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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

INTRODUCTION....................................................................................... 1

A. The Cessna Progressive Care Inspection Program ..................................................... 1


B. The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program ............................................................. 3

II THE CESSNA SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM ...... 5

A. Introduction ................................................................................ ................. .. 6


B. Manuals and forms required ........................................ ................................. 9
C. Qualifying an aircraft for Progressive Care................................................................ 10
D. Starting the Progressive Care Inspection Program ..................................................... 11
E. Use of the Operation Schedules............................................................................ 13
F. Use of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record .............................................. 17
G. Conducting the Operations .................................................................................... 19
H. Variations to the Cessna Progressive Care Program ........................................ .... 23
I. Cancelling the Progressive Care Program ........................................ ..... 25
J. Procedures for using Progressive Care on Cessna single-engine piston aircraft not
specifically covered in this section .......................................................................... 26

III THE CESSNA CARAVAN I PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM

A. Introduction ........................................................................................................ 30
B. Manuals and forms required ...................................................... 33
C. Qualifying an aircraft for Progressive Care ................................................................ 34
D. Starting the Progressive Care Inspection Program...................................................... 36
E. Use of the Operation Schedules.................. .............................................. 38
F. Use of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record............................................. 40
G. Conducting the Operations .................................................................................... 42
H. Variation to the Cessna Progressive Care Program.................................................... 46
I. Cancelling the Progressive Care Program ............................................ 48

IV THE CESSNA MULTI-ENGINE PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM

A. Introduction ........................................................................................................ 50
B. Manuals and forms required ........................................................ 52
C. Qualifying an aircraft for Progressive Care ................................................................ 53
D. Starting the Progressive Care Inspection Program ..................................................... 54
E. Use of the Operation Schedules .............................................................................. 56
F. Use of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record ............................................... 60
G. Conducting the Operations ........................................................ 62
H. Variations to the Cessna Progressive Care Program ........................................ .... 66
I. Cancelling the Progressive Care Program ............................................ 68
J. Procedures for using Progressive Care on Cessna multi-engine piston aircraft not
specifically covered in this section .......................................................................... 69

COPYRIGHT 1994
CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY
WICHITA, KANSAS, USA
D5552-4-13 Revision 4 October 1994
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

V THE CESSNA CONQUEST I AND II CONTINUOUS INSPECTION PROGRAM

A. Introduction .................................................................................................... 74
B. Choosing the proper inspection program .............................................................. 76
C. Manual and forms required ................................................................ ........ 79
D. Starting the Continuous Inspection Program .......................................................... 80
E. Use of the Phase Schedules .............................................................................. 81
F. Conducting the Phase Inspection........................................................................ 83
G. Special emphasis items..................................................................................... 88

VI THE CARAVAN II (406) CONTINUOUS INSPECTION PROGRAM

A. Introduction .................................................................................................... 94
B. Choosing the proper inspection program ............................................................... 96
C. Manual and forms required ................................................................................. 100
D. Starting the Continuous Inspection Program.......................................................... 101
E. Use of the Phase Schedules ........................................ ............................... 102
F. Conducting the Phase Inspection........................................................................ 104
G. Special emphasis items..................................................................................... 108

VII APPENDIX

A. Publications ordering information ....................................................................... 114


B. Progressive Care Inspection Program Notification form ....................................... .... 116
C. Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record sample form ..................................... ... 117
D. Continuous Inspection Schedule Chart sample form ................................................ 118
E. Component Overhaul and Replacement Record sample form ..................................... 119

NOTE

A revision bar will extend the full length of new or revised text. This bar will be
located adjacent to the applicable revised area on the outer margin of the page.

Please refer to your Cessna Revision Status Checklist Cards for the
most current revisions or temporary revisions to the manuals/publica-
tions listed herein. Subscribers to this service are notified of any
changes every 90 days.

If you would like to subscribe to the Cessna Revision Status Checklist


Cards, contact:

Cessna Aircraft Company


Dept. 751C
P.O. Box 7706
Wichita, KS 67277

Telephone: (316) 941-7674


Facsimile: (316) 942-9006
ii
INTRODUCTION

A. "THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM"

1. The Cessna Progressive Care Program is an efficient and comprehensive progressive inspection
and maintenance program which is designed to be used in lieu of a conventional 100-hour and/or
annual inspection program. The Cessna Progressive Care Program has been designed to help maxi-
mize aircraft safety and maintainability while minimizing aircraft downtime. The Cessna Progressive
Care program complies with the Federal Aviation Regulation requirements covering progressive
inspections.

2. While Cessna Progressive Care may be used on the following Cessna Aircraft Models, its benefits are
realized on aircraft which are being flown 200 hours or more per year. (400 hours or more for the
Caravan I)

MODEL YEAR MODEL YEAR


-172/F172 1977-1986 -T303 1982-1984
-182/F182/T182 1977-1986 -310R 1975-1981
-- -R182/FR182/TR182 1978-1986 -335 1980
-206/T206 1977-1986 -340/340A 1972-1984
-208 SERIES ALL -402C 1979-1985
-210/T210 1985-1986 -404 1977-1981
-P210 1985-1986 -414/414A 1970-1985
-421C 1976-1985

NOTE

Aircraft Models not referenced above can utilize this program (see page 27).

3. Cessna Aircraft Company recommends that aircraft which are flown 200 hours or more per year (400
hours for the Caravan I) be placed on the Cessna Progressive Care Program whether the aircraft is
flown for hire or not. An important benefit of Progressive Care is flexibility of scheduling. This is par-
ticularly important to operators utilizing aircraft in air taxi, charter and flight training, where the air-
craft is closely scheduled. Progressive Care allows the inspection and maintenance workload to be
divided into smaller operations which can be accomplished in less time. These shorter time periods
provide the operator with increased utilization and flexibility in scheduling.

1
INTRODUCTION

A. "THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM" (continued)

4. Under the Cessna Progressive Care Program the aircraft is inspected and maintained in four (1,2, 3
and 4) Operations at 50-hour intervals during a 200-hour or yearly period. The Operations are recy-
cled each 200 hours and are recorded in a specially provided Aircraft Inspection Record as each
Operation is conducted.

* *
* NOTE*
* *

The Caravan I is inspected and maintained at 100-hour intervals during a 400-hour cycle or yearly
period.

5. The Cessna Progressive Care Program complies with the requirements concerning Progressive
Inspections covered in Parts 43.15, 91.409 and 135.419 of the Federal Aviation Regulations.

2
INTRODUCTION

B. "THE CESSNA CONTINUOUS INSPECTION PROGRAM"

1. The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program has been developed to assist the owner/operator of
a Cessna multi-engine turboprop aircraft in performing maintenance and inspections in a logical,
simple and cost effective manner.

2. The sections of this manual which address the Cessna Continuous Inspections give a detailed
description of the operational procedures to use the program correctly and efficiently. A few
moments taken to fully understand how the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program works will
enable the owner/operator to achieve the maximum benefit from the inspection program.

3. The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program may be used on the following Cessna Aircraft:

Model 406/F406 ................................. Caravan II


Model 425 ........................................ Conquest I
Model 441 ........................................Conquest II

*****
*NOTE*
* *

4. Since the Continuous Inspection Program requirements of F.A.R. Part 91.409 do not apply to sin-
gle-engine turboprop aircraft, the Model 208/208A/208B Caravan I are not included in this sec-
tion. The Caravan I shall be maintained under an annual or progressive inspection program.

5. The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program complies with the requirements concerning continu-
ous inspection programs covered in Part 91.409 of the Federal Aviation Regulations.

3
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK

4
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

THE CESSNA SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM

A. Introduction ........................................................................................................ 6
B. Manuals and forms required ................................................................... 9
C. Qualifying an aircraft for Progressive Care ................................................................ 10
D. Starting the Progressive Care Inspection Program...................................................... 11
E. Use of the Operation Schedules ............................................................................. 13
F. Use of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record............................................... 17
G. Conducting the Operations .................................................................. 19
H. Variations to the Cessna Progressive Care Program ................................................... 23
I. Cancelling the Progressive Care Program ................................................................ 25
J. Procedures for using Progressive Care on Cessna single-engine piston aircraft not
specifically covered in this section.......................................................................... 26

5
A. INTRODUCTION (continued)

1. a) As described in F.A.R. Part 91.409(d), an owner/operator that desires to place an airplane on a


progressive inspection program must have the airplane inspected in accordance with an
approved progressive inspection program. The owner/operator may select one of the following
progressive inspection programs:

(1) An inspection program designed by the owner/operator.

(2) A manufacturer's approved inspection program.

b) This section presents the current Progressive Inspection Program recommended by the
Cessna Aircraft Company for the following Single-Engine piston aircraft models:

MODEL YEARS
172/F172 ........................ 1977-1986
182/F182/T182 ................... 1977-1986
R182/FR182/TR182 ............... 1978-1986
206 & T206 ...................... 1977-1986
210 &T210 ...................... 1985-1986
P210 ........................... 1985-1986

NOTE
******

ALL Cessna Single-Engine piston aircraft not listed in the above chart are addressed in
Paragraph J of this section.

6
A. INTRODUCTION (continued)

2. a) The Cessna Single-Engine Piston Progressive Inspection Program is divided into four (4)
separate Operations. One Operation (inspection) is accomplished every 50 hours of opera-
tion.

b) Additional SPECIAL INSPECTION requirements which are required at other intervals are
specified in Section 2 of the Aircraft Service Manual.

c) The four (4) recommended Operations are detailed as follows:

OPERATION 1
This inspection consists of all 50 hour inspection items.

OPERATION 2
This inspection consists of all 50 hour inspection items and all100 hour inspection items.

OPERATION 3
This inspection consists of all 50 hour inspection items.

OPERATION 4
This inspection consists of all 50 hour inspection items, all 100 hour inspection items and all
200 hour inspection items.

d) Accomplishment of these four Operations at specified points will assure compliance with the
hourly time limit requirements set by the manufacturer. Additional SPECIAL INSPECTION
requirements will be accomplished at their prescribed intervals and/or intervals coinciding
with OPERATIONS 1 through 4.

e) As defined by F.A.R. Part 91.409 (d) (4), the frequency and detail of the Progressive
Inspection shall provide for the complete inspection of the aircraft within each 12-calendar
months.

7
A. INTRODUCTION (continued)

f) If the airplane is approaching the end of a 12-calendar month period, but the complete cycle
of four Operations has not been accomplished, it will be necessary to complete the remaining
Operations regardless of aircraft hours before the end of the 12-calendar month period.

g) The Cessna Progressive Inspection Program is used in lieu of the conventional 100-hour/-
annual inspection program. Operators using Cessna Progressive Care are not required to
perform annual inspections every 12-calendar months as long as the inspection requirements
of the Progressive Inspection Program are complied with.

