Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 80

CREDITS

Publisher
AK Interactive S.L.
Fernando Vallejo A passion by Mig Jimenez
Chief Editor
John Murphy

S
ince I began making scale models more than 25 years ago, my main interest has always
Original idea been the weathering and all that this word means in modeling. Maybe the fascination
Art director with the weathering is due to the difficulty in achieving these effects. The same is true of
Mig Jimnez a climber who doesnt feel attraction to a small hill, but desire for a tall and difficult mountain.
The modeler will never feel satisfied with a clean model without effects, without realism, and
Editorial definitively without magic. He will always look for the most difficult subjects, the unique and
management special projects, and for these he will use his products and appropriate techniques to meet the
Carlos Cuesta
challenge of his imagination.

Graphic and
Until the FAQ2 was published, a publication had never been 100% focused on the painting
3D design
Enrique Royo techniques. Although in the last few years, most of modelers have shown special interest
in all that is related to the painting. All they are aware of is that what makes the difference
Layout between a boring model and an exceptional one is in fact the painting & weathering. This
PER is not an option, since all scale models need to be painted. But in spite of everything, the
existing publications focused in the painting are not abundant.
Article assistant
Iain Hamilton This publication begins in an important moment of the history of modeling, a time when all
over the entire world, painting & weathering has occupied the place that it deserves in this
Illustrations hobby. We will discover throughout these pages and successive issues, all aspects of the
Claudio Fernndez weathering. From the most classic techniques through to the most complex and difficult
techniques, we will show different perspectives from the best modellers explaining how
Editorial Assistant
to make weathering with different techniques. It will be The Weathering Magazine and
Chema Pellejero
here, you will find all that you need to know to bring realism to your projects. Although
Sales manager this first edition has more pages to celebrate the inauguration, each new issue will have
Jalal Benali 64 pages filled with articles related to each theme, for this inaugural issue we will explore
rust in many forms. Here you will see techniques not only applied to AFVs, but also to
Akatsiya ships, robots, trains and also in the future you will find airplanes, figures, and many other
Photographer subjects. All areas of modeling will take a place in this space, because each subject can be
Jos Irn useful to learning and also to be used for a possible diorama. Also, you will find numerous
real photo references, vehicle color profiles, and much more information that you can use
Akatsiya as inspiration and as a guide for your projects.
Leticia Crespo
Of course in any important project, it is necessary for a captain to make it reality and
Collaborators
in this case, John Murphy has been directing this exciting work. Besides being a great
Marc Reusser
modeler and having knowledge of many things, I admire him
Martin Kovc
David Mart for his professional trajectory and his pleasant personality.
Mr. Scratchmod And lastly, you will notice as soon as you pass
ass this page,
pa
Fran Romero a new character in the magazine that will accompany
accompany
Chris Jerrett us in an amusing and different way in each issue. It
is our pleasure to introduce Akatsiya. We have
June 2012 captured this dream for you, so thinking about
Depsito legal: modeling will be something more human a and
nd
LR 203 2012
LR-203-2012 more touching. Well, in fact the truth is that the
production team has only two options, Jo John
ohn
with underwear or Akatsiya, and I believe thatthat
we have chosen well, right?

www.theweatheringmagazine.com
info@theweatheringmagazine.com

suscriptions@theweatheringmagazine.com

Quarterly magazine
4 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
INDEX
RUSTING A PAPER PANZER
Mig Jimenez explains us how to paint a
very rusty what if tank. pag. 7

RAW STEEL PLATE


Bare steel plates have become very
popular, Mr. Scratchmod shows us the
way. pag. 16

BARE METAL ARMOUR


One of the most realistic modellers,
Martin Kovc, teaches us some rust
tips. pag. 20

SHIP RUSTING
Ships are a natural place for rust & co-
rrosion, dont miss this exciting look
with Fran Romero. pag. 30

SAND BLOWN OLD RUSTY


STEEL
Marc Reusser shows us how to treat an
abandoned 1/20 th scale Ma.K. pag. 50

RUSTY BEETLE
Our debut artist David Mart will sur-
prise you with an amazing corroded
Beetle. pag. 60

CHOOSE THE RIGHT


PRODUCTS
Our sensual muse Akatsiya, will help us
to know each rust product in the mar-
ket. pag. 68

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 5


Model and Photos Mig Jimenez
Text John Murphy

6 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


lets
recycle
this
scrap!!

I
n our first article we want to show
how to create a number of rust
effects that would not only be
seen on a tank or armoured vehi-
cle, but would also be seen on huge
variety of vehicles, machines, and
equipment made from iron or steel.
To demonstrate these techniques
we will be using a vk 4502 (p), pan-
zerkampfwagen tiger p2, which
was never actually put into produc-
tion and is commonly known as a
paper panzer. For us this is perfect
because we can be creative with
both the camouflage and weathe-
ring as this vehicle never actually
existed!
Our idea is to depict the vehicle after
test and evaluation and the vehicle
now sits abandoned and neglected
in the backyard of the Porsche fac-
tory. In very little time, the condi-
tion of the paintwork would start to
deteriorate and rusting would soon
take place. Here we offer a com-
prehensive guide to creating these
effects.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 7
RUSTING A PAPER PANZER

4 Once we are happy with the


chipping effect, we need to
seal the model with a matt var-
nish before adding Streak-
ing Grime for Dark
Yellow Vehicles.

This matt
coat will
prevent the Worn
Effects Fluid from be-
ing reactivated by the White
spirit used for streaking effects. The
Streaking Grime will tone and unify the
base colours and add subtle streaking effects
to all the sloped and vertical surfaces.

1 1 Even though this issue is dedi-


cated to rust effects, we will in-
clude the initial stages of painting
to get the model ready for the
weathering process to begin. Here
we have the model divided into
sub-assemblies ready for priming 3 Once the Worn Effects Fluid
with Vallejos hardwearing Acrylic- has dried, a camouage pattern of
Urethane Grey Primer. broad sand coloured stripes is air-
brushed on and allowed to dry for
2 a few minutes before wetting the
2 For the base colour of red prim- surface of the model with water
er we use the new AK Interactive and then scrubbing and scratching
Modulation set for German Red the sand coloured areas with an
Primer AK 124. Once we have com- old paint brush and cocktail stick to
pleted this to our satisfaction, the create chips and scratches
next step is to airbrush the hull and
turret with AK Interactives Worn
5 A heavy wash using the same
Effects Fluid.
Streaking Grime for Dark Yellow
is now applied to the deck on the
3 5 front section of the hull, where the
focus of our rust effects will be.

6 Chips and scratches are added


to the rest of the vehicle using
Vallejos Camouage Black Brown.
This colour is perfect for simulat-
ing bare metal where it has been
exposed to the elements.
8 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
7 Now the Streaking Grime has
6 7
had time to dry for a few minutes,
we can now blend and soften this
colour using a long bristled brush
carrying a small amount of White
Spirit. The grime is worked into the
edges and also allowed to pool in
certain areas to create a random
natural effect.

