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Devrani Narine-Gadar 04740401

Unit & Lesson Planning Skills

Lesson Plan 2

Strategy: Inductive Reasoning & Direct Instruction Model

Level: Form 4

This particular strategy was selected to create a more student-centered learning

environment. The use of Inductive Reasoning allowed students to utilize props, models,

visual aids, etc., in addition to appropriate scaffolding by the teacher, to process scenarios

presented to them and come to meaningful conclusions. Direct instruction was used to

further explain concepts to students to ensure the information they internalized from their

own experiences were in fact correct. This strategy was successful in engaging students

and maximizing student participation in classroom activities and discussion. It also

served to stimulate students thinking and questioning skills, as a greater than usual

number of students were asking questions relating to the lesson, as well as questions

beyond what was expected to be gained from the lesson.

This strategy is definitely one that I would continue to use in the classroom. It

serves to ensure that learning outcomes are met; it facilitates participation by all students;

and it creates a comfortable and fun learning environment for the students.
SCIENCE LESSON PLAN

TEACHER: Devrani Narine-Gadar

DATE: 13th March 2017

CLASS: Form 4

TIME: 9:00am

PERIODS: 2 (1 hour 20 minutes)

UNIT: Transport System in Animals The Circulatory System

TOPIC: Blood Vessels

REFERENCES (exclude class text, include page numbers).

CXC Biology. Pages 128 - 133.

PRE-REQUISITES

Knowledge:- students should know that:


The circulatory system in humans consists of the heart, blood vessels, and blood.
The heart acts as a pump.
Blood contains oxygen and nutrients to be transported to cells and tissues.

Skill:- students should know how to:


Identify the major vessels associated with the heart.
State the function of the vessels associated with the heart.
Work in groups.
MATERIALS & RESOURCES

For Teacher For each group / student


Whiteboard and markers Power point presentation
Multimedia projector Balloon
Laptop Tape
Sections of power-washer hose and normal
garden hose
Teabag
Cup of water
Evaluation sheet
Handout

CONCEPT OR PRINCIPLE

Blood vessels are an essential component of the circulatory system in animals, as they provide a
passageway for the flow of blood. The various blood vessels are adapted structurally for their unique
function. Without these specific adaptations, oxygenated blood will be unable to be transported from the
heart, deoxygenated blood will be unable to flow to the heart, and useful and harmful substances will be
unable to diffuse to and from cells and tissues.

MISCONCEPTIONS ALTERNATIVE IDEAS

Arteries and veins are the same size. Veins can also be found on the left side of
the body and arteries can also be found on
the right side of the body.
SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, students should be able to: Classification Learning Type

Discuss the function of arteries, veins and capillaries. Comprehension Cognitive

Discuss how the structure of arteries, veins, and Analysis Cognitive


capillaries relate to their function.

PROCESS SKILLS

During this lesson, students will be engaged in:

Identifying / formulating a problem X


Designing and Planning an experimental procedure
Setting-up and executing experimental work
Observing and measuring X
Recording of data and observations X
Interpreting and evaluating data and observations X
Communicating scientific ideas, observations and arguments X
Applying scientific ideas and methods to solve qualitative and quantitative problems X
Decision-making based on examination of evidence and arguments X
Extracting from available information data relevant to a particular situation X
ACTIVITIES

Model: Inductive Reasoning & Direct Instruction Model

Introduction:
The teacher will begin the lesson by showing the following diagram:

Water treatment plant

Pipelines pipelines

Reservoir

(dirty water / clean water)

Waterways/rainfall pipelines

Society (homes & buildings)

Students will be asked to suggest whether or not the diagram is similar to any system within the
human body.
Once they have identified it is similar to the circulatory system, students will be asked to state
what each component is similar to: reservoir heart, water treatment plant lungs, pipelines
blood vessels, water blood.
The teacher will inform students that for the class session we will be focusing on Blood
Vessels.

