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O FFICE OF THE C HIEF OF P ROTOCOL U NITED S TATES OF A

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF PROTOCOL UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SUMMARY GUIDE TO WORKING WITH FOREIGN DIGNITARIES

2007

Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 TABLE

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Introduction

II. The Office of the Chief of Protocol

III. Hosting Foreign Dignitaries – What You Need to Know

A. Reaching out to the Visitor

Port Courtesies

Security

Motorcade and Vehicles for the Dignitary and Delegation

Schedules

Greeters

Hotel Accommodations

B. Essential Information Regarding Delegation

Forms of Address and Introduction

Dietary Restrictions

Delegation Information

Interpretation/English Language Capability

Press

Gifts

Spouse Program

Local Attractions

Thank You Letters

C. Ceremonials/Receptions

United States Precedence List

Flag Display

Sample Invitation and Sample Menu

Suggested Fonts for Invitations, Menus, and Place Cards

Seating and Table Diagrams

Receiving Lines

Event Planning

D. Useful Protocol Information

Leading Official Delegations Overseas

IV. Contact Info

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 THE

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF PROTOCOL

Foreign Officials 2007 THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF PROTOCOL T he Office of the Chief

The Office of the Chief of Protocol recognizes the work you do with foreign governments and dignitaries visiting the United States and the efforts you put forth to foster and further diplomatic relations. In accordance with our desire to provide consistent levels of professionalism and openness to all foreign visitors, we thought it would be beneficial to share some operations and ideas we have implemented to sustain such goals. We are aware you may already know and follow many of these suggestions, but we hope this pamphlet will serve as a guide and answer some questions you may have to benefit you and the visits of foreign government leaders.

Under the direction of the Chief of Protocol, the office is responsible for activities including the planning, hosting, and officiating of ceremonial events for visiting heads of state, as well as coordinating logistics for the visits; managing Blair House, the President's guesthouse; and overseeing all protocol matters for Presidential and Vice Presidential travel abroad.

There are 5 sections in the Office of the Chief of Protocol: Visits, Ceremonials, Blair House, Diplomatic Affairs and Management.

VISITS

Plan and execute detailed programs for Chiefs of State and Heads of Government meeting with the President, Vice President or Secretary of State

Coordinate foreign media

Arrange arrivals of visiting dignitaries to the United States

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 •

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Accompany the President on official visits abroad

Propose and purchase gifts to give foreign leaders and receive reciprocal gifts on behalf of the President, First Lady, Vice President and Secretary of State

Plan and execute Presidential Delegations abroad

CEREMONIALS

Arrange official entertainment by the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of State in the Diplomatic Reception Rooms

Organize participation of the Diplomatic Corps in special events, Joint Sessions of Congress, inaugurations, funerals and other ceremonies

Maintain the Order of Precedence of the United States

BLAIR HOUSE

The President’s official guest house for monarchs, presidents and prime ministers while in Washington

Four interconnected townhouses; 110 rooms totaling 70,000 square feet; across the street from White House

Built in 1824; owned by the Francis Preston Blair family from 1835 to 1943

Purchased by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1943 as the President’s Guest House

DIPLOMATIC AFFAIRS

Oversee the accreditation of foreign Ambassadors and organize the presentation of their credentials to the President and Secretary of State

Act as the President’s personal representative and liaison to foreign Ambassadors in Washington

Determine the acceptability of foreign government personnel accredited to the United States

Resolve Diplomatic Immunity cases

Publish and maintain the Diplomatic List and the list of Foreign Consular Offices in the United States

MANAGEMENT

Administer the human resources, financial and information management systems, security and general services of the Office of the Chief of Protocol

Provide guidance and support to all divisions of the office

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 REACHING

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

REACHING OUT TO THE VISITOR

Port Courtesies

The term “Port Courtesies” is better termed as “Expedited Port Clearances.”

The term "expedited port clearance" refers to the procedure by which certain designated persons and their personal effects may enter the United States duty-free and be entitled to expedited inspection procedures at the first port of entry. The Office of the Chief of Protocol arranges for "expedited port clearance" with the United States Customs Border Protection (CBP).

Persons who are eligible for "expedited port clearance" through federal inspection areas are those persons designated as high ranking officials or distinguished foreign visitors. High ranking officials include chiefs of state, heads of government, cabinet members, and other senior government personnel. Distinguished foreign visitors include the immediate family members of Chiefs of State and Heads of Government, members of royal families, and other distinguished foreign visitors as designated by the Department.