8 We can now mask around the 9


8
deck area ready for the rst of the
rust colours to be airbrushed on.
Make sure the tape is lined up per-
fectly with the edge of the deck
area. Poor masking can spoil the
whole effect!

9 First we spray on a very light


coat of LifeColor Rust Light Shadow
(1). Notice that the streaking grime 10 11
effects are still visible through the
LifeColor paint. Keeping the paint
mix thin and the air pressure low
on our compressor will offer the
greatest control of these colours.

10 Next we add Rust Basecoat,


which is concentrated along the
front portion on the hull. We then
follow this by spraying on a small
amount of Rust Dark Shadow. This is
focused on only the front edge and
right hand corner of the deck area.

11 More of the LifeColor Rust Base


colour is airbrushed around
the gun barrel and mantlet
joint, as this area would be
prone to paint wear and
damage.

12 With the mask-


ing tape removed we
can see how the effect
has been graduated to
reveal the darkest and
deepest rust colour in the
front right-hand corner of
the deck. This will simulate
where the rainwater has col-
lected mostly in this corner due
to the vehicle being parked on
sloping ground.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 9
RUSTING A PAPER PANZER

13

Now that all the basic weathering is complete, we can


add both specic and general rust streaks to the verti-
cal surfaces. For this we use AK Interactive Rust Streaks
AK 013.

14

To add these streaks we rst make sure the bottle is


shaken well before using, we then start at the top
edge of where our streaks begin, then simply drag the
brush down over the surface making sure we vary the
width & length of the streaks.

15

With the rust streaks in place, the next step is to use a


clean brush wetted with White Spirit and gently ick
the brush up and down the streak. If you only drag the
wash downward or use too much pressure, you will re-
move it all and will have to start again.

16 The Rust streaks have now been completed on both the turret and hull. It is im-
portant take into consideration the story we are trying to tell with the model. We
need to remember how old the vehi-
cle is, what it has been used
for, and whether
it is in service or
abandoned.

10 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


17 18

On the horizontal edges of the armour plates, we can Vallejo German Camouage Black Brown is now heav-
now add pin washes to the chips. These can also be sof- ily thinned with water and washed onto the centre of
tened and blended with a clean brush and White Spirit. each engine-grille mesh. This colour is then stippled
and blended onto the mesh using a at brush.

19 20

Next we can start to add weathering to the large en- We work this colour into the corners and edges of the
gine-access cover and for this we will be using Winter hatch and as we can see this is a great colour for add-
Streaking Grime. ing general grime to the surface of a vehicle.

21 22

White Spirit and a clean brush can now be used to After allowing around 12 hours for the Winter Streak-
blend and soften the Winter Streaking Grime until it ing Grime to dry fully, we now add some more rust
becomes a subtle dark stain that perfectly replicates stains to the engine deck hatches.
dirt, grime, and old fuel and oil stains that often ac-
cumulate on these areas.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 11
RUSTING A PAPER PANZER

23 24

With various areas of rust added to the engine deck, Moving to the turret roof, we can now add individual
we can now blend these with more White Spirit. We rust streaks to the chips we added earlier. It is impor-
aim to be left with faint areas of rust caused by rain- tant to get these lines parallel. If they are at different
water and not unrealistic patches of red/brown paint. angles on the same surface it will look unnatural.

25 26

As with all the previous streaking effects, the hard Here we can see the nished effect, notice how we try to
edges need to be softened and blended to nish with make the streaks softer and spread slightly outwards as
faint and natural looking rust streaks and staining. they go further down. This is achieved by applying a little
more pressure with the brush toward the bottom of the
brush stroke. This may take a bit of practice to perfect.

27 28

The steel wheel rims are an area that will rust very quick-
ly, you only have to check the disc brakes on your car af-
ter a night of rain. They will quickly start exhibiting yel-
low/orange surface rust by the morning. To simulate this This LifeColor rust colour dries to a completely at
we paint the wheel rims in LifeColor Rust Light Shadow. nish and replicates this effect perfectly.
12 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
In these views of the completed
model we can see that all the
effects used are combined to
make a truly eye catching model.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 13


RUSTING A PAPER PANZER

VK 4502

14 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 15
RAW PLATE
Mr. Scratchmod

T
he technique shown here is just one of many different ways to create raw steel
effects. Depending on the type of steel, how long its been exposed to the
elements, and of course the setting will
depend on how it is painted and weathered.
The technique described here can be
altered to suit the situation for many
types of modelling projects.

1 The rst thing we


have to do is apply a
base colour to the mod-
el. This is always done
after applying a coat of
primer to be sure the
plastic is covered and
sealed. For a base col-
our of steel plate we
use Tamiyas acrylic Flat
Brown XF-10.

16 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


The next two steps involve the use of the sponge tech-
2
nique to add the small chips, which will give visual in-
terest to the base colour. For the rst choose a dark
brown. To get the best results we use a ne textured
sponge like those used for packaging of electrical items.

For the second colour we use a rust colour that is bright-


er and lighter than the brown base colour. First dip the
sponge in some of the paint, then remove the excess on
a paper towel; otherwise we will end up with large blobs
of paint on the surface instead of a chipping effect.

The next step is to apply a dense lter using oil paints.


Here we are using Winsor and Newton Vandyke Brown
thinned with odorless thinner to a consistency be-
tween a lter and a wash. This lter will help to unify
the previous effects and tones.

Once the lter has dried fully, the next step is to apply
a medium that we use to create a chipping effect. This
can be done using the hairspray technique and in this
case we are using AK Interactives Worn Effects which
has been developed for exactly this type of effect and
will guarantee consistent results.

With the Worn Effects coat dry, some light grey col-
ours were then airbrushed on in a random cloud pat-
tern. This effect can be varied from panel to panel to
help create the effect that vehicle is made from indi-
vidual steel plates. Once dry, more sponge chipping
can be added.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 17


RAW STEEL PLATE

7 8

The paint is then allowed to dry for about an hour be- For smaller areas of the light grey chipping we can add
fore starting the chipping process. To chip the paint we this directly using a sponge technique instead of us-
simply wet the surface with warm tap water and let it ing the hairspray technique. This is faster to apply and
soften the paint. A variety of old stiff-bristled brushes easier to control on smaller areas.
are used to scrub and dab the surface to create the
chipping effects in the light grey areas.