8
B. MANUALS AND FORMS REQUIRED

The following manuals and forms are used in the Cessna Single-Engine Piston Progressive Care
Inspection Program.

1. OPERATIONS MANUAL

The purpose of this manual is to provide the necessary information for promoting, establishing
and conducting a Progressive Care Program for Cessna owners and operators.

2. NOTIFICATION FORM

This form is submitted to the appropriate Governmental Aviation Agency when activating a
Progressive Care Inspection Program on a specific aircraft.

3. OPERATION SCHEDULES

As an aid in performing the inspections, the Operation Schedules have been prepared as work
forms for use in the shop. These Operation Schedules detail the inspection items for each
Operation and a place is provided for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to initial as each
item is performed.

4. PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

All Operations are recorded as they are conducted thereby providing the owner with a permanent
record of aircraft maintenance while on the Progressive Care Inspection Program.

* NOTE*

All manuals and forms used in the Cessna Progressive Care Inspection Program are available
from the Cessna Parts Distribution. Ordering information has been included in the Appendix.

9
C. QUALIFYING AN AIRCRAFT FOR PROGRESSIVE CARE

1. NEW DELIVERY AIRCRAFT

A new delivery aircraft must have less than 50 hours TOTAL TIME in service and enough calendar
time remaining since the issuance date of the original Airworthiness Certificate to allow the
owner/operator to complete a cycle of four Operations before the first annual inspection becomes
due. Operation Number 1 will be due at 50 hours time in service. Operation 2 will be due at 100
hours, Operation 3 will be due at 150 hours and Operation 4 will be due at 200 hours.

* EXAMPLE *

If the aircraft has two months remaining before the original Airworthiness Certificate expired
(annual inspection becomes due) and the aircraft Total Time was only 45 hours, the aircraft may
not be flown enough to require the completion of Operations 1 through 4 in the remaining two
months. In this example, the aircraft shall be handled per paragraph (2) below.

2. ALL OTHER AIRCRAFT

To qualify other aircraft which have more than 50 hours time in service for the Progressive Care
Inspection Program, conduct a Complete Airplane Inspection. This inspection consists of all 50-
hour, 100-hour and 200-hour inspection items plus those Special and Yearly Inspection items
which are due at the specified time. Operation Number 1 will become due 50 hours from the time
the Complete Airplane Inspection was accomplished.

NOTE

Variations to 1 and 2 above for starting an aircraft on the Progressive Care Inspection Program
can be found in Paragraph H of this section.

10
10
D. STARTING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM

F.A.R. Part 91.409(d) establishes the following requirements for placing an aircraft on a Progressive
Inspection Program.

1. DOMESTIC

Submit a written request to the FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) having jurisdiction
over the area in which the applicant is located and provide the following.

a) The name of a certified mechanic holding an Inspection Authorization, the name of a certified
Airframe Repair Station or the name of the manufacturer or the aircraft who will supervise
conduct the Progressive Inspection.

NOTE

Notification Form P/N D5497-1-13 is being used for this purpose and is to be signed by the
aircraft owner and the servicing organization. A copy of this form is provided in the Appendix.

b) A current inspection procedures manual (Operations Manual) available and readily under-
standable to the pilot and maintenance personnel.

c) A copy of the inspection schedule forms to be used while the aircraft is on the Progressive
Inspection Program.

2. INTERNATIONAL

Contact the local Governmental Aviation Agency prior to placing the aircraft on Progressive Care
to assure they are familiar and in agreement with the program.

11
D. STARTING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)

3. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE RECORDS

Make an entry in the Aircraft Maintenance Record stating that the aircraft has been placed on the
Progressive Care Inspection Program noting the date and aircraft hours.

4. PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

On the inside cover of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record:

a) Fill in the owner and aircraft information.

b) Complete and sign the verification information block.

c) Fill out the first entry in the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record indicating the TOTAL
Aircraft Hours when OPERATION Number 1 will be due (i.e. 50 hours total time in service for
new aircraft and 50 hours from the time the Complete Airplane Inspection was conducted for
all other aircraft).

12
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES

1. a) Operation Schedules have been developed for the specific models listed below and incorpo-
rated into Section 2 of their respective Service Manuals. Additional copies of these sched-
ules are available from the Cessna Parts Distribution and are listed by part number in the
Appendix.

MODEL YEARS
172/F172 .......................... 1977-1986
182/F182/T182 ..................... 1977-1986
R182/FR182/TR182 ................. 1978-1986
206 & T206 ...................... 1977-1986
210 & T210 ....................... 1985-1986
P210 .............................. 1985-1986

b) Each Operation Schedule has been prepared as a work form for use in the service shop and
the copies available from the Cessna Parts Distribution have been color-coded for easy iden-
tification.

OPERATION 1 - BLUE OPERATION 3 - GREEN


OPERATION 2 - YELLOW OPERATION 4 - PINK

2. TITLE BLOCK

The Title block is used to record important information about the servicing organization, cus-
tomer, and aircraft.

3. INSPECTION ITEMS

The Single Engine Operation Schedules are made up of items which have inspection intervals of
50, 100, and 200 hours.

OPERATION 1 ................................... 50 Hours Items


OPERATION 2 ....................... 50 and 100 Hours Items
OPERATION 3 .................................... 50 Hour Items
OPERATION 4 ................. 50, 100, and 200 Hour Items

13
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES (continued)

4. VERIFICATION / INITIALING

A space is provided on the right side of each sheet for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to
verify and initial as each item is accomplished.

5. ITEMS THAT ARE NOT APPLICABLE

Some of the items listed on the Operation Schedule may not be applicable to a specific aircraft. In
this case, the mechanic is to check off the item(s) as not applicable by entering the letters "NA"
(Not applicable) preceding his initials.

6. SPECIAL OPTIONS AND FIELD INSTALLED ITEMS

a) Cessna has prepared the Operation Schedules to assist the owner/operator in meeting the
inspection requirements of F.A.R. Part 91.409. The Operation Schedules are not intended to
be all-inclusive, for no such charts can replace the good judgement of a certified A&P
mechanic in the performance of his duties.

b) Additionally, the Operations Schedules do not address specially installed items or any field
installed items (i.e.: floats and Supplemental Type Certificated items). It is the mechanics
responsibility to insure that all items are inspected for airworthiness before the aircraft is
approved for return to service.

14
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES (continued)

*** ******* *** ***** ******


* *
*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
**********************
7. SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS

a) Although the inspection intervals of the items in the Operation Schedules are based on hours
time in-service, there are a few items which also have calendar limitations.

For example, an oil change may be required at the specified hourly intervals in the Operation
Schedule or at a monthly interval whichever comes first.

b) SPECIAL INSPECTION items with hour and/or calendar limitations are shown in Section
2 of the Aircraft Service Manual. The hour and calendar limitations of items in this category
must be monitored closely and the appropriate Operations conducted accordingly. There is a
section in the Progressive Care Inspection Record to record and monitor SPECIAL
INSPECTION items.

8. POST INSPECTION ITEMS

As part of each Operation, a functional check of the engine, avionics, and instruments shall be
conducted to assure proper operation. The items listed in this category also include a check of
the aircraft file for required materials and compliance with applicable Service Information Letters,
Mandatory and Recommended Service Bulletins, Airworthiness Directives, and lubrication of
components in accordance with the Service Manual Lubrication charts.

15
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES (continued)

9. CERTIFICATION FOR APPROVING THE AIRCRAFT FOR RETURN TO SERVICE

a) A place is provided at the end of each Operation Schedule to certify that the Operation has
been completed and the aircraft is ready to be approved for return to service. Spaces are pro-
vided for the supervising mechanic and aircraft inspector to sign. A space is also provided for
recording the aircraft time in-service at the time the Operation is accomplished.

b) When approving the aircraft for return to service, the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection
Record shall be signed. This action will insure a complete history of each inspection per-
formed.

16
F. USE OF THE PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

There are three different types of records contained in the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection
Record. Their purpose and instructions for use are as follows:

1. OPERATION RECORD - Spaces are provided for recording all essential information as each
Operation is accomplished. As shown in the sample record sheet, each Operation must be prop-
erly entered and endorsed by an aircraft inspector.

2. SERVICE INFORMATION LETTER. SERVICE BULLETIN AND AIRWORTHINESS


DIRECTIVE COMPLIANCE RECORD - Also included as part of the Aircraft Inspection
Record are sheets to provide reference of compliance with Service Information Letters, Service
Bulletins and Airworthiness Directives.

3. SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS RECORD - The last few pages of the Aircraft Inspection
Record consist of sheets for recording Special Inspection Items.

(samples shown on following page)

17
1.
OPERATION RECORD
Operation Operation
Operation Due Accomplished Work AircraftInspectorSignature
(Hours) Date OrderNo. Company
Name andCertificate
Number

Operation 1 950 950 7/3/94 T7110 ABC Flying Serv. C. L. Smith IA1234

Operation 2 1000 1000 10/2/94 T7131 ABC Flying Serv. C. L Smith IA1234

Operation 3 1050

Operation #

Operation

Operation#

that
"I certify accordance
in a progressive inspection
with program CareProgram)the operation entered above
Cessna Progressive wasperformed
and the air-
craft is approved for returntoservice

CESSNA SERVICE INFORMATION LETTER, SERVICE BULLETIN AND FAA AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE COMPLIANCE RECORD
2. Service Letter. Service Work
Bulletin or Airworthiness
Aircraft Order Aircraft Inspector
Date Directive
Number Hours Number
Company Name

10/2/94 SEB86-21 1000 T7131 ABC Flying Service C. L. Smith A&P1234

10/9/94 AD86-20-09 1037 T7156 ABC Flying Service C. L. Smith A&P1234

SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS RECORD

Aircaft Work Order Due(Hours AircraftInspector


Special Inspection Item Company or

10/2/94 Selector Valve 1000 T7131 ABC Flying Serv. 1500 J. Jones A&P1121

10/2/94 NG Pivot Brgs 1000 T7132 ABC Flying Serv. 2000 J. Jones A&P1121

18
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS

The following suggestions and recommendations are provided to assist in conducting Operations.

1. Perform the Operations as they become due using the applicable Operation Schedule.

*************************
* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *
********************

Inspection intervals may be exceeded by 10 hours if necessary, or performed early at any time
prior to the regular interval as provided below:

a) In the event of late compliance of any Operation scheduled, the next Operation in sequence
retains a due point from the time the late Operation was originally scheduled.

*********

** EXAMPLE *
*********

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 50 HOURS 50 HOURS
2 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
3 150 HOURS 159 HOURS"
4 DUE AT 200 HOURS

"Operation Number 3 was performed nine (9) hours late (within the 10 hour grace period).
The next Operation retains a DUE POINT 50 hours from the time when Operation 3 was
originally scheduled. In this example, Operation Number 4 is due at 200 hours.