If you have any questions about port courtesies, please call the Office of the Chief of Protocol port courtesies number at (202) 647-4074.

Security

Working with United States Secret Service and the United States Department of State Dignitary Protection Division

The men and women of the United States Secret Service (USSS) and Diplomatic Security (DS) are some of the most able minded and professional individuals you will have the pleasure to work with. They ensure the security of the foreign leader and the venues in which they visit and maintain a level of vigilance that is respected around the world.

If you are in the position to work with the USSS and DS, make sure you afford them the courtesy of going through the schedule, venues and other event information in advance. More than likely, the USSS and DS will already have a working scenario of the event but your added input to the dignitary’s visit will add to the security, communication and success of an event.

The USSS and DS will go over many items with you and they will be reaching out to state, county and local law enforcement. It is at times best to let the law enforcement experts work these trips out with one another due to the nature of their profession and responsibilities.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 If

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

If you have any questions in regards to dealing with a foreign security team, please contact the Office of the Chief of Protocol at (202) 647-1277.

Motorcade and Vehicles for the Dignitary and Delegation

If the foreign delegation has protection provided by the United States Secret Service or United States Department of State Dignitary Protection Division, you will not need to worry about the foreign leader’s vehicle but the delegation members will need to have transportation available to them. If that is the case, you will need to work with or allow the foreign delegation to assemble its own vehicles.

If the foreign dignitary is not traveling with a U.S. security agency or a foreign security agency, please be sure you or the foreign delegation has the necessary contacts to arrange vehicles. Handicap requirements of the delegation. Will you need a van for wheelchair, etc.? Size and shape of vehicles. If you are going to be pulling into a parking garage, some vans do not meet the height restrictions. Determine number of vehicles and manifest. Who is going and in what car? Water in each of the vehicles. This is preferable but not necessary. If you hire drivers or have volunteers, make sure they are present before any departures take place. Have an emergency number for the rental company in case there is an issue with one of the vehicles. Identification for vehicles / access to event site. Do they have ALL ACCESS passes? Determine who will drive the vehicles, obtain a background check on drivers and verify that they have a cell phone with them at all times. Ensure that the drivers have directions to the event sites, know the routes and are familiar with the area. Ask if the drivers have done a dry run of the route; if not, ask that they do so.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Schedules

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Schedules

It is extremely important when you first meet or speak with your foreign guests that you determine the schedule for the foreign leader and discuss locations, times and possible venues of interest. If security is involved or should be involved, you may want to schedule a meeting during which time security representatives are present. Because of certain security issues, some items may need to be worked out off line and not in a public setting or in an open group. Please consult with your foreign guests or your security personnel prior to your meeting.

Once you are able to go over the schedule, you may want to walk through the venues.

Event Site

In working with your foreign delegation or advance party to plan bilateral meetings, private events, or media events, the event site or venue should be worked into the overall timeline of the schedule. Last minute changes, although common, need to be avoided as much as possible. A well thought through event site that encompasses the foreign leader’s requirements, the arrangement for the delegation, press and security needs to be worked on days, if not weeks in advance.

Establish a point of contact for the event site.

Plan a walk through of the event site with security, host, vendors and entertainment personnel. Make sure you have a timeline or schedule so that everyone is briefed and on the same page.

How does the motorcade arrive at the event site? Outside - inside?

Official Ceremony on arrival and departure? What is it?

Do you plan to use a red carpet on arrival? Will weather conditions allow you to use a carpet?

Check weather conditions before the event. Compose an alternative rain site plan. Anticipate delays with traffic and have umbrellas on site in case it rains.

If the event is outside, are you using or do you need to use a tent, do you need heat lamps, AC, bug spray?

Have a volunteer plan if volunteers are being used and make sure that each volunteer knows his/her role and is wearing credentials.

Timelines and programs need to be printed out and checked for spelling.

Do you need to hire security?

Security Sweeps should be factored into your program and if magnetometers are used, times, locations and personnel should be factored into their use.

Green room for entertainment. Include water, snacks and other items as necessary.

Handicap requirements i.e. seating, ramps, elevators and other.

Will valet parking be required?

Determine the amount of time needed to build your event site and strike it down. Consult with your host and or vendors on how long you have the space, what additional charges may be incurred, and determine the auxiliary rain site location (find out transportation notifications, amendments and drive times to the next location).