9 10

To add colour and interest, the factory workers chalk marks are Fresh rust marks can now be added
added using a white pencil. The two round access plates are also using heavily thinned bright or-
painted in a red primer colour to add even more visual interest. ange paint sprayed along the edge
of some masking tape in a couple
of light coats.
11

With the tape removed we


can now add some bright
orange rain marks in the form
of thin squiggly lines. A wash
of enamel Light Rust will add
softer tones to this rust effect
and will also help unify the
airbrushed and brush painted
rust marks.
18 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
12 13

To nish this panel a pencil was run along across the weld- To add even more effects to the raw steel plate, we can
beads as they did not rust like the actual armour plates. use a whole range of products and mediums, such as
This was due to the high Nickel content of the welding enamel dust, streaking effects, washes, and pigments.
rods used during the construction of the real vehicle. These will all help bring the model to life.

Overall views of the nished Mine


Roller. All of the realistic weathering
effects used on this Mine Roller will be
covered in detail in future issues.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 19


Martin Kovc

U
sing a combination of acrylic paints, AK Interactive Worn Effects, and enamel wash-
es we show how to make scratch built plastic card appliqu armour look like totally
realistic heavy steel armour-plates complete with mill scale effects, surface rust and
welding seams.

20 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


1 The first step is to
base coat the appliqu
armour sections with
Tamiya NATO Black XF-
69. This is sprayed on us-
ing an airbrush.

2 A random mottled
rust pattern was then air-
brushed on using Tami-
ya NATO Brown XF-68
thinned with Tamiya Acryl-
ic Paint Thinner X-20A.

3 The armour plate sections


ections were
weere
AK-Interactive
then given a coat of AK-Interactive
uid
Worn Effects Fluid. This uid has be
een
e en
been
specically developed to o produce the
t
ar way to tthe
chipping effect in a similar
hairspray technique. The e difference
difference
is that the Worn Effects ts can
a
ore
be easily applied in a more
controlled way. Remem--
ber the more coats of
Worn Fluid that are ap-
plied the greater the
chipping effect will be.

4 A light blue/grey col-


our mixed from Tamiya
acrylics is then sprayed in
a random pattern of the
steel parts. This colour will
help represent the areas of
steel that have not rusted.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 21
BARE METAL ARMOUR

5 Using a needle some of the blue/


7
grey can be carefully scratched off
before the paint has had time to dry
fully.

6 More of the blue/grey colour


can now be removed by wetting
the surface and by gently rubbing
it with a piece of sponge we can
create a mottled mill scale effect.

7 Here we can see the result of the


scratches and sponge effects.

8 The next step is to paint tiny


8 chips of blue/grey over the surface
to replicate mill scale, which is a ef-
fect formed on the surface of hot
steel during the rolling process.

9 Instead of using enamel based


washes to replicate rust we are us-
ing acrylics. The trick behind paint-
ing rust with acrylics is to have the
surface dampened with water be-
fore starting to apply the paint. The
wet surface helps to blend and thin
the acrylic paint for a natural effect.
22 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
10 9

11

10 When adding ne sharp-edged


12
scratches and rust marks using acryl-
ics, it is best to add these to a dry
surface, so the edges do not soften
or blur.

11 Chalk marks added at the fac-


tory during the manufacturing
process are simply drawn on using
sharp white pencil available from
art supply shops.

12 By loading some of the rust 13


coloured acrylic paint onto an old
brush with cut down bristles and
icking with a nger creates ran-
dom rust splashes on the surface,
this helps to unify the rest of the
rust effects.

13 Using graphite pencil is the


best way to achieve metallic shine
on edges of the metal plates and
fresh cutting-torch lines.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 23
BARE METAL ARMOUR

14 15 16

14 Applying graphite powder with 15 SSharp edged rust stains are 16 TThe same Vallejo rust colors that
a piece of rubberized sponge is i
painted on using Tamiya masking were used on the armour plates will
a great way to achieve a realistic tape as a mask. This is very effec- be perfect for recreate realistic rust
metallic sheen to the surfaces of tive when replicating the marks effects on the tracks as well. These
the plates. It is important that the left when steel plates have been Friul Model white-metal tracks were
graphite powder is only applied to placed on top of another during rst primed using Tamiya NATO
the areas not covered by rust. outside storage before being used Black. The orange and brown tones
in the factory. were applied using a ne textured
sponge.

18

17

17 OOne of the main advantages of using acrylics paints 18 The


T kit tow chain was weathered in exactly the same
is that enamel washes can be applied straight after way as Friul Model tracks.
without causing damage to the base colours. If using
enamel washes over enamel paints then the model
must allowed to dry fully for a couple of days
before attempting to apply these washes.

19 When painting weld seams


it is important to rst spray the
surrounding areas in a very
dark grey or black to
simulate the burn
marks caused
by the heat
from the weld-
ing process.

24 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


20

21 20 The
T weld seams are picked out
using a bright silver colour to make
the welds shine. A dark brown pin-
wash can be added to highlight the
texture of the welds.

In this photo of a Hobby Boss Super


Pershing we can see that the same
painting effects have been used to
replicate the bare metal parts of the
mantlet counter-balance weights.
ATH E R I NG
WE C A R
A BOX
W
eathering railway (Railroad) locomotives
locomo
otives
and rolling stock has to be approached
approache ed dif-
ferently than modelling static models
models of
aircraft or amour. For example, the modeller will have
to weather many carriages and wagons to complete
a particular train.Also, these items will receive much
more handling than a static model, this means regular
weathering products such as pigments would get worn
away after the carriages have been picked up a few
times. Pigments can be sealed in with matt varnish, but
these tend to darken or reduce the pigment and spoil
the final look.
Our idea is to show a method of producing a nicely
weathered American railroad boxcar that will not take
frequentt han-
too long to finish and will be resistant to frequen
John Murphy dling and look great on any railway layout.

This is how clean the boxcar 1


looks out of the box from
the manufacturer. Some
model railway companies
do supply rolling stock
pre-weathered, but to be
honest they look like they
have just been airbrushed
with some brown paint
randomly around the
lower sides and look
unrealistic.

The rst step is to airbrush 2


on Humbrol Super Enamel
No.26 Khaki. This is thinned
with Humbrol Enamel
thinner and misted over
the undersides and lower
sides of the bodywork.

26 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


3

Once the enamel has been left to dry for around 30


minutes, the next step is to use a brush wetted in
White Spirit and start to drag the bush down over the
sides to achieve a streaky look. Make sure the brush is
not too wet, as it will remove all of the paint on the
rst pass of the brush.

Here we can see the streaking ef-


fect as the White Spirit evaporates. 4
As we can see, the heavier streaks
remain along the bottom of the
boxcar.

5 6 7

Rust patches and chipping can now Further rust areas can be added Here we can see the completed rust
be added once the White Spirit has to other parts of the boxcar. Here patches and chipping. Compared
fully dried. For the rust areas we use masking tape has been applied to to some reference photos this rust
German Camouage Black/Brown create horizontal areas of rust. damage is quite restrained!
from the Vallejo Modelcolor range
of acrylics. The vertical frames have
been masked off and a piece of
sponge carrying a small amount of
paint can be carefully dabbed onto
these frames.

