Innovation in Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry for Industrial
Development 183
Polymers and Materials 189
Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology 201
Process Design, Simulation and Control 205
Sustainable Energy Technology 213
Separation and Purification Technology 229
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE THAI
INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY

Dear Distinguished Participants,


It is my great pleasure to cordially extend warm greetings to honorable plenary and keynote speakers
and participants of the 26th National Thai Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Conference
(TIChE 2016) in conjunction with the 6th TIChE International Conference (ITIChE 2016) at Thailand
Science Park Convention Center, Pathumthani, Thailand from October 26-28, 2016. This year the
conference has been focusing on Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development.
To revolve through Industry 4.0 or the 4th Industrial Revolution, the roles and competencies of
chemical engineers and other relevant disciplines have becoming more crucial. Under the unlimited
needs but limited resources, the challenge is how to use energy and the existing resources most
effectively. The Innovative Technology could be one among other strategies.
The conferences are successfully co-organized by the Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of
Engineering, and Chemical & Process Engineering Division, The Sirindhorn International Thai-German
Graduate School of Engineering in collaboration with Chemical Process Engineering Technology
Division, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, King Mongkuts University of Technology North
Bangkok (KMUTNB). On behalf of the Thai Institute of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
(TIChE), I would like to express my sincere thanks to the organizing committee and the organizing staff
for their efforts to make the conferences productive.
And I certainly hope that all participants will benefit from the conferences and find that their technical
programs are highly informative, as well as will have good opportunity to exchange ideas and
experiences in all aspects for continuing research networking. Lastly, I wish that all of you having
unforgettable memories like every year.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Anchaleeporn Waritswat Lothongkum


President of The Thai Institute of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (TIChE)
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF KING
MONGKUTS UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY
NORTH BANGKOK

Dear Honorable Guests and Participants,

On behalf of King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok, it is an honor and my great
pleasure to warmly welcome all guests and participants to the 26th National Thai Chemical Engineering
and Applied Chemistry Conference (TIChE2016) in conjunction with the 6th TIChE International
Conference (ITIChE2016) at Thailand Science Park Convention Center, Pathumthani, Thailand, from
October 26-28, 2016.

As we are moving into the next industrial revolution i.e. INDUSTRY 4.0, it is definitely a challenge to
the chemical engineering community to integrate into smart production systems with Internet of
Things-IoT. The conference theme this year, Innovative Technology toward Sustainable
Development, has been arranged to align well with the current situation beside the chemical
engineering fundamentals and principles. Furthermore, green and sustainability always have been the
focuses of the industrial development for last few decades, and so interestingly covered in
TIChE/ITIChE2016 as well.

Last but not least, I would like to express my appreciation to the Thai Institute of Chemical Engineering
and Applied Chemistry (TIChE) for believing in us to co-host this year conference, and to admire the
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering
Technology Division, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Chemical and Process Engineering
Division, The Sirindhorn International Thai-German Graduate School of Engineering, for their great
efforts and really Make-It-Success. I have a strong believe that this year conference will contribute
significantly to the modern engineering and science communities as a whole

Prof. Dr. Teravuti Boonyasopon


President of King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok (KMUTNB)
MESSAGE FROM CONFERENCE CHAIR

Dear Honorable Guests, Colleagues and Participants,


In year 2016, it is an honor that the Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, and
Chemical & Process Engineering Division, The Sirindhorn International Thai- German Graduate School
of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok in collaboration with Chemical
Process Engineering Technology Division, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, have received the
opportunity to cohost the 26th National Thai Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Conference
( TIChE2016) and the 6th International Thai Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Conference
(ITIChE2016). On behalf of the Conference Committees and Staffs, I am very pleased to welcome you
all to participate in the conference programs and share the memorable moments.
So far, chemical engineers and the like have played key roles in the world of traditional manufacturing
industry but the scenarios are changing as the information technology- driven industrial processes are
more revealing to the industries of many sectors. It is the integration of every manufacturing process
with the Internet-of-Things i.e. from raw material, machines, and equipment and instrumentations,
automation and robotics etc. The main characteristics of the futuristic manufacturing as referred in the
INDUSTRY 4. 0 are questioning our future roles! Not to mention, as moving forward towards smart
and intelligent industrial systems, we need to also think green and be sustainable still.
Thus, Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development, has been raised as the theme for
this year. By covering various spectra of research areas, engineering principles and science and
technology, we do hope that all participants find the conference programs fruitful and useful.
To this end, I would like to deeply and sincerely express my gratitude to all of my colleagues and
committees and staffs both within and outside the university. Without all of them, this conference
programs will not be possible and successful. I also would like to thank all companies providing
financial supports and make it possible. Finally, I really appreciate that the Thai Institute of Chemical
Engineering and Applied Chemistry offering us the honor and opportunity to co- host the
TIChE/ITIChE2106 and guiding us till the end.

Asst. Prof. Dr. Karn Pana-Suppamassadu


TIChE/ITIChE 2016 Conference Chair
Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering, KMUTNB
STEERING COMMITTEE
1. Teravuit Boonyasopon President of King Mongkuts
University of Technology North
Bangkok
2. Chanasak Baitiang Vice President for Academic Affairs
3. Suchat Siengchin Vice President for Research and
Academic Promotion
4. Udonkiat Nontakaew Dean of Faculty of Engineering
5. Monpilai Narasingha Dean of the Sirindhorn
International Thai-German
Graduate School of Engineering
6. Phavanee Narataruksa Dean of Faculty of Engineering
and Technology
INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD
1. Bi-min Zhang Newby The University of Akron
2. Alberto Strioto University College London
3. Tan Huey Ling Universiti Teknologi Mara
4. Jeffrey Giacomin Queens University
5. Stuart Holmes The University of Manchester
6. Edward Roberts University of Calgary
7. Pratim Biswas Washington University in St.Louis
8. Goran N. Jovanovic Oregon State University
9. Kueir-Rarn Lee Chung Yuan University
10. Kuniaki Gotoh Okayama University
11. Keiko Sasaki Kyushu University
12. Tsuyoshi Hirajima Kyushu University
13. Wiwut Tanthapanichakoon Siam Cement Group
14. Matthus Sienbenhofer TU Graz Austria
15. Raphael Idem University of Regina
16. Paitoon Tontiwachwuthikul University of Regina
17. Thumrongrut Mungcharoen Asia Pacific Roundtable for
Sustainable Consumption and
Production
18. Jean-Pierre Leclerc CNRS Nancy Universit
19. Hidenari Yasui The University of Kitakyushu
20. Stefan Ernst Technical University of
Kaiserslautern
CONFERENCE SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
1. Karn Panasuppamassadu King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
2. Panarat Rattanaphanee Suranaree University of
Technology
3. Atichat Wongkoblap Suranaree University of
Technology
4. Kulchanat Prasertsit Prince of Songkla University
5. Sukritthira Ratanawilai Prince of Songkla University
6. Supawan Tirawanichakul Prince of Songkla University
7. Sininart Chongkhong Prince of Songkla University
8. Chayanoot Sangwichien Prince of Songkla University
9. Chakrit Tongurai Prince of Songkla University
10. Lupong Kaewsichan Prince of Songkla University
11. Pornsiri Kaewpradit Prince of Songkla University
12. Pakamas Chetpattananondh Prince of Songkla University
13. Juntima Chungsiriporn Prince of Songkla University
14. Sutham Sukmanee Prince of Songkla University
15. Suratsawadee Kungsanant Prince of Songkla University
16. Ram Yamsaengsung Prince of Songkla University
17. Thirawat Mueansicha Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
18. Weerinda Appamana Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
19. Nattacha Phetyim Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
20. Weraporn Pivsa-Art. Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
21. Sasiradee Jantasee Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
22. Sommai Trichaiyaporn Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
23. Pongsri Siwarasak Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
24. Chaiyapop Siraworakun Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
25. Juraivan Ratanapisit Rajamangala University of
Technology Thanyaburi
26. Prodpran Siritheerasas Thammasat University
27. Worarat Pattaraprakorn Thammasat University
28. Cattaleeya Pattamaprom Thammasat University
29. Patcharaporn Thitiwongsawet Thammasat University
30. Supitcha Rungrodnimitchai Thammasat University
31. Panu Danwanichakul Thammasat University
32. Harnpon Phungrassami Thammasat University
33. Phairat Usubharatana Thammasat University
34. Malee Santikunaporn Thammasat University
35. Thanit Bhibhatbhan Thammasat University
36. Phanida Saikhwan Thammasat University
37. Satok Chaikunchuensakun. Thammasat University
38. Woranee Paengjuntuek Thammasat University
39. Tippabust Eksangsri Thammasat University
40. Akkarat Wongkaew Burapha University
41. Piyachat Wattanachai Burapha University
42. Mattana Santasnachok Burapha University
43. Soipatta Soisuwan Burapha University
44. Pailin Ngaotrakanwiwat Burapha University
45. Witawat Jangiam Burapha University
46. Yanisa Laoong-u-thai Burapha University
47. Dang Saebea Burapha University
48. Wachira Daosud Burapha University
49. Chaiwat Kanhari Burapha University
50. Lek Wantha Burapha University
51. Anat Deepatana Burapha University
52. Srisuda Nithettham Burapha University
53. Kanokwan Ngaosuwan Rajamangala University of
Technology Krungthep
54. Lerdluk Kaewvimol Rajamangala University of
Technology Krungthep
55. Surat Boonpung Rajamangala University of
Technology Krungthep
56. Suchada Ukaew Naresuan University
57. Pamornrat Chantam Naresuan University
58. Panatpong Boonnoun Naresuan University
59. Nuttawan Yoswathana Mahidol University
60. Chularat Sakdaronnarong Mahidol University
61. Wanida Kooamornpattana Mahidol University
62. Suphang Chulalaksananukul Mahidol University
63. Sira Srinives Mahidol University
64. Woranart Jonglertjunya Mahidol University
65. Paritta Prayoonyong Mahidol University
66. Warangkana Pornputtapitak Mahidol University
67. Sompop Sanongraj Ubon Ratchathani University
68. Channarong Puchongkawarin Ubon Ratchathani University
69. Thanudkij Chareerat Ubon Ratchathani University
70. Wipada Sanongraj Ubon Ratchathani University
71. Natthaya Punsuwan Ubon Ratchathani University
72. Idtisak Paopo Ubon Ratchathani University
73. Karnika Ratanapongleka Ubon Ratchathani University
74. Channarong Puchongkawarin Ubon Ratchathani University
75. Jaggrit Umpush Ubon Ratchathani University
76. Supatpong Mattaraj Ubon Ratchathani University
77. Nanthiya Hansupalak Kasetsart University
78. Peerapan Dittanet Kasetsart University
79. Siripon Anantawaraskul Kasetsart University
80. Phungphai Phanawadee Kasetsart University
81. Metta Chareonpanich Kasetsart University
82. Paisan Kongkachuichay Kasetsart University
83. Apinya Duangchan Kasetsart University
84. Chalida Niamnuy Kasetsart University
85. Sirikul Chunsawang Rangsit University
86. Sataporn Komhom Rangsit University
87. Patcharee Khumtita Rangsit University
88. Kanokporn Ananchuensook Rangsit University
89. Panida Sampranpiboon Rangsit University
90. Mali Hunsom Chulalongkorn University
91. Kejvalee Pruksathorn Chulalongkorn University
92. Nathapol Pintuyothin Chulalongkorn University
93. Tawatchai Charinpanitkul Chulalongkorn University
94. Deacha Chatsiriwech Chulalongkorn University
95. Apinan Soottitantawat Chulalongkorn University
96. Jirdsak Tscheikuna Chulalongkorn University
97. Chalida Klaysom Chulalongkorn University
98. Paravee Vas-Umnuay Chulalongkorn University
99. Palang Bumroongsakulsawat Chulalongkorn University
100. Sarawut Rimdusit Chulalongkorn University
101. Varong Pavarajarn Chulalongkorn University
102. Nattaporn Tonanon Chulalongkorn University
103. Kasidit Nootong Chulalongkorn University
104. Suttichai Assabumrungrat Chulalongkorn University
105. Joongjai Panpranot Chulalongkorn University
106. Tharathon Mongkhonsi Chulalongkorn University
107. Artiwan Shotipruk Chulalongkorn University
108. Bunjerd Jongsomjit Chulalongkorn University
109. Muenduen Phisalaphong Chulalongkorn University
110. Seeroong Prichanont Chulalongkorn University
111. Paisan Kittisupakorn Chulalongkorn University
112. Soorathep Kheawhom Chulalongkorn University
113. Pimporn Ponpesh Chulalongkorn University
114. Ura Pancharoen Chulalongkorn University
115. Siriporn Damrongsakkul Chulalongkorn University
116. Sorada Kanokpanont Chulalongkorn University
117. Chutimon Satirapipathkul Chulalongkorn University
118. Suchaya Nitivattananon Chulalongkorn University
119. Nattaya Pongstabodee Chulalongkorn University
120. Somkiat Ngamprasertsith Chulalongkorn University
121. Nisit Tantavichet Chulalongkorn University
122. Nuttapol Pootrakulchote Chulalongkorn University
123. Pattarapan Prasassarakich Chulalongkorn University
124. Sirilux Poompradub Chulalongkorn University
125. Napida Hinchiranan Chulalongkorn University
126. Khantong Soontarapa Chulalongkorn University
127. Tharapong Vitidsant Chulalongkorn University
128. Prasert Reubroycharoen Chulalongkorn University
129. Chawalit Ngamcharussrivichai Chulalongkorn University
130. Prapan Kuchonthara Chulalongkorn University
131. Pornpote Piumsomboon Chulalongkorn University
132. Benjapon Chalermsinsuwan Chulalongkorn University
133. Chaiwat Prapainainar King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
134. Wannakul Bumrungsalee King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
135. Sangnuan Sriratchatchawarn King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
136. Pairoj Wongwirojthana King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
137. Kraipat Cheenkachorn King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
138. Anurak Petirasakul King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
139. Kitti Thumasattaya King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
140. Panitnad Chandranupap King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
141. Patcharin Worathanakul King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
142. Pichan Tantichaipakorn King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
143. Prakorn Kittipoomwong King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
144. Thirawudh Pongprayoon King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
145. Chantaraporn Phalakornkule King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
146. Monpilai Narasingha King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
147. Phavanee Narataruksa King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
148. Matthew Hartley King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
149. Rungrote Kokoo King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
150. Supak Tontisirin King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
151. Suchata Kirdponpattara King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
152. Phisit Jaisathaphon King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
153. Suwimol Wongsakulphasatch King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
154. Tawiwan Kangsadan King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
155. Suksun Amornraksa King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
156. Unalome Wetwatana Hartley King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
157. Malinee Sriariyanun King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
158. Piyapong Hunpinyo King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
159. Nataporn Sowasod King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
160. Thitiporn Suttikul King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
161. Pilasinee Limsuwan King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
162. Jakkid Sanetuntikun King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
163. Nattawan Pitipuech King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
164. Prayut Jiamrittiwong King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
165. Thanarak Srisurat King Mongkut's University of
Technology North Bangkok
LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
1. Karn Panasuppamassadu King Mongkut's University of Technology
(Chairman) North Bangkok
2. Chaiwat Prapainainar King Mongkut's University of Technology
(Secretary) North Bangkok
3. Prakorn Kittipoomwong King Mongkut's University of Technology
(Secretary) North Bangkok
4. Wannakul Bumrungsalee King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
5. Sangnuan Sriratchatchawarn King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
6. Pairoj Wongwirojthana King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
7. Kraipat Cheenkachorn King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
8. Anurak Petirasakul King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
9. Kitti Thumasattaya King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
10. Panitnad Chandranupap King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
11. Patcharin Worathanakul King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
12. Pichan Tantichaipakorn King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
13. Thirawudh Pongprayoon King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
14. Chantaraporn Phalakornkule King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
15. Monpilai Narasingha King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
16. Phavanee Narataruksa King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
17. Matthew Hartley King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
18. Rungrote Kokoo King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
19. Supak Tontisirin King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
20. Suchata Kirdponpattara King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
21. Phisit Jaisathaphon King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
22. Suwimol Wongsakulphasatch King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
23. Tawiwan Kangsadan King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
24. Suksun Amornraksa King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
25. Unalome Wetwatana Hartley King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
26. Malinee Sriariyanun King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
27. Piyapong Hunpinyo King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
28. Nataporn Sowasod King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
29. Thitiporn Suttikul King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
30. Pilasinee Limsuwan King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
31. Jakkid Sanetuntikun King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
32. Nattawan Pitipuech King Mongkut's University of Technology
North Bangkok
CONFERENCE PROGRAM
26 OCT 2016
15.00 17.00 Registration Foyer 3rd floor
27 OCT 2016
08.00 - 09.00 Registration Foyer 3rd floor
Welcoming address by
09.00 - 09.15 Auditorium 3rd floor
Asst. Prof. Dr. Karn Pana-Suppamassadu
Opening ceremony by
09.15 - 09.45 Auditorium 3rd floor
Assoc. Prof. Dr.Suchart Siengchin
09.45 - 10.00 Coffee break
Plenary session by
10.00 - 11.30 Assoc. Prof. Dr. Prasert Pavasant and Auditorium 3rd floor
Dr. Pongsak Laoswatchaikul
11.30 - 12.00 Special lecture by Council of Thai Engineering Auditorium 3rd floor
12.00 - 13.00 Lunch break Event hall 2nd floor
Keynote lecture by
13.00 - 13.45 Auditorium 3rd floor
Prof.Dr. Ing. Stefan Ernst
13.45 - 15.30 Oral session 1
15.30 - 15.45 Coffee break
15.45 - 17.15 Oral session 2
17.15 - 18.15 Poster session Foyer 3rd floor
18.30 - 20.30 Dinner banquet Event hall 2nd floor
28 Oct 2016
08.00 - 09.00 Registration Foyer 3rd floor
Keynote lecture by
09.00 - 09.45 Auditorium 3rd floor
Prof.Dr. Ing. Matthus Sienbenhofer
Keynote lecture by
09.45 - 10.30 Auditorium 3rd floor
Prof. David C. Stuckey
10.30 - 10.45 Coffee break
10.45 - 12.00 Oral session 3
12.00 - 13.00 Lunch break Event hall 2nd floor
13.00 - 14.45 Oral session 4
14.45 - 15.00 Coffee break
Closing ceremony including award presentation
15.00 - 16.30 Auditorium 3rd floor
ceremony
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 1
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 13.45-15.30
ROOM 305 TIChE: Sustainable Energy Technology
Chairpersons: Apiluck Eiad-Ua
: Paweena Prapainainar
Time Code Presenter Title

13.45 T-SET02-O22 Ruamporn Nikhom



14.00 T-SET03-O62 Medta Boupan


14.15 T-SET04-O64 Suchat Pongchaiphol BASIC UNDERSTANDING TO DEVELOP
A CHEMICAL PROCESS FROM BATCH
REACTOR TO CONTINUOUS REACTOR
14.30 T-SET10-O120 Nattapon Popaitoon


14.45 T-SET13-O145

15.00 T-SET14-O148 Wannee Ekasilp

15.15 T-SET15-O166 Yanyong Sookklay

15.30 Coffee break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 1
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 13.45-15.30
ROOM 306 TIChE: Catalyst and Reaction Engineering
Chairpersons: Paisan Kongkachuichay
: Siriporn Jongpatiwut
Time Code Presenter Title

13.45 T-CRE01-O24 Hengheng


Jarunongkran
-
14.00 T-CRE02-O70 Chadaporn
Khaolumloet Er(OTf)3
14.15 T-CRE03-O74 Thanyaporn TMA MgCl2/EtOH
Pongchan
14.30 T-CRE04-O68 Nattajuk
Wongkam
14.45 T-CRE05-O58 Sineenart PREPARATION OF SILICA-COATED
Jamnongphol POLYETHYLENE BY IN SITU POLYMERIZATION
WITH METALLOCENE CATALYST
15.00 T-CRE06-O81 Nasrada
Sukarawan
15.15 T-CRE07-O82 Atthawut
Wattanasap -
15.30 Coffee break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 1
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 13.45-15.30
ROOM 403 ITIChE: Polymers and Materials
Chairpersons: Tienchai Tonthai
: Doungporn Yiamsawas
Time Code Presenter Title