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 •

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Do you need to have a coat check on site?

Are there gifts presented on arrival and departure? What is it and who is presenting?

Have an advance staff person on site that knows the event and what is going on and who can lead the VIP and delegation to their seats, etc.

Confirm Greeters (for arrival and/or departure).

Confirm that a person will be on site to assist with delegation movements.

Have a copy of the program for the dignitary and her/his delegation.

Confirm VIPs and number of attendees. Do you need to consult with the dignitary on who is in the audience? You may need to have a check list of who is in the audience to account for the necessary acknowledgements.

Determine that the meeting participants are favorable to the purpose of the event.

Have a seating chart.

Determine length of program and when it will actually start.

Know the restroom locations.

Ensure that tent cards have correctly spelled names and phonetics.

Check the height and type of podium. Is it well lit? Consult with the dignitary if there are any special needs with the podium.

Consider a photographer for archival purposes.

Determine if there will be a receiving line (if so, confirm when, where, number of clicks, etc.)

You should provide background notes on the country, leader and the event so that your delegation can be properly prepared to meet their counterparts.

Make sure your caterer is on site to help service meeting rooms, hold rooms and green rooms.

Greeters

Greeting/Farewell Committees Be sure to consider who will greet the dignitary upon arrival and departure. This list should be in proper rank order and include honorific, full names and titles.

Hotel Accommodations

Hotels are inclusive and customer service oriented so most of your work is done for you. Many times, a foreign delegation will already have their hotel chosen but you should have a list of hotels you could suggest to a delegation. Here is a brief check list on what a foreign delegation would consider to support their leaders overnight:

Walk through of the hotel rooms. Check on the delegation about any smoking or non smoking requirements (allergic reactions or smoking needs).

Business Center (computers, Internet access, printers, copiers, etc.).

Monetary exchange.

Shuttle Service to and from airports.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 •

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Hours of Operation (i.e. when are the check-in/check-out times?).

Local attraction information.

Determine if the delegation needs a Control Room to work out of (if a Control Room is necessary, please be advised that equipment—computers, phones, etc.—may need to be ordered).

Key pick up on arrival to the hotel should be as smooth as possible. Work out the logistics and timing of the key pick up, i.e. credit card for incidentals, etc.

Information on luggage call (location), restaurant hours and location and room listing of the delegation may be posted in their rooms.

Do you need a filing area for the press or a room to host meals for the delegation?

Check the exercise room and make arrangements if the foreign leader has specific requests about exercise equipment.

Should prayer time and location be considered during the stay at the hotel? What arrangements need to be made?

Billing should be handled in advance of the delegation’s arrival.

Cultural sensitivities should be adhered to at all times. The honor bar or movies on demand may need to be removed or blocked.

Where is the motorcade parked at the hotel? Do you need to reserve parking spaces?

How are group meals being arranged and or paid for?

The Office of the Chief of Protocol does not engage with hotel arrangements with foreign delegations but if you are providing the arrangements, be sure to confirm when the rooms will be ready for check-in and do a walk-through of the hotel prior to the delegations arrival.

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION REGARDING DELEGATION

Forms of Address and Introduction

The proper title and spelling of a foreign leader and delegation is of paramount importance. Before you go to print on programs, schedule, engravings or media announcements, you MUST consult with the foreign delegation on the proper spelling, title, abbreviations and honorifics.

Dietary Restrictions

If there are any meals being served during a visit, it is essential that you determine what the food preferences and, if any, allergic reactions (flowers, smoking) are for the foreign dignitary and his/her delegation.

Make sure you work with your foreign counterparts on the preferred meal of the delegation whether it is breakfast, lunch or dinner. It may be necessary to have them provide you with a list of things not to serve or that they are allergic to. Religious customs must be followed so when scheduling an event, you may want to consult a religious calendar on holidays, etc. In addition to holidays, you may want to

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 inquire

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

inquire on any birthdays, celebrations or anniversaries in your planning. If you decide to have any surprises, please consult with the foreign delegation and or staff.

Delegation Information

When hosting a delegation, be sure to confirm that you have the correct information for all of the delegation members, meeting participants, and essential staff. You should ask for a list of all official and accompanying delegation members to include honorific, full names, titles and phonetics in rank order. Having such a list that is approved by your foreign guest will help you in determining meeting participants, seating charts, tent cards, gift cards, and identifying delegates in photo opportunities. The list should also include the photographer, interpreter, and security (if any).