The model boxcar came with a bright silver roof and to tone this down a
mixture of rust colour and brown acrylic paints were sponged onto the
roof section until virtually all of the silver had been covered.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 27
WEATHERING A BOX CAR

9 10

The roof section with the sponge effects completed. A sponge The Light Rust wash is best applied with a
was chosen, as it would not cover the silver completely in the brush with long bristles, this help the wash
same way as if a brush had been used. The sponge also adds a ow over the surfaces and around the details.
little texture to the effect. The drying time of the wash can be reduced
by using a hairdryer on a low heat setting.

11

12

The light Rust Wash The trucks were


is then followed by painted separately
a further wash, this using the same Hum-
time using a darker brol Khaki as used on
colour in the form of Track the rest of the boxcar.
Wash. This is added mainly to the bolted panel
joints and the recessed channels on each panel.

13 14

The next step was to add a wash onto the trucks, by AK Interactive Engine Oil was applied to the axle hubs
using an acrylic colour we save having to wait days for to simulate lubricating grease.
the enamel paint to dry before adding an enamel wash,
which could soften and ruin the Humbrol Khaki colour.
28 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
15
16

Moving back to the boxcar, we can Once the Light Rust wash had been allowed to dry, some of Life-
now add a Light Rust Wash to the colors Sleeper Grime was misted along the lower edges to blend and
sides and ends of the bodywork. tone down all the previous effects. This colour is available in Life-
Unlike the photo, this wash is best Colors excellent Rail Weathering paint set.
added while the model is laying at
on its side so the wash doesnt pool
along the lower edges.

17 18

A mixture of Rainmarks for NATO Tanks and Summer Dark Steel pigment was added to the independent
Kursk Earth is applied. This was washed into the recess- brake wheel and chain using a bre rubbing stick from
es of the end panels. It was also added as a pin wash to an art supply shop.
details on the lower sections of the sides.

19

The nished boxcar. When compared with the


photo of it un-weathered, it is clear to see a much
more realistic and attractive nish.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 29
RUST ON THE HIGH SEA

Model Fran Romero


Photo Mig Jimenez
Text John Murphy

This is an example of a Heavy


cruiser made by the same author.

1 2

Using a ne tipped artists paintbrush, Vallejos Model This is best done completing small sections at a time. If
Color German camouage black Brown is used to add we loose patience and start to rush this part, the chips
random scrapes and areas of chipped and aked paint. and scratches will look too large and spoil the effect.

30 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


rust on
the high sea
B
y design, ships of iron
and steel will spend
their entire existence
on the oceans and salt water
seas. Heavily effected by
corrosion, ships will very
quickly show heavy signs of
rust stains and streaking rust.
Here we will explore some
techniques used to paint the
unique rusting that occurs on
ships.

3 4

Heavier chipping is added to the cut out on the top Rust Streaks and Light Rust Wash will be our choice for
edge of the hull where the anchor is raised and lowered. adding the many rust streaks and stains covering the
ships hull. These colours can be used individually or
mixed to create varied tones.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 31


RUST ON THE HIGH SEA

9 Once the Rust Streaking


has been added to the deck
details, it can be blended
again using a soft brush
wetted with White Spirit.
We can see the difference
between the blended rust
at the top compared with
the unblended still being
applied.

5 6

Using a ne tipped brush, the Light Rust Wash is paint- Once the Light Rust wash has been allowed to dry for a
ed in vertical lines from various chips and scratches short while, a brush dampened in White Spirit is then used
added earlier. to blend and soften these streaks for a more subtle effect.

7 8

With the Light Rust stains now fully dry, thinner rust Rust Streaks can now be added to the deck areas, pay-
streaks can be added to the centre of these lighter col- ing particular attention to the area where the anchor
oured stains. These are then blended to create a natu- chain lays and other raised xtures on the deck, such
ral effect. as the capstons used to raise the anchor.
32 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
Here we can see the nished rust effects, which
work really well on the grey painted deck.
This heavy rust effect would happen
in only a short time on warships
operating in the harsh con-
ditions of the Baltic or
North Atlantic dur-
ing WWII.

10

11 12

Even the modern U.S. Navy supercarrier, USS Abraham Some more subtle Light Rust Wash streaks have been
Lincoln (CVN-72) is showing signs of heavy rust stain- added further along the hull. These are also softened
ing on her hull sides whilst deployed on operations. and blended using a brush dampened with White Spirit.

13 14

We think displaying the ship with weathering adds so much In this close-up of the bow of an old navy warship, we
interest to the nished model and really tells the story of can see several weathering effects, including chipping
how harsh sea conditions take their toll on any ship. and worn paint on the front edge of the bow. Also of
interest is the patchy worn paint on the grey and red
areas of the hull.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 33
Mr. Scratchmod

I
n this guide we will explain how to create of paint, in exactly the same way as paint
textured rust using pigments, acrylic paints would flake away from a heavily rusted metal
and stiff brushes. in real life.

This technique is perfect for creating heavily For this feature we will be using an old
rusted vehicles, but instead of using the turret from a U.S. M26 Pershing tank with a
new chipping fluids, or hairspray and salt, faded green as the camouflage colour. This
which are used in combination with water technique is obviously not limited to just
to remove the top layer of paint to create green and will in fact give even better results
chips and scratches in the surface, this effect on a German dark yellow or Gulf War desert
relies on the paint being scrubbed off of the sand coloured vehicle for example.
unstable pigment underneath the top layer

The turret is rst primed using Vallejos Black acrylic


primer, followed by a LifeColor dark brown acrylic,
which will act as the base rust colour, we can now
start adding the rust pigment. To do this we rst mix
Dark Brown Wash with some Track Rust Pigment. This
is then painted onto the surface of the model using a
large brush.
34 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
3 4

Track Rust Pigment is now stippled onto the Dark Brown


Wash and thanks to the slow drying time of the wash,
there is no need to rush this part. The wash will help
to x the pigment models surface. Different shades of
rust pigment can be used during this process to vary the Here we can see that the pigment has soaked up all
effect. It is worth noting that the more pigment that is the wash and is already starting to produce a realistic
applied the thicker the rust effect will be and the easier effect. For even thicker rust, more wash can be painted
it will be to chip off the camouage paint later. on followed by more pigment.

5 6

To ensure the pigment adheres really well, a light coat In this close-up of the turret we can see the rough tex-
AK-Interactives Pigment Fixer is misted on using an air- ture the pigment creates under the faded green layer
brush. This will darken the pigment a little, but do not of paint. This layer of paint is best applied in a couple
worry as it is to be expected using any kind of pigment of light coats, so we dont get the surface too wet and
xer and will not spoil the overall effect in this case. ruin the pigments underneath.