13.45 I-PM01-O27 Piyawan Wongsatarn NANO TITANIUM DIOXIDE IMPREGNATED


ALGINATE BEADS FOR DYE REMOVAL VIA
ADSORPTION-PHOTOCATALYTIC
DEGRADATION PROCESS
14.00 I-PM02-O28 Narisara Bancha ACRYLONITRILE/CELLULOSE COPOLYMER
FROM AGRICULTURAL WASTES FOR USE AS
HEAVY METAL ABSORBENT
14.15 I-PM03-O29 Harich OXIDE FORMATION ON STEEL SURFACES
Krungkarnchana
14.30 I-PM04-O30 Charoen Panyo SYNTHESIS OF NANOSILICA FROM
SUGARCANE BAGASSE ASH
14.45 I-PM06-O49 Chomphoonut EFFECT OF MILLED GLASS FIBER ON
Buaprommee THE MECHANICAL AND PHYSICAL
PROPERTIES OF POLYPROPYLENE FOR
FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING
15.00 I-PM07-O55 Pakpong POLYANILINE-FUNCTIONALIZED REDUCED
Roongruangsree GRAPHENE OXIDE CHEMIRESISTIVE SENSOR
FOR A DETECTION OF VOCs
15.15 I-PM08-O71 Xainikone HYDROGEL BASED-ON NATURAL RUBBER
Lorsomkharm GRAFTED WITH 2-ACRYLAMIDO-2-METHYL-
1-PROPANESULFONIC ACID
15.30 Coffee break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 1
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 13.45-15.30
ROOM 404 ITIChE: Process Design, Simulation and Control
Chairpersons: Veerayut Lersbamrungsuk
: Thanarak Srisurat
Time Code Presenter Title

13.45 I-PSC01-O53 Chaiyapop PROPERTIES ESTIMATION OF POLY-LACTIC


Siraworakun ACID SYNTHESIS USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL
NETWORK
14.00 I-PSC02-O65 Arthit Dubey A CASE STUDY ON THE FOAM FORMATION
AT THE SEALED WELL OF THE THERMAL
POWER PLANT
14.15 I-PSC03-O84 Bordin Wanichodom APPLICATION OF LMI BASED ROBUST
FUZZY CONTROLLER TO POLYPROPYLENE
POLYMERIZATION REACTOR WITH
UNCERTAINTIES
14.30 I-PSC04-O113 Apichat Kritruchtanun COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS
SIMULATION OF SMALL SCALE BIOMASS
DOWNDRAFT GASIFER
14.45 I-PSC05-O117 Bunyaphat Suphanit STARCH LOSS REDUCTION IN
A HYDROCYCLONE WASHING UNIT OF
A CASSAVA STARCH PRODUCTION PLANT
15.00 I-PSC08-O42 Nutthawoot VERIFICATION OF MICROREACTOR DESIGN
Jermkwan EQUATION BY COMPUTATIONAL FLUID
DYNAMICS SIMULATION :
FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS
15.15

15.30 Coffee break


ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 1
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME 13.45-15.30
ROOM 405 ITIChE: Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology
Chairpersons: Woranart Jonglertjunya
: Malinee Sriariyanun
Time Code Presenter Title

13.45 I-BFT01-O33 Jinnaphat Wangpor BATCH ETHANOL FERMENTATION FROM


CASSAVA STARCH HYDROLYSIS THROUGH
RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY
14.00 I-BFT02-O41 Supalak ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CASSAVA
Isarapakdeetham STARCH BY USING CO-FERMENTATION
14.15 I-BFT03-O46 Woranart ENZYMATIC LIQUEFACTION AND
Jonglertjunya SACCHARIFICATION OF CASSAVA STARCH
FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION
14.30 I-BFT04-O87 Lucksamee Jaisat EFFECT OF EXPERIMENTAL PARAMETERS
ON THE DEGREE OF QUATERNIZATION OF
QUATERNIZED CYCLODEXTRIN GRAFTED
WITH CHITOSAN
14.45 I-BFT05-O106 Sirikan Yodkaew MODELING OF MOISTURE SORPTION
ISOTERMS AND THERMODYMIC
PROPERTIES OF SLICED CHICKEN
15.00 I-BFT08-O133 Khunpitchayha ALTERNATIVE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENT
Lunfkadee USING CHITOSAN AS CARRIER
15.15 I-BFT07-O126 Varupsorn Seubphet BETA GLUCAN EXTRACTION FROM YEAST
USING ADVANCED TECHNIQUES
15.30 Coffee break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 2
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 15.45-17.15
ROOM 305 TIChE:
(1) Separation and Purification Technology
(2) Innovation in Chemical Engineering
& Applied Chemistry for Industrial Development
(3) Process Design, Simulation and Control
Chairpersons: Uthaiporn Suriyapraphadilok
: Pratarn Wongsarivej
Time Code Presenter Title

15.45 T-SPT02-O99 Jirarot Arnusan



16.00 T-SPT03-O169 Sunisa Jongdee MANGANESE OXIDATION BY
OZONATION PROCESS IN
AQUEOUS SOLUTION
16.15 T-IA01-O50 Wiroon WHY DO INNOVATIONS IN
Tanthapanichakoon CHEMICAL ENGINEERING FAIL TO
COMMERCIALIZE?
16.30 T-IA02-O17 Nuttapoom Rattanajairakul



16.45 T-IA04-O69 Wuttipong Sirinitiphapra PRODUCTION OF SODIUM
CARBOXY METHYL CELLULOSE
(CMC) FROM CORN COB FOR
FOOD, BEVERAGE AND
COSMETICS INDUSTRIES.
17.00 T-PSC06-O157 Rattanon Nonpaiwan Performance Improvement for
Gas Turbine by inlet air cooling
method
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 2
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 15.45-17.15
ROOM 306 TIChE: Catalyst and Reaction Engineering
Chairpersons: Supaporn Therdthianwong
: Thongthai Witoon
: Unalome Wetwatana Hartley
Time Code Presenter Title

15.45 T-CRE08-O79 Amornrat Meedam




16.00 T-CRE11-O111 Weerapong Phochaisang


16.15 T-CRE12-O122 Anuwat Yasadayan
V2O5-MoO3/TiO2
NO
16.30 T-CRE13-O32 Phongsakorn Khanmanee -

16.45 T-CRE14-O152 Winatda Prachumsai
-

17.00 T-CRE17-O177 Pinyapat Pengbubpha

--
/
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 2
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 15.45-17.15
ROOM 403 ITIChE: Polymers and Materials
Chairpersons: Cattaleeya Pattamaprom
: Pornnapa Kasemsiri
Time Code Presenter Title

15.45 I-PM09-O115 Paiboon Saejear EFFECT OF pH ON CORROSION


PROTECTION PROPERTY OF
TITANIA-MESOPOROUS SILICA
NANOCOMPOSITE COATING ON
316L STAINLESS STEEL
16.00 I-PM10-O119 Kittipon Bunyanuwat EFFECTS OF POLYOL MOLECULAR
WEIGHTS ON THERMOREVERSIBLE
LIGHT SCATTERING BEHAVIORS OF
BENZOXAZINE-URETHANE ALLOYS
16.15 I-PM11-O129 Noppawat Kuengputpong PHASE SEPARATION BEHAVIORS
OF POLYIMIDE AND POLYSULFONE
BLENDS FOR ELECTRICALLY
CONDUCTIVE LAYER MATERIAL
APPLICATION
16.30 I-PM14-O162 Worawat Jansomboon CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHENE
SYNTHESIZED BY MODIFIED
HUMMERS AND LIQUID-PHASE
EXFOLIATION METHOD
16.45 I-PM15-O172 Bunthoeun Nim PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES
OF ELECTROSPUN FIBERS
OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE-LOADED
POLYLACTIDE/POLY
(VINYLPYRROLIDONE) BLENDS
17.00 I-PM16-O173 Anusorn Faklek DEVELOPMENT OF COMMERCIAL
BICYCLE AND MOTORCYCLE INNER
TUBE USING SURFACE-MODIFIED
SILICA
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 2
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME 15.45-17.15
ROOM 404 ITIChE: Process Design, Simulation and Control
Chairpersons: Bunyaphat Suphanit
: Parinya Khongprom
Time Code Presenter Title

15.45 I-PSC09-O57 Suputtharagris OPTIMIZATION OF SEMI-BATCH


Akkaravathasinp REACTIVE DISTILLATION USING
RESPONSE SURFACE METHOD :
CASE STUDY OF ESTERIFICATION
OF ACETIC ACID WITH METHANOL
IN A PROCESS SIMULATION
16.00 I-PSC11-O154 Panut Bumphenkiattikul TRANSIENT WELL-MIXED MODEL
FOR POLYPROPYLENE IN A
FLUDIZED BED REACTOR
16.15 I-PSC12-O160 Pongpawee Chanlaor DISCRETE ELEMENT METHOD
COUPLED WITH EULERIAN MODEL
IN A SPOUTED BED FOR SILICON
PRODUCTION
16.30 I-PSC13-O165 Rungrote Kokoo HENRY'S LAW CONSTANT
ESTIMATION OF OZONE IN
UNSATULATED FATTY ACIDS
16.45 I-PSC14-O168 Koraphat Tangchirachot MODIFICATION OF AN INDIVIDUAL
QUICK FREEZER USING CFD
MODELING
17.00 I-PSC15-O51 Ekaroek Phumnok THE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID
DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF SILICA-
NATURAL RUBBER LATEX MIXING.
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 2
27 OCTOBER 2016: TIME: 15.45-17.15
ROOM 405 ITIChE
(1) Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology
(2) Biomedical Engineering & Biomaterials
(3) Environmental, Safety, Health & Risk
Management
Chairpersons: Harnpon Phungrassami
: Sasitorn Aueviriyavit
Time Code Presenter Title

15.45 I-BEB01-O118 Nipat Asarasri EFFECT OF CROSS - LINKING AGENTS


ON THE PROPERTIES OF
HYDROXYAPATITE/CHITOSAN/COLLAGE
N COMPOSITES
16.00 I-BEB02-O67 Chayanit CONCANAVALIN A-FUNCTIONALIZED
Phatoomvijitwong GRAPHENE BASED ELECTROCHEMICAL
SENSOR FOR MONITORING OF CANCER
CELL CHARGES
16.15 I-ESH02-O34 Thitaporn Khumphu ACTIVATED CARBON FROM SOLID
WASTE OF PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY
FOR COLOR REMOVAL OF
WASTEWATER
16.30 I-ESH01-O47 Venus Seedokbuab A NICKEL-GRAPHENE COMPOSITE
AMPEROMETRIC SENSOR FOR A
DETECTION OF FORMALDEHYDE
16.45
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 3
28 OCTOBER 2016: TIME 10.45-12.00
ROOM 305 TIChE: Environmental, Safety, Health & Risk
Management
Chairpersons: Pongsri Siwarasak
: Suriyan tiampet
Time Code Presenter Title

10.45 T-ESH01-O15 Anurak Petiraksakul



11.00 T-ESH02-O56 Witthaya Krobthong

Fe/TiO2
11.15 T-ESH03-O73 Varocha Champa


11.30 T-ESH04-O102 Panuwat Takham

11.45 T-ESH05-O105 Naphatcha Wongkia



12.00 Lunch break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 3
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME: 10.45-12.00
ROOM 306 TIChE: Polymers and Materials
Chairpersons: Kanokporn Ananchuensook
: Nawadon Petchwattana
Time Code Presenter Title

10.45 T-PM02-O60 Santipab Thaigird




11.00 T-PM04-O109 Jintana Srimuk
(-)
11.15 T-PM05-O124 Peeraya
Santidamrongpan
11.30 T-PM08-O153 Tienchai Tonthai

11.45 T-PM09-O161



12.00 Lunch break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 3
28 October 2016 : TIME: 10.45-12.00
Room 403 TIChE:
(1) Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology
(2) Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology
Chairpersons: Kittiphoom Suppalakpanya
: Benjamaporn Wonganu
Time Code Presenter Title

10.45 T-BFT01-O26 Kittiphoom


Suppalakpanya
11.00 T-BFT02-O92
Cellic Ctec2
11.15 T-BFT04-O150 Nuttawan Yoswathana

11.30 T-PPT01-096 Krisda Saeheng

11.45

12.00 Lunch break


ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 3
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME 10.45-12.00
ROOM 404 ITIChE: Sustainable Energy Technology
Chairpersons: Arthit Neramittagapong
: Navadee Srisiriwat
Time Code Presenter Title
10.45 I-SET01-O19 Thawipon Wuttilerts EVALUATION OF BIODIESEL PRODUCTION
USING OIL FEEDSTOCK FROM
CONTAMINATED MACRO ALGAE IN
SHRIMP FARMING
11.00 I-SET02-O18 Thirasit BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM
Kusolsongtawee CERATOPHYLLUM DEMERSUM L. AND
CARBON FOOTPRINT EVALUATION
11.15 I-SET03-O21 Suppharoek ALCOHOL ASSISTED METHANOL
Likhittaphon SYNTHESIS FROM CO2 OVER AN
ULTRASONIC ASSISTED PRECIPITATED
CATALYSTS
11.30 I-SET04-O14 Prakorn POTENTIAL OF BIOMASS FEEDSTOCK AS A
Kittipoomwong CO-FIRING FUEL FOR MAE MOH POWER
PLANT
11.45 I-SET05-O35 Supattra OILS FROM CATALYTIC AND NON-
Budsaereechai CATALYTIC PYROLYSIS OF PLASTIC
PACKAGING WASTES
12.00 Lunch break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 3
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME: 10.45-12.00
ROOM 405 TIChE: Catalyst and Reaction Engineering
Chairpersons: Kitirote Wantala
: Thana Sornchamni
Time Code Presenter Title
10.45 I-CRE11-O121 Pattra Kongsupapkul EFFECTS OF MGO-ZSM-23 ZEOLITE
CATALYST ON THE PYROLYSIS OF PET
BOTTLE WASTE
11.00 I-CRE02-O31 Chalinee Uppala DIRECT EPOXIDATION OF PROPYLENE TO
PROPYLENE OXIDE OVER MULTIMETALLIC
RUTHENIUM-COPPER-BASED CATALYSTS
11.15 I-CRE05-O40 Worawit Unchananun EFFECT OF CATALYST PREPARATION
CONDITIONS ON THE PROPERTIES AND
ACTIVITIES OF CAO AND MGO BASE
CATALYSTS FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION
FROM PALM OLEIN
11.30 I-CRE06-O23 Kanpichcha Intaramas SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF CASSAVA
MASH AND STARCH TO GLUCOSE USING
CARBONACEOUS SOLID ACID CATALYSTS
11.45 I-CRE07-O59 Suniti Thaijiamaree PHOTODEGRADATION OF REACTIVE RED
120 DYE USING SYNTHESIZED
SPHERE-TIO2 UNDER UV ILLUMINATION
12.00 Lunch break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 4
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME: 13.OO-14.45
TIChE: Environmental, Safety, Health & Risk
ROOM 305
Management
Chairpersons: Chularat Sakdaronnarong
: Panida Sampranpiboon
Time Code Presenter Title
13.00 T-ESH06-O107 Peeradaphan
Saisuwansiri

13.15 T-ESH07-O127 Junjira Duangbut REMOVAL OF PROTEIN FROM
WASTEWATER BY CALCIUM ALGINATE
HYDROGEL MEMBRANE COMBINED WITH
COAGULATION
13.30 T-ESH09-O130 Sujeenun Suntikul

13.45 T-ESH10-O132 Asamaphorn Pudindarn


14.00 T-ESH11-O80 Wattana A STUDY ON CURVED TURBINE
Tungthirawanich AERATOR
14.15 T-ESH12-O151 Lek Wantha


14.30

14.45 Coffee break


ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 4
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME: 13.00-14.45
ROOM 306 TIChE: Sustainable Energy Technology
Chairpersons: Jintawat Chaichanawong
: Tawiwan Kangsadan
Time Code Presenter Title

13.00 T-SET01-O16
Saccharomyces cerevisiae SG

13.15 T-SET05-O75

13.30 T-SET16-O175 Seri Chitriprot


13.45 T-SET08-P88 Sakdipat Wiengket
Ni-Mo
Co-Mo
14.00

14.15

14.30

14.45 Coffee break


ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 4
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME: 13.00-14.45
ROOM 403 TIChE: Process Design, Simulation and Control
Chairpersons: Chiyapop Siraworakun
: Prayut Jiamrittiwong
Time Code Presenter Title

13.00 T-PSC01-O90 Sarawut Jitpinit

13.15 T-PSC02-O93 Sihanart Wuttibramote


90

13.30 T-PSC03-O101 Tanatis Sakuma
90


13.45 T-PSC04-O155 Chontira Boonfung



14.00 T-PSC05-O156 Krittamet Phothong

14.15

14.30

14.45 Coffee break


ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 4
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME: 13.00-14.45
ROOM 404 TIChE: Sustainable Energy Technology
Chairpersons: Phungphai Phanawadee
: Chalida Klaysom
Time Code Presenter Title
13.00 I-SET06-O36 Jatupong Sarabut SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM CO2 AND
H2O THROUGH A BARIUM-BASED SOLID
OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS
13.15 I-SET07-O63 Krittamet Yanawibut PHOTOCATALYTIC CONVERSION OF
CARBON DIOXIDE TO ALCOHOLS OVER
TITANIUM DIOXIDE-GRAPHENE
COMPOSITE
13.30 I-SET08-O66 Somchate Wasantwisut A FABRICATION OF HYDROGEN FUEL
CELL PROTOTYPE USING
GRAPHENE-PALLADIUM COMPOSITE
13.45 I-SET09-O76 Waranya Chitsonthi BIOCRUDE OIL PRODUCTION FROM
HYDROTHERMAL LIQUEFACTION OF
DEMINERALIZED SUGARCANE LEAVES
14.00 I-SET010-O94 Prodpran Siritheerasas MICROWAVE TORREFACTION OF
SAWDUST PELLETS WITH OR WITHOUT
THE ADDITION OF BIOMASS CHAR
14.15 I-SET11-O95 Phichayanan Waiyanate EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE ABSORBERS
ON THE TORREFACTION OF
HIGHLY-MOIST MUNICIPAL SOLID
WASTE (MSW) PELLETS
14:30 I-SET012-O134 Panuwattana APPLICATION OF Fe2O3/CaSO4 MIXED
Kanokwannakorn METAL OXIDE FOR METHANE OR COAL
CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION
14.45 Coffee break
ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION 4
28 OCTOBER 2016 : TIME: 13.00-14.45
ROOM 405 TIChE: Catalyst and Reaction Engineering
Chairpersons: Kajornsak Faungnawakij
: Sanchai Kuboon
Time Code Presenter Title
13.00 I-CRE08-O91 Thanaree ENHANCED VISIBLE LIGHT-INDUCED
Phongamwong PHOTOCATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF NOVEL
CHLOROPHYLL AND MG CO-MODIFIED
P25 PRESENT ONLY
13.15 I-CRE12-O125 Nantaya Imprapantree ENHANCE SCR AND BENZENE
COMBUSTION ACTIVITIES OF TiO2
(ANATASE) BY SULFURIC
ACID-TREATMENT
13.30 I-CRE13-O131 Kittayanat MODIFIED V2O5-WO3/TIO2 CATALYST
Laolertrattana FOR THE SIMULTANEOUSLY REMOVAL
OF NO AND BENZENE
13.45 I-CRE14-O137 Pathompat Khowattana FLAME SPRAY PYROLYSIS DERIVED
SILICA-TITANIA SUPPORTS FOR COBALT
FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS
14.00 I-CRE16-O140 Kanokporn Sinpakdee EFFECT OF INLET/OULET PATTERNS ON
PERFORMANCE OF MICROREACTORS
FOR COUPLED SMR-COMBUSTION
14.15 I-CRE17-O48 Apichaya Theampetch WASHCOATING METHOD ON STAINLESS
STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR FISCHER
TROPSCH SYSTHESIS IN MICROCHANNEL
REACTOR
14:30 I-CRE18-O171 Rungnapa Kropporn FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS OVER
COBALT-BASED CATALYST COATED
ONTO STAINLESS STEEL
MULTICHANNEL REACTOR
14.45 Coffee break
POSTER TICHE : FOYER 3RD FLOOR
27 0CTOBER 2016, TIME: 17.15 18.15
Code Presenter Title
T-SET06-P77 Weerayut Kaoian
T-SET11-P135 Chuleehat
Sriakkarin -
Core-shell :

T-SET12-P136 Wasakon Umchoo
MCM-41
T-SPT01-P78 Jaripong Menwa
Ocimum citriodourum Vis.