*******
* NOTE *
* *
*** ****

Any Operation may be exceeded by 10 hours if necessary, INCLUDING Operation Number 4.

As stated in F.A.R. 91.409(d)(2)(ii), the 10-hour grace period can only be used for
"ENROUTE" flight time.

19
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

1. b) In the event of early compliance of any Operation scheduled, that occurs 10 hours or less
ahead of schedule, the next Operation due point may remain where originally set.
*********
* EXAMPLE *

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 50 HOURS 50 HOURS
2 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
3 150 HOURS 145 HOURS"
4 DUE AT 200 HOURS
**Because Operation Number 3 was performed five (5) hours early (within the 10 hour grace
period), Operation Number 4 will retain the DUE POINT originally scheduled.

c) In the event of early compliance of any operation scheduled, that occurs more than 10 hours
ahead of schedule, the next Operation due point must be rescheduled to establish a new due
point from time of early accomplishment.

* EXAMPLE *

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 50 HOURS 50 HOURS
2 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
3 150 HOURS 135 HOURS*
4 DUE AT 185 HOURS
**Because Operation Number 3 was performed fifteen (15) hours early (more than 10 hours
early, Operation Number 4 must be rescheduled to have a DUE POINT 50 hours after
Operation Number 3 was actually performed. In this example, Operation Number 4 was
rescheduled to be due at 185 hours.

20
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

2. Prior to actually starting an Operation, a check is to be made of the Progressive Aircraft


Inspection Record for the following.

a) Operation Record to determine which Operation is due.

b) The Service Information Letter, Service Bulletin, Airworthiness Directive Compliance Record
for previous compliance and items that are due.

c) Special Inspection Items Record for items that are due.


*** ******
* NOTE *
*** ******

It is important to review Section 2 of the Aircraft Service Manual for all Special Inspection items
that are due and verify that each item is recorded in the Progressive Aircraft Inspection Record.

3. The intent of the Operation Schedules is to provide inspection personnel with a checklist of the
items requiring inspection. Therefore, when conducting an Operation, inspection personnel shall
have available the following additional information:

a) Applicable Service Manuals and Parts Catalogs since these are to be utilized to obtain the
technical information necessary for accomplishing the inspection items and servicing the air-
craft as required.

b) Cessna Service Information Letters, Mandatory & Recommended Service Bulletins and FAA
Airworthiness Directives since a compliance check of these items is to be made as part of
each Operation.

21
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

4. Inspection discrepancies found as a result of conducting an operation are to be recorded and


corrected as necessary before approving the aircraft for return to service.

5. As the Operation is completed, the supervising mechanic and aircraft inspector are to sign the
Operation Schedule and the aircraft inspector is to fill out and sign the Progressive Care
Inspection Record. Any Special Inspection items, Service Information Letters, Service Bulletins
or Airworthiness Directives that are accomplished during the Operation are also to be entered on
the appropriate record sheet at the back of the Progressive Care Inspection Record for future ref-
erence.

* NOTE*

Although the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record provides a permanent record of the
inspections accomplished under the Cessna Progressive Care Program, the original aircraft,
engine and propeller logbooks/records are to be maintained in accordance with the FAR's relative
to inspection, maintenance, repairs and alterations.

22
H. VARIATIONS TO THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM

1. VARIATION TO NORMAL SCHEDULING

a) For increased flexibility in scheduling, an Operation may be divided and accomplished over a
period of several days allowing the aircraft to remain on flight status.

*EXAMPLE*

If an OPERATION DUE point is set at 50 hours, a portion of the Operation could be done at 40
hours, and another portion at 45 hours and the remainder at 50 hours.

In recording the Operation in the Aircraft Inspection Record, the entry under OPERATION
ACCOMPLISHED would be the actual aircraft hours at the time the initial part of the Operation
was first begun, which in the above example was 40 hours.

b) As stated in Section G, titled Conducting The Operations, in the event of early compliance of
any Operation scheduled that occurs 10 hours or less ahead of schedule, the next Operation
DUE POINT will remain where originally set. In the event of early compliance of any Operation
scheduled, that occurs more than 10 hours ahead of schedule, the next Operation DUE
POINT will be rescheduled to establish a new DUE POINT from the time of early accomplish-
ment.

23
H. VARIATIONS TO THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM (continued)

2. AMENDING OPERATION SCHEDULES

a) Aircraft are utilized in many types of flight operations and may be subjected to environmental
or climatic conditions which may necessitate changing the frequency of inspection and ser-
vicing of various components and parts of the aircraft.

b) Since the inspection frequencies of the items contained in the Operation Schedules are
based on operating the aircraft under average operational and environmental conditions,
actual service experience may indicate the need to make changes in the Operation
Schedules in order to maintain a high level of safety and reliability of the aircraft. This, of
course, will depend upon the particular use and geographical location of the aircraft.

c) Changes resulting in item(s) being inspected more often may be handled as follows:

Any inspection scheduled that requires the various inspection items detailed in the Operation
Schedule to be performed at a frequency equal to that specified or more frequently is accept-
able to Cessna Aircraft Company.

d) Changes resulting in item(s) being inspected less often may be handled as follows:

Any inspection item performed at a time period in excess of that specified in the Operation
Schedule must be approved by the appropriate Governmental Aviation Agency.

24
I. CANCELLING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM

1. If the Progressive Care Program is discontinued, the owner/operator must notify the local
Governmental Aviation Agency, in writing, of the discontinuance. After the discontinuance, the
first annual inspection under FAR 91.409 (a) is due within 12 calendar months after the last com-
plete inspection. The 100-hour inspection under FAR 91.409 (b) is due 100 hours after the com-
plete inspection.

2. A complete inspection of the aircraft, for purposes of determining when the annual or 100-hour
inspections are due, requires a detailed inspection of the aircraft and ALL its components in
accordance with the progressive inspection. A routine inspection of the aircraft and a detailed
inspection of several components IS NOT considered to be a complete inspection.

25
J. PROCEDURES FOR USING PROGRESSIVE CARE ON CESSNA SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON
AIRCRAFT NOT SPECIFICALLY COVERED IN THIS SECTION

1. a) In the past, Cessna has provided the following Operation Schedules that have covered a
wide variety of Cessna Single-Engine aircraft.

PART NUMBER OPERATION SCHEDULES


D5000-1-13 Light Single Engine (LSE)
D5017-13 High Performance Single Engine/Utility (HPSE/UTILILINE)
D5004-13 Agricultural Aircraft Except Ag Husky (AG)

*NOTE *
* *

b) These Operation Schedules are no longer available. Cessna recommends that each
owner/operator currently utilizing these schedules to take the following action immediately.

c) Review, modify if necessary, develop and submit new Operations Schedules (if modified) to
the local Governmental Aviation Agency for approval.

d) The following guidelines will assist the owner/operator in developing new Operation
Schedules for the specific models not provided by Cessna Aircraft Company:

2. a) Utilize a current Operation Schedule contained in one of the following Aircraft Service
Manuals: (Use latest Service Manual revision)

SERVICE MANUAL OPS. SCHEDULE


MODEL YEARS PART NUMBER PART NUMBER
172/F172 ...........................1977-1986 D2065-2-13 D5102-2-13
182/F182/T182....................1977-1986 D2068-2-13 D5101-1-13
R182/FR182/TR182 ..............1978-1986 D2069-2-13 D5103-2-13
206 & T206 ......................... 1977-1986 D2070-2-13 D5104-2-13
210 & T210 ......................... 1985-1986 D2073-1-13 D5105-1-13
P210.................................1985-1986 D2074-1-13 D5106-1-13

26
J. PROCEDURES FOR USING PROGRESSIVE CARE ON CESSNA SINGLE-ENGINE AIRCRAFT
NOT SPECIFICALLY COVERED IN THIS SECTION (continued)

2. (continued)
b) As a guide to assist the operator in choosing which Operation Schedule to modify, use the
cross-reference chart below.

MODEL USE THIS OPERATION SCHEDULE

120, 140,150, 152, 170, 172, F172, 175 MODEL 172 P.N. D5102-2-13

177,180,182, F182, T182,185,188 MODEL 182/T182 P.N. D5101-1-13

172RG, 177RG, R182, FR182, TR182 MODEL R182/TR182 P.N. D5103-2-13

205, 206, T206, 207, T207 MODEL 206/T206 P.N. D5104-2-13

210, T210 MODEL 210/T210 P.N. D5105-1-13

P210 MODEL P210 P.N. D5106-1-13

c) Modify one of these schedules to fit each specific aircraft.

d) Review the Operation Schedule and delete items that are not applicable to the specific aircraft.

27
J. PROCEDURES FOR USING PROGRESSIVE CARE ON CESSNA SINGLE-ENGINE AIRCRAFT
NOT SPECIFICALLY COVERED IN THIS SECTION (continued)

2. (continued)

e) After reviewing the specific aircraft, add inspection requirements to the Operation Schedule
for specific items which are not covered.

f) Submit the revised Operations Schedules to the local Governmental Agency for approval.

3. Develop your own Operation Schedules

a) Section 2 of each Aircraft Service Manual contains the manufacturer's recommended inspec-
tion intervals for each model. Use these recommendations to develop Operations Schedules
that will work efficiently for the specific aircraft.

b) Following completion of the development of the Operation Schedules, submit them to the
local Governmental Aviation Agency for approval along with the other paperwork required by
F.A.R. Part 91.409 to use the progressive inspection program.

28
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

THE CESSNA CARAVAN I PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM


A. Introduction ......................................................................................................... 30
B. Manuals and forms required ..................................................................................... 33
C. Qualifying an aircraft for Progressive Care ........................................ .... 34
D. Starting the Progressive Care Inspection Program ............................................ 36
E. Use of the Operation Schedules .................................................... 38
F. Use of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record ................................................ 40
G. Conducting the Operations...................................................................................... 42
H. Variations to the Cessna Progressive Care Program ..................................................... 46
I. Cancelling the Progressive Care Program ......... ...................................................... 48

29
A. INTRODUCTION

1. a) As described in F.A.R. Part 91.409 (d), an owner/operator that desires to place an airplane on
a progressive inspection program must have the airplane inspected in accordance with an
approved progressive inspection program. The owner/operator may select one of the follow-
ing progressive inspection programs:

(1) An inspection program designed by the owner/operator.