7 8

Here is where this technique differs from using either If there are any areas that are hard to chip, then just
the salt or hairspray technique. Instead of using water dampen the area with a soft brush and water before
to remove the paint to create chipping and exposed scrubbing and scratching the paint off as normal. Re-
rusty metal, we just use various stiff brushes, includ- member do not use too much water, as the pigment
ing worn out wire brushes and even a cocktail stick to will become very soft and could easily be ruined.
make individual scratches.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 35
RUST
RUST
R
RUUSTCHIPPING
CHI
CHIPPING
HIIP
H PPPIIN
NG

10 11

Even an old metal wheel from a mini-drill set is perfect In this close-up we can see when the surface is damp it
for adding random scrapes and scratches. Each style helps to create natural and realistic stains around the
brush or stick helps to create a different damage and rust patches, just as it would happen in real life.
wear effect that has occurred over a number of years.

12 13

Here a pointed wooden stick is being used to create In this nal photo we can see just how good the result
individual scratches in specic areas. This method of- is that this technique produces. Notice how the aked
fers greater control than the more random effect pro- paint at the edge of the chips and scratches has a real
duced by scratching with wire brushes. three-dimensional effect.

Here we can see the On this AFV Club Centurion Mk.5/1 pigments have
same technique can be been used to add texture the exhaust cover, to simu-
used to add texture to late paint that has burnt off. This time the pigments
the exhaust mufer of a have been stippled onto a base coat of oil paint in-
larger scale 1/24 vehicle. stead of an enamel wash..

36 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


OLD METAL
FIXTURES
AND FITTINGS
U
sing enamel washes and graphite powder we show how
replicate realistic old metal fixtures and fittings. for our
to re
example we are using an old wooden door with metal
exam
hinges
hinges and brackets.
hi bra this effect would also be perfect for many
items, such
it h as d
drain covers and just about any iron or steel components
used in construction of old buildings.

John Murphy
2 1 3

The rst step is to AK Interactives enamel


paint the part in a washes Light Rust Wash
suitable base colour. and Track Wash are mixed
This can be sprayed or brush painted onto the part We have chosen in various ratios to rep-
depending on how large the area is that requires Frame Dirt from the licate fresh rust or much
painting. LifeColor acrylic range darker old rust.

Graphite powder is the


secret to achieving an
This wash mix can now be allowed to ow over the ultra-realistic metallic nish
part and around the details. Pre-wetting the area with to these iron parts. For this
white spirit will help the wash ow more easily over we use AK Interactive Dark
the surfaces. Steel Pigment.

38 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


6 7 8

The area around the parts to be A make-up applicator sponge is the With the tape removed, we can see
rubbed with the Dark Steel Pig- perfect tool to apply the pigment, how good the Dark Steel Pigment
ment, are rst masked off to ensure as it applies and buffs the pigment looks. If the metal work isnt too
we dont end up with a polished at the same time. old we can stop here, but for an
metal nish on the wooden parts! older look we can carry on.

To make the metal look older we can


add another wash, this time just us-
ing the Track Wash. This will give the
metal an aged and weathered look.

10

Here we can see the nished effect.


Rust washes can now be added to
the wooden parts surrounding rust
to simulate where it soaked into
the wood.
WEATHERING
Model and Photos Mig Jimenez
Text John Murphy WHITE METAL
TRACKS
W
hite metal tracks such as those produced by Friulmodel make a fantastic addition
to any tank or armoured vehicle, but one of the problems has been how to paint
them. Sometimes the paint doesnt adhere well and when paint chips off, bright
silver is left showing through, By chemically treating the tracks with a fluid that turns the
metal to a realistic rusted metal finish, we can make sure this will not happen in future. Here
we show just how simple this is to do.

1 2

These are the products and tools you will need to turn The rst step is to clean and degrease the tracks prior
shiny white-metal tracks into one that look as real as to immersing them in the Burnishing Fluid. Acetone is
the real thing. A glass dish or bowl, an old toothbrush, perfect for this task as it is especially formulated for
Acetone, water, and the secret ingredient, AK Interac- degreasing or paint removal.
tives Metal Burnishing uid.

3 4

With the track soaking in the Acetone, an old tooth- After removing the tacks from the Acetone and al-
brush is used to scrub the tracks which will ensure all lowed to dry out fully on a paper towel, we can now
grease & any mould-release agent has been complete- prepare the Metal Burnishing mix. This is mixed in a
ly removed from every surface. ratio of 1:1 with water into a glass dish or bowl.
40 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
5 6

The track section has now been immersed in the Metal Here we can see that the chemical reaction happens
Burnishing mix and again using an old toothbrush, the quickly and how it turns the tracks from bright silver
tracks are scrubbed to ensure that any trapped air bubbles into a more realistic rust brown colour, which is now
are removed from recessed details. This is to make certain etched into the surface of the metal.
that the Burnishing uid effects every part of the track.

7 8

Once the tacks have been removed from the Burnish- The tracks can be left as they are, or weathered further
ing uid, they should be washed under running water depending on how the model is to be displayed. In this
and then left to dry fully. When they have dried it is case European Earth and North African Dust pigments
clear to see just how excelent the tracks look. are being applied dry.

9 10

The pigments can now be permanently xed in place Here we can see in this photo of the completed model
using Pigment Fixer. just how realistic the tracks look, and thanks to the
Metal Burnishing uid this is easy achieve.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 41
SMALL CHIPS AND RUST STAINS
N
ot all rust effects have to be complex when adding them to a
model. Here we show a simple technique that can be used for many
different scales and subjects such as military vehicles, railways,
ships, buildings, and civilian cars. In this instance we are adding the
rust damage to a US Army World War II supply truck.
John Murphy

The rst step is to apply the light green colour


rst, this is then followed by the brown making
sure the light green is visible around the edge of
the brown spot or scratch to simulate a three-di-
mensional effect.

To create the chips and scratches on the olive drab base


coat, we are going to use Vallejo US Grey Light, which
2
is actually a light green colour and LifeColor Brown.

3 4

For the rust streaking effect a good quality oil paint is Small dots Burnt Sienna oil paint are now placed be-
used. In this case Burnt Sienna is chosen as it offers an neath the scratches and chips. You will need to take
excellent orange/brown colour perfect for simulating into account the angle of the scratches and which way
this kind of rust. the rust stains would ow over the surface of the real
vehicle when it is wet.
42 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
5 6

Next we need to drag the oil paint downwards using Some further blending of the pigment and oil paint
light strokes with a at brush. The type of brush used with a clean dry brush will help create the nal look of
for dry-brushing is perfect for this. Again think about a soft and subtle rust effect.
the angle of these streaks. If they defy gravity, they
will look unnatural therefore they will look unrealistic 8
on the model.