T-PM01-P38 Mattanyu SYNTHESIS OF CARBON NANOMATERIALS USING
Jaengthong STAINLESS STEEL TYPE 304 AS SUBSTRATE AND
CATALYST BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION METHOD
T-PM03-P61 Suwanna Kananub
-
T-IA03-P98
T-ESH13-P158
(II)

T-ESH14-P159 Panida
Sampranpiboon
T-ESH15-P170

T-CRE09-P104 Waleeporn 2
Donphai

T-BFT03-P100 Thirawat
Mueansichai
T-BFT05-P176 Waruntorn
SHELF-LIFE STUDY OF MOCHI ICE CREAM
Kaewkeeree
T-BEB01-P45

POSTER ITICHE : FOYER 3RD FLOOR
27 0CTOBER 2016, TIME: 17.15 18.15
Code Presenter Title
I-PM05-P44 Saowapa Chotisuwan FIRE-RETARDANT PAPER BASED ON MONTMORILLONITE
AND OIL PALM TRUNK FIBRES
I-PM12-P139 Godchaporn Bunmee ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES ENHANCEMENT OF
POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATE) FOR DYE-SENSITIZED
SOLAR CELL APPLICATION
I-PM13-P141 Kotchamon Yimmut SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF POLY(BUTYL
ACRYLATE-CO-FLUORINATED ACRYLATE)-GRAFT-
NATURAL RUBBER
I-IA01-P97 Satit Yousatit ONE-POT SYNTHESIS OF HEXAGONAL MESOPOROUS
SILICA WITH A HIGH LOADING OF AMINOPROPYL
GROUP
I-ESH03-P86 Vanida Chairgulprasert REMOVAL OF METHYLENE BLUE DYE IN WATER USING
LONGKONG FRUIT PEELS
I-ESH04-P114 Adisak Jaturapiree EQUILIBRIUM, KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS
ADSORPTION OF METHYLENE BLUE BY MODIFIED
SUGARCANE LEAVES
I-CRE01-P25 Weerinda Appamana DEVELOPMENT OF CE/LA0.25SR0.75CO0.5MN0.5O3
CATALYST FOR FURTHER APPLICATION IN A SOLID
OXIDE FUEL CELL TYPE REACTOR
I-CRE03-P37 Mutsee Termtanun PHOTOCATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF FE AND MO- DOPED
WO3 ON DEGRADATION OF METHYLENE BLUE
I-CRE04-P39 Mutsee Termtanun FE/PT-DOPED TIO2 FOR FURFURAL PHOTOCATALYTIC
DEGRADATION
I-CRE09-P103 Atikhun klaewkla SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF MG AND AL LAYERED
DOUBLE HYDROXIDES AS ALDOL CONDENSATION
CATALYSTS
I-CRE10-P116 Chanita Wattanasomboon DEVELOPMENT OF NICKEL OXIDE BY USING
SURFACTANT ASSISTED HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT
SYNTHESIS
I-CRE15-P138 Varistha Preechawan PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION OF METHYLENE BLUE
DYE IN AQUEOUS TITANIA NANOPARTICLES
SUSPENSIONS WITH VARIOUS LIGHT SOURCES
I-BFT06-P108 Ratsarin Akkharasinphonrat STUDY OF RECYCLABILITY OF EMIM-AC IN
LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS PRETREATMENT
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Biorefinery, innovative technologies toward sustainable
Development
Matthus Siebenhofer
E-Mail : m.siebenhofer(at)tugraz.at
Graz University of Technology

At the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2015 in Paris the members agreed
on reducing their carbon output "as soon as possible" and to do their best to keep
global warming "to well below 2 degrees C". The goal of global warming beneath 2C
can just be reached if between 2000 and 2050 the cumulative carbon emission is
limited to 1.000 Gt CO2. At the moment the annual CO2 emission amounts 36 Gt CO2.
With this capacity limit and production rate CO2 emission may be switched off in
2027.
To reach the goal of 2C earth warming the Paris agreement further comprises to exit
the use of fossil fuels [1]. The phase-out of fossil fuels entails that new technologies
must be developed, process intensification has to be applied in all fields of industrial
production and state of the art technologies have to be re-boarded with new
technologies. Main obstacle of the bio-refinery is the economic feasibility, which can
be addressed either by a fair valuation basis or/and by new technologies and
processes. Fair valuation basis is a political topic. Research has to address technical
topics. New technologies and processes have to suffice economic and ecological
aspects.
As early as in the late 19th century, research activities on usage of waste from the
pulp and paper industry are reported [2], [3]. In the 1920s and 1930s first industrial
size plants were built for the production of furfural and for the recovery of lignin;
lignin was then used as dispersing agent. US patent 2.050.400, dating back to the year
1930, claims a method for the recovery of heat and chemicals from waste products
from industrial processes such as alcohol [4]. In 1940 already P. von Walden [Zitat]
addressed a still fashionable topic: How long the national economy can tolerate to
classify lignin as wastage? In conclusion the pulp and paper industry has been the
focus and lead in industrial biorefinery for centuries. Referring to the Paris Agreement
several technologies and products, covering a span from low molecular weight
constituents such as ethanol, carboxylic acids or furfural to product blends like
turpentine and tall oil may seemingly just need reevaluation of the market potential,
arising the question, wether there is any need for future research activities?
Membrane separations is an established technology in processing effluents from
bioprocesses [5], targeting isolation of dissolved macromolecular constituents. New
technologies for intensified carboxylic acid isolation have become subject of intensive
investigation. Investigation of hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of black liquor
is under way. Finally, reactive separations may offer new approaches in the isolation
and processing of biobased products to contribute innovative technologies toward
sustainable development.
[1] C. McGlade and P. Ekins, The geographical distribution of fossil fuels unused
when limiting global warming to 2 C, Nature, vol. 517, no. 7533, pp. 187190, 2015.
[2] B. Kamm, P. Gruber, and M. Kamm, BiorefineriesIndustrial Processes and
Products, Ullmans Encycl. Ind. Chem., vol. 5, pp. 659688, 2007.
[3] N. A. Engineering, The Ecology of Industry: Sectors and Linkages. Deanna
Richards, Greg Pearsonq, 1998.
[4] C. L. Wagner, Method for Recovery of heat and chemicals from waste
products, 2,050,400, 1930.
[5] L. Y. Jiang and J. M. Zhu, Separation technologies for current and future
biorefineries status and potential of membrane-based separation, vol. 2, no.
December, pp. 673690, 2013.
Carbon dioxide hydrogenation for
energy storage and chemical feedstock production
Professor Dr.-Ing Stefan Ernst
E-Mail : ernst@chemie.uni-kl.de
Kaiserslautern University of Technology

Carbon dioxide hydrogenation for energy storage and chemical feedstock production
Depending on the cheap availability of hydrogen, carbon dioxide can be selectively
hydrogenated to methane, methanol or liquid hydrocarbons as a means for energy
storage but also as a means for chemical feedstock production (e.g., methanol can
be further converted to short chain olefins (MTO or MTP process) or to aromatics
(MTA process).

This keynote would give a short overview over the different routes and will highlight
our own results on the selective hydrogen of carbon dioxide to methane over various
metals supported on mixed alumina-titania supports.
PLENARY SPEAKERS
Industry 4.0: Role of Thai University for Engineering Education
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Prasert Pavasant
- Acting Vice President for Administration, Vidyasirimedhi
Institute of Science and Technology
- Director Research and Researchers for Industries
Program

Dr. Pongsak Laoswatchaikul, Ph.D. (Economics)


- Plan and Policy Analyst at the Office of Industrial
Economics, Ministry of Industry
- Lecturer, Mahanakorn University of Technology,
National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA),
and Suan Dusit University
Biomedical Engineering & Biomaterials
(I-BEB)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BEB01-O118

EFFECT OF CROSS LINKING AGENTS ON THE PROPERTIES OF


HYDROXYAPATITE/CHITOSAN/COLLAGEN COMPOSITES
Nipat Asarasri* and Panchan Sricharoon
Department of Chemical Engineering, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok,
nipat_asarasri@hotmail.com

Abstract:
This research investigated effect of cross - linking agents, citric acid and tannic acid,
on the properties of hydroxyapatite/ chitosan/ collagen composites synthesized by
precipitation method. The experiments were done at different ratios of
hydroxyapatite / chitosan/ collagen composites. The result showed that with
increasing chitosan content in the composites, Vickers hardness value were
increased. Hydroxyapatite/ chitosan/collagen composite at the ratio of 70/15/15
was chosen to add cross - linking agents at 5, 10, and 20% by weight of the
composites. As a result, Vickers hardness values were increased with an increase in
the amount of citric acid but Vickers hardness values of tannic acid were not
increased clearly. However, it was found that the citric acid gave greater Vickers
hardness value than that of the tannic acid at 20% by weight of the composites.

Keywords: hydroxyapatite, citric acid, tannic acid, Vickers hardness


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BEB02-O67

CONCANAVALIN A-FUNTIONALIZED GRAPHENE BASED


ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSOR FOR MONITERING OF CANCER CELLS
Chayanit Phatoomvijitwong, Venus Seedokbuab, Krittamet Yanawibut, Nutpichan Pienutsa,
Piamsiri Sawaisorn, Kulachart Jangpatarapongsa, Rachanee Udomsangpetch,
Bovornlak Oonkhanond and Sira Srinives*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University
25/25 Puttamonthon 4 rd., Nakhon pathom, 73170, THAILAND.
sira.sri@mahidol.edu

Abstract:
This research investigated effect of cross - linking agents, citric acid and tannic acid,
on the properties of hydroxyapatite/ chitosan/ collagen composites synthesized by
precipitation method. The experiments were done at different ratios of
hydroxyapatite / chitosan/ collagen composites. The result showed that with
increasing chitosan content in the composites, Vickers hardness value were
increased. Hydroxyapatite/ chitosan/collagen composite at the ratio of 70/15/ 15
was chosen to add cross - linking agents at 5, 10, and 20% by weight of the
composites. As a result, Vickers hardness values were increased with an increase in
the amount of citric acid but Vickers hardness values of tannic acid were not
increased clearly. However, it was found that the citric acid gave greater Vickers
hardness value than that of the tannic acid at 20% by weight of the composites.

Keywords: Electrochemical sensor, Graphene, Concanacalin A, Ovarian cancer cells


Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology
(I-BFT)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT01-O33

BATCH ETHANOL FERMENTATION FROM CASSAVA STARCH


HYDROLYSIS THROUGH RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY
Jinnaphat Wangpor and Woranart Jonglertjunya*
Department of chemical engineering, Faculty of enginering, Mahidol University, Thailand
woranart.jon@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
Cassava starch were liquefied by alphaamylase and saccharified by gluco-amylase
before fermentation for bioethanol production. Response surface methodology was
used to optimize the effects of percentage of starch, liquefaction temperature and
liquefaction time on sugar (dextrin, maltose and glucose) concentrations. Maximum
glucose content was 186.43 g/l when cassava starch (30%w/v) was liquefied by
alpha-amylase at 80C for 90min and saccharified by gluco-amylase at 60C for
60min. Saccharomyces cerevisiae TISTR 5606 (S. cerevisiae) and Zymomonas
mobilis TISTR 405 (Z. mobilis) were studied in batch mode to prove ethanol
efficiency and the performance of microorganism. The growth curve was determined
in bioreactor. The culture was inoculated at 30 1C and agitated at 70rpm with a
Rushton turbine in a 2 liter-working volume bafed tank. The culture medium was
made up of soluble cassava starch, diammonium phosphate, urea and magnesium
sulfate. The batch mode results showed that the log phase was approximately 16h.
The growth curves of Z. mobilis showed good agreement with the growth curve of
S. cerevisiae but the number of viable cells/mL was slightly lower. Maximum
ethanol concentration of 75.78g/l and ethanol yield of 37.89% (g/g dry starch) with
a fermentation efficiency of 74.30% were observed when using the mixed culture of
S. cerevisiae and Z. mobilis for 72h of fermentation.

Keywords: ethanol, S. cerevisiae, Z. mobilis, cassava starch


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT02-O41

ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CASSAVA STARCH BY USING CO-


FERMENTATION
Woranart Jonglertjunya*, Supalak Isarapakdeetham, Tanyatorn Udomcharoensab and Chularat
Sakdaronnarong
Department of chemical engineering, Faculty of engineering, Mahidol University, Thailand
woranart.jon@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
Co-fermentation can simplify the process of ethanol production from cassava starch by
using microorganisms including fungi (Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oligosporus, Trichoderma
reesei), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Zymomonas mobilis). The cassava
starch solution was controlled pH to 5 by acetate buffer. Saccharification of cassava starch
(5%w/v) by fungi was firstly investigated amount of total reducing sugar concentration. The
result showed that single culture of R. oligosporus gave the highest yield of 0.37g TRS/g dry
starch. Next, ethanol production from cassava starch (30 %w/v) that was liquefied with
alpha-amylase and saccharified with glucoamylase was achieved highest yield of 0.08 g
ethanol/g dry starch by using co-culture of R. oligosporus and S. cerevisiae for 2days.
Additionally, cassava starch was liquefied with alpha-amylase and inoculated fungi for 7days
in order to investigate glucose content during this period. The results showed that amount
of glucose from single culture of A. niger, R. oligosporus and T. reesei was continuously
increasing in 7 days and the highest yield achieved by R. oligosporus at 7days was 0.24 g
glucose/g dry starch. Finally, cassava starch was liquefied with alpha-amylase, inoculated
fungi for 7 days and then inoculated S. cerevisiae or Z. mobilis for 2days. The result showed
that co-culture of R. oligosporus and S. cerevisiae can produce 50.9 g/l (corresponding to
the highest yield of 0.17 g ethanol/g dry starch).

Keywords: Ethanol, Cassava starch, Fungi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zymomonas


mobilis
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT03-O46

ENZYMATIC LIQUEFACTION AND SACCHARIFICATION OF CASSAVA


STARCH FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION
Woranart Jonglertjunya*, Thanita Apichatmetha, Sunisa Temnuch, Chanon Nangrhok and Chularat
Sakdaronnarong
Department of chemical engineering, Faculty of engineering, Mahidol University, Thailand
woranart.jon@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
This research was studied on ethanol fermentation from cassava starch. The effect
of enzymatic liquefaction and saccharification was studied by various enzyme
combinations and pH and measured total reducing sugar. The total enzyme content
of -amylase and glucoamylase were 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8 and 0.9 mg per g cassava
starch. pHs were controlled at 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0. The results showed that the
optimal the total enzyme content of -amylase and glucoamylase were 0.8 mg per
g cassava starch and pH was 5.0. Gelatinized starch (10%w/v) was liquefied by -
amylase and saccharified by glucoamylase before fermentation using single culture
of S.cerevisiae (TISTR 5606) and single culture of Z. mobilis (TISTR 405) and mixed
culture of these microorganisms. The result shows that batch fermentation of
cassava starch using single culture of S.cerevisiae gave the highest ethanol
concentration of 31 g/l and 61 % efficiency for 36 hours.

Keywords: Ethanol, Cassava starch, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zymomonas mobilis


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT04-O87

EFFECT OF EXPERIMENTAL PARAMETERS ON THE DEGREE OF


QUATERNIZATION OF QUATERNIZED CYCLODEXTRIN GRAFTED WITH
CHITOSAN
Lucksamee Jaisat1, Uracha Ruktanonchai2, Sarunya Phunpee2, and Apinan Soottitantawat1,*
1
Center of Excellence in Particle Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2
National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology
Development Agency 111 Thailand Science Park, Pathumtani 12120, Thailand
apinan.s@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
This research aimed to find suitable conditions and to compare the effect of
experimental parameters of quaternization reaction of chitosan and cyclodextrin
grafted with chitosan (CD-g-CS). CD-g-CS has potential applications in many fields.
However, the applications of the CD-g-CS is limited because of its poor water
solubility. Quaternized cyclodextrin grafted with chitosan (QCD-g-CS) was
synthesized for improving the solubility. The quaternized chitosan (QCS) and the
QCD-g-CS were prepared by reacting chitosan or the CD-g-CS with glycidyltrimethyl
ammonium chloride (GTMAC). The effects of mole ratio, reaction time, and reaction
temperature on degree of quaternization (DQ) were investigated. The results
indicated that the conditions that suitable for this reaction is at the mole ratio of 7,
the reaction time of 5 hrs, and the temperature of 50 C. For the synthesis of QCD-
g-CS, the trend of the DQ at various mole ratio similar the trend of the DQ of the
QCS.

Keywords: Chitosan, cyclodextrin, cyclodextrin grafted with chitosan, quaternization


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT05-O106

MODELING OF MOISTURE SORPTION ISOTHERMS AND THERMODYMIC


PROPERTIES OF CHICKEN MEAT
Sirikan Yodkaew1, Yutthana Tirawanichakul2 and Supawan Tirawanichakul1,*
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla
90112, Thailand
2
Department Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla 90112, Thailand
supawan.t@psu.ac.th

Abstract:
The objectives of this work were to evaluate the moisture sorption isotherms model
for prediction equilibrium moisture content (EMC) and to investigate some
thermodynamics properties of chicken meat. To determine the EMC value for the
chicken meat, the experiments were carried out among surrounding temperature
ranging from 50-65C correlating to relative humidity of 10-90%. And the exact
moisture content values in each equilibrium state condition were curve fitted by six
commonly EMC models. The criteria for the best fitting model was the highest
coefficient of determination (R2) and the lowest mean relative error (RMSE) value.
The result showed that the simulated EMC values using the modified Oswin model
were the best fitting model with the exact values. Finally, the thermodynamic
properties in terms of enthalpy and entropy of heat sorption for chicken meat were
evaluated by following the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The results were stated
that the enthalpy and entropy of heat sorption was negative exponential function
of moisture content.

Keywords: chicken meat, equilibrium moisture content, heat of sorption, isosteric


heat
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT06-P108

STUDY OF RECYCLABILITY OF EMIM-AC IN LIGNOCELLULOSIC


BIOMASS PRETREATMENT
Ratsarin Akkharasinphonrat1, Kesirin Datepanyawat1, Prapakorn Tantayotai2, Kraipat Cheenkachorn1
and Malinee Sriariyanun3,*
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, KMUTNB, Thailand
2
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot, University, Thailand
3
Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, TGGS, KMUTNB, Thailand
macintous@gmail.com

Abstract:
Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars as raw materials for biorefinery
process is considered as a rate-limiting step. To improve the efficiency,
pretreatment is suggested to modify biomass to be more susceptible for hydrolysis
reaction. Here, we aimed to study the application of ionic liquid (IL), EMIM-Ac, for
pretreatment and its potential for recyclability. First, the optimum operational
condition for EMIM-Ac pretreatment was determined, based on Response Surface
Methodology (RSM), to be 71.83 min of duration time, 128.4oC of reaction
temperature, and 5% w/w loading mass ratio. To observe the potential of
recyclability of EMIM-Ac, different types of anti-solvents, including methanol, water,
and acetone were tested as anti-solvent to precipitate cellulose from the mixture.
After 5 cycles of IL recovery using methanol, more than 80% of sugars were still
obtained compared to the first round of pretreatment suggesting the high possibility
of recyclability of EMIM-Ac.

Keywords: pretreatment, lignocellulosic biomass, Ionic liquid, recyclability, biorefinery


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT07-O126

BETA GLUCAN EXTRACTION FROM YEAST USING ADVANCED


TECHNIQUES
Varupsorn Seubphet, Nuttawan Yoswathana* and Mohammad Naghi Eshtiaghi
Department of Chemical Engineering, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand
nuttawan.yos@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
Beta glucan is widely distributed in cell wall of microorganism. The first part to
extract beta glucan is digestion of the cell and the last, purification part.
Conventional digestion method is autolysis, with long treatment time and high
energy consumption. The advanced techniques, subcritical water (SCW) and high
electric field pulse (HELP), was proposed in this paper. The results of this study
have indicated that SCW at 160 C with time of 60 min resulted in highest beta
glucan (222.46 mg/g of dry yeast cell) followed by HELP treatment (97.68 mg/g) and
was distinct higher than conventional autolysis method (46.33 mg/g).

Keywords: beta glucan, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, novel techniques


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT08-O133

ALTERNATIVE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENT USING CHITOSAN


AS CARRIER
Khunpitchayha Lungkadee*, Piyabutr Wanichpongpan and Virote Boonamnuayvitaya
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of Technology
Thonburi, Bang Mod, Thung Khru, Bangkok 10140, Thailand
khunpitchayhaL@gmail.com

Abstract:
Chitosan is a biopolymer with rich remarkable properties that are appropiate for
biomedical applications. Several previous studies showed that chitosan has been
used as adsorbent materials. In this work the adsorption of calcium by chitosan
together with the effects of chitosan particle sizes and degree of deacetylation
(%DD) were investigated. The adsorption isotherm parameters were evaluated with
Langmuir and Freundlich models in order to characterise the experimental isotherm.
The experimental experiments reveal that chitosan performed good adsorption
capability and correlated with the particle sizes and degree of deacetylation.
Smaller paticle sizes and higher degree of deacetylation result in the increase of
adsorption. Coefficient of determination or R squred (R2) shows that Freundlich
model fitted well with the experimental data.

Keywords: chitosan, calcium, adsorption, isotherm


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT09-O143

APPLICATION OF HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD PULSES FOR PLANT CELL


DISINTEGRATION
Tulakorn Manakhajornvej, Nuttawan Yoswathana and Mohammad Naghi Eshtiaghi*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University, Nakorn Pathom,
Thailand
mohammad.esh@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
High Electric Field Pulses (HELP) is a non-thermal cell disintegration method for
extraction of intracellular compounds. The aim of this study is to investigate the
effect of HELP process parameters on cell disintegration of plant cell materials. And
also evaluated the prediction model for sugar cane HELP treatment using Response
Surface Methodology (RSM). The rests of this study showed that at 9 kV/cm and 60
pulses up to 70% cell disintegration of sugar cane was observed. Similarly, cell
disintegration of coconut meat using HELP at 4 kV/cm, 60 pulses was achieved.
Comparison between heat and HELP cell disintegration clearly indicated that it is
possible to disintegrated plant cell with similar or higher disintegration degree at
very shorter time (about 1 min) compare to thermal method (15 min). In addition,
the energy consumption for HELP treated sample was distinct lower (3 kJ/kg)
compare to thermal treatment (200 kJ/kg).