(2) A manufacturer's approved inspection program.

b) This section presents the current Progressive Inspection Program recommended by the
Cessna Aircraft Company for the Caravan I Series Aircraft:

MODEL
208
208A
208B

30
A. INTRODUCTION (continued)

2. a) The Cessna Caravan I Progressive Inspection Program has the primary inspection items
divided into four (4) separate Operations. One Operation (inspection) is accomplished every
100 hours of operation.

b) The four (4) primary Operations are detailed as follows:

ITEMS OPERATION OPERATION OPERATION OPERATION


1 2 3 4

ENGINE 100/200/400 100 100/200 100


LANDING GEAR 100 100/200/400 100 100/200
WING/EMPENNAGE 100/200 100 100/200/400 100
FUSELAGE 100 100/200 100 100/200/400

*** ****** ***


* EXAMPLE *
* *

Operation 1 consists of all 100-hour items for the aircraft; 200-hour items for the engine and
Wing/Empennage; and all 400-hour items for the engine.

c) Accomplishment of these four Operations at specified points will assure compliance with the
hourly time limit requirements set by the manufacturer.

d) As defined by F.A.R. Part 91.409 (d) (4), the frequency and detail of the Progressive
Inspection shall provide for the complete inspection of the aircraft within each 12-calendar
months.

31
A. INTRODUCTION (continued)

e) If the airplane is approaching the end of a 12-calendar month period, but the complete cycle
of Operations one through four have not been accomplished, it will be necessary to complete
the remaining Operations regardless of aircraft hours before the end of the 12-calendar
month period.

f) The Cessna Progressive Inspection Program is used in lieu of the conventional 100
hour/annual inspection program. Operators using Cessna Progressive Care are not required
to perform annual inspections every 12-calendar months as long as the inspection require-
ments of the Progressive Care Program are complied with.

NOTE

Additional special inspection items listed Chapter 5 of applicable service/maintenance manuals

32
B. MANUALS AND FORMS REQUIRED

The following manuals and forms are used in the Cessna Caravan I Progressive Care Inspection
Program.

1. OPERATIONS MANUAL

The purpose of this manual is to provide the necessary information for promoting, establishing
and conducting a Progressive Care Program for Cessna owners and operators.

2. NOTIFICATION FORM

This form is submitted to the appropriate Governmental Aviation Agency when activating a
Progressive Care Inspection Program on a specific aircraft.

3. OPERATION SCHEDULES

As an aid in performing the inspections, the Operation Schedules have been prepared as work
forms for use in the shop. These Schedules detail the inspection items for each Operation and a
place is provided for "Sign Off" when each item is completed.

4. PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

All Operations are recorded as they are conducted thereby providing the owner with a permanent
record of aircraft maintenance while on the Progressive Care Inspection Program. The
Progressive Care Inspection Record is not required to be used when the owner/operator is utiliz-
ing CESCOM. if utilizing CESCOM, the Aircraft Maintenance Record shall be used to record all
Operations conducted.

NOTE

All manuals and forms used in the Cessna Progressive Care Inspection Program are available
from the Cessna Parts Distribution. Ordering information has been included in the Appendix.

33
C. QUALIFYING AN AIRCRAFT FOR PROGRESSIVE CARE

1. NEW DELIVERY AIRCRAFT

A new delivery aircraft must have less than 100 hours TOTAL TIME in service and enough cal-
endar time remaining since the issuance date of the original Airworthiness Certificate to allow the
owner/operator to complete a cycle of four Operations before the first annual inspection becomes
due. Operation Number 1 will be due at 100 hours time in service. Operation 2 will be due at 200
hours, Operation 3 will be due at 300 hours and Operation 4 will be due at 400 hours.

*EXAMPLE*

If the aircraft has two months remaining before the original Airworthiness Certificate expired
(annual inspection becomes due) and the aircraft Total Time was only 90 hours, the aircraft may
not be flown enough to require the completion of Operations 1 through 4 in the remaining two
months. In this example, the aircraft shall be handled per paragraph 2 ALL OTHER AIR-
CRAFT.

34
C. QUALIFYING AN AIRCRAFT FOR PROGRESSIVE CARE (continued)

2. ALL OTHER AIRCRAFT

To qualify other aircraft which have more than 100 hours time in service for the Progressive Care
Inspection Program, conduct a Complete Airplane Inspection. This inspection consists of all 100-
hour, 200-hour and 400-hour inspection items plus those Special Inspection items which are due
at the specified time. Operation Number 1 will become due 100 hours from the time the Complete
Airplane Inspection was completed.

* *******
* NOTE *

Variations to 1 and 2 above for starting an aircraft on the Progressive Care Inspection Program
can be found in Paragraph H of this section.

35
D. STARTING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM

F.A.R. Part 91.409(d) establishes the following requirements for placing an aircraft on a Progressive
Inspection Program.

1. DOMESTIC

Submit a written request to the FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) having jurisdiction
over the area in which the applicant is located and provide the following.

a) The name of a certified mechanic holding an Inspection Authorization, the name of a certified
Airframe Repair Station or the name of the manufacturer of the aircraft who will supervise or
conduct the Progressive Inspection.

NOTE

Notification Form P/N D5497-1-13 is being used for this purpose and is to be signed by the air-
craft owner and the servicing organization. A copy of this form is provided in the Appendix.

b) A current inspection procedures manual (Operations Manual) available and readily under-
standable to the pilot and maintenance personnel.

c) A copy of the inspection schedule forms to be used while the aircraft is on the Progressive
Care Inspection Program.

2. INTERNATIONAL

Contact the local Governmental Aviation Agency prior to placing the aircraft on Progressive Care
to assure they are familiar and in agreement with the program.

36
D. STARTING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)

3. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE RECORDS

Make an entry in the Aircraft Maintenance Records stating that the aircraft has been placed on
the Progressive Care Inspection Program noting the date and aircraft hours.

4. PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

On the inside cover of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record:

a) Fill in the owner and aircraft information.

b) Complete and sign the verification information block.

c) Fill out the first entry in the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record indicating the TOTAL
Aircraft Hours when OPERATION Number 1 will be due (i.e., 100 hours total time in service for
new aircraft and 100 hours from the time the Complete Aircraft Inspection was conducted for
all other aircraft).

NOTE*

The Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record is not required to be used when the owner/operator
is utilizing Cessna's Computerized Maintenance Records System (CESCOM). With the owner/opera-
tor and mechanics input, CESCOM will record and monitor Airworthiness Directives, Service Bulletins
and Special Inspection items.

37
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES

1. Operation Schedules have been developed for the Caravan I and incorporated into Chapter 5 of
the Aircraft Maintenance Manual. Additional copies of these schedules are available from the
Cessna Parts Distribution and are listed by part number in the Appendix. Each Operation Schedule
has been prepared as a work form for use in the service shop and the copies available from the
Cessna Parts Distribution have the primary operations color-coded for easy identification.

OPERATION 1 - BLUE OPERATION 3- GREEN


OPERATION 2 - YELLOW OPERATION 4 - PINK

2. TITLE BLOCK

The Title block is used to record the Aircraft Registration Number, Aircraft Model and Serial
Number, and Time in Service.

3. COMPLETION "SIGN OFF"

A space is provided on the right side of each sheet for "Sign Off" when each item is completed.

4. ITEMS THAT ARE NOT APPLICABLE

Some of the items listed on the Operation Schedule may not be applicable to a specific aircraft In
this case, the mechanic is to check off the item(s) as not applicable by entering the letters "NA"
(Not applicable) proceeding his initials.

5. SPECIAL OPTIONS AND FIELD INSTALLED ITEMS

a) Cessna has prepared the Operation Schedules to assist the owner/operator in meeting the
inspection requirements of F.A.R. Part 91.409. The Operation Schedules are not intended to
be all-inclusive, for no such charts can replace the good judgement of a certified A&P
mechanic in the performance of his duties.

38
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES (continued)

5. (continued)

b) Additionally, the Operations Schedules do not address specially installed items or any field
installed items (i.e., floats and Supplemental Type Certificated items). It is the mechanic's
responsibility to insure that all items are inspected for airworthiness before approving the air-
craft for return to service.

6. SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS

a) Although the inspection intervals of the items in the Operation Schedules are based on hours
time in-service, there are a few items which also have calendar limitations.

b) For example, a functional test of the fuel vent system float valves is required at a specified
hourly interval in the Operation Schedule or at a yearly interval whichever comes first.

c) SPECIAL INSPECTION items with hour and/or calendar limitations are listed in the
Introduction of this section and are also listed in Chapters 4 and 5 of the Aircraft Maintenance
Manual. The hour and calendar limitations of items in this category must be monitored closely
and the appropriate Operations conducted accordingly.

d) There is a section in the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record to record and monitor
Special Inspection items. Cessna's Computerized Maintenance Records System (CESCOM),
will also assist the owner/operator in monitoring SPECIAL INSPECTION items.

7. POST INSPECTION ITEMS

As part of each Operation, a functional check of the engine, avionics and instruments shall be
conducted to assure proper operation. The items listed in this category also include a check of
the aircraft file for required materials and compliance with applicable Mandatory and
Recommended Service Bulletins, Airworthiness Directives and lubrication of components in
accordance with the Service Manual Lubrication charts.

39
F. USE OF THE PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

There are three different types of records contained in the Progressive Care Inspection Record. Their
purpose and instructions for use are as follows:

1. OPERATION RECORD - Spaces are provided for recording all essential information each
Operation is accomplished. As shown in the sample record sheet, each Operation must be prop-
erly entered and endorsed by an aircraft inspector.

2. SERVICE BULLETIN AND AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE COMPLIANCE RECORD


- Also included as part of the Aircraft Inspection Record are sheets to provide reference of com-
pliance with Service Bulletins and Airworthiness Directives.

3. SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS RECORD - The last few pages of the Aircraft Inspection
Record consist of sheets for recording Special Inspection Items.
*******
*NOTE*

The Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record is not required to be used when the owner/oper-
ator is utilizing Cessna's Computerized Maintenance Records System (CESCOM). With the
owner/operator and mechanic's input, CESCOM will record and monitor Airworthiness Directives,
Service Bulletins and Special Inspection items.

* (samples shown on following page).

40
1.

OPERATION RECORD
Operation Operation
Operation Due Accomplished Work AircraftInspectorSignature
Number (Hours (Hours) Date OrderNo. Company
Name and Certificate
Number

Operation 1 900 900 7/3/94 T7110 ABC Flying Serv. C. L. Smith IA1234

Operation 2 1000 1000 10/2/94 T7131 ABC Flying Serv. C. L. Smith IA1234

Operation 3 1050

Operation *

Operation
Operation

Operation
Operation

Operation *

*I certifythatin accordance witha progressive inspection


program(CessnaProgressive
Care Program)
the operation
entered above was
performedandtheair-
craft isapproved for returnto Service
CESSNA SERVICE INFORMATION LETTER, SERVICE BULLETIN AND FAA AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE COMPLIANCE RECORD
2. ServiceLetter. Service Work
Bulletin or Airworthiness Aircraft Order Aircraft Inspector
Date Directive Number Hours Number Company
Name Signature

10/2/94 CAB86-08 1000 T7131 ABC Flying Service C. L Smith A&P1234

10/9/94 AD86-20-09 1037 T7156 ABC Flying Service C. L Smith A&P1234

SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS RECORD


Next Inspection
Aircraft WorkOrder Due (Hours AircraftInspetor
Date Special Inspection
Item Hours Number CompanyName or Date) Signature
3.
10/2/94 Selector Valve 1000 T7131 ABC Flying Serv. 1500 J. Jones A&P1234

10/2/94 NG Pivot Brgs 1000 T7132 ABC Flying Serv. 2000 J. Jones A&P1234

41
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS

The following suggestions and recommendations are provided to assist in conducting Operations.