7
6

Once the oil paint has been allowed to dry for a few
days, further
Dust washes or airbrushed dust can be added to help
create the overall effect of a hard working US Army
Before the oil paint has dried fully, rust coloured pig- supply
pp y truck during
g WWII.
ment can now be added onto each h of the chips and
hat occurs around
scratches to represent rust staining that
these marks. By using pigment it will ll add texture and
ent rmly in place
the oil paint will help to x the pigment
once it has dried fully.

Here we can see this same


ame 9
effect applied to the
exhaust cover on a Tiger
ger 9
I. The same techniqueue is
perfect for simulating
ting
rust around bullet and
shrapnel damage, as well
as bent and creased metal
etal
where the paint has aked
ked
away from the surface e of
the exhaust cover.
ver.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 43
m60a1
LESS IS MORE
Chris Jerrett

S
ubtle rusting is a tool all modelers should have in their painting arsenal because small
patches of rust are found on virtually all armoured fighting vehicles. When trying to
achieve a realistic rust finish, it is an important part regardless of how extensive you
want to go with your model. So for this issue dedicated to RUST, we want to do something
subtle to illustrate that sometimes less is more. Our example is of a USMC M60A1 involved
in intensive training leading up to Operation Desert Storm.

1 Before we can start adding the rust


effects, we must apply some enamel
washes. These will form the founda-
tion of the general weathering and
also the rust effects.

44 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


2 3

We can see that the washes have now added subtle Finer scratches and smaller chips using Raw Umber
stains and streaked effects to the model. Scratches are acrylic are now added onto to the pale cream areas to
being added using a very pale cream colour. create a three-dimensional scratch effect.

With a ne brush we gently apply random streaks


and marks. It is not critical how they look at the mo-
ment, because the next ssteps
teps will tone these down
considerably.

As we can see here a va-


riety of oil paints will be used
for the rust effects. It is best to put the
paint onto cardboard to allow the excess oil to
soak away rst, whichc will
will ensure the oil paint dries to a matt nish.
nish.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 45
M60A1 LESS IS MORE

6 First we start with a ne


tipped brush and dab paint
in the recessed areas where
water would pool and cause
rust to generate.

With a
wide brush
dipped in clean
White Spirit we
gently draw the oil paint
out from the recess to create streaks,
which blend and soften as they are
pulled from the starting point.

8 9

Heavier rust streaks can be added to the sloping sec- While mixing the oil colours we make dark grimy tones
tions of the engine deck, where lots of paint damage to build-up dirt and corrosion in these areas.
can appear due to engine maintenance etc.

46 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


10 11

To produce the tiniest of rust spots and chipped paint With a ne brush and thinner we simply run more of
the sponge technique is used. In this case we use very the rusty enamel wash gently down over the vertical
little paint on the sponge and dap the paint on gently surfaces, such as the sides of the turret. One light wide
to create these. stroke for heavy water ow and narrow strokes for
more concentrated ow of rusty water.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 47
M60A1 LESS IS MORE

12 13

Using a very thin mixture of Light Rust washes and Spare track links and tow cables attached to a tank
Rust Streaks we use a syringe to inject this wash into are also prone to rusting. These are rst painted us-
areas where water would collect and cause pools of ing acrylics followed by oil paint washes. Be sure which
rusty water. parts would actually rust before applying the washes.

48 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 49
F
or this project we wanted to create below to a dull sheen. What moisture there
the look of an old rusting steel space is would merely be due to the temperature
suit, on a forbidding, desert planet. cooling at night which creates some humidity
A place where heat, sun, and wind-blown in the atmosphere. So no real streaking of
sand, have worn most of the paint away, rust is caused by water running down the
and pitted and oxidized the metal surface surface. The rust would appear mainly along
the newly exposed edges, where the sand
and wind have eroded the paint and where
1
moisture has been slowly creeping under the
remaining paintwork causing it to crack and
flake away.

Marc Reusser

Gunze resin primer is used before airbrushing a base-


coat with various mixes of Hull Red and camouage
Black Brown to emulate the colour of old oxidized steel.

50 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


Pale green
and grey
tones are
sprayed on top of
the hairspray layer. The top layer
can then be chipped using water
and a stiff bristled paintbrush.

2 3

The salt technique is now used to represent newer rusting/oxidation. All the parts are now sprayed with a matt
We leave the highest points in the darker tones, as these areas varnish in preparation for the hairspray
would have been exposed to the elements the longest. application. Notice how it has darkened
the rust tones and unied them.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 51
SAND BLOWN OLD RUSTY STEEL

4 5

Using a 10/0 artists brush, small pin-washes of rust are We now add washes to the larger surfaces, but rst
added. For these we use both enamel rust washes and we must dampen the area with odorless turpentine
oil paint, which are applied along the edges of panels before adding the pin-wash. This will help the pin-
and around details. washes ow over the surface for a subtle effect.

6 7

The pin-washes can now be applied along the edge of the To create texture and sun bleaching, some of the paint
chipped paint areas. The turpentine will cause the wash chips were then mapped using LifeColor White Ox-
to spread much further and create very subtle tones. ide. This can also be done before or after the pin-
washes to create variations of discolouration.

On some corners and horizontal 8


protrusions where rust would
collect over time, additional
thinned spot washes of AK
Interactive Rust Streaks
were layered on to produce
this buildup.

52 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


9 To accentuate some of the 10
edges and simulate slightly
polished edges and high
points on some curved sur-
faces, AK Dark Steel pig-
ment was applied using an
artists bre pencil.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 53


RUST
REFERENCE PHOTOS

W
eathering references are all around us, but all too often we dont even notice or
give them a second thought. During the research for this edition of the magazine,
it has become a mission to find and observe many forms of rust and rust based
weathering effects on many varied items that we have found on our travels. We hope this
small selection will prove invaluable for your own reference library.

In this photo of an abandoned BMP in


Northern Afghanistan, we can see that the
rust has taken on an even tone of brown
all over. It actually looks like it has been
painted brown, because the shade of rust
is so uniform over the entire vehicle.

On this steam locomotive boiler we can see numerous rust tones,


which can be replicated by using some of the techniques described in
this issue.

The glacis plate of this captured Iraqi T-55 on display at the Tank
Museum in Bovington England. Displays both rust chips and
scratches on the front fender as well long rust streaks from the
headlight guards due to the vehicle being stored outside for a
period of time.

54 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


On the side of this railway locomo-
tive it is interesting to see that not
all rust streaks are bright orange. In
just this one picture there are many
weathering effects to be seen of-
fering great references for many
forms of scale modelling.

Even on a modern warship such as the USS Essex LHD-2, we can still see it
is affected by rust and after long operational deployments the hull sides
can be completely cover in rust streaks.

Could this be the ultimate photo


to demonstrate both rust streaking
and chipped paint effects? It would
be a real test of ones painting skills
to replicate this on a model.