Keywords: High Electric Field Pulses (HELP), cell disintegration, energy consumption, non-
thermal process, sugar cane, coconut meat
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-BFT10-P167

VALUE ADDITION OF SUGARCANE MOLASSES, AN INEXPENSIVE


SUBSTRATE, FOR POLYHYDROXYBUTYRATE PRODUCTION BY
ALCALIGENES EUTROPHUS NCIMB 11599
Peerapat Sourkajang1, Phakphimol Piwpan1, Phimchanok Jaturapiree1 and Adisak Jaturapiree2,*
1
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University,
Nakhon Pathom, Thailand
2
Division of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology and Research Unit of Agriculture Residue
Products and Biomaterials, Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Muang, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand
adisak_ja@hotmail.com

Abstract:
Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a biodegradable polymer synthesized and
accumulated in a variety of microorganisms where it is stored as carbon and energy
sources. The PHB production cost is more expensive than the petrochemical
polymer due to the cost of substrates. In this study, the different sources of
sugarcane molasses, the by-product of sugar industries, were used as a low cost
carbon source in order to reduce PHB production cost. The culture achieved the
maximum PHB production 21.36% PHB content after 24 h shaking at 150 rpm and
37C in a PYM medium containing 10 g/L molasses, 1.5 g/L yeast extract 2.5 g/L and
peptone. The extracted PHB was identified by 1H NMR, which showed properties
similar to those of standard PHB. This study indicated that using the molasses as an
inexpensive carbon source can be contributed to reduce the high PHB production
cost.

Keywords: biodegradable plastic, molasses, PHB


Catalyst & Reaction Engineering
(I-CRE)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE01-P25

DEVELOPMENT OF Ce/La0.25Sr0.75Co0.5Mn0.5O3 CATALYST FOR


FURTHER APPLICATION IN A SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL TYPE REACTOR
Weerinda Appamana1,*, Thirawat Mueansichai1, Pongsri Siwarasak1,
Sasiradee jantasee1 and Suttichai Assabumrungrat2
1
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Rajamangala University of Technology
Thanyaburi, Pathumtani 12110, THAILAND
2
Center of Excellence in Catalysis and Catalytic Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical
Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, THAILAND
weerinda.a@en.rmutt.ac.th

Abstract:
This work focused on synthesizing Ce/ La0. 25Sr0. 75Co0. 5Mn0. 5O3 ( Ce/ LSCM)
composites for application as a material in fuel cell typed reactor at high
temperature between 700-900C. The Ce/LSCM was investigated for their potential
use in an oxidative coupling of methane ( OCM) reaction. The Ce/ LSCM was
characterized using XRD and BET. The catalytic activity of catalysts for OCM reaction
was studied in fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed using co-feeds of
methane, oxygen and nitrogen inert gas molar ratio of 4:1:3 at various temperatures
(700-900oC). The results show that the methane conversion increases with increasing
operating temperature, and that operating temperature significantly influences the
reaction selectivities. The optimum temperatures appear at 800oC, where the C2
hydrocarbon selectivity was 55.3% . Increasing the operating temperature from 700
to 850oC, the conversion of methane was rapidly increased, from 10.3% to 15.2%
with increasing C2 hydrocarbon selectivity.

Keywords: C2 hydrocarbon, methane, OCM, Ce/La0.25Sr0.75Co0.5Mn0.5O3


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE02-O31

DIRECT EPOXIDATION OF PROPYLENE TO PROPYLENE OXIDE OVER


MULTIMETALLIC RUTHENIUM-COPPER-BASED CATALYSTS
Photchanan Phon-in1, Chalinee Uppala1, Anusorn Seubsai1,* and Metta Chareonpanich1,2
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, 10900,
Thailand
2
NANOTEC Center for Nanoscale Materials Design for Green Nanotechnology, Kasetsart University,
Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
fengasn@ku.ac.th

Abstract:
Multi-metallic RuO2-CuO-NaCl-TeO2-MnOx/SiO2 catalysts were investigated for the
epoxidation of propylene to propylene oxide (PO) using O2 under atmospheric
pressure. The metallic weight ratio, the total metal loading on SiO2 support,
calcination time, and calcination temperature were optimized for PO formation rate.
RuO2 and CuO were determined to exhibit a critical bifunctional role for PO
synthesis. These active sites were assisted by MnOx and TeO2 to increase PO
formation rate and by NaCl to reduce CO2 formation. With using the Box-Behnken
design, a maximized PO formation rate of 1507 gPO h-1 kgcat-1 was obtained by varying
O2/propylene feed volume ratio, (O2+propylene)/Helium volume ratio, total feed
gas flow rate, and reaction temperature.

Keywords: propylene, propylene oxide, epoxidation, RuO2, CuO


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE03-P37

PHOTOCATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF Fe AND Mo- DOPED WO3


ON DEGRADATION OF METHYLENE BLUE
Mutsee Termtanun1*, Rujiroj Tamnitra1, Siriporn Wongwaitaweesup1 and Supakij Suttiruengwong2
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology,
Silpakorn University
2
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial
Technology, Silpakorn University
sukuraii@hotmail.com

Abstract:
This research developed tungsten oxide to use as a photocatalyst under the visible
region. It aimed to improve WO3 by doping Fe at 1 mol % , doping Mo at 1 mol %
and co-doping Fe/Mo at 1:1% 1:2% 1:3% 2:1% 2:2% 3:1% by mol. The synthesized
WO3 by flame spray pyrolysis was compared with the modified WO3 at different Fe
and Mo doping levels. The main objective is to find out the appropriate doping
level of Fe and Mo on WO3 for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue. From
the results, a synergistic effect appears after co-doping of Fe and Mo on WO3, leads
to significant improvement in photocatalytic activity. Among different prepared
compositions, the most superb WO3 that achieves the highest degradation of
methylene blue is 2:1% Fe/Mo co-doped WO3.

Keywords: photocatalyst, advanced oxidation process, degradation of methylene


blue, Flame spray pyrolysis
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE04-P39

Fe/Pt-DOPED TiO2 FOR FURFURAL PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION


Mutsee Termtanun1*, Kanniga Mingmit1, Krittaporn Likhitsup1 and Supakij Suttiruengwong2
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology,
Silpakorn University
2
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology,
Silpakorn University
ko_naeko@yahoo.com

Abstract:
This research focused on titanium dioxide as a based photocatalyst and developed
its band gap energy into the visible range for the photo-activation. It aimed to
improve photocatalytic performance of TiO2 by varying doping level of Fe/Pt from
0.25% to 0.75% by weight. The synthesized and modified TiO2 were compared with
the commercial TiO2 to prove the effectiveness of flame spray pyrolysis. The
photocatalytic efficiency of different doped metal was compared to find out the
most suitable level of Fe and Pt. From the results, Fe doped TiO2 enhances the
photocatalytic activity by narrowing the band gap energy when compared with the
pure synthesized TiO2. Pt-doped TiO2 is beneficial to reduce the recombination of
photogenerated electrons and holes but it does not enhance the narrow of band
gap and surface area. The optimum composition is at 0.75%Fe/0.5%Pt doped TiO2
which has the highest photoactivity for furfural degradation.

Keywords: photocatalyst, Flame spray pyrolysis, Furfural, photocatalytic degradation


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE05-O40

EFFECT OF CATALYST PREPARATION CONDITIONS ON THE


PROPERTIES AND ACTIVITIES OF CaO and MgO BASE CATALYSTS FOR
BIODIESEL PRODUCTION FROM PALM OLEIN
Kandis Sudsakorn* and Worawit Unchananun
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University,
Bangkok 10900, Thailand
fengkdsk@ku.ac.th

Abstract:
In this research, the effect of prepartion conditions (chemical ratio and calcination
tempature) of precipitated CaO and MgO catalysts on their properties and
transesterification activities as percentage of methyl ester content (% FAME) was
investigated. The CaO catalysts were calcined at 700 or 800 C while those of MgO
catalysts were at 410 and 510 C. The catalysts were characterized using SEM, N2-
adsorption, Hammett-indicator and XRD and tested for their activities on biodiesel
production from palm olein and methanol using a reaction condition of 65oC, 2 h,
12:1 methanol-to-oil molar ratio, and 5 wt% catalyst amount. The best preparation
conditions for CaO catalyst were 1:3 Ca2+ :Na+ molar ratio and 700 C calcination
temperature while those of MgO were 1:1 Mg2+ :Na+ and 410C. At these conditions,
the highest values of % FAME of 98.14% and 42.98% could be obtained with the
CaO and MgO catalysts, respectively.

Keywords: biodiesel, transesterification, palm olein, CaO, MgO, catalyst preparation


condition
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE06-O23

SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF CASSAVA MASH AND CASSAVA STARCH


TO GLUCOSE USING CARBONACEOUS SOLID ACID CATALYSTS
Kanpichcha Intaramas and Chularat Sakdaronnarong*,
Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University, Nakorn Pathom,
73170 Thailand
chularat.sak@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
Solid acid catalysts have recently been recently studied in starch hydrolysis as solid
catalysts could be recycled, easy to separate and low cost, therefore they play an
important role in glucose production for biorefinery process. In this work, different
methods namely sulfonation and Cl- dipping were used to synthesize solid acid
catalyst when amorphous carbon was a support. Synthesized catalysts were then
used to hydrolyze cassava starch and cassava mash. Hydrothermal hydrolysis of
cassava starch and cassava mash gave high sugar yield that were 111.10% total
reducing sugar (TRS) and 42.18% glucose yields from CC-SO3H catalyst and 87.11%
TRS and 37.35% glucose yields from HA-L-SO3H catalyst at 140 C for 3h. Moreover,
byproducts such as levulinic and formic acids were produced at low concentration.

Keywords: cassava mash and cassava starch, carbonaceous solid acid catalyst,
liquefaction, saccharification
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE07-O59

PHOTODEGRADATION OF REACTIVE RED 120 DYE USING


SYNTHESIZED SPHERE-TIO2 UNDER UV ILLUMINATION
S. Thaijiamaree and N. Pongstabodee*
Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University,
Bangkok, Thailand
sangobtip.p@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
This research was to study photodegradation of Reactive red 120 (RR120) dye using
synthesized sphere-TiO2 under UV illumination. Comparison the performance
between the synthesized sphere-TiO2 and the commercial TiO2 was also mentioned.
The synthesized sphere-TiO2 were prepared by hydrolysis precipitation method. The
synthesized sphere-TiO2 and the commercial TiO2 were characterized by means of
X-ray diffraction (XRD) for determining the crystallize structure and N2
adsorption/desorption for evaluating the specific surface area. The morphology of
both TiO2 photocatalysts was analyzed by Field Emission Scanning Electron
Microscope (FESEM). The factors studied here were illumination time, types of
photocatalyst and its dosage. The XRD patterns revealed that the structure of both
catalysts was anatase phase. From N2 adsorption/desorption, it evaluated that the
synthesized sphere-TiO2 had higher specific surface area than the commercial TiO2
about 9.5-folders. The FESEM revealed that the shape of commercial TiO2 was non-
spherical with smooth surface but the synthesized one was not. The complete
photodegradation was achieved when using 0.10 g of photocatalyst under UV
illumination within the first 30 minutes for the synthesized sphere-TiO2 and within
120 minutes for the commercial TiO2.

Keywords: photodegradation, reactive red 120, TiO2, UV illumination


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE08-O91

ENHANCED VISIBLE LIGHT-INDUCED PHOTOCATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF


NOVEL CHLOROPHYLL AND MG CO-MODIFIED P25
Thanaree Phongamwong and Metta Chareonpanich*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, NANOTEC Center for Nanoscale
Materials Design for Green Nanotechnology, and Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and
its Applications in Chemical, Food and Agricultural Industries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900,
Thailand
fengmtc@ku.ac.th

Abstract:
The nano-bio hybrid materials with the features of both material types are the
potential alternative for improving the activity of photocatalysts. In this research,
the unique chlorophyll and Mg co-modified P25 was synthesized as a visible light
reactive photocatalyst by using a simple incipient wetness impregnation method.
The synthesized catalysts were tested for photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine
B (RhB) under visible light and the effect of co-modified chlorophyll and magnesium
were investigated. It was found that the activities of catalysts were in the order of:
P25 < Mg/P25 < Chl/P25 < Chl-Mg/P25. The addition of chlorophyll and
chlorophyll-Mg in the catalyst could promote the photocatalytic efficiency for
approximately 1.9 and 2.3 times of P25, respectively. This remarkable photocatalytic
activity could be attributed to the enhancement in visible light adsorption, the
additional electrons from chlorophyll, and the synergistic effect between modifiers
and P25 catalyst.

Keywords: chlorophyll, Mg/P25, RhB degradation, Spirulina, visible light


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE09-P103

SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF Mg AND Al LAYERED DOUBLE


HYDROXIDES AS ALDOL CONDENSATION CATALYSTS
Atikhun Klaewkla1 and Chawalit Ngamcharussrivichai1,2,*
1
Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University,
Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2
Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology (PETROMAT),
Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
chawalit.ng@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
A series of Mg and Al mixed oxides, derived from Mg and Al layered double
hydroxides (MgAl LDHs) were used as solid base catalysts for synthesis of , -
unsaturated branched carbonyl compounds via aldol condensation of furfural with
2-butanone. The MgAl LDH precursors with different Mg/Al atomic ratios were
prepared via co-precipitation and urea methods, and were then calcined at 500 C
to obtain the corresponding mixed oxides. The physicochemical properties of the
MgAl LDHs and mixed oxides were characterized by using various techniques. The
aldol condensation reaction was performed batch wise in a stainless-steel autoclave
at 80 C for 8 h, and the reaction products were analyzed for their composition
using a gas chromatography (GC). The MgAl mixed oxide with the Mg/Al ratio of 3,
prepared by co-precipitation, was the suitable catalyst, giving a high furfural
conversion and a high selectivity to the desired carbonyl compound product.

Keywords: Aldol condensation, Furfural, unsaturated carbonyl compound, layered


double hydroxide
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE10-P116

DEVELOPMENT OF NICKEL OXIDE BY USING SURFACTANT ASSISTED


HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT SYNTHESIS
Chanita wattanasomboon1, Suwimol Wongsakulphasatch2*, Chaiwat Prapainainar2,
Weerakanya Maneeprakorn3, Atthaphon Maneedaeng4, and Suttichai Assabumrungrat1
1
Center of Excellence on Catalysis and Catalytic Reaction Engineering, Department of
Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Phyathai Road, Wang Mai,
Phatumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of
Technology North Bangkok, 1518 Pracharat 1 Rd., Wongsawang, Bangsue, Bangkok 10800, Thailand
3
National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development
Agency, Klong Luang Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
4
School of Chemical Engineering, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima
30000, Thailand
suwimol.w@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
This research aims to develop nickel oxide for electrochemical-related applications. The
addition of surfactants as structure directing agent for nickel oxide synthesis is the subject
of investigation. In this work, nickel oxide was prepared by 2 methods: precipitation with the
addition of cationic gemini-surfactant (butanediyl-1,4-bis(dimethyl dodecyl ammonium
bromide)) mixed with anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate,SDS) and modification of
preparation method by urea hydrolysis with hydrothermal treatment. The results showed
that by addition of surfactant Gemini:SDS = 0.04:8.2 molar provides greater porous
morphology and uniform particle size.

Keywords: nickel oxide, precipitation, surfactant


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE11-O121

EFFECTS OF MgO-ZSM-23 ZEOLITE CATALYST ON THE PYLOLYSIS


OF PET BOTTLE WASTE
Pattra Kongsupapkul1, Kraipat Cheenkachorn1 and Supak Tontisirin1,2*
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University
of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
2
Center of Eco-Materials and Cleaner Technology, King Mongkuts University
of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
supak.t@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
The pyrolysis reaction of poly( ethylene terephthalate) or PET bottle waste was
conducted comparatively in two cases: without catalyst and with MgO-ZSM-23
zeolite catalyst. The pyrolysis of PET was successfully decomposed to the product
of liquid/ wax, char, and gas ( major product). Applying MgO-ZSM-23 catalyst, the
product shows pronounced higher yield of gas (72.5 vs. 58.7 wt.%) and less yield of
char solid (8 vs. 17.6 wt.% ). The gas product shows less yield of CO2 (75 vs. 98
wt.% ) but gives higher hydrocarbon gas fractions of C1-C5 (25 vs. 2.1 wt.% ). In
liquid/ wax products, the catalytic pyrolysis shifted the product spectrum from
higher molecular weight, e. g. , biphenyl, terphenyl to benzene derivatives,
predominantly in benzoic acid.

Keywords: ZSM-23 zeolite, catalytic pyrolysis, PET, renewable energy, fuel


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE12-O125

ENHANCE SCR AND BENZENE COMBUSTION ACTIVITIES OF TiO2


(ANATASE) BY SULFURIC ACID-TREATMENT
Nantaya Imprapantree* and Tharathon Mongkhonsi
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University
254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, THAILAND
nantaya.imp@gmail.com

Abstract:
Benzene oxidation and NO reduction with NH3 were performed on TiO2 (anatase)
catalyst. The catalyst was treated with sulfuric acid having concentration in the
range 0-1.0 M. Catalysts were characterized by using X-ray powder diffractometer
(XRD), Nitrogen Physisorption, pyridine adsorption and NH3temperature
programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The results indicate that treatment with sulfuric
acid can improve NO reduction activity and conversion of benzene to CO 2 of TiO2
catalyst

Keywords: selective catalytic reduction (SCR), benzene oxidation, anatase


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE13-O131

MODIFIED V2O5-WO3/TiO2 CATALYST FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS


REMOVAL OF NO AND BENZENE
Kittayanat Laolertrattana* and Tharathon Mongkhonsi
Department of Chemucal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University
245 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, THAILAND
kittayanat.l@student.chula.ac.th

Abstract:
This research aims to study the effect of sulfuric acid treatment on the catalytic
performance of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 for the simultaneous removal of NO, CO2 and
benzene. The catalysts are prepared wet impregnation method. Catalysts were
characterized by using ICP technique (ICP-OES Perkin Elmer Optima 7000DV), X-ray
powder diffractometer (XRD), single point BET surface area measurement, pyridine
adsorption and NH3temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The base V2O5-
WO3/TiO2 catalyst is the catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of
nitrogen oxide by NH3. The reaction is carried out in the reaction temperature range
120 - 450 C. It is found that V2O5-WO3/TiO2 treated with 0.2M H2SO4 has the highest
catalytic activity for benzene oxidation and nitrogen oxide reduction.

Keywords: catalyst V2O5 WO3/TiO2 , sulfuric acid , SCR


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE14-O137

FLAME SPRAY PYROLYSIS DERIVED SILICA-TITANIA SUPPORTS FOR


COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS
Pathompat Khowattana, Sunanta Deemee, Tunyaporn Sup-Udom, Nutchapon Chotigkrai and
Choowong Chaisuk*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology,
Silpakorn Univerisy, Nakhon Pathom 73000
cchaisuk@yahoo.com

Abstract:
The effect of silica content on flame spray-made silica-modified titania supported
cobalt catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was investigated. The catalysts
were prepared by two steps as the supports were first prepared by flame spray
pyrolysis (FSP) and then 10 wt.% of Co were loaded on FSP-made silica-titania
supports using incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were
characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 physisorption, H2-chemisorption and
temperature programmed reduction in H2 (H2-TPR). The results presented the
promotional effect of silica on physical properties and metal-support interaction,
resulting in higher reducibility and Co active sites. The catalytic test in FTS showed
that selectivity toward C5+ products was significantly improved by reducing
formation of methane over silica-titania supported cobalt catalysts. The highest
selectivity to C5+ products was obtained at 50 wt.% silica loading.

Keywords: Titania, Silica, Cobalt Fisher-Tropsch catalyst, flame spray pyrolysis,


metal-support interaction
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE15-P138

PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION OF METHYLENE BLUE DYE IN


AQUEOUS TITANIA NANOPARTICLES SUSPENSION WITH VARIOUS
LIGHT SOURCES
Varistha Peechawan1, Okorn Mekasuwandamrong2 and Joongjai Panpranot 1*
1
Center of Excellence on Catalysis and Catalytic Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical
Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Phyathai Road, Wang Mai, Phatumwan,, Bangkok
10330, Thailand
2
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industial Technology, Silpakorn
University, Nakorn Pathom 73000, Thailand
joongjai.p@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
In this study, the photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye has
been investigated using suspension of different TiO2 nanoparticles including Degussa P25
TiO2, nitrogen-doped P25, flame spray pyrolysis (FSP)-derived TiO2 and 1 mol% Si- and 1
mol% Fe-modified FSP-TiO2 under UV and visible light sources. Compared to P25 TiO2, all
the FSP-synthesized TiO2 and modified TiO2 exhibited lower band gap energy similar to the
N-doped P25. However, under UV light irradiation P25 showed the highest photocatalytic
activity while the FSP-1 mol%Si-TiO2 and N-doped P25 exhibited comparable activity for MB
decomposition under visible light. It is suggested that not only the lower band gap energy
but also the increase of BET surface area of the modified catalysts was important for
improving the catalyst activity especially under visible light irradiation.