1. Perform the Operations as they become due using the applicable Operation Schedule.

*******************
* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *
* *
*******************

Date controlled inspection intervals can be exceeded by 30 days if necessary and time controlled
Inspection intervals can be exceeded by 10 hours if necessary, or can be performed early at any
time prior to the regular interval as provided below:

a) In the event of late compliance of any Operation scheduled, the next Operation in sequence
retains a due point from the time the late Operation was originally scheduled.

** *******
* EXAMPLE *
* *

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
3 300 HOURS 309 HOURS*
4 DUE AT 400 HOURS

"Operation Number 3 was performed nine (9) hours late (within the 10-hour grace period).
The next Operation retains a DUE POINT 100 hours from the time when Operation 3 was
originally scheduled. In this example, Operation Number 4 is due at 400 hours.

* NOTE *

Any Operation may be exceeded by 10 hours if necessary, INCLUDING Operation


Number 4.

As stated in F.A.R. 91.409 (d) (2) (ii), th e 10-hour grace period can only be used for
"ENROUTE" flight time.

42
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

1. b) In the event of early compliance of any Operation scheduled, that occurs 10 hours or less
ahead of schedule, the next Operation due point may remain where originally set.

* EXAMPLE *

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
3 300 HOURS 295 HOURS**
4 DUE AT 400 HOURS
**Because Operation Number 3 was performed five (5) hours early (within the 10-hour grace
period), Operation Number4 will retain the DUE POINT originally scheduled.

c) In the event of early compliance of any operation scheduled, that occurs more than 10 hours
ahead of schedule, the next Operation due point must be rescheduled to establish a new due
point from time of early accomplishment.
***********
* EXAMPLE *
* **********

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
3 300 HOURS 285 HOURS**
4 DUE AT 385 HOURS
**Number 3 was performed fifteen (15) hours early (more than 10 hours early), Operation
Number 4 must be rescheduled to have a DUE POINT 100 hours after Operation Number 3
was actually performed. In this example, Operation Number 4 was rescheduled to be due at
385 hours.

43
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

2. Prior to actually starting an Operation, a check is to be made of the Progressive Aircraft


Inspection Record or CESCOM for the following.

a) Operation Record to determine which Operation is due.

b) The Service Bulletin and Airworthiness Directive Compliance Record for previous compliance
and items that are due.

c) Special Inspection Items Record for items that are due.


***********
* *
NOTE *

It is important to review the Operation Schedule for all SPECIAL INSPECTION items that are
due and verify that each item is recorded in the Progressive Aircraft Inspection Record.

3. The intent of the Operation Schedules is to provide inspection personnel with a checklist of the
items requiring inspection. Therefore, when conducting an Operation, inspection personnel shall
have available the following additional information:

a) Applicable Maintenance Manuals and Parts Catalogs since these ar to be utilized to obtain
the technical information necessary for accomplishing the inspection items and servicing the
aircraft as required.

b) Mandatory and Recommended Service Bulletins and FAA Airworthiness Directives since a
compliance check of these items is to be made as part of each Operation.

44
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS(continued)

4. Inspection discrepancies found as a result of conducting an Operation are to be recorded and


corrected as necessary before approving the aircraft for return to service.

5. As the Operation is completed, the inspector is to fill out and sign the Progressive Care
Inspection Record. Any Special Inspection items, Service Bulletins or Airworthiness Directives
that are accomplished during the Operation are also to be entered on the appropriate record
sheet at the back of the Progressive Care Inspection Record for future reference.

6. The Progressive Care Inspection Record is not required to be used when the owner/operator is
utilizing Cessna's Computerized Maintenance Record System (CESCOM). If utilizing CESCOM,
the Aircraft Maintenance Record shall be used to record all Operations conducted.

* NOTE *

Although the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record provides a permanent record of the
inspections accomplished under the Cessna Progressive Care Program, the original aircraft,
engine and propeller record/logbooks are to be maintained in accordance with the FAR's relative
to inspection, maintenance, repairs, and alterations.

45
H. VARIATIONS TO THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM

1. VARIATION TO NORMAL SCHEDULING

a) For increased flexibility in scheduling, an Operation may be divided and accomplished over a
period of several days allowing the aircraft to remain on flight status.

** ******
* EXAMPLE *
* *

If an OPERATION DUE point is set at 100 hours, a portion of the Operation could be done at
90 hours, and another portion at 95 hours and the remainder at 100 hours.

In recording the Operation in the Aircraft Inspection Record, the entry under OPERATION
ACCOMPLISHED would be the actual aircraft hours at the time the initial part of the Operation
was first begun, which in the above example was 90 hours.

b) As stated in Section G, titled Conducting The Operations, in the event of early compliance of
any Operation scheduled that occurs 10 hours or less ahead of schedule, the next Operation
DUE POINT will remain where originally set. In the event of early compliance of any Operation
scheduled, that occurs more than 10 hours ahead of schedule, the next Operation DUE
POINT will be rescheduled to establish a new DUE POINT from the time of early accomplish-
ment.

46
H. VARIATIONS TO THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM (continued)

2. AMENDING OPERATION SCHEDULES

a) Aircraft are utilized in many types of flight operations and may be subjected to environmental
or climatic conditions which may necessitate changing the frequency of inspection and ser-
vicing of various components and parts of the aircraft.

b) Since the inspection frequencies of the items contained in the Operation Schedules are
based on operating the aircraft under average operational and environmental conditions,
actual service experience may indicate the need to make changes in the Operation
Schedules in order to maintain a high level of safety and reliability of the aircraft. This, of
course, will depend upon the particular use and geographical location of the aircraft.

c) Changes resulting in item(s) being inspected more often may be handled as follows:

Any inspection scheduled that requires the various inspection items detailed in the Operation
Schedule to be performed at a frequency equal to that specified or more frequently is accept-
able to Cessna Aircraft Company.

d) Changes resulting in item(s) being inspected less often may be handled as follows:

Any inspection item performed at a time period in excess of that specified in the Operation
Schedule must be approved by the appropriate Governmental Aviation Agency.

47
I. CANCELLING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM

1. If the Progressive Care Program is discontinued, the owner/operator must notify the local
Governmental Aviation agency, in writing, of the discontinuance. After the discontinuance, the
first annual inspection under FAR 91.409 (a) is due within 12 calendar months after the last com-
plete inspection. The 100-hour inspection under FAR 91.409 (b) is due 100 hours after the com-
plete inspection.

2. A complete inspection of the aircraft, for purposes of determining when the annual or 100-hour
inspections are due, requires a detailed inspection of the aircraft and ALL its components in
accordance with the progressive inspection. A routine inspection of the aircraft and a detailed
inspection of several components IS NOT considered to be a complete inspection.

48
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

IV THE CESSNA MULTI-ENGINE PISTON PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM

A. Introduction ..................................................................................................... 50
B. Manuals and forms required ................................................................................ 52
C. Qualifying an aircraft for Progressive Care ........................................ ..... 53
D. Starting the Progressive Care Inspection Program .................................................. 54
E. Use of the Operation Schedules .......... ............................................. 56
F. Use of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record ........................................... 60
G. Conducting the Operations ................................................................................. 62
H. Variations to the Cessna Progressive Care Program ................................................ 66
I. Cancelling the Progressive Care Program .............................................................. 68
J. Procedures for using Progressive Care on Cessna multi-engine piston aircraft not
specifically covered in this section ....................................................................... 69

49
A. INTRODUCTION

1. a) As described in F.A.R. Part 91.409 (d), an owner/operator that desires to place an airplane on
a progressive inspection program must have the airplane inspected in accordance with an
approved progressive inspection program. The owner/operator may select one of the follow-
ing progressive inspection programs:

(1) An inspection program designed by the owner/operator.

(2) A manufacturer's approved inspection program.

b) This section presents the current Progressive Inspection Program recommended by the
Cessna Aircraft Company for the following Multi-Engine piston aircraft models:

MODEL YEARS

T303 ..................................................... 1982-1984


310R & T310R ........................................ 1975-1981
335 .............................................................. 1980
340 & 340A ............................................ 1972-1984
402C ............................ ............ 1979-1985
404 ......... ................................ 1977-1981
414 & 414A ......... ................................. 1970-1985
421C .................................................... 1976-1985

***********
* *
* NOTE
* *

ALL Cessna Multi-Engine piston aircraft not listed in the above chart are addressed in Paragraph J of
this section.

50
50
A. INTRODUCTION (continued)

2. a) The Cessna Multi-Engine Piston Progressive Inspection Program is divided into four (4) sepa-
rate Operations. One Operation (inspection) is accomplished every 50 hours of operation.

b) Additional SPECIAL INSPECTION requirements which are required at other intervals are
specified in Section 2 or Chapter 5 of the appropriate Aircraft Service/Maintenance Manual.

c) Accomplishment of these four Operations at specified points will assure compliance with the
hourly time limit requirements set by the manufacturer. Additional SPECIAL INSPECTION
requirements will be accomplished at their prescribed intervals and/or intervals coinciding
with OPERATIONS 1 through 4.

d) As defined by F.A.R. Part 91.409 (d) (4), the frequency and detail of the Progressive
Inspection shall provide for the complete inspection of the aircraft within each 12-calendar
months.

C) e) If the airplane is approaching the end of a 12-calendar month period, but the complete cycle
of four Operations has not been accomplished, it will be necessary to complete the remaining
Operations regardless of aircraft hours before the end of the 12-calendar month period.

f) The Cessna Progressive Inspection Program is used in lieu of the conventional 100
hour/annual inspection program. Operators using Cessna Progressive Care are not required
to perform annual inspections every 12-calendar months as long as the inspection require-
ments of the Progressive Inspection Program are complied with.

51
B. MANUALS AND FORMS REQUIRED

The following manuals and forms are used in the Cessna Multi-Engine Piston Progressive Care
Inspection Program.

1. OPERATIONS MANUAL

The purpose of this manual is to provide the necessary information for promoting, establishing
and conducting a Progressive Care Program for Cessna owners and operators.