This T-62 at the tank graveyard in


Kabul, Afghanistan has received
a lot of battle damage to the tur-
ret and each of the shell and bul-
let marks has generated an area of
rust around each impact. This rust-
ing will happen in only a few hours
after it has happened.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 55


RU
R
RUST
UST
ST R
REFERENCE
REFERENCES
EF
E FER
E RENC
E NCE
EN CESPHOTOS

Here is the per-


fect photo to
illustrate how
rain, which has
formed a puddle
in the metal com-
ponent leaves
a tide mark of
bright orange
rust as the water
evaporates.

This sheet metal engine cover


suffers from some serious sur-
face rust, in fact there is more
rust than paint remaining. Of
interest are the many small rust
coloured rain streaks fanning
out from their point of origin.
56 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
This rather battered looking Kubel-
wagen exhibits some great refer-
ence with the badly rusted front
fender, displaying a textured rust
effect where the paint has aked
away. There is also rust staining
around some of these patches.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 57


RU
R
RUST
UST
ST R
REFERENCE
REFERENCES
EF
E FER
E RENC
E NCE
EN CESPHOTOS

This isnt a photo of rust but it is worth


remembering when you are about to
add rust to a model, it is worth dou-
ble-checking your references. For ex-
ample the mudguard on this Soviet
BMP is actually made of aluminium
and not steel and therefore there
Here on these steel plates in an engineering yard, we can see the mill scale
would be orange/red ferrous oxide
effect that we have replicated in our bare steel article within the pages
rust surrounding any damage.
of this issue.

58 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


COLOR PROFILES
Claudio Fernndez

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 59


T Y B E E
S

TL
RU

E
R
ust is the main focus in them while creating a logical
this first issue, so we will transition.
focus primarily on the rust
effects. Everybody knows that
there are many methods used to paint
rust effects, this way is only one option.

We have selected a very popular and


attractive vehicle, the 50 Volkswagen
Beetle. The idea is to create an old rusty
Beetle with two different sides; one more
damp and shadowed (the north face)
and the other more sunny and dry (the
south face), creating contrast between

David Mart

60 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


1 2

We apply a base rust colour, using Tamiya This is the moment for the Hair Spray technique,
(NATO brown XF-68 and Matt black XF- using Worn Effects (AK-088). We apply diluted with
1) mixed with matt varnish ( Hobby water if necessary.
Color H-20), and diluted with
Gaia thinner (T-01s).This way
we create a strong resist- 3
ant base of the appro-
priate rust colour.

We paint the base color, in this case white (Vallejo


71001). It is important to apply different densities for
variation.

After dampening the sur-


face with water, we can
start to rub with different
tools such as brushes , nee-
dles, etc.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 61
RUSTY BEETLE

5 6

Now we have a good rusty base for the weathering We do some rusting with the sponge technique using
effects. After varnishing with a satin varnish (AK- acrylic paint (Lifecolor rust series), to create contrast
010), we apply a dark wash to all of the panels. (AK- and texture.
045 Dark Brown).

7 8

Now is the moment for oils, creating selective fading We apply discoloration, shadows, and highlights.
using rust tones and white.

9 10

We create rust streaks (AK-013) on all the vertical sur- Working the effect with white spirit (AK-011) to create
faces. vertical streaks using a at brush.
62 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
11 12

Next we use Streaking Grime (AK-012) for the ap- With Light Rust Wash (AK-042), we paint the recent
pearance of old rust. fresh rust.

13 14

To complete the rust effects, we apply pigments in


specic places, creating more varied rust tones.

15

The beetle and the products used in for weathering. THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 63
RUSTY BEETLE

64 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 65
RUSTY BEETLE

66 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 67
CHOOSE THE RIG
Here we can see just a small selection of various products we
can use to produce rust effects on scale models. Some are
supplied as dedicated sets with a specic job, while others
are available separately from within that companys range
of products

W
hatever our interest in scale modelling the types of paints and weathering products we use play a
very important part in the way our finished models will look, therefore it is advantageous that we
know the strengths and weaknesses of each type and which will produce the very best results.

To produce rust effects we can use enamel-based paints, oil paints, acrylics, pigments and pas-
tel powders. Most manufacturers produce specic rust colours with in their ranges and as
we can see in our small selection in the accompanying photos here, these vary greatly
between manufacturers. We also have the choice of mixing our own shades and also
combining different products, such as mixing oils with enamels and pigments to
create unique effects.

While we are discussing pigments, there has been a huge in-


crease in recent years of the number paint and model
manufacturers now producing specialist weather-
ing pigments formulated for modelling and
today we have many different brands and
hundreds shades to pick from. Pigments for
weathering are also available in the form
of pastel chalk sticks, which have long
been used by artists and are normally
stocked by general art supply stores
and in the old days were the only way
modelers could and realistic dust, rust
and soot effects to models.

Lastly we have specialist chemicals that can be used to


create real rust on metal surfaces, such AK Interactives
Metal Burnishing Fluid or instant rusting products sup-
plied in a kit that will generally include a form of pow-
der or paste that can be treated with a special uid to
rapidly produce a layer of rust oxide on the surface the
metallic powder has been applied.

In this section we are displaying only the tip of the


iceberg of what products are available to the mod-
eller today. With so many products to choose from,
choosing the right one can be confusing, but hope-
fully after reading our RUST issue we will help you in
the right direction.
68 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
GHT PRODUCTS

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 69


ENAMELS RUST STREAKS
Enamels until the recent development of acrylic Easily imitate the rust streaks over any surface, us-
model paints were the only real paint suitable for ing this color. Use a ne brush to draw the lines and
our needs. Humbrol became the name we most asso- a thick at brush dampened with White Spirit to
ciated with enamel paints and or years modellers ex-
stump the lines.
perimented and developed techniques using these
paints as a basis and it has only been since acrylics
come to the forefront that we realised the smell is
strong with these paints, the drying time is slow and 1
that some enamels contained harmful toxins as do
the thinners needed to dilute this paint and wash
the brushes.

Weathering with enamels has its advantage as they


are hard wearing and the can be thinned in much
the same way as oil paints or the newly developed
and especially formulated lters and washes.
2
They do dry quicker than regular oil paints when
used as a lter or wash.

The disadvantages with enamels are when they are


thinned right down, the colour pigment can become
gritty and not ow as a coloured wash. This can spoil
the effect we are trying to achieve
3

Among all available enamels, AK Interactive has de-


veloped the exception, creating an advanced prod-
uct specially designed for weathering. Even though
they are enamel based, they have been optimised
for weathering purposes. Speci cally regarding dry
time and other characteristics that convert this kind
of paint into one of the best options for modellers.
AK Interactive products are easy to use and are avail- ACRYLICS
able in specic colors designed for different effects. The advantages with acrylic paints are that they of-
There are a variety of colors for rust effects, de- fer great coverage and dry extremely quickly and a
signed to work in combination with acrylic chipping. safer to work with than enamels or lacquer based
products, they are also impervious to enamel based
weathering products, which means we do not need
to leave at least 24 hours before adding enamel
washes or lters for example.