Keywords : photocatalytic, Titania nanoparticles, impregnation, Flame spray pyrolysis


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE16-O140

EFFECT OF INLET/OULET PATTERNS ON PERFORMANCE


OF MICROREACTORS FOR COUPLED SMR-COMBUSTION
Kanokporn Sinpakdee 1, Karn Pana-Suppamassadu1,*, Prayut Jiamrittiwong2, Thanaruk Srisurat2,
Thana Sornchamni3 and Rungrote Chuvaree3
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok
2
Faculty of Science, Energy and Environment, Rayong Campus, King Mongkuts University of
Technology North Bangkok
3
PPT Public Company Limited, Thailand
karn.p@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
The A- and Z-type microchannel reactors for Steam Methane Reforming coupled
with Methane Combustion were designed and evaluated for its performance by
computational and modeling approaches. The kinetics of SMR and MC were
adopted from literatures [1, 2]. In the models, Ni/MgAl2O3 catalyst layers were
applied on the bottom of each channel. The influence of inlet/outlet patterns i.e.
effective entrance/exit lengths and orientation angles on flow and temperature
distributions and methane conversions were investigated. The maximum methane
conversion achieved by the A- and Z-type microchannel reactors were 87.6% and
72.9%, respectively.

Keywords: Microchannel reactor, microreactor, Steam Methane Reforming


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE17-O48

SINGLE LAYER AND MULTILAYERS OF RU/AL2O3 USING


WASHCOATING METHOD ON STAINLESS STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR
FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN MICROCHANNEL REACTOR
Apichaya Theampetch1,*, Phavanee Narataruksa1, Chaiwat Prapainainar1 and Thana Sornchamni2
1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of
Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
Research and Development Center for Chemical Engineering Unit Operation and Catalyst Design,
King Mongkuts University of Teachnology North Bangkok, Thailand
2
PTT Research and Technology Institute, PTT Company Limited, Thailand
a.theampetch@gmail.com

Abstract:
Major challenge of using metal based microcrochannel reactor is catalyst active phase
deposition onto the metal surface. Washcoating method is one of the effective procedure
for depositing supported catalyst onto the substrate surface. In order to control quality of
the catalytic washcoated layer, stability of catalyst slurry, amount of catalyst solution and
number of coatings were focused. The catalyst slurry used in this work contained 20wt% of
10%Ru/Al2O3, 5wt% of polyvinyl alcohol, 1% of acetic acid and water. The suitable pH of
catalyst solution was in a range of 2 4. For the single layer coating, the good adherance of
catalytic layer was observed. The highest %weight loss was 0.007% at pH value of 8. From
the effect of catalyst slurry volume, 0.1 ml and 0.2 ml gave relatively low catlyst loading
difference of before and after adhesion test. The average thickness of 0.2 ml single layer
washcoating was 121.73m. For multilayer washcoating, the results clearly showed that the
obtained washcoated layer can be used to apply onto the metallic substrate not only
single layer but also multilayer. The double layer washcoating gave the highest catalyst
loading per unit area for every volume of catalyst slurry. The 0.2 ml gave relatively good
adherence and uniform washcoating layer in multilayer coating process.

Keywords: washcoat, Fischer Tropsch synthesis, Microchannel reactor


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-CRE18-O171

FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS OVER COBALT-BASED CATALYST


COATED ONTO STAINLESS STEEL MULTICHANNEL REACTOR
Rungnapa Kropporn1,2, Watis Warayanon1,2, Monrudee Phongaksorn1,2, Thana Sornchamni3 and
Sabaithip Tungkamani1,2,*
1
Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science,
King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok, Thailand.
2
Research and Development Center for Chemical Engineering Unit Operation and Catalyst Design
(RCC), Science and Technology Research Institute, King Mongkuts University of Technology North
Bangkok, Thailand
3
PTT Research and Technology Institute, PTT Public Company Limited, Thailand.
sabaithip.t@sci.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
The objective of this work is to study the performance of 30%Co/MgO (30CMC) and 30%Co-
1%Mn/MgO (30CMMC) catalyst-coated plates. The catalyst samples were prepared by sol-
gel method and deposited onto a stainless steel plate (coating area of 6.9 mm x 60.0 mm)
by spray coating. The Fisher-Tropsch Synthesis were demonstrated on catalyst-coated
plates in a multichannel reactor. The effects of syngas flow rate (similar CO to H2 ratio),
coating thickness and Mn promoter on FTS performance were carried out. Operating with
low feed flow rate enhance the stable of activity as well as C5+ selectivity. Increasing the
thickness of catalyst layer results into the improvement of selectivity toward long chain
hydrocarbons with the decline in FTS activity due to the porosity of catalytic layer. The
electronic effect of Mn promoter developes CO chemisorption which diminishes the CH4
formation. The addition of Mn reinforce a selective toward gasoline production.

Keywords : Multichannel Reactor, Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Cobalt Based Catalyst


Coated, stainless steel
Environmental, Safety, Health &
Risk Management
(I-ESH)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-ESH01-O34

ACTIVATED CARBON FROM SOLID WASTE OF PULP AND PAPER


INDUSTRY FOR COLOR REMOVAL OF WASTEWATER
Thitaporn Khumphu, Thanawat Praiphong, Khantaphong Chareunkulpa, Thanathip Seelapath,
Atip Lanugphairojana and Yuvarat Ngernyen*
Biomass & Bioenergy Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of
Engineering, Khon Kaen University, 40002
nyuvarat@kku.ac.th

Abstract:
This work focused on the preparation of activated carbon from wood dust by physical activation with CO2. The
preparation process consisted of carbonization of sample under the flow of N2 at 400oC and 1 hr followed by
activating the derived chars with CO2 at 800oC for 1 hr. The porous properties of the resultant activated carbon
was characterized based on the analysis of N2 adsorption isotherms at -196oC. The results showed that the
activated carbon was dominated with micropore structure (77%) with the surface area of 357 m2/g and average
pore width of 2.1 nm. The prepared activated carbon was then used as adsorbent for color removal of
biological treated wastewater. It was found that the percentage of color removal increased with the increasing
of amount of adsorbent. The adsorption reaches equilibrium at 12 and 4 hr for the using of activated carbons of
1 and 1.5 g with the maximum percentage of 90% and 93%, respectively. This was higher than the target value
of the company at 58%. The removal of color by using commercial activated carbon reach equilibrium at 24
and 16 hr for the using of carbons 1 and 1.5 g with the percentage of 75% and 100%, respectively. The
percentage removal of color for prepared activated carbon is higher than commercial activated carbon at all
adsorption times for using sample of 1 g. However, for the case of using sample of 1.5 g, the percentage color
removal for prepared carbon is higher than commercial activated carbon for the adsorption time less than 14 hr
after that the results showed reverse trend. Therefore, the prepared activated carbon had higher efficiency for
color removal of wastewater than commercial activated carbon in the meaning of shorter equilibrium time and
%removal. This mean that wood dust, that is the waste, can be the potential raw material for produced
activated carbon for using as adsorbent to remove color from wastewater.

Keywords: Activated carbon, wood dust, pulp and paper, wastewater


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-ESH02-O47

A NICKEL-GRAPHENE COMPOSITE AMPEROMETRIC SENSOR FOR A


DETECTION OF FORMALDEHYDE
Venus Seedokbuab, Krittamet Yanawibut, Nutpichan Pienutsa, Chayanit Phatoomvijitwong and
Sira Srinives*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University
25/25 Puttamonthon 4 rd., Nakhon pathom, 73170, THAILAND.
sira.sri@mahidol.edu

Abstract:
Formaldehyde is the most active aldehyde with a disinfection ability, killing bacteria
and stopping bacteria from growing. It has been banned internationally from food
and food-related products due to high toxicity that lead to dizziness, vomiting and,
in extreme cases, death. In this work, the sensor was fabricated relying on catalytic
activity of nickel nanoparticles immobilized on graphene support (Ni-graphene
composite), and was operated in an amperometric mode of an electrochemistry
work station. Our best sensor showed good responses to 1-60 ppm of formaldehyde
in pH 13 alkali solution with a sensitivity of ~0.09 ppm-1 with good rate of
reproducibility. No significant interferences were observed from testing the sensor
against benzoic acid (preservative), sodium hydrosulfite (bleach) and sodium tetra
borate (food additive) at tested concentrations.

Keywords : formaldehyde, Amperometric sensor, graphene, nickel nanoparticles,


composite material
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-ESH03-P86

REMOVAL OF METHYLENE BLUE DYE IN WATER USING LONGKONG


FRUIT PEELS
Vanida Chairgulprasert* and Hongnapa Waehayee
Department of Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Prince of Songkla University, Pattani
Campus, Mueang, Pattani 94000, Thailand
vanida.c@psu.ac.th

Abstract:
The adsorption of methylene blue dye from water onto longkong waste peel has
been investigated under various experiment conditions. Batch experiments were
conducted to determine the effect of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time,
adsorbent dose and temperature. The equilibrium time was found to be 205
minutes at the optimum pH of 7. The capacity of adsorption was improved with
increasing of initial dye concentration and temperature. In contrast, as the mass of
adsorbent increased, a decrease in the adsorption capacity was obtained. For
isotherm study, the adsorption data of longkong peel was best fitted to Freundlich
model. The kinetics of adsorption followed the pseudo second order model.
Thermodynamic parameters such as, enthalpy, entropy and free energy changes
were evaluated. The adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous.

Keywords : adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetics, methylene blue, longkong,


Aglaia dookkoo Griff.
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-ESH04-P114

EQUILIBRIUM, KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS ADSORPTION OF


METHYLENE BLUE BY MODIFIED BAGGASE
Chutikan Norasan and Adisak Jaturapiree*
Research Unit of Agriculture Residue Products and Biomaterials, Faculty of Science and Technology,
Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Muang, Nakhon Pathom 73000, Thailand
adisak_ja@hotmail.com

Abstract:
In this research, the removal of methylene blue dye (MB) from aqueous solution with
sugarcane leaves as an adsorbent was investigated using a batch adsorption experiment.
The experiments have been devided into two parts. The objective of the first part is to find
out the effect of pretreatment with chemicals (NaOH and KOH) and enzymes (pectinase
and cellulase) on the adsorption capacity of the sugarcane leaves. It was found that the
sugarcane leaves pretreated firstly with NaOH and then sequenthly pretreated with
cellulase (SL-NaOH/Cellulase) showed the maximum adsorption capacity. In the second
part, the adsorption bahaviors of SL-NaOH/cellulase was determined and compared to the
unpretreated sugarcane leaves (SL-untreated). The results showed that SL-NaOH/cellulase
had a greater percentage of dye removal than SL-untreated. However, both of the samples
reached equilibrium in 5 hours. For the study on adsorption isotherm, it was found that
Langmuir isotherm model was the best data fitting for both SC-NaOH/Cellulase and SL-
untreated with maximum sorption capacity of 1.387 and 2.985 mg/g respectively. For the
study of the kinetic model, it was found that the experimental data were fitted very well
with the pseudo-second-order. The thermodynamic study revealed that both adsorbents
showed negative values of enthalpy (H), and negative values of Gibbs free energy (G)
changes indicating an exothermic and spontaneous biosorption.

Keywords: modified bagasse, dye adsorption, kinetic, Thermodynamics, methylene


blue
Innovation in Chemical Engineering &
Applied Chemistry for Industrial Development
(I-IA)
th
The 6 TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-IA01-P97

ONE-POT SYNTHESIS OF HEXAGONAL MESOPOROUS SILICA


WITH A HIGH LOADING OF AMINOPROPYL GROUP
1 1,2,*
Satit Yousatit and Chawalit Ngamcharussrivichai
1
Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University,
Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2
Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology (PETROMAT),
Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
chawalit.Ng@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
In the present study, we developed a new sol-gel approach to synthesize amine-
functionalized hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS-NH2) in the presence of
dodecylamine as a neutral templating agent. The functionalization was performed
via direct co-condensation method using 3-aminopropyltri-methoxysilane (APS) as
an amino-functional group precursor. The APS loading amount was varied in a range
of 015 mol%. The resultant materials were characterized for their physicochemical
properties using various techniques. The HMS-NH2 materials obtained not only had
highly ordered hexagonal structure, but also very high concentration of amino-
propyl group (0.16 mmol g-1).

Keywords: mesoporous materials, functionalization, co-condensation, amine


Polymers & Materials
(I-PM)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM01-O27

NANO TITANIUM DIOXIDE IMPREGNATED ALGINATE BEADS FOR DYE


REMOVAL VIA ADSORPTION-PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION
PROCESS
Piyawan Wongsatarn and Datchanee Pattavarakorn*
1 Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200,
Thailand
datchanee.p@cmu.ac.th

Abstract:
The nano titanium dioxide impregnated alginate (TiO2-ALG) beads has been
prepared and used for the removal of methyl orange (MO). Nano-TiO2 was
entrapped in Ca-alginate matrix bead under the effects of nano-TiO2 and
glutaraldehyde crosslinker contents. The TiO2/ALG beads were then characterized
by BET, SEM, TG and texture analysis. Moreover, the MO removal efficiency of TiO2-
ALG beads via adsorption-photocatalytic degradation process under UVC radiation
was investigated. The results showed that nano-TiO2 content, irradiation time and
pH affect the adsorption-photocatalytic degradation efficiency of the TiO2-ALG
beads. The maximum %MO removal was found for 30%wt TiO2-ALG beads at pH =
3 and 180 minutes irradiation time. The TiO2-ALG beads can be reused in which the
MO removal efficiency decreased about 54% after reuse for seven times.

Keywords: photocatalytic degradation, alginate beads, adsorption, TiO2


nanoparticles, dye removal
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM02-O28

ACRYLONITRILE/CELLULOSE COPOLYMER FROM AGRICULTURAL FOR


USE AS HEAVY METAL ABSORBENT
Narisara Bancha and Datchanee Pattavarakorn*
Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200,
Thailand
datchanee.p@cmu.ac.th

Abstract:
This research aims to develop biosorbent materials from agricultural wastes, i.e.
coffee ground (CG), sawdust (SD) and sugarcane bagasse (SB). These wastes were
modified by graft copolymerization with acrylonitrile monomer and used as Cr(VI)
adsorbents. After copolymerization, the acrylonitrile/cellulose copolymers were
characterized by FTIR and SEM. The FTIR results indicated the cyano group in all
absorbent structures after grafted successfully. Furthermore, the effects of contact
time, pH and amount of absorbent to Cr(VI) removal potential of copolymers were
investigated.

Keywords: graft copolymerization, adsorption, cellulose, agricultural waste, Cr( VI)


removal
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM03-O29

OXIDE FORMATION ON STEEL SURFACES


Harich Krungkarnchana and Chutima Kongvarhodom*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of
Technology Thonburi, Thailand
chutima.kon@kmutt.ac.th

Abstract:
Formation of oxides on AISI 1045 and AISI 304 at 673 K for 168 hours and 720 hours
in air was studied. The oxide formed on AISI 1045 surface was magnetite with
different sizes of oxide particles because of the different exposure times.
Thicknesses of the oxide film formed on AISI 1045 for 168 hours and 720 hours were
found to be 2.98 m and 4.33 m, respectively. The oxide formed on AISI 304
surface was not observed for 168 hours but it was found as iron oxide and
chromium oxide for 720 hours. The thickness of the oxide film formed on AISI 304
was not determined from the weight gain measurement due to the irregular
characteristic of oxide formed.

Keywords: oxidation, corrosion, carbon steel, stainless steel, magnetite


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM04-O30

SYNTHESIS OF NANOSILICA FROM SUGARCANE BAGASSE ASH


Charoen Panyo and Apinon Nuntiya*
Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200,
Thailand
nuntiyaapinon@gmail.com

Abstract:
The objective of this study was to synthesis nanosilica from sugarcane bagasse ash
(SBA). Sugarcane bagasse ash was burnt at 800 C for 4 h. Silica content which
obtained after heat treatment at 800 C for 4 h was 76.8% . SBA was purified by
alkaline extraction method with 4 M NaOH. Percent yield of silica extracted by 4 M
NaOH was 35.25. Subsequently, the purified silica from SBA was used to production
of nanosilica by precipitation method. The precipitation was done by refluxing silica
from SBA in boiling 2.5 M NaOH by continuous stirring for 3 h. Then, nanosilica was
precipitated by added 2. 5 M H2SO4 with flow rate of 1, 2, and 3 ml/ min,
respectively. TEM results showed that the addition of 2.5 M H2SO4 with flow rate of
2 ml/min provided agglomerate particles with dimension of 5-20 nm. The specific
surface area was found to be 544.3 m2/g.

Keywords: nanosilica, sugarcane bagasse ash, precipitation


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM05-P44

FIRE-RETARDANT PAPER BASED ON MONTMORILLONITE AND OIL


PALM TRUNK FIBRES
Saowapa Chotisuwan*, Kreepon Wannarit, Phetcharapon Kaewna, Sareena Kardae, Yupadee
Chaisuksan and Jareerat Roumcharoen
Department of Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Prince of Songkla University, Pattani
Campus, Pattani, Thailand 94000
saowapa.c@psu.ac.th

Abstract:
Fire-retardant paper was prepared by mixing of montmorillonite (MTM),
carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and cellulose fibres (CF) isolated from oil palm
trunk biomass by alkaline treatment. The mixtures of dispersed CMC, MTM and CF
with various ratios were stirred for 24 h, then casted and dried to form paper. The
samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray
diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and thermogravimetric
analyzer (TGA). Their mechanical and fire retardance properties were also evaluated.
The CMC50:MTM50:CF12 paper showed the best of flame-retardant testing with
maximum tensile testing at 24.7 MPa and Youngs Modulus at 13.7 MPa.

Keywords: Fire-retardant paper, montmorillonite, cellulose fibres, carboxymethyl


cellulose
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM06-O49

EFFECT OF MILLED GLASS FIBER ON THE MECHANICAL AND


PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYPROPYLENE FOR FUSED
DEPOSITION MODELING
Chomphoonut Buaprommee and Anongnat Somwangthanaroj*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok
10330
anongnat.s@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
The aim of this paper was to investigate the influences of adding milled glass fiber
on the mechanical properties and shrinkage behavior of polypropylene (PP) as a
feedstock material for fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique. Due to
semicrystalline structure of PP, it negatively affects the dimensional stability. PP
with different milled glass fiber content (0, 10, 20 and 30 wt%) were studied in
order to decrease shrinkage. Dogbone-shaped specimens were fabricated by FDM
3D printer for tensile test and square boxes were printed for evaluating shrinkage
behavior. Furthermore, fracture surfaces of printed tensile samples were analyzed
via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to support the tensile results. The findings
indicated that milled glass fiber enhanced the tensile modulus and elongation at
break, and reduced shrinkage behavior. Finally, PP may become an alternative
choice as a material for FDM technique.

Keywords: milled glass fiber, mechanical properties, shrinkage, polypropylene,


fused deposition modeling.
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM07-O55

POLYANILINE-FUNCTIONALIZED REDUCED GRAPHENE OXIDE


CHEMIRESISTIVE SENSOR FOR A DETECTION OF VOCs
Pakpong Roongruangsree1, Nutpichan Pienutsa2, Venus Seedokbuab2, Krittamet Yanawibut2,
Chayanit Phatoomvijitwong2, Sira Srinives*2
1Science Division, Mahidol University International College, Mahidol University,

999 Salaya, Puttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom, 73170, THAILAND.


2Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University

25/25 Puttamonthon 4 rd., Nakhon Pathom,, 73170, THAILAND.


sira.sri@mahidol.edu

Abstract:
Graphene is a 2-dimensional nanostructure with outstanding electrical, chemical,
and mechanical properties. Its ability to react/interact with gas molecule and
become more or less electrical conductive created basic principal for graphene-
based gas sensor. In this research, chemically exfoliated graphene was synthesized,
and further composited with polyaniline (PANI) conductive polymer. The composite
was fabricated to a chemiresistive sensor and was demonstrated in detecting
selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - water, ethanol, and benzene. The
sensor sensitivity was determined as 0.2289, 0.0806 and 0.0295 ppm-1 for water,
ethanol and benzene, respectively. The sensing mechanism relies on PANI acting as
a VOCs capturing nodes, altering conductivity of graphene.

Keywords: Graphene, Polyaniline, Chemresistive sensor, Volatile organic compound


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM08-O71

HYDROGEL BASED ON NATURAL RUBBER GRAFTED WITH


2-ACRYLAMIDO-2-METHYL-1-PROPANESULFONIC ACID
Pairote Klinpituksa1,*, Vanida Chairgulprasert2,* Xainikone Lorsomkharm
Division of Chemistry, Department of Science, Faculty of Science and Technology
Prince of Songkla University, Pattani 94000, THAILAND
1kpairote31@gmail.com

2vanida.c@psu.ac.th

Abstract:
Hydrogel was prepared by free radical polymerization with grafting of 2-acrylamido-
2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) onto natural rubber (NR) backbone, using
potassium persulfate (KPS) initiator and N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) cross-
linker. The polymerization reaction was carried out at 40-60C for 20 minutes. The
swelling capacity of hydrogel was investigated with regard to the effects of
monomer concentration, cross-linker concentration, and initiator concentration. The
chemical structures in the hydrogel were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy The
results showed that the swelling capacity increased with the quantities of AMPS,
MBA, and KPS, and with reaction temperature.