2. NOTIFICATION FORM

This form is submitted to the appropriate Governmental Aviation Agency when activating a
Progressive Care Inspection Program on a specific aircraft.

3. OPERATION SCHEDULES

As an aid in performing the inspections, the Operation Schedules have been prepared as work
forms for use in the shop. These Operation Schedules detail the inspection items for each
Operation and a place is provided for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to initial as each
item is performed.

4. PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

All Operations are recorded as they are conducted thereby providing the owner with a permanent
record of aircraft maintenance while on the Progressive Care Inspection Program.

***********
* NOTE *

All manuals and forms used in the Cessna Progressive Care Inspection Program are available
from the Cessna Parts Distribution. Ordering information has been included in the Appendix,

52
C. QUALIFYING AN AIRCRAFT FOR PROGRESSIVE CARE

1. ALL AIRCRAFT

To qualify other aircraft which have more than 50 hours time in service for the Progressive Care
Inspection Program, conduct a Complete Airplane Inspection. This inspection consists of all 50-
hour, 100-hour and 200-hour inspection items (as applicable to model) plus those Special and
Yearly Inspection items which are due at the specified time. Operation Number 1 will become due
50 hours from the time the Complete Airplane Inspection was completed.

*************
* *
* NOTE *

Variations to method above for starting an aircraft on the Progressive Care Inspection Program
can be found in Paragraph H of this section.

53
D. STARTING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM

F.A.R. Part 91.409(d) establishes the following requirements for placing an aircraft on a Progressive
Inspection Program.

1. DOMESTIC

Submit a written request to the FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) having jurisdiction
over the area in which the applicant is located and provide the following.

a) The name of a certified mechanic holding an Inspection Authorization, the name of a certified
Airframe Repair Station or the name of the manufacturer of the aircraft who will supervise or
conduct the Progressive Inspection.

NOTE

Notification Form P/N.D5497-1-13 is being used for this purpose and is to be signed by the air-
craft owner and the servicing organization. A copy of this form is provided in the Appendix.

b) A current inspection procedures manual (Operations Manual) available and readily under-
standable to the pilot and maintenance personnel.

c) A copy of the inspection schedule forms to be used while the aircraft is on the Progressive
Care Inspection Program.

2. INTERNATIONAL

Contact the local Governmental Aviation Agency prior to placing the aircraft on Progressive Care
to assure they are familiar and in agreement with the program.

54
D. STARTING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)

3. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE RECORDS

Make an entry in the Aircraft Maintenance Records stating that the aircraft has been placed on
the Progressive Care Inspection Program noting the date and aircraft hours.

4. PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

On the inside cover of the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record:

a) Fill in the owner and aircraft information.

b) Complete and sign the verification information block.

c) Fill out the first entry in the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record indicating the TOTAL
Aircraft Hours when OPERATION Number 1 will be due (i.e., 50 hours total time in service for
new aircraft and 50 hours from the time the Complete Aircraft Inspection was conducted for
all other aircraft).

55
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES

1. a) Operation Schedules have been developed for the specific models listed below and incorpo-
rated into Section 2 or Chapter 5 of their respective Service/Maintenance Manuals. Additional
copies of these schedules are available from the Cessna Supply Division and are listed by
part number in the Appendix.

MODEL YEARS

T303 ........................................... 1982-1984


310R & T310R ............................... 1975-1981
335 ................................................... 1980
340 & 340A .................................. 1972-1984
402C ........................................... 1979-1985
404 ......... ....................... 1977-1981
414 & 414A ................................... 1970-1985
421C ........................................... 1976-1985

b) Each Operation Schedule has been prepared as a work form for use in the service shop and
copies available from the Cessna Supply Division have been color-coded for easy identifica-
tion.

OPERATION 1- BLUE OPERATION 3 - GREEN


OPERATION 2 - YELLOW OPERATION 4 - PINK

2. TITLE BLOCK

The Title block is used to record the important information about the servicing organization, cus-
tomer, and aircraft.

56
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES (continued)

3. VERIFICATION / INITIALING

A space is provided on the right side of each sheet for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to
verify and initial as each item is accomplished.

4. ITEMS THAT ARE NOT APPLICABLE

Some of the items listed on the Operation Schedule may not be applicable to a specific aircraft. In
this case, the mechanic is to check off the item(s) as not applicable by entering the letters "NA"
(Not applicable) preceding his initials.

5. SPECIAL OPTIONS AND FIELD INSTALLED ITEMS

a) Cessna has prepared the Operation Schedules to assist the owner/operator in meeting the
inspection requirements of F.A.R. Part 91.409. The Operation Schedules are not intended to
be all-inclusive, for no such charts can replace the good judgement of a certified A&P
mechanic in the performance of his duties.

b) Additionally, the Operations Schedules do not address specially installed items or any field
installed items (i.e., Supplemental Type Certificated items). It is the mechanics responsibility
to insure that all items are inspected for airworthiness before approving the aircraft for return
to service.

57
E. USE OF THE OPERATIONS SCHEDULES(continued

* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *
* *

6. SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS

a) Although the inspection intervals of the items in the Operation Schedules are based on hours
time in-service, there are a few items which also have calendar limitations.

For example, an oil change may be required at the specified hourly intervals in the Operation
Schedule or at a monthly interval whichever comes first.

b) SPECIAL INSPECTION items with hour and/or calendar limitations are shown in Section
2 or Chapter 5 of the appropriate Aircraft Service/Maintenance Manual. The hour and calen-
dar limitations of items in this category must be monitored closely and the appropriate
Operations conducted accordingly. There is a section in the Progressive Care Aircraft
Inspection Record to record and monitor SPECIAL INSPECTION items.

58
E. USE OF THE OPERATION SCHEDULES (continued)

7. POST INSPECTION ITEMS

As part of each Operation, a functional check of the engines, avionics and instruments shall be
conducted to assure proper operation. The items listed in this category also include a check of
the aircraft file for required materials and compliance with applicable Service Information Letters,
Mandatory and Recommended Service Bulletins, Airworthiness Directives and lubrication of com-
ponents in accordance with the applicable Service/Maintenance Manual Lubrication charts.

8. CERTIFICATION FOR APPROVING THE AIRCRAFT FOR RETURN TO SERVICE

a) A place is provided at the end of each Operation Schedule to certify that the Operation has
been completed and the aircraft is ready to be approved for return to service. Spaces are pro-
vided for the supervising mechanic and aircraft inspector to sign. A space is also provided for
recording the aircraft time in-service at the time the Operation is accomplished.

b) When approving the aircraft for return to service, the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection
Record shall also be signed. This action will insure a complete history of each inspection per-
formed.

59
F. USE OF THE PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT INSPECTION RECORD

There are three different types of records contained in the Progressive Care Inspection Record. Their
purpose and instructions for use are as follows:

1. OPERATION RECORD - Spaces are provided for recording all essential information as each
Operation is accomplished. As shown in the sample record sheet, each Operation must be prop-
erly entered and endorsed by an aircraft inspector.

2. SERVICE INFORMATION LETTER. SERVICE BULLETIN AND AIRWORTHINESS


DIRECTIVE COMPLIANCE RECORD - Also included as part of the Aircraft Inspection
Record are sheets to provide reference of compliance with Service Information Letters, Service
Bulletins and Airworthiness Directives.

3. SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS RECORD - The last few pages of the Aircraft Inspection
Record consist of sheets for recording Special Inspection Items.

(samples shown on following page)

60
1.
OPERATION RECORD
Operation Operation
Operation Due Accomplished Work Aircraft Inspector
Signature
Number (Hours) (Hours) Order No. CompanyName andCertificateNumber

Operation 1 950 950 7/3/94 T7110 ABC Flying Serv. C. L.Smith IA1234
Operation 2 1000 1000 10/2/94 T7131 ABC Flying Serv. C. L. Smith IA1234
Operation 3 1050

Operation

Operation

Operation *

Operation #
Operation

"I certifythatin accordance witha progressive


inspection
program
(Cessna Progressive
CareProgram)the operation entered
above wasperformed
andthe air-
craft is approved for return to service
CESSNA SERVICE INFORMATION LETTER. SERVICE BULLETIN AND FAA AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE COMPLIANCE RECORD
2. Service Letter.Service Work
Bulletinor Airworthiness Aircraft Order Aircraft Inspector
Date Directive Number Hours Number CompanyName Signature

10/2/94 MEB86-21 1000 T7131 ABC Flying Service C. L.Smith A&P1234


10/9/94 AD86-20-09 1037 T7156 ABC Flying Service C. L Smith A&P1234

SPECIAL INSPECTION ITEMS RECORD

Aircraft WorkOrder Due(Hours) AircaftInspector


Date Special Inspection
Item Hours Number Company
Name or Date) Signature

10/2/94 Selector Valve 1000 T7131 ABC Flying Serv. 1500 J. Jones A&P1234

10/2/94 NG Pivot Brgs 1000 T7132 ABC Flying Serv. 2000 J. Jones A&P1234

61
G.. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS

The following suggestions and recommendations are provided to assist in conducting Operations.

1. Perform the Operations as they become due using the applicable Operation Schedule.

* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *
*******************

Inspection intervals can be exceeded by 10 hours if necessary, or performed early at any time
prior to the regular interval as provided below:

a) In the event of late compliance of any Operation scheduled, the next Operation in sequence
retains a due point from the time the late Operation was originally scheduled.

**********
*EXAMPLE *

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 50 HOURS 50 HOURS
2 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
3 150 HOURS 159 HOURS*
4 DUE AT 200 HOURS

*Operation Number 3 was performed nine (9) hours late (within the 10-hour grace period).
The next Operation retains a DUE POINT 50 hours from the time when Operation 3 was
originally scheduled. In this example, Operation Number 4 is due at 200 hours.

NOTE
* NOTE *
* *

Any Operation may be exceeded by 10 hours if necessary, INCLUDING Operation


Number 4.

As stated in F.A.R. 91.409 (d) (2) (ii), the 10-hour grace period can only be used for
"ENROUTE" flight time.

62
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

1. b) In the event of early compliance of any Operation scheduled, that occurs 10 hours or less
ahead of schedule, the next Operation due point may remain where originally set.

* EXAMPLE*
****** ****

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 50 HOURS 50 HOURS
2 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
3 150 HOURS 145 HOURS*
4 DUE AT 200 HOURS
**Because Operation Number 3 was performed five (5) hours early (within the 10-hour grace
period), Operation Number 4 will retain the DUE POINT originally scheduled.

c) In the event of early compliance of any operation scheduled, that occurs more than 10 hours
ahead of schedule, the next Operation due point must be rescheduled to establish a new due
point from time of early accomplishment.