Probably the biggest single advantage with working


with acrylics is the can be thinned and any brushes
washed and cleaned using regular tap water.

The disadvantages of working with acrylics are that


they are more difcult to use for colour washes, as
they are more difcult to control and once dry they
cannot be cleaned off and start again if we are un-
happy with the nal result.
70 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
AK Interactive produces
d a very goodd set off ffour rust
colours in their Chipping and Rust set.

The four rust tones in the LifeColor set provide a great


starting point for some superb rust effects and are the Com Art produce two rust tones in their Real Deal
colours we have used for some of the rust effects used Weathering Set from www.iwata-media.com.
on our VK 4502 (P), Panzerkampfwagen Tiger P2 ar- We did nd when airbrushing these colours that they
ticle in this issue. took several coats before achieving a solid base layer.
And the paint dried to a satin nish, not ideal for rep-
licating rust!

Vallejo Acrylics produce a huge range of modelling


paints, dedicated to armour, aircraft, general model-
ling and war gaming and amongst these hundreds of
colours, their range are several that would be suitable
for rust tones. In their panzer Aces line for example,
they have three rust shades that can be mixed to pro-
duce many realistic effects.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 71
3

Once the Rust developer chemical has been brushed


onto the surface it reacts with the powder and starts
to turn the powder rusty over a short period of time.
Due to the course texture of the powder and nal ef-
fect, we think it would only really be suited for larger
scales

We can create rust using chemical based products such


as Scenic Rust from Deluxe Materials. Included in the
set, is a iron powder, a xative and a chemical that will
react with the iron powder to produce the rust effect.

Another interesting product used to create natural


rust is the Metal Burnishing Fluid. This product can rust
any metal part, like iron or white metal. It has become
1 very useful for the popular Friulmodel Tracks which are
cast in white metal. Simply clean the tracks with ac-
etone using a stiff brush, submerging the tracks in the
liquid. Next, we need only to mix 50% water with 50%
of Metal Burnishing uid in a container and place the
tracks inside. While using a stiff brush to remove the
air bubbles from the tracks, we need only wait 10 - 15
First we must mix the xative (glue) and powder to minutes for realistic and permanent Fruil Tracks!
the manufacturers recommendations and the tools
provided.

Idea Patina is another chemical method used to create


rust on large areas in an easy way. This product has
This mix can now be applied to the desired surface or two parts....one paint made with iron and one liquid
item. We did nd it difcult to get an even coverage which will produce the rust. Paint a piece with the iron
and because this paste is quite thick it can easily cover paint, then apply the blue liquid. You will see how with
and hide small details. time, the piece will become rusted.
72 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
OIL PAINTS PIGMENTS
Oil paints have been used by artists and modelers Artists have used pastel powders for hundreds of
for many years and for a long time have been used years and more recently specialised pigments have
to add washes and many weathering effects to mod- been developed and used by railway modelers to
els. Like most other types of paint medium they are add weathering to locomotives and rolling stock.
produced by many different manufacturers and the The use of these pigments has grown immensely in
quality can vary greatly. We recommend using art- recent years have now incredibly popular and used
ists grade and never use the cheaper student va- in the weathering all other forms of scale modelling.
riety, which have inferior performance compared to As with any other product that proves successful and
the artists grade. protable it is inevitable that many different brands
will appear on the market. Just as with oil paints,
A good quality oil paint can be thinned with tur- there is a huge difference in quality between manu-
pentine or white spirit to produce amazingly subtle facturers and some are no more than regular paint
washes. They can also be mixed with enamels or var- pigment that is actually quite coarse in its texture
nishes to create glossy effects to replicate oil or fuel and do not adhere very well to the surface they are
stains and spills for example. applied to.

The disadvantages with oil paints are generally the Pigments are the perfect tool for adding dust, mix-
long drying time, which can adversely delay the ing into mud, adding exhaust soot, rust effects or
speed we can progress with our weathering stages. even polished metal nishes to our models and are
one of those products that have really helped revolu-
tionise the painting and nishing side of our hobby.
The disadvantage with pigments until the advent of
xers was that they could be worn off, if the model
is handled too much and when matt varnish is used
to protect them and seal them onto the surface, it
can drastically change the colour of the pigment, es-
pecially lighter tones and spoil the effect we were
trying to achieve. Thankfully this has now changed
with thee development of specialist
sp xers designed
ally for this task.
specically

As we can see in this nal photo of the test cards we We can see that even the Scenic Rust has produced
painted using products from just three different com- a number of different shades rust on this small test
panies, it is obvious there isnt a single colour that sample. The best advice is to study your references and
could be classed as the perfect shade of rust, especially have fun experimenting with some of the many amaz-
when they are compared to the right hand card, which ing products now available to us.
has been treated with Deluxe materials Scenic Rust.
THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 73
POSTCARDS
FROM
THE WORLD
D
uring May of each year, the city
of Shizuoka Japan celebrates the
most important model event in
the world: the Shizuka Hobby Show. It is
mainly organized by Tamiya and here the
best Asian modellers display their latest
creations in the most grand exposition
area that you can imagine.If you
have the opportunity, visit this
festival at least once in your
life. Your mind will be
changed forever

74 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST


SHIZUOKA HOBBY SHOW 2012

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 75


76 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST
AK Interactive japan
ese staff
Hasegawa C ompany and Mig Jimenez
President of

Crossroad modellers from Tokio

me Spanish modellers
AFV C lub president and so Tamiya party in Shizuoka Hobby
Show

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / RUST / 77


IN THE NEXT ISSUE...
by the Devil of Modelling
Over many years, I have noticed how many modeller follow others, imitating styles or methods. The worst of-
fenders are those who follow the line of thinking that models must be clean and absent of dust and dirt. Where
did they come up with that idea?? They simply follow others like sheep, explaining that those who apply dust or
dirt are attempting to cover poor construction or remains of glue! But in our opinion, they are simply scared of
the omnipresent effect: THE DUST. If you dont believe me, take a look at this photo taken recently in a model
show....you can see these modellers are kicking up large clouds of dirt and dust around them...perhaps the dust
will fall down only on my vehicle!. But these modelers are so focus in their idea and they cannot see anything
around them. Dont be a sheep...break the rules and be adventurous! Cross the line and enter in the dark side of
the modelling. If you are scared, please dont read the next issue of The Weathering Magazine about dust and
dirt. Be a good boy and leave your models clean of dust...or be part of realistic modeling!
Our distributions:

EXCLUSIVIST FOR ITALY

...and much more!


Via Spagna 11 - 35010 Vigonza (PD) Italy Tel +39 049 8955008 - Fax +39 049 8959260
e-mail: info@steelmodels.com - website: www.steelmodels.com