Identification of delegation at event sites or in security sensitive areas

If there are certain areas that require identification or lanyards (credentials) please be sure to determine who and how many need them. If the credentials require names, please double check that the names are spelled correctly. Often times, the dignitary does not wear credentials because of their significance to the visit so check ahead of time on what is deemed appropriate. Each delegate has an official and access related credential. Is it ALL ACCESS? How do the delegates receive their credentials? Do these credentials require a photo? Press Credentials? If possible, please have additional credentials available if one is lost or a guest is added at the last minute.

Interpretation/ English Language Capability

This is a very important factor to the overall success of the trip. We always confirm the language capability of the entire delegation and whether or not they need additional interpretation or interpreters. The staging of the interpreters is one matter to discuss and the other is if simultaneous or consecutive interpretation will be necessary for the meetings, bi-lats, press conferences and press statements.

Prior to the arrival of the foreign leader and delegation, it is incumbent upon you to check with the foreign delegation and advance staff concerning the needs of all delegation members on their English speaking capabilities. There is a lot of planning, staff and cost involved with covering interpretation. Dependant upon the requirements for both the leader and the delegation and the type of coverage needed, you must consider the following:

Determine if interpretation is required for head delegate and/or the delegation.

Locate interpretation services in your area. Consider local universities as a possible resource.

Simultaneous Interpretation requires an interpreter (sets) for each language.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 •

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Simultaneous Interpretation requires an interpreters’ booth (area) and earpieces for members of

the delegation, essential staff and press.

through in addition to a sound system so that members of the delegation not requiring interpretation can hear what is being said.

Microphones will be required for the leaders to speak

Consider the needs of the press in terms of interpretation (i.e. will the press need headsets?)

Consecutive Interpretation requires that there are breaks within sentences—for this reason, Consecutive Interpretation takes twice as long as Simultaneous Interpretation. Therefore, you should prepared to double the amount of time for Consecutive Interpretation into your schedule.

For Simultaneous Interpretation, make sure you have additional ear pieces on site and that they have been tested and charged.

Determine whether the interpreter needs to be seated next to the delegate or delegation.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Press

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Press

In any event, considerations should be made for press at all times, whether it is an open or closed press event. Careful planning must be made with the visiting delegation concerning what events are open to the press, who handles press releases, press handouts, and how the press will be set up to cover an event (i.e. lighting, sound, mult box, chairs, staging, backdrop, etc.).

Determining the location of an event has implications. If you are outside, weather can become an issue, so a rain site should be considered. If you are inside, consider when the space is available, overtime charges, user fees, etc.

The size of the venue determines both how much audio is necessary and the necessary proximity of the press to capture the event. (NOTE: a camera throw shouldn’t be more than 75 feet)

Determine whether guests will be seated or standing and whether there is a section for disabled guests. You should also consider the length of the program and how long individuals would be standing for.

Work with security in matters involving the delegation, attendees and press.

Consider what the back drop will be and whether or not you need a stage. If you do have a stage, the stage should be in compliance with in-house or local regulations on height, railings and accessibility. FYI – the stage should be the same height as the press platform so that the camera is on equal height to the guest. Avoid white or light backdrops.

If the event is open to the press, consider a press area with phone lines, a mult box, power source, chairs, etc. You may want to do a walk through with an audio-visual vendor.

Determine if a podium or podiums are needed for joint remarks, press conferences, etc. Podiums should be of the same make and when dealing with height issues, make sure you can adjust the height of the podium or speaker if necessary (speaker box). Check to make sure there is enough light on the podium so remarks can be read and have water close by.

If flags are being used for the event, ensure that proper flag protocol is followed.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Gifts

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Gifts

Please confirm if the foreign dignitary and or his/her delegation plan on giving any gifts. It is important that gifts be discussed in advance so that both parties can have a detailed timeline of when and how gifts are to be handled. This will avoid any surprises but assure that presentations, whether they are protocol to protocol or leader to leader, are done correctly.

Gifts are typically presented in a protocol to protocol exchange; meaning gifts are handled between staff members assigned to handle the gifts of two or more leaders. At times, the foreign leader and his/her U.S. counterpart may decide to do a leader to leader gift exchange. Please be sure to negotiate prior to the gift exchange so the appropriate measures are taken to ensure a smooth gift presentation.