**********
* EXAMPLE

OPERATION OPERATION SCHEDULED OPERATION ACCOMPLISHED


1 50 HOURS 50 HOURS
2 100 HOURS 100 HOURS
3 150 HOURS 135 HOURS**
4 DUE AT 185 HOURS
**Because Operation Number 3 was performed fifteen (15) hours early (more than 10 hours
early), Operation Number 4 must be rescheduled to have a DUE POINT 50 hours after
Operation Number 3 was actually performed. In this example, Operation Number 4 was
rescheduled to be due at 185 hours.

63
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

2. Prior to actually starting an Operation, a check is to be made of the Progressive Aircraft


Inspection Record for the following.

a) Operation Record to determine which Operation is due.

b) The Service Information Letter, Service Bulletin, Airworthiness Directive Compliance Record
for previous compliance and items that are due.

c) Special Inspection Items Record for items that are due.

* *
* NOTE *
* *

It is important to review Section 2 or Chapter 5 of the appropriate Aircraft Service/Maintenance


Manual for all Special Inspection items that may be due and verify that each item is recorded in
the Progressive Aircraft Inspection Record.

3. The intent of the Operation Schedules is to provide inspection personnel with a checklist of the
items requiring inspection. Therefore, when conducting an Operation, inspection personnel shall
have available the following additional information:

a) Applicable Service/Maintenance Manuals, Parts Catalogs, and Wiring Diagram Manuals since
these are to be utilized to obtain the technical information necessary for accomplishing the
inspection items and servicing the aircraft as required.

b) Cessna Service Information Letters, Mandatory and Recommended Service Bulletins and
FAA Airworthiness Directives since a compliance check of these items is to be made as part
of each Operation.

64
G. CONDUCTING THE OPERATIONS (continued)

4. Inspection discrepancies found as a result of conducting an Operation are to be recorded and


corrected as necessary before approving the aircraft for return to service.

5. As the Operation is completed, the supervising mechanic and aircraft inspector are to sign the
Operation Schedule and the aircraft inspector is to fill out and sign the Progressive Care
Inspection Record. Any Special Inspection items, Service Information Letters, Service Bulletins
or Airworthiness Directives that are accomplished during the Operation are also to be entered on
the appropriate record sheet at the back of the Progressive Care Inspection Record for future ref-
erence.

NOTE
******NOTE*

Although the Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record provides a permanent record of the
inspections accomplished under the Cessna Progressive Care Program, the original aircraft,
engine and propeller logbooks/records are to be maintained in accordance with the FAR's relative
to inspection, maintenance, repairs, and alterations.

65
H. VARIATIONS TO THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM

1. VARIATION TO NORMAL SCHEDULING

a) For increased flexibility in scheduling, an Operation may be divided and accomplished over a
period of several days allowing the aircraft to remain on flight status.

******* ***
* EXAMPLE *
* *

If an OPERATION DUE point is set at 50 hours, a portion of the Operation could be done at 40
hours, and another portion at 45 hours and the remainder at 50 hours.

In recording the Operation in the Aircraft Inspection Record, the entry under OPERATION
ACCOMPLISHED would be the actual aircraft hours at the time the initial part of the Operation
was first begun, which in the above example was 40 hours.

b) As stated in Section G, titled Conducting The Operations, in the event of early compliance of
any Operation scheduled that occurs 10 hours or less ahead of schedule, the next Operation
DUE POINT will remain where originally set. In the event of early compliance of any Operation
scheduled, that occurs more than 10 hours ahead of schedule, the next Operation DUE
POINT will be rescheduled to establish a new DUE POINT from the time of early accomplish-
ment.

2. COMBINING OPERATIONS

Operations 1 & 2 can be combined and performed simultaneously at 100 hour intervals with
Operations 3 & 4 being performed at alternate 100 hour intervals. When combining Operations,
the 50 hour requirements must continue to be performed at 50 hour intervals.

66
H. VARIATIONS TO THE CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM (continued)

3. AMENDING OPERATION SCHEDULES

a) Aircraft are utilized in many types of flight operations and may be subjected to environmental
or climatic conditions which may necessitate changing the frequency of inspection and ser-
vicing of various components and parts of the aircraft.

b) Since the inspection frequencies of the items contained in the Operation Schedules are
based on operating the aircraft under average operational and environmental conditions,
actual service experience may indicate the need to make changes in the Operation
Schedules in order to maintain a high level of safety and reliability of the aircraft.

(1) Changes resulting in item(s) being inspected more often may be handled as follows:

Any inspection scheduled that requires the various inspection items detailed in the
Operation Schedule to be performed at a frequency equal to that specified or more fre-
quently is acceptable to Cessna Aircraft Company.

(2) Changes resulting in item(s) being inspected less often may be handled as follows:

Any inspection item performed at a time period in excess of that specified in the
Operation Schedule must be approved by the appropriate Governmental Aviation
Agency.

67
. CANCELLING THE PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM

1. If the Progressive Care Program is discontinued, the owner/operator must notify the local
Governmental Aviation agency, in writing, of the discontinuance. After the discontinuance, the
first annual inspection under FAR 91.409 (a) is due within 12 calendar months after the last com-
plete inspection. The 100-hour inspection under FAR 91.409 (b) is due 100 hours after the com-
plete inspection.

2. A complete inspection of the aircraft, for purposes of determining when the annual or 100-hour
inspections are due, requires a detailed inspection of the aircraft and ALL its components in
accordance with the progressive inspection. A routine inspection of the aircraft and a detailed
inspection of several components IS NOT considered to be a complete inspection.

68
J. PROCEDURES FOR USING PROGRESSIVE CARE ON CESSNA MULTI-ENGINE PISTON AIR-
CRAFT NOT SPECIFICALLY COVERED IN THIS SECTION

1. a) In the past, Cessna has provided the following Operation Schedules that have covered a
wide variety of Cessna Multi-Engine aircraft.

PART NUMBER OPERATION SCHEDULES


D5200-13 Center Line Thrust (CLT)
D5214-13 Multi-Engine (ME)
*******-*-

* NOTE *
* *
*********

b) These Operation Schedules are no longer available. Cessna recommends that each
owner/operator currently utilizing these schedules to take the following action immediately.

c) Review, modify if necessary, develop and submit new Operation Schedules (if modified) to
the local Governmental Aviation Agency for approval.

d) The following guidelines will assist the owner/operator in developing new Operation
Schedules for the specific models not provided by Cessna Aircraft Company:

2. a) Utilize a current Operation Schedule contained in one of the following Aircraft


Service/Maintenance Manuals: (use latest Service/Maintenance Manual revision)

SERVICE MANUAL OPS. SCHEDULE


MODEL YEARS PART NUMBER PART NUMBER
T303 .......................................... 1982-1984 D2532-1-13 D5267-13
310R & T310R ............................... 1975-1981 D2514-13-13 D5246-2-13
335.....................................................1980 D2522-3-13 D5247-3-13
340 & 340A ................................... 1972-1984 D930-25-13 D5280-1-13
402C ........................................... 1979-1985 D2527-5-13 D5277-1-13
404 ............................................. 1977-1981 D2517-14-13 D5250-4-13
414 & 414A ................................... 1970-1985 D778-30-13 D5278-1-13
421C ........ ..................... 1976-1985 D2515-19-13 D5279-1-13

69
J. PROCEDURES FOR USING PROGRESSIVE CARE ON CESSNA MULTI-ENGINE AIRCRAFT
NOT SPECIFICALLY COVERED IN THIS SECTION (continued)

2. b) As a guide to assist the operator in choosing which Operation Schedule to modify, use the
cross-reference chart below.

MODEL USE THIS OPERATION SCHEDULE

T303 MODEL T303 P.N. D5267-13

310, T310, 320 MODEL 310R/T310R P.N. D5246-2-13

335 MODEL 335 P.N. D5247-3-13

336, 337, P337 NA NA

340, 340A MODEL 340/340A P.N. 5280-1-13

402C MODEL 402C P.N. D5277-1-13

404 MODEL 404 P.N. D5250-4-13

411,414 MODEL 414/414A P.N. D5278-1-13


*401,401A, 401B
*402, 402A, 402B
*421,421A, 421B

421C MODEL 421C P.N. D5279-1-13

*The Model 414 portion of the 414/414A Operation Schedule should be used as the basic
Operation Schedule for the 401, 401A, 401B, 402, 402A, 402B, 421, 421A, and 421B series air-
planes because of the similarities in the mechanical landing gear and tip tank fuel systems.
Additionally, refer to paragraph c) below.

c) Modify one of these schedules to fit each specific aircraft.

Review the Operation Schedule and delete items that are not applicable to the specific aircraft.

70
J. PROCEDURES FOR USING PROGRESSIVE CARE ON CESSNA MULTI-ENGINE AIRCRAFT
NOT SPECIFICALLY COVERED IN THIS SECTION (continued)

2. (continued)

d) After reviewing the specific aircraft, add inspection requirements to the Operation Schedule
for specific items which are not covered.

e) Submit the revised Operations Schedules to the local Governmental Agency for approval.

3. Develop your own Operation Schedules

a) Section 2 or Chapter 5 of the appropriate Aircraft Service/Maintenance Manual contains the


manufacturer's recommended inspection intervals for each model. Use these recommenda-
tions to develop Operations Schedules that will work efficiently for the specific aircraft.

b) When you have completed the development of the Operation Schedules, submit them to your
local Governmental Aviation Agency for approval along with the other paperwork required by
F.A.R. Part 91.409 for approval to use the progressive inspection program.

71
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK

72
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

V THE CESSNA CONQUEST I AND II CONTINUOUS INSPECTION PROGRAM

A. Introduction .......................... ................................... ................................... 74


B. Choosing the proper inspection program ................................................................... 76
C. Manual and forms required ..................................................................................... 79
D. Starting the Continuous Inspection Program .............................................................. 80
E. Use of the Operation Schedules.............................................................................. 81
F. Conducting the Phase Inspections .......................................................................... 83
G. Special Emphasis Items ....................................................................... 88

73
A. INTRODUCTION

1. a) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program has been revised to assist the owner/operator of
a Cessna multi-engine turboprop Model 425 or 441, in performing inspections in a logical, sim-
ple and cost effective manner.

b) Federal Aviation Regulation 91.409 (e) defines the inspection requirements for turbo-propeller
multi-engine airplanes. You, the owner/operator may select one of the following inspection
programs:

(1) A currently approved inspection program


(2) A program established by the owner/operator
(3) A manufacturer's inspection program

c) This section presents the Continuous Inspection Program recommended by the Cessna
Aircraft Company for the following Cessna models:

Model 425 .................................... Conquest I


Model 441 ................................... Conquest II

74
A. INTRODUCTION

2. a) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program is divided into five primary phases which are
numbered 2 through 6. These five phases will cover the inspection requirements that become
due on the aircraft with inspection intervals of 600 hours or less and those inspection require-
ments that become due every 24 months or less. Phase D is a combination of the phases 4,
5, and 6.

b) This chart illustrates the inspections that will be performed during the appropriate phase.