Keywords: natural rubber, water-swellable rubber, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-


propanesulfonic acid, hydrogel
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM09-O115

EFFECT OF pH ON CORROSION PROTECTION PROPERTY OF TITANIA-


MESOPOROUS SILICA NANOCOMPOSITE COATING
ON 316L STAINLESS STEEL
Paiboon Saejear and Teeraporn Suteewong*
Department of Chemical Engineering, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang,
Bangkok 10520, Thailand
teeraporn.su@kmitl.ac.th

Abstract:
Coating is one of versatile methods that can protect metal surface from corrosive
environment. Various types of anti-corrosion coating have been studied. Composite
coating that contains dispersed particles has shown promising protection efficiency
for metal such as carbon steel and stainless steel. In this work, we report the
preparation of anti-corrosion coating for 316L stainless steel using titania-
mesoporous silica nanocomposites (MSN@TiO2) as an anti-corrosion filler. Corrosion
resistance behavior of coated steels in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution (pH 3-11) were
measured using a potentiodynamic technique. It was found that at all pHs, stainless
steel coated with MSN@TiO2/epoxy-silane provide the lowest pitting current density
comparing to bare stainless steel and stainless steel coated with pure epoxy-silane.

Keywords: mesoporous silica nanopartcles, titania, composite, coating, corrosion

.
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM10-O119

EFFECTS OF POLYOL MOLECULAR WEIGHTS ON THERMOREVERSIBLE


LIGHT SCATTERING BEHAVIORS OF BENZOXAZINE-URETHANE
ALLOYS
Kittipon Bunyanuwat and Sarawut Rimdusit*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok
10330
sarawut.r@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
Effects of polyol molecular weights (1000, 2000, and 3000 daltons or PU1K, PU2K
and PU3K) on thermally reversible light scattering (TRLS) behaviors of BA-a: PU
polymer alloys are investigated. The experimental results revealed that TRLS of BA-
a:PU alloys tends to occur at a wider range of alloy compositions with an increase
of the polyol molecular weights. That is the TRLS phenomenon of BA-a:PU1K was
observed at 10 to 20wt% of PU1K while BA-a:PU3K was found at 20 to 50 wt% of
the PU. The fully opaque state was observed at room temperature whereas the
transparent state was achieved when the specimen was heated above 170C.
Moreover, the results reveals that Tg values of all BA:PU alloys increase with
increasing PU fraction from 0 to 50 percent by weight in the alloy networks. The
TRLS materials based on BA-a:PU alloys find potential use in thermal sensor or
shutter etc.

Keywords: Benzoxazine, Alloy, Urethane, Thermally reverible light scattering, Phase


separation.
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM11-O129

PHASE SEPARATION BEHAVIORS OF POLYIMIDE AND POLYSULFONE


BLENDS FOR ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTIVE LAYER MATERIAL
APPLICATION
Noppawat Kuengputpong1, Sunan Tiptipakorn2, Sarawut Rimdusit1,*
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok
10330
2 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Science, Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen

Campus, Nakhon Pathom 73140, Thailand


sarawut.r@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
Phase separation behaviors of polymer blends between 3,3,4,4-
biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride/4,4-diaminodiphenyl ether (s-BPDA/ODA)
polyimide (PI) and polysulfone (PSF) have been investigated. All blend films with
400-micron thickness were prepared by a solution casting method. The effects of
PSF mass fraction (varied from 0 to 100 wt%) on thermal and mechanical properties
of the blends were eamined by a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and a
universal testing machine (UTM). From the results, the tensile modulus of the
blends was observed to increase with increasing PSF contents in a linear manner.
Furthermore, glass transition temperature of PI/PSF blends indicated that the blends
were partially miscible in nature due to the appearance of two Tgs that shift
towards each other. The optical micrographs reveal the phase separation of the
blends being dependent on the blend compositions.

Keywords: Polyimide, Polysulfone, Partially miscible blend, Phase separation.


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM12-P139

ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES ENHANCEMENT OF POLY(METHYL


METHACRYLATE) FOR DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL APPLICATION
Godchaporn Bunmee1, Nuttapol Pootrakulchote2 and Napida Hinchiranan2,*
1 Program of Petrochemisty and Polymer Science, Faculty of Science,Chulalongkorn University,
Bangkok, Thailand
2 Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok,

Thailand
napida.h@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is consisted of transparent electrode,
semiconductors, coordination compounds, inorganic salts and metallic catalysts.
However, transparent electrodes made from the conductive glass have some
inherent problems such as brittleness, heavy weight, and high cost. To solve these
drawbacks of glass electrode, polymer was expected to substitue. Poly(methyl
methacrylate) (PMMA) was selected to replace the conductive glass since it has
excellent optical transparency, low cost and light weight. Thus, this work aimed to
develop a conductive PMMA sheet used as a counter electrode by deposition of
poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) (electrical conductivity = 36 S.cm-1) via
spin coating technique to increase electrical conductivity of PMMA surface. The
modified PMMA sheet was assembled with other components to form the DSSC.
The efficiency to convert solar light as electricity was also reported.

Keywords: Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), Dye-sensitized solar cells, Electrical


conductivity, Counter electrode, Poly(methyl methacrylate)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM13-P141

SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF POLY(BUTYL ACRYLATE-CO-


FLUORINATED ACRYLATE)-GRAFT-NATURAL RUBBER
KotchamonYimmut1 and Napida Hinchiranan2*
1Program
in Petrochemistry and Polymer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University,
Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330,

Thailand,
napida.h@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
Graft copolymerization of poly(butyl acrylate (BA)-co-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl
methacrylate (3FMA)) onto natural rubber (NR) was prepared in the latex stage
initiated by potassium persulfate (K2SO4). The effects of BA/3FMA wt ratio, initiator
concentration and reaction temperature on the monomer conversion, grafting
properties detected by soxhlet extraction and water contact angle were
investigated. From the initial study, it was observed that the maximum content of
graft NR (GNR) at 70.7 wt% was achieved when the graft copolymerization was
performed by using 1.5 phr K2SO4 at 60 C for 8 h. At this condition, the chemical
structure of graft product was characterized by using attenuated total reflectance
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The decomposition temperature
was evaluated by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The morphology of graft
product was also observed by using transmission electron microscope (TEM).
Moreover, it was found that the contact angle of the graft product film was 101,
which was higher than that of NR film as 1.25 times.

Keywords: Natural rubber, 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate, butyl acrylate, graft


copolymerization
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM14-O162

CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHENE SYNTHESIZED BY MODIFIED


HUMMERS AND LIQUID-PHASE EXFOLIATION METHOD
Worawat Jansomboon1, Palivut Brikshasri1, Sangchai Sarawutanukul1, Paweena Prapainainar1,2,3*
1NationalCenter of Excellence for Petroleum, Petrochemicals and Advance Material, Department of
Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
2Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and Its Applications in Chemical Food and

Agricultural Industries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand


3NANOTEC-KU-Center of Excellence on Nanoscale Materials Design for Green Nanotechnology,

Kasetsart University, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand


fengpwn@ku.ac.th

Abstract:
Graphene was synthesized through chemical cleavage followed by reduction process and
through liquid-phase exfoliation methods. The characteristics of synthesized graphene were
investigated by Raman spectroscopy, FTIR, SEM, XRD and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. It
was found that graphene oxide (GO) synthesized by modified Hummers had carboxylic acid,
hydroxyl, and ether groups confirming that graphite was successfully oxidized. The result
also showed that graphene oxide consisted of 12 layers and the layer distance was in the
range of 0.67-0.72 nm. In liquid-phase exfoliation method, graphene sheets were
synthesized by mixing graphite with naphthalene and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP)
followed by sonication. The results indicated that the inter layer spacing of graphite was
expanded from 0.3356 to 0.3364 nm or 0.23%. The highest graphene concentration was up
to 3.26 mg/ml and the yield was 54.34% at 120 minute of sonication time. Therefore, the
sonication time was directly proportional to graphene concentration in NMP.

Keywords: Graphene, Graphene oxide, Graphene characterization, Modified


Hummer, Liquid-phase mechanical exfoliation.
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM15-O172

PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF ELECTROSPUN FIBERS OF


TITANIUM DIOXIDE-LOADED POLYLACTIDE/POLY(VINYLPYRROLIDONE)
BLENDS
Bunthoeun Nim, Paiboon Sreearunothai, and Pakorn Opaprakasit*
School of Bio-Chemical Engineering and Technology, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology
(SIIT), Thammasat University, Pathum Thani 12121, Thailand
pakorn@siit.tu.ac.th

Abstract:
Nanofibers of polylactide (PLA)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) blends loaded with TiO2
particles have been prepared by an electrospinning technique. TiO2 particles are
formed by sol-gel mechanisms from titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) precursor.
Effect of TiO2 formation rate on properties of the fibers are examined by adding
isopropyl alcohol (IPPA) to slow down the TiO2 precipitation process. The use of
IPPA produces fiber mats consisting of slightly bigger and smoother filaments, but
smaller-sized embedded TiO2 particles. Both materials show a distinct UV absorption
characteristic of TiO2 at max 300 nm, which can be applied in many catalytic
applications. Degradation behaviors of the materials in phosphate buffer solutions
have also been investigated.

Keywords: Polylactide, Poly(vinylpyrrolidone), Titanium dioxide, Electrospinning,


Degradation
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PM16-O173

IMPROVEMENT OF BICYCLE AND MOTORCYCLE INNER TUBE USING


SURFACE-MODIFIED SILICA
Anusorn Faklek 1, 2 and Thirawudh Pongprayoon 1, 2,*
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of
Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok 10800, Thailand
2Center of Eco-Materials and Cleaner Technology, King Mongkuts University of Technology North
Bangkok, Bangkok 10800, Thailand
thirawudh.p@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
This research was to study the mechanical properties of the rubber compound
mixed with modified silica via admicellar polymerization. The formula compounds
of rubber inner tube were selected for mixing with silica as a reinforcement. The
properties of the rubber compounds were compared with commercial inner tube
using carbon black as a reinforcement. The results showed that the mechanical
properties of the rubber compounds using modified silica were better than those of
all rubber compounds using unmodified silica and carbon black, especially flexibility
that was much higher than that of carbon black reinforcement rubber.

Keywords: inner tube, natural rubber compound, modified silica, mechanical


property
Process Design, Simulation & Control
(I-PSC)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC01-O53

PROPERTIES ESTIMATION OF POLY-LACTIC ACID SYNTHESIS USING


ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK
Chaiyapop Siraworakun*, Sommai Pivsa-art and Sumonman Niamlang
Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, Faculty of Engineering,
Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi, Pathum Thani, Thailand
chaiyapop.s@en.rmutt.ac.th

Abstract:
This article aims to estimate properties of the Poly-Lactic Acid (PLA) synthesized by
direct condensation polymerization process in laboratory scale using artificial neural
network (ANN). Firstly, samples of PLA were synthesized at various conditions
(reactant amount, pressure, temperature and reaction time). The samples were
further analysed for thermal property: melting temperature (Tm). Then a neural
network for properties estimation (Tm) was developed using of those analysed data.
The obtained neural network was tested and validated by comparing with another
set of analysed data. The simulation results showed that the neural network model
could predict the properties of samples in accuracy over 80% .

Keywords: neural network, Poly-Lactic Acid, properties estimation


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC02-O65

A CASE STUDY ON THE FOAM FORMATION AT THE SEALED WELL OF


THE THERMAL POWER PLANT
Arthit Dubey*, Panchan Sricharoon and Jindarat Pimsamarn
Department of Chemical Engineering, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok
athitdubey_dubey@hotmail.com

Abstract:
This research investigated the influences of cooling water flowrate and surface
tension on a foam formation at the sealed well of thermal power plant. The
volume fraction of the entrained air, which was related as the main cause of foam
formation on the water surface around the sealed well, was simulated using the
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with the commercial code ANSYS Fluent. The
volume of fluid ( VOF) and the k-epsilon models were employed to analyze the
volume fractions of air in water and the turbulence flow, respectively. The results
from the CFD showed that when the water flowrates were increased from 15,000 to
28,000 m3/ h, the average air volume fractions would be increased from 0.057 to
0.074. In contrast, the surface tension showed no effect on the foam formation in
this study.

Keywords: cooling water flowrate, cooling water surface tension, foam formation,
Sealed well, CFD
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC03-O84

APPLICATION OF LMI BASED ROBUST FUZZY CONTROLLER TO


POLYPROPYLENE POLYMERIZATION REACTOR WITH UNCERTAINTIES
Bordin Wanichodom and Pornchai Bumroongsri*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol Uniersity, 73170, Thailand
pornchai.bum@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
Polymerization reaction has been considered as a highly nonlinear process due to
the presence of the parameteric uncertainties, resulting in high level of difficulty in
control. The human experience based method, namely fuzzy logic control, is an
alternative approach in which the process is controlled, according to the rules
implemented by the experienced operators. In this paper, the developed robust
fuzzy controller was applied to guarantee the stability of the polypropylene
polymerization process in the presence of the uncertainties in kinetic constants for
propagation rate and heat of reaction. The results showed that the mass of polymer
and the reactor temperature can be regulated to setpoints despite uncertainties.

Keywords: fuzzy logic, LMI, polypropylene polymerization process, process control,


robustness
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC04-O113

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF SMALL SCALE


BIOMASS DOWNDRAFT GASIFER
Apichat Kritruchtanun and Pimporn Ponpesh*
Computational Process Research Unit, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering,
Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok, 10330
pimporn.p@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
Computation fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling has been applied in this study to modify
downdraft gasifier in order to improve the efficiency for energy generation. The
gasifier was simulated as porous bed. The RNG k- model was used to solve the
turbulent gas flow. The mass transfer was solved using Eddy Dissipation Concept
approach. The energy equation was used to solve the temperature distribution in
the reactor. The results of this research will be used to develop the design and
operation guidelines of biomass downdraft gasifiers for community empowerment.

Keywords: downdraft gasifier, porous bed, partial oxidation, CFD modeling.


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC05-O117

STARCH LOSS REDUCTION IN A HYDROCYCLONE WASHING UNIT OF


A CASSAVA STARCH PRODUCTION PLANT
Chatsuang Chirapornchai1, Patcharawadee Ittipornpaisarn1, Chanakarn Thamsiriprideeporn1, Annop
Nopharatana2, and Bunyaphat Suphanit1,2,*
1Department of Chemical Engineering, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi,
126 Pracha-Utit Rd., Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140
2Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute (PDTI), King Mongkuts University of Technology
Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utit Rd., Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140
bunyaphat.sup@kmutt.ac.th

Abstract:
In a cassava starch production process, the improvement in the design and
operation of a hydrocyclone network was focused on to reduce starch loss and also
to reduce starch impurities such as sulfur and fine pulp in the product. A simulation
model was firstly created and then tuned with actual plant data by adjusting a set
of empirical parameters in a hydrocyclone model. Several modification approaches
were then investigated. A substantial amount of starch loss saving worth 21.43
million Baht/year could be obtained by combining all considered approaches.
Finally, to decrease the starch impurities, an additional hydrocyclone stage was
applied in addition to the modification approaches. The pulp content in the starch
slurry could be reduced from 586 to 223 ppm by weight. The benefit in terms of
starch recovery was 21.53 million Baht/year in the last modification scheme.

Keywords: cassava starch washing, hydrocyclone network simulation, starch


impurity, starch loss
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC07-O144

PROCESS MODELLING, THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF


BIOMASS GASIFICATION FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION
Apichart Meechai 1, 3, Piyapong Hunpinyo2, 3* and Phavanee Naraturaksa1, 3
1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of
Technology North Bangkok, Thailand
2 Division of Chemical Process Engineering Technology (CPET), Faculty of Engineering and Technology,
King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok (Rayong Campus),Thailand
3Research and Development Center for Chemical Engineering Unit Operation and Catalyst Design
(RCC), King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok, 1st and 7th Floor (Room 702), STRI
Building, Thailand
piyapong.h@eat.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
This project aims to develop alternative energy generation for producing renewable sources and is
suitable for agricultural sector in Thailand. The framework focuses on electricity production (small-
scale applications of 10-15 kW) using syngas as fuel from biomass gasification process intakes an
internal combustion (IC) engine. Conceptually, the methodology uses ASPEN Plus simulator as tool
for analytical modeling and thermodynamic conditions to perform concept design studies of syngas
production and system configuration. In particular, the lack of the solid library modeling is
compensated by FORTRAN codes nested within the ASPEN Plus input file to calculate mass and
energy balances for predicting the syngas performances i.e., volumetric flowrate, syngas composition,
lower heating valve (LHV), syngas yield, power output and cold gas efficiency (CGE), respectively,
which all of them lead to optimize by adjusting better the model sensitivity over uncertainty
conditions.

Keywords: Compact downdraft gasifier, Biomass gasification, ASPEN Plus process


modelling, Thermodynamic analysis, Gibbs free energy minimization.
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC08-O42

VERIFICATION OF MICROREACTOR DESIGN EQUATION BY


COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS SIMULATION: FISCHER-TROPSCH
SYNTHESIS
Nutthawoot Jermkwan1,2,*, Phavanee Narataruksa1,2, Chaiwat Prapainainar1,2, Apichaya Theampetch1,2
and Wanthana Chaiwang1,2
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering,

King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand


2Research and Development Center for Chemical Unit Operation and Catalyst Design,

Science and Technology Research Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology North Bangkok,
Bangkok, Thailand
jermkwan.n@gmail.com

Abstract:
Design equations for a catalytic microchannel reactor for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were
proposed and verified in this study. Design equations were created in term of dimensionless
group with assumption of a two-dimensional catalytic microchannel reactor to obtain an
optimal dimension of channel; height and length for a single straight flow channel with a
crossection of square or rectangular. Length of a flow channel can be divided into three
regions by particular controlled regimes consisting of kinetic, external diffusion and fluid
flow rate. The dimension of channel were optimized by the Intersection of Asymptotes
Method responding to maximum reaction rate. After that, dimension of channels from
design equation were simulated by Computational Fluid Dynamics method via COMSOL
Multiphysics 3.5a to compare reaction rate between the two methods. The difference of
results from design equations compared with simulation were about 25-50%.

Keywords: Microreactor, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, design equations, Computational


Fluid Dynamics
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC09-O57

OPTIMIZATION OF SEMI-BATCH REACTIVE DISTILLATION USING


RESPONSE SURFACE METHOD: CASE STUDY OF ESTERIFICATION OF
ACETIC ACID WITH METHANOL IN A PROCESS SIMULATION
Suputtharagris Akkaravathasinp1,2, Phavanee Narataruksa1,2 and Chaiwat Prapainainar1,2,*
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of
Technology North Bangkok, Thailand
2Research and Development Center for Chemical Unit Operation and Catalyst Design, Science and

Technology Research Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology North Bangkok, Thailand
chaiwat.r@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
This paper proposes optimization method in order to find the optimal operating parameters
on reactive distillation column (RD column) via esterification of acetic acid with methanol
to produce methyl acetate using Aspen Batch Distillation. The set-up reactive distillation
model was adopted from an in-house made RD column, which comprised of seven stages
including reboiler and condenser, five possible feed stages, where solid catalyst for the
reaction was contained. In this work, effect of temperature of heater at reboiler, feed stage
and reflux rate on yield of methyl acetate and purity of total distillated product were
studied. Case studies were designed by design of experiment and consequently simulation
results was optimized by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to determine optimal
condition. The result indicated that the optimum temperature of heater at reboiler, feed
stage and reflux rate were 141.87 C, Stage4 and 332.48 moleshour-1, respectively, giving
maximum yield and purity of methyl acetate at 57.50 mole% and 80.46 wt.%, respectively

Keywords: Reactive distillation, Esterification, Aspen batch distillation, Response


surface method.
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC10-O72

EFFECT OF FLOW DIREACTION OF COOLING STREAM ON FISCHER-


TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN MICROREACTOR
Wanthana Chaiwang1,2*, Apichaya Theampetch1,2, Nutthawoot Jermkwan1,2, Phavanee Narataruksa1,2,
Thana Sornchamni3 and Chaiwat Prapainainar1,2
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of

Technology North Bangkok, Thailand


2Research and Development Center for Chemical Engineering Unit Operation and Catalyst Design,

King Mongkuts University of Technology North Bangkok, Thailand


3PTT Research and Technology Institute, PTT Company Limited, Thailand

wanthana.chw@gmail.com

Abstract:
Heat removal is a crutial issue for Fischer Tropsch synthesis operation owing to its
highly exothermic characteristic. In this work the concept of microchannel and heat
exchanger integration into a single module was studied. The microreactor/heat
exchanger simulation model composed of 3 reaction channels and 3 cooling
channels. The effect of cooling stream direction on FT reaction performance was
focused. The simulation results showed that co current direction presented higher
temperature difference, especially for inlet position although conversion of reactant
were relatively closed compare to counter current case. The CO conversion of co
current and counter current were relatively closed of 10.71% and 10.65%
respectively.