It should also be recommended that both parties speak of what the gifts will be so that surprises or the appearance of a surprise be avoided. Ex: If you know the foreign leader enjoys reading, perhaps consider a series of books to his/her taste. If you know the foreign leader enjoys working out, consider running shoes, jogging suit or a work out bag. It is appropriate to have a state seal and or name of the leader on such items as long the name and title are approved by the foreign delegation.

Gifts for a delegation member can also be given but need to be thought through on whom of the delegation should get a gift. At times, gifts are given only to individuals involved in the events or meetings.

Spouse Program

Be sure to ask whether there will be a separate spouse program for the dignitary’s spouse. We typically assign a Protocol Officer to support the spouse program as many of the same issues are involved. Be prepared to recommend activities that may be of interest such as visiting businesses, visiting schools and other suggestions that may be of interest to him or her personally.

Local Attractions

Have a suggested list of local attractions, places to eat, etc. for the dignitary and delegation. There may be some specific things they would like to see or do so have packets of information available to them.

Thank You Letters

Thank you letters on behalf of the lead government official to the foreign leader and his/her delegation is extremely important to the diplomatic process. More often than not, you could be either visiting the leader’s country or receiving future guests with whom you have established relations in the past.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 CEREMONIALS/RECEPTIONS

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

CEREMONIALS/RECEPTIONS

United States Precedence List

American guests are placed according to the United States Order of Precedence. The observance of the Order of Precedence is one of the cardinal rules of protocol.

Members of Congress rank according to length of continuous service. When two or more representatives are attending the same dinner, the highest rank is given to those who have served the greatest number of consecutive years. However, leadership ranks higher, i.e. Speaker of the House ranks just below the Vice President (refer to Precedence List).

The Cabinet (other than the Secretary of State who ranks higher), is ranked according to the date of establishment of the department. The Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of Defense rank the highest after the Secretary of State.

Protocol of foreign guests is determined from the foreign government (although there is typically set precedence for chiefs of state, heads of government, foreign ministers, Chiefs of Mission etc.)

Flag Display

Whether it is the United States flag, country flag, state flag or city flag, there is a protocol mechanism in place that addresses the proper set up of flags when more than one person or country is present on stage. Regardless of the country or state, flags should be flown on separate staff of equal height and the flag(s) should be of equal size. This is particularly important when you have foreign flags on stage along with the United States flag. The U.S. flag and foreign flag should be of equal staff height and size.

The order of precedence for flags generally is National flags (US first, then others in alphabetical order in English), State (host state first, then others in the order of admission) and territories (Guam, Puerto Rico, etc.), Military (in order of establishment: Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard), then other.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Sample

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Sample Invitation

Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Sample Invitation

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Sample

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Sample Menu

Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Sample Menu

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Suggested

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Suggested Fonts for Invitations, Menus, and Place Cards

Our basic fonts include “Edwardian Script ITC” (XwãtÜw|tÇ fvÜ|Ñà \gV< and

“Monotype Corsiva” (Monotype Corsiva), both of which are best used in medium or large sizes.

Seating and Table Diagrams

Our basic seating template for a working event of 20 or fewer is to place the guest of honor across from the host/hostess. Typically, spouses are not included in working lunches and dinners.

Secretary Rice Hosting Working Lunch

Typicall y, spouses are not included in working lunches and dinners. Secretary Rice Hosting Working Lunch

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Round

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Round Table Seating

For other seatings, such as at a round table, the place of honor is to the right of the

host

as the co-host. If the guest of honor is married, their spouse has equal rank and could be seated either next to the host or next to the host’s spouse, depending on which the host

would like to do. Many times men and women ar e alternated. The next highest ranking person would be to the left of the host.

. If the host is married, the spouse would sit directly across from

him or her to serve

\
\

Sample Seating Card

host. . If the host is married, the spouse would s it directly across from him
host. . If the host is married, the spouse would s it directly across from him

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Table

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Table Diagrams

Formal place setting

Foreign Officials 2007 Table Diagrams Formal place setting Working Lunch – inclu des a seating chart

Working Lunch – inclu des a seating chart and pen and note card.

Officials 2007 Table Diagrams Formal place setting Working Lunch – inclu des a seating chart and

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Receiving

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Receiving Lines

Is it appropriate to always have a receiving line?

The main purpose of a receiving line is to allow the guests to meet the host and guest of honor.

If properly executed, a receiving line is the most efficient and effective way for everyone to have an opportunity to interact with the host.