Development:
Students will be asked to suggest the specific vessels the pipelines on each side of the diagram
represent.
The teacher will inform students that they will be examining various factors associated with
blood vessels.
Blood Pressure
The teacher will ask students to consider what they believe the pressure of the water leaving the
reservoir to our homes may be like; taking into consideration the reservoir represents the heart.
Once students suggest the pressure will be high, students will be asked to suggest why with
respect to arteries.
Students will then be asked to suggest what they believe the pressure in the rivers /streams going
towards the reservoirs will be like; taking into consideration that rivers flow naturally without a
pump.
Once students suggest the pressure will be low, students will be asked to suggest why with
respect to veins.

Structure of Vessels
Arteries:
Students will be placed into groups. Each group will be given a balloon and tape; and will be
asked to keep blowing into the balloon. The teacher will explain that the balloon represents an
artery, and blowing air into it represents blood flowing through under pressure.
The teacher will listen carefully for students concerns as to whether it may burst.
Students will be asked to identify how the balloon is capable of accommodating the increased
pressure. Once they have identified that the balloon can expand, the teacher will inform students
that arteries are capable of doing the same due to the presence of elastic fibres.
Students will be asked to suggest what can be done to prevent the balloon from bursting; making
use of any extra material provided. Once students have identified that tape can be placed around
the balloon to prevent it from bursting, the teacher will inform student that arteries also contain
connective tissue which maintains the shape of the vessel as well as prevent it from bursting.
The teacher will show a diagram of an artery so students can identify the various layers that
make it up.

Veins:
Students will be asked to state if they believe veins will have the same thick layers of elastic
fibres and connective tissue even though blood flows under low pressure. Students will be
required to explain their responses.
The teacher will show a diagram of a vein so students can identify the various layers and their
relative thickness.
Students will be asked to consider blood flowing to the heart from the lower body in veins; and a
possible consequence of blood flowing upward under low pressure against gravity. Students will
be asked to suggest a possible adaptation to combat the problem.

Students will be asked to compare the diagrams of the artery and vein, and to identify any other
difference between the two.
Once students have identified the lumen are of different sizes, students will be asked to suggest a
reason for this.
To assist with their explanation, students will be provided with a section of a power-washer hose
and a section of a normal garden hose. Students will be asked to suggest how the different sizes
of the passageway for water enables each hose to carry out its specific function. Students will be
required to relate this to lumen size in arteries and veins.

Capillaries:
The teacher will ask students to consider the size of the pipelines that come directly from the
reservoir in relation to the pipelines leading directly to our homes. Students will be asked to
suggest why the reduction in the size of the pipeline is necessary.
Once students have suggested that it allows a decrease in pressure, the teacher will explain that
arteries are reduced to arterioles; and veins are reduced to venules. Further, capillaries are
smaller structures that link arterioles and venules:
Arteries arterioles capillaries venules veins
The teacher will explain that capillaries are one-cell thick.
In their groups students will be provided with a teabag and a cup of water. The teacher will
explain that the teabag represents the capillary walls, and the tea leaves within it represent blood
vessels.
Students will be required to place their teabags in the water and observe what happens. They will
be required to relate their observations in terms of what is allowed to leave/enter capillaries; and
what is not allowed to leave.
Evaluation / Assessment:
Students will be provided with an evaluation sheet containing a table. Students will be required
to complete the table taking into consideration the information presented and the class
discussions.

Consolidation:
Students will be chosen at random to provide answers for sections of the table presented on the
evaluation sheet.
Students will be asked if they have any questions based on discussions within the class session;
and other students will be required to address those questions.
All students will be provided with a handout containing material covered in the class session.

Assignment:
Students will be provided with a diagram showing the main arteries and veins leading to and
from major organs within the body. Students will be required to research the names for each of
the specific arteries and veins.

This was an engaging lesson that allowed students many interactive


opportunities to understand and apply the concept.