Keywords: Microreactor, Microheat exchanger, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis,


Computational Fluid Dynamic
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC11-O154

TRANSIENT WELL-MIXED FLOW MODEL FOR POLYPROPYLENE


PRODUCTION IN A FLUDIZED BED REACTOR
Panut Bumphenkiattikul1, Sunun Limtrakul1,*, Terdthai Vatanatham1 and P. A. Ramachandran2
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900
2Department of Energy Environmental & Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis,

Saint Louis, MO, USA 63130


fengsul@ku.ac.th

Abstract:
Gas-solid phase polymerization of propylene in a fluidized bed reactor is
commercially used for polypropylene production. Polypropylene physical properties
are certainly controlled by polymer molecular weight and polydispersity index (PDI)
which depend on kinetic rate of polymerization. Due to many complex reactions
such as site activation, initiation, propagation, chain transfers, site transformation,
and deactivation, a method of moment is used in order to predict molecular weight
of polypropylene. This work presents a well-mixed flow model as a simplified
representation of a fluidized bed reactor with hydrodynamic correlation and
method of moment. This model is capable of predicting polymer production rate,
reactor temperature, particle size, molecular weight and PDI. In addition, the
hydrogen concentration effect on polymer molecular weight can be predicted. This
model also predicts volume fraction of solid phase and particle diameter change as
a function of time. This model is useful for both interpretation of laboratory data
and for scale-up of industrial scale reactor.

Keywords: Polypropylene, Well-mixed flow model, Fluidized bed reactor, method of


moment, PDI
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC12-O160

DISCRETE ELEMENT METHOD COUPLED WITH EULERIAN MODEL


IN A SPOUTED BED FOR SILICON PRODUCTION
Pongpawee Chanlaor1, Sunun Limtrakul1,*, Terdthai Vatanatham1 and P.A. Ramachandran2
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Kasetsart University,

Bangkok 10900, Thailand


2 Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis,

Missouri 63130, USA.


fengsul@ku.ac.th

Abstract:
The discrete elemement method for solid phase coupled with Eulerain model for
gas phase is applied in the silicon production by silane chemical vapor deposition in
a spouted bed to investigate local phase movements, and mass and heat transfer
in the system. The simulation provides the distribution of phase, temperature,
concentration in the bed. In addition, the particle size distribution due to surface
deposition on the silicon seed particle and scavenging of the fines formed in the gas
phase. Futhermore, the particle size distribution shows a broad distribution due to
non uniform deposition reaction on the solid particles.

Keywords: Silicon, Fluidized bed, chemical vapor deposition, Discrete element


method
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC13-O165

HENRYS LAW CONSTANT ESTIMATION OF OZONE IN UNSATURATED


FATTY ACID
Rungrote Kokoo1,*, Matthana Khangkhamano2, William B. Zimmerman3
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkuts University of
Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
2Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, Pince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand

3Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

rungrote.k@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
The Henrys Law constant is the required parameter for gas-liquid reactions to
determine the reaction rate constants. It is very difficult to practically estimate the
Henrys Law constant using experiment of the systems containing ozone and
unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, the simulation technique using Aspen Plus and
Polymath software was presented to evaluate the Henrys Law constant of such
systems. The results showed that the Henrys Law constants obtained from the
simulation is slightly different from the experiment for binary and multi-fluid system.
The simulation method is, therefore, an alternative technique for determination of
the Henrys Law constant.

Keywords: Henrys Law constant, estimation, ozone, unsaturated fatty acid


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC14-O168

MODIFICATION OF AN INDIVIDUAL QUICK FREEZER USING


CFD MODELING
Koraphat Tangchirachot and Pimporn Ponpesh*
Computational Process Research Unit, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering,
Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok, 10330
pimporn.p@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
Velocity and temperature profiles of cryogenic air in an individual quick freezer (IQF)
for industrial food processing were simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamic
(CFD) modeling. In addition, the motion of fragments broken off from the products
was investigated. The results were used to guide the modification of the IQF so as
to mitigate the cleaning problem due to the fragments, blown and trapped in
different locations. RNG k- model, radiative energy equation, and discrete phase
model were used to predict the velocity, temperature, and product fragment
trajectories respectively. Good agreement with the experimental results was found.

Keywords: Individual Quick Freezer, Turbulent multiphase flow, Frozen food processing,
CFD modeling
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-PSC15-O51

THE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF SILICA-


NATURAL RUBBER LATEX MIXING
Ekaroek Phumnok1,*, Sukritthira Ratanawilai1, Charun Bunyakan2
1Chemical Engineering Department, Engineering Faculty, Prince of Songkhla University, Songkhla,
90110, Thailand.
2School of Engineering and Resources, Walailak University, Nakhonsithammarat, 80161, Thailand.

ekaroek.ph@skru.ac.th

Abstract:
The aim of this research is to simulate the silica-natural rubber latex mixing in a
stirred tank by using computational fluid dynamics. The computational fluid
dynamics (CFD) were applied in the micro-silica dispersion and natural rubber mixing
using the stirred tank. The volume fraction of silica phase in NR latex phase at
various mixing times were predicted and compared with the experimental results.
The result was shown that, the silica will be dispersed well after the mixing time
was more than 40 seconds. The mixing time prediction from CFD was compared
with the experiment and a good agreement was found.

Keywords: CFD, Silica, latex, mixing


Sustainable Energy Technology
(I-SET)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET01-O19

EVALUATION OF BIODIESEL PRODUCTION USING OIL FEEDSTOCK


FROM CONTAMINATED MACRO ALGAE IN SHRIMP FARMING
Thawipon Wuttilerts1, Peeriya Peerapongpipat2, Pongpan Suksommanat3 and Suphang
Chulalaksananukul1,*
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University, Salaya campus,

Nakornpathom, 73170, Thailand


2P.P Tutor House, Non buri, Nonthaburi, Thailand

3Sun Genesis Industry, Teparak road Km24, Bangsaothong, Samutprakarn, 10540, Thailand

suphang.chu@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
This research was aimed to manage and utilize 3 contaminated macro algae from shrimp
farming, Caulerpa lentillifera, Caulerpa racemosa, and Acanthophora spicifera as an
alternative oil feedstock for biodiesel production. Oil extraction was performed and
biodiesel production was conducted in further to get the maximum yield. The optimization
of condition, such as the molar ratio of oil to methanol, effect of reaction time, reaction
temperature, and percentage of catalyst were carried out. The results were discovered that
the average amount of oil from these macro algae were approximately 3.3% from dried
basis. The optimum condition for biodiesel production with these 3 macro algae was nearly
the same. The reaction was complete within 8 hours and the achievement of biodiesel
yield was 55.58% from Caulerpa lentillifera with the suitable condition of oil to methanol
molar ratio 1:15 using 1 % of KOH at 60 oC. Caulerpa racemosa sp. can be produced 58.36%
of biodiesel from the condition of oil to methanol ratio 1:15 with 1.5 % of KOH at 60 oC. As
well, the optimum condition for biodiesel production from Acanthophora spicifera was
using 1:12 of oil to methanol ratio with 1 % of KOH and obtained 49.29% of biodiesel.

Keywords: biodiesel, greenhouse gas, oil feedstock, macro algae, shrimp farming
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET02-O18

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CERATOPHYLLUM DEMERSUM L.


AND CARBON FOOTPRINT EVALUATION
Thirasit Kusolsongtawee1, Luksanaree Maneechot2, Thawipon Wuttilerts1 and Suphang
Chulalaksananukul1,*
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University, Salaya campus,

Nakornpathom, 73170, Thailand


2Research Center for Environmental Quality Management, Kyoto University, 5200811, Japan

suphang.chu@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
The aim of this research was to find the suitable conditions for bio-ethanol
production from Ceratophyllum demersum L., an abundant aquatic plant. The
parameters affected to alcohol production were evaluated. Percentage of solid, the
amount of yeast, pH value and temperature were carried on. The results
elucidated that the condition to produce the maximum bio-ethanol from
Ceratophyllum demersum L. were applied with 10% (w/v) of solid, 10% (w/v) of
yeast, controlled pH= 6 at 30 degree Celsius. The highest rate of bio-ethanol
production was reached 2.92 g ethanol/L within 24 hrs. By the way, the Carbon
Footprint for ethanol production was able to calculate only from 2 boundary steps
of life cycle analysis which were the boundary step of raw material acquisition and
of manufacturing process. Consequently, the carbon footprint for ethanol
production from Ceratophyllum demersum L. was 77.8780 kg CO2 equivalent.

Keywords: bio-ethanol, Ceratophyllum demersum L., Carbon footprint


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET03-O21

ALCOHOL ASSISTED METHANOL SYNTHESIS FROM CO2 OVER AN


ULTRASONIC ASSISTED PRECIPITATED CATALYSTS
Suppharoek Likhittaphon1, Rangsalid Panyadee1, Wannasiri Fakyam1, Sumittra Charojrochkul2, Thana
Sornchamni3 and Pattaraporn Kim-Lohsoontorn1,*
1Department of Chemical Engineering, Mahidol University

2National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), National Science and Technology

Development Agency
3PTT Research & Technology Institute, PTT Public Company Limited

pattaraporn.kim@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
The CuO/ZnO catalysts are synthesized using co-precipitation method with varied
precipitation temperature (25-80C), pH value (5-10) and technique (conventional
precipitation and ultrasonic assisted precipitation), which affect the catalyst
properties and activity. Crystallite size, specific surface area and surface acidity are
investigated for catalyst characterization. Methanol is directly synthesized from CO2
and H2 through an alcohol-assisted method with ethanol as a medium. The results
shows that the catalyst precipitated at 60 C and pH 8 with the use of ultrasonic
exhibited the maximum %yield of methanol at 33% and 81% selectivity.

Keywords: Alcohol-assisted methanol synthesis, Ultrasonic-assisted precipitation,


CO2 utilization, Copper Zinc Oxide
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET04-O14

POTENTIAL OF BIOMASS FEEDSTOCK AS A CO-FIRING FUEL FOR MAE


MOH POWER PLANT
Prakorn Kittipomowong*, Karn Panasuppamassadu and Monpilai Narasingha
Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering
King Mongkuts University of Technology-North Bangkok
prakorn.k@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

Abstract:
Potential of biomass feedstocks from four primary food crops as a co-firing fuel for
Mae Moh power plant has been investigated using publicly available database. It
can be concluded that no single type of biomasses can meet the electricity
capacity of Mae Moh power plant. Besides, this study also found that biomass
which has the most potential to generate electricity is rice straw (316 MW) while the
most potential biomass redisue is sugar cane leaves and tops (175 MW).

Keywords: Co-firing, Bio-energy, electricity, biomass, power plant


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET05-O35

OIL PRODUCTIONS FROM CATALYTIC AND NON-CATALYTIC


PYROLYSIS OF PLASTIC PACKAGING WASTES
Supattra Budsaereechai, Atip Lanugphairojana and Yuvarat Ngernyen*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, 40002
nyuvarat@kku.ac.th

Abstract:
Catalytic and non catalytic pyrolysis of plastic packaging wastes were conducted in
fixed-bed reactor. Four types of plastics were used in this study: polypropylene (PP),
polystyrene (PS), low density polyethylene (LDPE) and high density polyethylene
(HDPE). The effect of pyrolysis temperature (400550oC), pyrolysis time (414 min),
types of catalyst (zeolite and kaoline), and catalyst content (catalyst/plastic weight
ratio 0.050.20) on oils yield and their properties were investigated. It was observed
that pyrolysis temperature did not affect the oil products yield while heating value
of oil products slightly increase with increasing pyrolysis temperature. When
pyrolysis time increased, oil products yield also increased. Use of zeolite and
kaoline increased the yield and heating value of oil products. However, catalyst
content also did not affect the yield and heating value of products. The heating
value and viscosity of obtained oils were comparable to commercial fuels like
diesel and gasohol 91. FTIR results showed that oils from PS had compositions in
accordance with gasohol 91 while oils from PP, LDPE and HDPE had compositions in
accordance with diesel.

Keywords: pyrolysis, plastic packaging waste, oil, Zeolite, Kaoline


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET06-O36

SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM CO2 AND H2O THROUGH A BARIUM-


BASED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS
Jatupong Sarabut1, Sumittra Charojrochkul2, Thana Sornchamni3, Pattaraporn Kim-Lohsoontorn1,*
1 Department of chemical engineering, Mahidol university, Thailand

2National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC),

National Science and Technology Development Agency


3PTT Research & Technology Institute, PTT Public Company Limited

pattaraporn.kim@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
This research project is conducted for the purpose of syngas production from CO2
and H2O using a solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). BaCeO3- (BC), Ba0.6Sr0.4CeO3-
(BSC), Ba0.6Sr0.4Ce0.9Y0.1O3- (BSCY), and Ba0.6Ce0.9Zr0.4O3- (BCZ) are synthesized using
solid state reaction method. BC, BSC, and BSCY are calcined at 1100oC for 2h and
BCZ is calcined at 1300oC for 12h. Its shown 100% perovskite. The proton
conductivity is tested (400-800oC) and it is found that the conductivity increase with
temperature. The activity toward the reverse water gas shift reaction is also tested
(400-800oC) and it is found that CO yield of BCZ higher than BSCY, BSC, and BC,
respectively at 550-800oC. Electrolyte composite with Cu are also tested toward
RWGS. Addition of 40%wt. Cu significantly increases catalytic activity as the reaction
temperature for synthesis syngas decreases to lower 400oC and CO yield of Cu/BSCY
higher than Cu/BCZ, Cu/BSC, and Cu/BC, respectively.

Keywords: Solid oxide electrolysis cell, reverse water gas shift, proton conductivity,
strontium doped barium cerate, syngas
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET07-O63

PHOTOCATALYTIC CONVERSION OF CARBON DIOXIDE TO ALCOHOLS


OVER TITANIUM DIOXIDE-GRAPHENE COMPOSITE
Krittamet Yanawibut, Sira Srinives1,*, Pattaraporn Kim-Lohsoontorn2,*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University
25/25 Puttamonthon 4 rd., Nakornpathom, 73170, THAILAND
1sira.sri@mahidol.edu

2pattaraporn.kim@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract:
This study aims at providing an alternative approach to CO2 utilization, molecularly
reforming CO2 into liquid fuel such as ethanol or methanol. The technique relies on
photocatalytic conversion, utilizing catalytic activities of titanium dioxide (TiO2)
nanoparticles and charge transportation of graphene support, in liquid phase and at
room temperature. Graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized, following a modified
Hummers method, and further composited the GO with titanium dioxide (TiO2)
nanoparticles through a sol-gel method. After that, thermal was used for reduction
of GO functional groupsto obtain reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Photocatalyst was
characterized using TEM, BET surface analysis, FTIR spectra and XRD. Our best result
showed that the TiO2/rGO composite with 20 wt. % TiO2 loading converted water-
dissolved CO2 into ethanol, yielding 28.62 mol ethanol per gram composite. Good
performance of the TiO2/rGO composite was attributed to low band gap energy (2.9
eV) and high surface area (106.5 m2/g) of the material.

Keywords: Graphene, Tatanium dioxide, composite materials, Photocatalytic


conversion, Carbon dioxide utilization
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET08-O66

A FABRICATION OF HYDROGEN FUEL CELL USING


PALLADIUMGRAPHENE COMPOSITE ANODE
Somchate Wasantwisut, Nattapon Pangjanta, Nutpichan Pienutsa, Venus Seedokbuab, Krittamet
Yanawibut, Chayanit Phatoomvijitwong and Sira Srinives*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahidol University 25/25 Puttamonthon
4 rd., Nakhon pathom, 73170, THAILAND
sira.sri@mahidol.edu

Abstract:
This study aims at showing catalytic activity of a potent fuel cell anode candidate,
Pd-rGO composite. The palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized
and immobilized on reduced graphene oxide (rGO), following a sol-gel method with
potassium bromide (KBr) as soft template. The obtained Pd nanoparticles were in
spherical (nanoparticles) and cubical geometry (nanocubes) with a particle size
ranging from 10 to 50 nm, providing "edges" that expose the active Pd atoms for
catalysis purpose. Catalytic performances of the PdrGO composite were tuned and
tested over electrochemical oxidation of ethanol in a liquid phase electrochemical
cell, and catalytic oxidation of hydrogen in a gas phase proton exchanging
membrane fuel cell. Best results obtained from PdrGO composite with 10% wt Pd
loading per gram of graphene oxide and 0.01 M KBr concentration exhibited current
density of 25.73 mA/cm2 for ethanol and 4.09 A/cm2 for hydrogen.

Keywords: hydrogen fuel cell, Palladium nanoparticles, Graphene, composite


materials
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET09-O76

BIOCRUDE OIL PRODUCTION FROM HYDROTHERMAL LIQUEFACTION


OF DEMINERALIZED SUGARCANE LEAVES
W. Chitsonthi1 and P. Kuchonthara2,*
1Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University,
Bangkok, 10330, Thailand
2Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University,

Bangkok, 10330, Thailand


prapan.k@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a promising process to convert biomass into
liquid fuels, so called biocrude. The objective of this work was to investigate an
effect of demineralization using nitric acid on the liquefaction of sugarcane leaves.
Besides, the biocrude production from that process was comprehensively explored
in various ratios of co-solvent (ethanol/water). The experiments were conducted in
a 250 mL autoclave reactor at a temperature range of 300-350C and reaction time
of 60 minutes. The results indicated that the demineralization obviously reduced
ash content in sugarcane leaves and gave a higher biocrude yield from HTL using
pure ethanol. The characteristic of biocrude was also evaluated in terms of
elemental composition, water content, and the total acid number (TAN).

Keywords: biomass, Hydrothermal liquefaction, mineral matter, Deminerlization


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET10-O94

MICROWAVE TORREFACTION OF SAWDUST PELLETS WITH OR


WITHOUT THE ADDITION OF BIOMASS CHAR
Prodpran Siritheerasas*, Kullapat Chaloemngam and Wirantorn Booncharoen
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Thammasat University
Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
sprod@tu.ac.th

Abstract:
In this study, the torrefaction of highly moist sawdust pellets (with the initial
moisture content of 40 wt.%) using microwave irradiation, with or without the
addition of biomass char, was investigated. It was found that the torrefied sample
with the addition of the char of corncob (biomass char) had lower amounts of
moisture and volatile matter than did the torrefied sample without the addition of
corncob char. The amounts of moisture and volatile matter of the torrefied sample
decreased with time. An increase in the microwave power led to a decrease in the
amounts of moisture and volatile matter. It was also found, from the combustion
test runs, that the torrefied sample possessed a higher rate constant (k) and a lower
activation energy (Ea) than did the raw sample.

Keywords: Torrefaction, microwave irradiation, Sawdust pellets, biomass char,


combustion kinetics
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET11-O95

EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE ABSORBERS ON THE TORREFACTION OF


HIGHLY MOIST MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW) PELLETS
Phichayanan Waiyanate*, Pongtorn Dhupatemiya, and Prodpran Siritheerasas
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Thammasat University
Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
phichayanan.wai@dome.tu.ac.th

Abstract:
The purpose of this research was to study the effects of microwave absorbers on
the torrefaction of highly moist municipal solid waste pellets. The effect of the type
of agricultural residue used as the microwave absorbers (char from agricultural
residue), microwave power, and torrefaction time on the torrefaction of MSW-pellet
samples was investigated. It was found that the addition of char from bagasse
yielded the lowest remaining mass and the highest temperature of the torrefied
sample. The increases in the torrefaction time and the microwave power resulted in
lower amounts of remaining moisture and volatile matter. The amounts of ash and
fixed carbon were found to be relatively constant at their initial values. The addition
of the microwave absorbers led to an increase in carbon content, but a decrease in
the amount of oxygen, of the torrefied sample, when compared to the sample
without the addition of the microwave absorber.

Keywords: microwave absorber, agricultural-residue char Torrefaction, Municipal


solid waste (MSW), microwave irradiation
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

I-SET12-O134

APPLICATION OF Fe2O3/CaSO4 MIXED METAL OXIDE FOR METHANE


OR COAL CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION
Panuwattana Kanokwannakorn1, Sasithorn Sunphorka2 and Prapan Kuchonthara1,*
1Department of Chemical Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
2Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Rajamangala University of Technology Tawan-Ok

Uthenthawai Campus, Bangkok, Thailand


prapan.k@chula.ac.th

Abstract:
This research studied the effects of Fe2O3 addition to CaSO4 oxygen carrier which is
the worthwhile material in terms of combustion and thermal stability. The result
revealed that 20 wt.% Fe2O3/CaSO4 gave the best result in terms of methane
conversion, thermal stability and regenerability. For the CLC of coal, the reaction
temperature is optimal at 950oC. The reduction reaction was rapidly completed
within 60 min. SEM and XRD were used to analyze the solid composition and
morphology of spent oxygen carrier. It was found that 20 wt.% Fe2O3/CaSO4 could
be used in CLC process both gaseous and solid fuels.