Times when a receiving line might not be appropriate would be, for example, if the guests had been in a conference all day and had already met the host or hostess. There are events where the nature of the event dictates whether a receiving line would be appropriate.

Time Factor: At many large receptions, the decision is made to not have a receiving line because of the time allowed. Depending on the number of guests and the number of people in the receiving line, the time factor can dictate wheth er or not a receiving line can happen.

Photographs: If you are having photographs, you need to consider the time the photographs will take. For instance, are they posed photos or just candid? A posed photo can take up to 30 seconds and when you multiply that by 300 or 400 guests, the process could take at least a couple of hours.

Determine cultural and diplomatic sensitivities of your foreign leader, delegation and guests.

Who should be in the receiving line and what is the lineup?

The most traditional receiving line consists of the host, guest of honor, hostess and spouse of guest of honor

Order: A protocol officer typically facilitates the order and gives instructions to the guest, i.e., please give your name and your spouse’s name

The Chief of Protocol or someone else makes the introductions to the Host/Hostess (the Guest of Honor is introduced first and then their spouse)

The direction that you feed into the receiving line can vary

Facilitating the Receiv ing Line

Pushers and Pullers to make it easy for guests

- Peo ple are necessary for pulling guests off the receiving line and directing them where to go. This helps with the f low of the receiving line as guests are sometimes confused after going through the line and need guida nce as to what to do next.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 •

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Purse holder

Tw

Announce cards:

o p otographers

h

- Better than nametags

- A

- Help with photo identification after event

ssist host in identifying guests, even though it m

ay seem unnecessary

Sample An

no nce Card

u

Mr. Bryan J. Langley Assis tant Chief of Protocol for Visits and Mrs. Gwen Langley

Special Amenities to Consider with Receiving Lines

Waiter with tray

Hot towels

Hand sanitizer

to get drinks before going through the line

E vent Planning

When Hosting Events:

Place cards or toe cards are a nice touch and ar e encouraged

Giv

e a t least very clear direction on where to sit or stand

There i

s a reason why people are placed in precedence order – you know your counterpart, or at le

ast

know w

ho the highest ranking people in the room are based on their pro

ximity to the host or guest of

honor.

In business and social settings, it is the responsibility of the host to take the initiative to start the program, make op ening remarks, etc.

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Menu

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Menu Planning

Be sure food is appropriate for your guests, (i.e. serving kosher foods to adhere to dietary laws of Judaism)

Colors can also be very important in setting the tone for an event. For example, white flowers have the connotation of death in Asian countries, which would be an important thing to know when deciding on flowers for a luncheon or dinner. Colors can also be used to add a special

to uch. For example, for a State dinner last

menu ca

rds matched the table linens the visiting delegation.

ye r, the chocolate brown ink on the invitations and

a

. You can also try to somehow tie in the country colors of

USEFUL PROTOCOL INFORMATION

Leading Official Delegations Overseas

n traveling outside of the United States

in regards to passport and visa requirements. It is extremely important to research countries before traveling

to them

The

O fice of the Chief of Protocol can assist if you have a delegatio

f

. Refer to the Sta

te Department website for country updates and background notes.

CultureGrams.com is a website where you can learn the proper etiquette, dress, etc. for different countries.

T ry to learn the language (at least the basics – it will be appreciated).

Helpful Informa tion

Country Backgro und Notes

http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/

Protocol Frequently Asked Questions

http://w ww.state.gov/s/cpr/what/c18027.htm

World Factbook

https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index.html

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Office of the Chief of Protocol Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials 2007 Office

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Summary Guide to Working with Foreign Officials

2007

Office of the Chief of Protocol

Chief o

f Protocol of the Unite

d States

CONTACT INFO

202.647.2663

www.state.gov/s/cpr/

A mbassador Nancy G. Brinker

202.647.4543

D eputy Chief of Protocol of the United States Raymond P. Martinez

202.647.4121

Deputy Chief of Protocol of the United States Charity Wallace

202.647.4616

Assistant Chiefs of Protocol:

Visits – Bryan Langley

202.647.1277

C eremonials – Amy Little

202.647.1735

Diplomatic Affairs – G ladys Boluda

202.647.1985

M anagement (Acting) – Shirley Stewart-Coates

202.647.1700

Blair House Manager – Randall Bumgardner

202.566.8001

Public Affairs/Press Yale Scott

202.647.2299

Gifts

 

Tiffany

Divis

202.647.1161

Cu

sto

m

s

Jessie Johnson

202.647.4074

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