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A s with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them
A s with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them
A s with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them
A s with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them
A s with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them
A s with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them
A s with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them

As with Windows ’95 and other operating systems, if you want to use them you must be able to navigate the file system. The best and fastest way to do this in Linux is through the use of commands.

I have decided that I won’t get into a detailed discussion of the various major directories and subdirectories that comprise the Linux filesystem because:

1. I can’t be bothered and I have better things to do.

2. By typing the command "xfm &" in an xterm window, one can view, conceptualise and navigate a graphical representation of the Linux filesystem. Note: You can also type the command "git" in an xterm for a non-graphical view.

It is important for fellow Newbies to note that the top of your filesystem or "root" is characterised by a "backslash" ’/’. All other directories branch off the root directory. Therefore what you do in root is very important to the welfare of your system and your nerves - especially when recursively deleting files and directories.

especially when recursively deleting files and directories. F inally, The Commands Note: For more Information see

Finally, The Commands

Note: For more Information see the manual pages on local system (man), the Linux How-To’s or Try here. Also note: Linux commands are case sensitive

Basic File Manipulation Command Function cd [/usr] Change to ’/usr’ directory ls [allansthings]
Basic File Manipulation Command Function cd [/usr] Change to ’/usr’ directory ls [allansthings]

Basic File Manipulation

Command

Function

cd

[/usr]

Change to ’/usr’ directory

ls [allansthings]

List contents of directory ’allansthings’

ls -l

List contents of current directory in vertical format

ls -la

List contents of current directory in detailed format ie. every file,

ls -S

permissions etc. Lists files based on their size

ls -R

Lists all directories and their contents below that where the

cp [bad /root/good] cp bad/* good

command was effected copy ’bad’ to ’good’ directory Copy entire contents of ’bad’ directory to ’good’.

cp *

/

root

rm

[bad]

rm

*

rm

-r

rm

-r *

rm -rf [neurosis] rmdir [bad] mkdir [good]

mv

[bad] [good]

mv

[terrible] [great]

usermount

(un)mount mount -t iso9660 /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom

mount -t vfat /dev/hda1

/mnt/cdrive

Copy all files in current directory to parent directory delete file ’bad’ Removes all files in current directory Remove files in all subdirectories where command was issued Remove files and directories To force delete. BEWARE when using on ’root’ (/) directory. Remove directory ’bad’ (must be empty) Make directory named ’good’ Rename file or directory ’bad’ to ’good’ Move file or directory ’terrible’ to file or directory ’great’ (Rename & Move same under Linux) Loads the usermount tool, a program used to mount / unmount devices. mounts / unmounts a device eg. "mount floppy" Command used to mount CD-ROM; alternatively use the usermount tool. Command used to mount a Windows partition (assuming it is the

first or only partition on C Drive - which is hda1) . Alternatively,

head [inflow] tail [outflow] cat [mouse] cat [f4 f8] > [f9] less [money]

use the usermount tool but you will probably have to add the windows partition to it via the Linux-configuration tool (linuxconf). Output beginning of file named ’inflow’ Output end of file named ’outflow’ View the contents of file named ’mouse’ Concatenates file 4 and file 8 into file 9 Lists contents of file named ’money’ a screen of data at a time

more [money]

(similar to ’more’ command above) Lists contents of file named ’money’ by screen

emacs [money]

Loads contents of file ’money’ in Emacs editor

vi [money]

loads contents of file ’money’ in Vi editor

[money] loads contents of file ’money’ in Vi editor Basic System Commands Command Function startx
[money] loads contents of file ’money’ in Vi editor Basic System Commands Command Function startx
[money] loads contents of file ’money’ in Vi editor Basic System Commands Command Function startx

Basic System Commands

Command

Function

startx shutdown -h now shutdown -r now exit man

Loads X Window GUI Shutsdown and halts the system Shutsdown and reboots the system exits from xterm Linux manual eg. ’man ls’ will outline options related to ’ls’

linuxconf

command Loads the Linux-configuration tool, from where one can

netconf

configure many aspects of the system. Loads the Network Configurator which enables one to configure

netcfg &

Network Connectivity eg. PPP / Internet Use this tool to dial your ISP (select ’interface’ tab and ’activate’

adduser

button. Can also be used to configure an internet connection) Add a new user to the system eg. adduser allan

passwd

Set password eg. passwd allan

df control-panel & xfm & Ctrl z Ctrl s Ctrl q find locate whereis glint

Lists amount of free space in each partition Loads the Control Panel tool Loads graphical file management tool Suspend current process Stop screen scrolling Resume screen scrolling Search for file eg. find / -name lilo.conf Search (see ’man locate’) Search eg. ’whereis .netscape’ Loads graphical program indicating installed ’rpm’ applications

rpm -i [filename] rpm -e [filename] rpm -q [filename] tar -zxvf [filename] printtool cat [filename] > /dev/lp

and their details. Also useful for installing ’rpm’ applications. Install rpm applications (see man rpm) Uninstall rpm package (see man rpm) Query whether package is installed on system Unzips and extracts program in .tar.gz format loads "Red Hat’s" printer configuration program. Send a file to be printed directly to the printer (root user / group

lpr [filename]

only). Prints a file.

lpq

View contents of a print queue.

lprm -

Cancel all print jobs (’lprm 15’ will cancel print job 15)

git

file system viewer

will cancel print job 15) git file system viewer The Linux Webring: [ Previous | Next
will cancel print job 15) git file system viewer The Linux Webring: [ Previous | Next

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