Keywords: Calcium sulfate oxygen carrier, Fluidized bed reactor, chemical looping
combustion, coal
Biomedical Engineering & Biomaterials
(T-BEB)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-BEB01-P45



*
, , , ,
10140
panchan.sri@kmutt.ac.th

:

scaffold


scaffold
simulated body fluid (SBF)
scaffold

: , , , ,

Biochemical Engineering & Food Technology


(T-BFT)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-BFT01-O26


*, ,
. . . 80240
kittiphoom.s@rmutsv.ac.th

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-BFT02-O92

Cellic Ctec2
.. ,*, , .. , .
50

fengjrc@gmail.com

:
(Oil Palm Empty Fruit
Bunches) Cellic Ctec2

54.74, 21.73
16.17
10, 15 20 60
15 14.28
3.41
5, 7, 10 15
Cellic Ctec2 20 FPU/g substrate
140 5 5
10
85.79
60.29 12.51

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-BFT03-P100


, , *, .
. .
thirawat.m@en.rmutt.ac.th

:

30
500 200 30


68.55%
67.26% 4.08% 4.11% 3.16% 2.59%
4.23% 4.18% 0.34% 0.29%

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-BFT04-O150


.. *, Prof. Dr. M.N. Eshtiaghi

nuttawan.yos@mahidol.ac.th

:
(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

220.
1:92 110 330 .
5 ,4 15

314 182.8 .

: , , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-BFT05-P176

SHELF-LIFE STUDY OF MOCHI ICE CREAM


Waruntorn Kaewkeeree1, Aussama Soontrunarudrungsri1,*, Edgar Chamber IV2,*
1
Faculty of Biotechnology, Assumption University, Hua-Mark, Bangkok, Thailand, 10150
aussama.soon@gmail.com
2
Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health, Kansas State University, Manhattan KS, USA,
66506
eciv@k-state.edu

Abstract:
Shelf life study is a crucial step of product development since it indicates safety,
acceptable sensory characteristics with proclaimed nutritional values when the product is
kept in the recommended condition. This study was aimed to study the sensory properties,
physical properties the correlation between sensory properties and physical properties of
mochi ice cream as it was kept in different conditions (-5oC, -10oC and -20oC). Descriptive
analysis was performed by 8 trained-panelists and evaluated using intensity score between
0-15. Texture profile analysis (TPA) was performed by using texture analyzer. The results
from both measurements were performed ANOVA, t-test and Dunnetts test (=0.05) and
Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were performed to compare the stored samples with
the control as well as indicate the correlation between sensory attributes and physical
characteristics. There were 13 developed lexicon attributes. The longer of storage caused
lower intensity of softness and gumminess from mochi phase. From texture analyzer that
showed significantly decreased from control. From these results, both measurements can
be applied for mochi ice cream development.

Keywords: shelf life, mochi ice cream, sensory analysis, physical measurement,
Texture
Catalyst & Reaction Engineering
(T-CRE)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE01-O24

-
*
, ..
140 10530
vissanu.meeyoo@gmail.com

:
15%
Ni/Ce0.75Zr0.25O2

650 850
6 9



(W/F)
650 6 9


(W/F)
(W/F)

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE02-O70

Er(OTf)3
*
, .

kptanawa@gmail.com

:
15%

(Er(OTf)3)
- 150 200 0
45 Er(OTf)3 0.1:1 1:1
200
5
190
30 Er(OTf)3 0.5:1
54.29

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE03-O74

TMA MgCl2 /EtOH



1* 1 2
, ,
1
10330
2
PTT Research and Technology Institute, Wangnoi, Ayutthaya 13170
*thanyaporn.ttp@gmail.com

:
(TMA) MgCl2
adduct (-OH group)
TMA OH
Ti
MgCl2 /EtOH 1:6 TMA 3
(MgCl2 /EtOH/TMA) 1:6:6 1:6:6.3 1:6:6.6 MgCl2 /EtOH/TMA
1:6:6.3 6.9 kg PE/mmol cat.h
( SEM)

: , , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE04-O68



*
, .
10520
kptanawa@gmail.com

:


190



: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE05-O58



1 1,* 2
, ,
1
10330
2


bunjerd.J@chula.ac.th

MMAO 3
(XRD) SiO2-syn
1,081 m2/g (activity)
70oC 400gPE/gZrh
SiO2 -com 98 gPE/gZr h SiO2 -syn 77 gPE/gZrh
52 gPE/gZrh

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE06-O81



*
,


254 10330
bunjerd.j@chula.ac.th

(100:0, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70 0:100)




3400 1363-1632 cm-1

Cu(30)Ag(70)Li/M-Al > Cu(50)Ag(50)Li/M-Al > Cu(70)Ag(30)Li/M-Al > Cu(0)Ag(100)Li/M-
Al > Cu(100)Ag(0)Li/M-Al
(synergistic effect)

: , , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE07-O82



1,* 2 1

1

254 . 10330
2
. ()
71 2 13170
Atthawut1308@gmail.com

(Titanocene) MAO
10% 3, 3.25, 3.5 3.75
1081m2/g
(SEM)
0.1-0.5 MAO 3.75
2.96 kg PE/mmol cat.h

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE08-O79



*
,

10330
aname_i@hotmail.com


270

2 80
10

82.83
79

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE09-P104

2

1,2* 1,2
,
1
--
2

10900
waleepornd@gmail.com


(Ni/BPS) (AC)
(CB) (NT) 10Ni(CB)
/BPS 17.5
13.0

: ,, , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE11-O111



*
,

10330
suphot.P@Chula.ac.th

(Impregnation method) 2, 4 6
(NH3-TPD)
(CO2-TPD)

(Binding energy O 1s)
(XPS)
(X-Ray Diffraction)

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE12-O122

V2O5-MoO3/TiO2
NO
*
,
10330

A.Yasadayan@gmail.com

:
(NO)
(Selective catalytic reduction ; SCR) V2O5-MoO3/TiO2
0.2 0.5 M
0.2 M CO2

: ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE13-O32


1 1,* 2
, .. , ..
1
,
140 10530
2

vissanu.meeyoo@gmail.com

1 2
Ni-P-B



hexamethyleneimine (HMI)

: , , -

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE14-O152


, , , ,
*
.
169 . . .
. 20131
soipatta@buu.ac.th


-
CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 CaO, ZrO2 ,
Zeolite type-A HZSM-5 2:1
250 C
(GC) (%CO2 conversion)
(%Selectivity)
CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 HZSM5
,
HZSM-5
C2 C3

: , / / ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-CRE17-O177

--/
1 2* 3*
, .. , ..
1

pinyapat_pengbubpha@hotmail.com
2

wipoo.sr@kmitl.ac.th
3

kkkunlan@kmitl.ac.th

-- ABS (TiO2)

JIS Z 2801 (2010) E.coli TiO2


ABS TiO2 0 0.5
(Internal mixture) 245 6
(Compression molding) 245
TiO2 0.5
(Tensile strength) 18 Mpa (Modulus)
679.39 Mpa 53 30

TiO2 0.5

: , ,
Environmental, Safety, Health &
Risk Management
(T-ESH)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH01-O15


*, , ,

anurak.p@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

50x50x50
100 15
800-1,200 3
Flat Disc-6- Blade Turbine, 45 Pitched-4- Blade Turbine 45 Flat Disc-
6- Blade Turbine 45Flat Disc-6-
Blade Turbine 800
(SAED) 1.334 kgO2/kWh

: , ,
(SAE), (KLa)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH02-O56


Fe/TiO2
, .. *

pornsawan.as@kmitl.ac.th

:

Fe/TiO2 Box-Behnken
Minitab 95
(X1)
Fe/ TiO2 (X2) (X3) (X4)

= 38.7 + 0.2666 X1 + 194.2X2 - 0.1120X3 + 1.313X4 - 0.000475X1X1 181.3
X2X2 200 X1 = 140 X2 = 0.53
X3 = 250 X4 = 1
5
99.6 (TOC)
62

: , , , Fe/TiO2
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH03-O73



, , .. *

pornsawan.as@kmitl.ac.th

H2O2
pH pH 5.7
H2O2
H2O2 100 mg/L 53%
10,000 mg/L 92.55%
10 mg/L 35% 1,000
mg/L 92% H2O2
10,000 mg/L 100 mg/L pH 5.7 92.55%

: , , Fe/NaA, H2O2
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH04-O102


*,

panuwat_tak@hotmail.com

:

Pilot Scale
2/3
1/3 (6 12 )
0.3-1.5 m3/h
1.59 m SAED
1.2 1.5 m3/h
95% ( = 0.05)

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH05-O105



*,

naphatcha.wg@gmail.com

0.55 0.5
0.25
70 90 ./
4.2 /
(G)
20%, 35%, 50% 65% (0.55
) 35% 390 -1
79.5% 50% (G=326 -1), 65%
(G=286 -1) 20% (G=516 -1) 78.6%,
76.9% 73.4%

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH06-O107



,

patcharin.w@eng.kmutnb.ac.th


NaY

300 C 5.5 wt.%Cu/Zeolite Y


67.06 1 wt.%Fe/ Zeolite Y 61.14
2 5.5wt%Cu-1wt%Fe/Zeolite Y
82.40
100 300 600 C 100 C

: NaY, , , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH07-O127


,

umpuch_ck@yahoo.com

:

(Polyethylene glycol, PEG) 20000 g/mol 2.5:2.5

SEM (BSA)


100% 0.5 13 10
psi

: , , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH09-0130

, *

supatpong.mj@gmail.com

:

(HL4040FN, GE water
and process technology) 0.01 0.005
10 7



: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH10-O132


, *

varong.p@chula.ac.th

:




30

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH11-O80


*, . .


w.tungthirawanich@gmail.com

:

2 (4 6 )
(Pilot Scale)
1.8-2.4 m3/h 0.4 m
6 SAED 4
1.8, 2.1 2.4 m3/h

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH12-O151



1,2, 2, 2, 2,*
1

2

lekw@eng.buu.ac.th

:

PHAST
Version 7.11

(1.5 )

30,000 ppm 15 (Short-
term Exposure Limit : STEL)
> 106.92 127.75

5,000 ppm 8 (Permissible exposure
limit : PEL)
> 189.75 237.06

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH13-P158

(II)
*,
12000
wanvimon@rsu.ac.th

:
(II)
600C 2 1 M NaCl 600 C 2

/
/
(Cu2+) 5-6
180

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH14-P159


*, ,

panida.s@rsu.ac.th

3 M 1:15 50oC 8
2.618
(XRD)
100 %
63.66

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-ESH15-P170



*, ,

sangnuan.s@eng.kmutnb.ac.th

:

(H2O2)

(COD)
Granular 1:9
2 1
40:30 mL 90 2
(COD) 100 mg/l, 24.5 S.U. 2
30:10 mL
60 8 COD 333.3 mg/l,
3.95 S.U.

: , , , Granular
Innovation in Chemical Engineering &
Applied Chemistry for Industrial Development
(T-IA)
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

T-IA01-O50

Why Do Innovations in Chemical Engineering Fail to Commercialize?


Wiroon Tanthapanichakoon*, Suchat Pongchaiphol, Rungroj Termsuk
Global R&D Co. Ltd.
wiroont.globalrd@gmail.com

Abstract:
The world is overwhelmed with the so-called innovations. The problem is that
most innovations end up as only patents or small-scale production because they fail
to be scaled up or commercialized on a large scale. Forbes reported that a staggering
95% of the active 2 million patents fail to be commercialized, and an incredible
amount of research money is being wasted down the drain around the world. This
paper analyzes why innovations in chemical engineering fail to be commercialized,
and suggests ways to increase the chance of successful scale-up and
commercialization. The approach includes the big picture of scale-up work flow and
also the detailed picture of equipment design and scale-up methodology. We also
provide examples of successful scale-up of innovations in chemical engineering, as
well as our findings and lessons-learned from the scale-up process. An approach to
scale up some common types of equipment or reactor are also discussed.

Keywords: innovations, chemical engineering, scale-up, commercialization, research


The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

T-IA02-O17


*, .

t_craziness@hotmail.com1

:




50 oC

16.7% w/v 0.1
3.25 20 53%

: , , ,
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

T-IA03-P98


, , *, .
. .
thirawat.m@en.rmutt.ac.th



3 0.5, 20, 70
35%
100 50 48
11.5
70 57

: , , ,
The 6th TIChE International Conference 2016
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
Bangkok, Thailand, October 26-28, 2016

T-IA04-O69



*,

fengsks@ku.ac.th

:
35 45
(CMC)
CMC
3
CMC
CMC 1.28 1.50
47.84 29.18 CMC
USP37

: ,
Polymers & Materials
(T-PM)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM01-P38

304

*
, , ,
, 123
40002
chaikr@kku.ac.th, c.kruehong@gmail.com

304 650
1:1:2
400 20
304
15
FE-
SEM TEM 3

: , , , 304
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM02-O60



*
, ,

surat.ar@kmitl.ac.th

:


0-80%

-
(Sintering)



: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM03-P61


-
*
,

joongjai.p@chula.ac.th

:
(Amberlyst 31)
-

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)
exchange capacity activity selectivity

: -, , , Amberlyst 31
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM04-O109

(-)
*
,

jintana09530055.por@gmail.com

:



(-)


:, , , (-)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM05-O124


1 1 2,* 2 3
, , , ,
1

2

3

sutasineene@kku.ac.th

:



(Scanning Electron Microscope; SEM)
0.8 A
(compact)
210 5

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM06-O146



1,* 1,2
,
1
()
2

(Design of Experiments; DOE)


Rt ( NCO
OH), (ZnO) (SiO2 )
(Ablation test)


TGA DSC

: , , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM07-O147



1,* 1,2 1
, ,
1
()
2

: , , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM08-O153


1,* 1 1 2
, , ,
1

2

tienchai.ton@mahidol.ac.th

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PM09-O161


1* 2
,
1,2

*kanokporn_anan@hotmail.com

:
(Polylactic Acid : PLA)
45 m 0
1 3 5 % wt. 20 rpm
190 C Compression molding 180 C 1 bar



PLA

PLA

: , , , ,

Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology
(T-PPT)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-PPT01-O96


1 1,* 2
, ,
1
10330
2
114 . .
. . 12120
*ppattara@chula.ac.th

:
(DBT) 4,6-
(4,6-DMDBT)
3


> >
Cu Ni
Cu-Y ~ Ni-Y > Ni/AC
~ Cu/AC

: , ,
Process Design, Simulation & Control
(T-PSC)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

PSC01-O90


*
,
.
sarawut_j@rmutt.ac.th




3 ,

3.65%


45.6%

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

PSC02-O93


90
*
, ,
10520
cfdgroup_santi@hotmail.com

90
1.5
FLUENT

90
Renormalization group k-epsilon

: , 90 ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

PSC03-O101

90

*
, ,
10520
cfdgroup_santi@hotmail.com

90



4 3
(17.05, 34.1, 51.15 /), (90, 180, 270 ),
(1D, 1.5D, 2D) D , (,
, ) (Orthogonal
Array)

: , , 90 ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

PSC04-O155



*
, , ,
30000
atichat@sut.ac.th

:
(CO2)
(Monte Carlo)
10 60 283 K 4500 kPa


(SiO4)


CO2

: , , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

PSC05-O156



*
, , ,
30000
atichat_w@hotmail.com

:
(Selectivity)

(Grand Canonical Monte Carlo, GCMC)
293.15K 318.15K

: , , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

PSC06-O157


(Gas Turbine)

, .. *

18 99 . . . 12120
cattalee@engr.tu.ac.th

:
(Gas Turbine)
292 MW (Compressor)
Aspen Hysys version 8.6
34 ,
49% Base case 3
1. (Base case) 2. (Fogging Spray
Cooling) 3. (Electrical Chiller) Fogging Spray
Electrical Chiller 6.85 12.73

: (Gas Turbine), (Fogging Spray


system), (Electric Chiller system),
(The Ideal Brayton cycle)
Sustainable Energy Technology
(T-SET)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET01-O16

Saccharomyces cerevisiae
SG
*
. , , ,
, , ,

pongsri.s@en.rmutt.ac.th

:
Saccharomyces cerevisiae SG

24 20 40
31C 40C
40 2,000 mL 5% v/v
15 % w/v
40 pH 5 72
31C

: , , , Saccharomyces cerevisiae SG,



26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET02-O22


*
. , ,
93210
ruamporn6798@gmail.com

:


pH 3 5
56.9 38.1

5 15
120 70

BOD5 COD
95 pH pH

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET03-O62



1 1 1 1,2,* 1,2
, , , , ,
1

1

2

sutasineene@kku.ac.th

:


250 350C

99

15%Cr/DM 91.7
12

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET04-O64



* *
, ,
Global R&D Co. Ltd.
rungrote.globalrd@gmail.com

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET05-O75

RT-P3
SG
*
. , . , . , , ,
, ,

pongsri.s@en.rmutt.ac.th

:
RT-P3
5 (LM) (OR:RB)
7.2x107
cell/mL, 150 g 5, 25, 45 g 5
400, 450, 550 mL 242C 7
9.10 g/L OR:RB:LM 150:25:450 6

: , , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET06-P77


*
, .
10330
nuttapol.p@chula.ac.th

:

Ni0.85Se
Poly(Ethylene oxide), 5% acetamide NaI/I2


4.0 %

DSSC 30 x 30

: Dye-sensitized solar cell, Gel Polymer Electrolyte, Platinum-free counter


electrode
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET08-P88

Ni-Mo
Co-Mo
1 1,* 2
, ,
1
10330
2
114 . .
. . 12120
*ppattara@chula.ac.th

:
Ni-Mo
Co-Mo Ni-
Mo Co-Mo
C14, C15 C16



- 0.2 320 70
60

: , , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET10-O120



*
, .
10330
*
nuttapol.p@chula.ac.th


(dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC)


(photoconversion efficiency; PCE)

(short circuit current density; Jsc) 1 :


500 3 PCE
4.3 % 58.9 % DSSC

: , , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET11-P135

- Core-shell:

1, 2 1, 2 1, 2,*
, ,
1
- 10900
2

10900
fengmtc@ku.ac.th

:

- Core-shell

27.7 mT
(N-S) 20.2%
240C 1.7

: CO2 hydrogenation; Core-shell; Silica-aluminosilicate; Green catalyst


26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET12-P136

MCM-41
1, 2 1, 2 1, 2, *
, ,
1
- 10900
2

10900
fengmtc@ku.ac.th

:
Fe-
Cu/MCM-41



15.69

: , , , ,

26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET13-O145


* 1,*
, ,
12000
sirikul@rsu.ac.th

:
2
0.2 m3 15 55

(mixed solar dryer) (flat plate
collector) 80x120 cm2 8 cm
0.3 cm 15
(natural convection or
passive system) 2,000 g 73.66

5 29-30 2559 09.0017.00 .
58.06C 39.73C
552.32 g 569.74 g
72.38 71.51
1.28 2.15
3.07x10-5 s-
1

61

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET14-O148




12000
wannee.e@rsu.ac.th

:

0.565 m2 2 45o
0.011m2
.06 m2

30
%

: ,,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET15-O166



. - . 12110
yanyong_s@en.rmutt.ac.th

:


( Tube
Furnace) 10 C/min
100 cm/ 3min



350 C
500 m 4 g 1.30
5.76%
28.82 48.25

: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SET16-O175



1,* 2
.. ,
2
serij@mitrphol.com

:

(Zero Breakdown Technique)
(Root Cause Failure Analysis : RCFA)
(Fish bone
diagram) 98.43 2.65
28,371,420.00

: , ,
Separation & Purification Technology
(T-SPT)
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SPT01-P78


Ocimum citriodourum Vis.

1,*, 2, 1
1 10330

2 10330

somkiat.n@chula.ac.th

:
( )
(SCCO2)
GC-MS
4.04 SCCO2 (350
70 ) 1.50 0.29


: , ,
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SPT02-O99


, *
10330
khantong.S@chula.ac.th

:




Over flow


1 0.04650.0003 0.05790.0009
/ 40 o
1 0.04020.0007 /


22-23% 14-15% 2
1000 /

:
26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SPT03-O169


Box-Behnken Design (BBD)
1,2, 1,2 1,*
1 40002

40002
kumsaen@gmail.com


(Mn2+)
(MnO2)
(0.05 )
(5 10 15 ) pH (3 4
5) (5 10 15 )
Box-Behnken Design (BBD)


2.194 100% 15
pH 4 20

: ;;; Box-Behnken Design (BBD)


26
Innovative Technology toward Sustainable Development
26-28 2559

T-SPT06-P77


, . *
10330
nuttapol.p@chula.ac.th

:

Ni0.85Se
Poly(Ethylene oxide), 5% acetamide NaI/I2


4.0 %

30 x 30

: , ,