PHASE INSPECTION ITEMS PERFORMED


1 Not Used (Deleted by Cessna SNL87-5)
2 100 Hour or 12 Month Inspection Items
3 200 Hour or 12 Month Inspection Items
D 600 Hour/24 month items (complete aircraft)
4 600 Hour/24 Month Items (Nose and Tailcone)
5 600 Hour/24 Month Items (Cockpit and Cabin)
6 600 Hour/24 Month Items (Wings, Engine, Landing Gear and Hydraulics)

* NOTE *
* *

For Special Inspection items refer to the applicable Maintenance Manual (Chapter 5).

75
B. CHOOSING THE PROPER INSPECTION PROGRAM

1. The owner/operator must make a choice between the method 1 and method 2 inspection pro-
grams offered by Cessna Aircraft Company before beginning to use the new Cessna Continuous
Inspection Program. The following text will describe both inspection programs.

************* ********
a) * METHOD 1 INSPECTION PROGRAM *

METHOD 1 INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT TIME (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


At 100 Hours 2 100
At 200 Hours 2, 3 & 4 * 100/200 (part of 600 hour items)
At 300 Hours 2 100
At 400 Hours 2, 3 & 5 100/200 (part of 600 hour items)
At 500 Hours 2 100
At 600 Hours 2,3 & 6 * 100/200 (part of 600 hour items)
The Cycle is then repeated.

*The Method 1 inspection program allows the operator the freedom to spread the Six Hundred
Hour Requirements over three different inspections. This method of accomplishing the Phase
inspections provides a more even distribution of maintenance and manpower usage for each
200 hours of operation. This inspection program works effectively when the aircraft is flown a
MINIMUM of 600 hours every 24 months.

76
B. CHOOSING THE PROPER INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)
************ ****** *************
1. b) * METHOD 2 INSPECTION PROGRAM *
********** ******** ************

METHOD 2 INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT TIME (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


At 100 Hours 2 100
At 200 Hours 2, 3 100/200
At 300 Hours 2 100
At 400 Hours 2, 3 100/200
At 500 Hours 2 100
At 600 Hours 2, 3 & D * 100/200/600
The Cycle is then repeated.

*The Method 2 inspection program is very similar to Method 1 inspection program. This
program lets the operator perform all of the 600 hour inspection items during one inspec-
tion. The Method 2 program should be used by all operators who do not expect to consis-
tently fly the aircraft more than 600 hours in 24 months. The Method 2 inspection program
works best when the operator wants to schedule all of the 600 hour inspection items at
one time.

77
B. CHOOSING THE PROPER INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)

2. PHASE INSPECTION DUE

AIRCRAFT TIME (HRS) METHOD 1 PROGRAM METHOD 2 PROGRAM


100 2 2
200 2, 3 & 4 ......................... 2& 3
300 2 2
400 2,3 & 5 ......................... 2& 3
500 2 2
600 2, 3 & 6......................... 2, 3 & D

This chart compares the two programs side by side. The first difference occurs between the two programs
at 200 hours after program startup. Both inspections require all 200-hour inspection items to be accom-
plished but the Method 1 inspection also allows accomplishment of a portion of the 600 hour require-
ments. The differences occur every 200 hours.

78
C. MANUAL AND FORMS REQUIRED

The following manual and forms are used in the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program.

1. OPERATIONS MANUAL

The purpose of this manual is to provide the necessary information for promoting, establishing
and conducting the Continuous Inspection Program for Cessna owners and operators.

2. PHASE SCHEDULES

As an aid in performing the inspections, the Phase Schedules have been prepared as work forms
for use in the shop. These Schedules detail the inspection items for each Phase Inspection and a
place is provided for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to initial as each item is performed.

***********
*NOTE*
** ****

The manual and forms used in the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program are available from the
Cessna Parts Distribution. Ordering information has been included in the Appendix.

79
D. STARTING THE CONTINUOUS INSPECTION PROGRAM

1. Two steps are required to begin the program.

a) Conduct a complete airplane inspection by performing Phase 2, 3 and D.

b) Start the program using either Method 1 or Method 2.

2. If a combined Phase 4, 5, and 6 inspection from the previous Cessna recommended Continuous
Inspection program has been completed on the airplane within the previous 100 hours of opera-
tion, the new program may be started with either Method 1 or Method 2 by beginning at the 100
hour point by accomplishing a Phase 2 inspection.

3. If a combined Phase 4, 5, and 6 inspection from the previous Cessna recommended Continuous
Inspection program has been completed on the airplane within the previous 200 hours of opera-
tion, the new program may be started by accomplishing one of the following:

a) Method 1; at the 200 hour point, accomplish Phases 2, 3, and 4 inspections.

b) Method 2; at the 200 hour point, accomplish Phases 2, and 3 inspections.

*****
*NOTE
******

Cessna SNL 94-10, dated August 26, 1994, announced the revised Continuous Inspection
Program and in accordance with the SNL, should be started within the next 600 hours of oper-
ation or 18 months, whichever occurs first.

******
*NOTE

Variations to the steps above for utilizing the Continuous Inspection Program can be found in
Paragraph F of this section.

80
E. USE OF THE PHASE SCHEDULES

1. a) Phase Schedules have been developed for the specific models listed and incorporated into
their respective Maintenance Manuals. Additional copies of these Phase Schedules are
available from the Cessna Parts Distribution and are listed by part number in the Appendix.

MODEL

425 ....................... Conquest I


441 ..................... Conquest II

b) Each Phase Schedule has been prepared as a work form to be used in the service shop.
Page 1 of each Phase Schedule gives very useful information about the particular Phase
Inspection and should be reviewed.

2. PAGE 1 INFORMATION

a) This page will list time intervals for the inspection items that are to be inspected and serviced.

EXAMPLE: Phase 2 inspection items consist of 100-hour or 12-month interval inspection


items.

b) This page will also list the applicable access panels that will require removal to accomplish
the inspection and will refer the mechanic/inspector to the appropriate engine Maintenance
Manual for the periodic inspection requirements and checks.

81
E. USE OF THE PHASE SCHEDULES (continued)

3. VERIFICATION / INITIALING

A space is provided on the right side of each sheet for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to
verify and initial as each item is accomplished.

4. ITEMS THAT ARE NOT APPLICABLE

Some of the items listed on the Phase Schedule may not be applicable to your specific aircraft. In
this case, the mechanic is to check off the item(s) as not applicable by entering the letters "NA"
(not applicable) preceding his initials.

5. FIGURES

Inspection items are divided into airplane zones. A figure is included in the Phase Schedule illus-
trating the location of the zone and precedes the inspection items in that zone. Zone numbers
also follow each inspection item.

EXAMPLE: Battery- Recondition (Zone 132) [24]

Figures having numbers in ( ) indicate that the item is on the right side of the aircraft. Numbers in
[ ] indicate a chapter reference.

82
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION

The following suggestions and recommendations are provided to assist you when conducting a
Phase Inspection.

1. Perform the Phase Inspections as they become due using the applicable Phase Schedule.
****** ******** ***************
* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *

Each inspection interval can be exceeded by 10 hours or can be performed early at any time prior
to the regular interval as provided below:

a) In the event of late compliance of any Phase Inspection scheduled, the next Phase
Inspection in sequence retains a due point from the time the late Phase Inspection was origi-
nally scheduled.

* EXAMPLE:
*****************
EXAMPLE: METHOD 11 PROGRAM
METHOD ************
PROGRAM

PHASE PHASE SCHEDULED PHASE ACCOMPLISHED


2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
2,3 & 4 300 HOURS 300 HOURS
2 400 HOURS 409 HOURS**
2,3 & 5 DUE AT 500 HOURS
"Phase Number 2, due at 400 hours, was performed nine (9) hours late. The next Phase Inspection
retains a DUE POINT 100 hours from the time when Phase Number 2 was originally scheduled. In
this example, Phase Number 2, 3 & 5 is due at 500 hours.

83
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION (continued)

1. b) In the event of early compliance of any Phase Inspection scheduled, that occurs 10 hours or
less ahead of schedule, the next Phase Inspection due point may remain where originally set.
******** *********************

* EXAMPLE: METHOD 1 PROGRAM *

PHASE PHASE SCHEDULED PHASE ACCOMPLISHED


2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
2,3 & 4 300 HOURS 300 HOURS
2 400 HOURS 395 HOURS"
2, 3 & 5 DUE AT 500 HOURS
"Because Phase Number 2, due at 400 hours, was performed five (5) hours early (within the 10 hour
grace period), Phase Numbers 2, 3,& 5 will retain the DUE POINT originally scheduled.

c) In the event of early compliance of any Phase Inspection scheduled that occurs more than
10 hours ahead of schedule, the next Phase Inspection due point msut be rescheduled to
establish a new due point from the time of early accomplishment.
************ *****************
* EXAMPLE: METHOD 1 PROGRAM *
*****************************

PHASE PHASE SCHEDULED PHASE ACCOMPLISHED


2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
2,3 & 4 300 HOURS 300 HOURS
2 400 HOURS 385HOURS**
2, 3 & 5 DUE AT 485 HOURS
"Because Phase Number 2, due at 400 hours, was performed fifteen (15) hours early, Phase
Number 5 must be rescheduled to have a DUE POINT 100 hours after Phase Number 2 was actually
performed. In this example, Phase Number 2, 3 & 5 was rescheduled to be due at 485 hours.

84
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION (continued)

2. Prior to actually starting a Phase Inspection, a check is to be made of the following.

a) Aircraft Log and the Inspection Schedule Chart to determine which Phase Inspection(s) is
due.

b) Airworthiness Directives, Service Letters and Service Bulletins for previous compliance and
items that are due.

c) Engine Maintenance Manual for applicable inspection items.

d) Special Inspection Items (Phases)


These remaining Phases are to be accomplished concurrently with one of the five primary
Phases which fall closest to that interval without exceeding it.

e) The Component Time Limits Section, 5-11-00 of the aircraft maintenance manual is to be con-
sulted to provide accomplishment of any component overhaul/replacement requirement that
is due.

85
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION (continued)

3. The intent of the Phase Schedules is to provide the inspection personnel with a checklist of the
items requiring inspection. Therefore, when conducting a Phase Inspection, the inspection per-
sonnel should have available the following additional information:

a) Applicable Maintenance Manuals, Parts Catalogs, and Wiring Diagram Manuals since these
are to be utilized to obtain the technical information necessary for accomplishing the inspec-
tion items and servicing the aircraft as required.

b) Cessna Service Information Letters, Service Bulletins, and FAA Airworthiness Directives
since a compliance check of these items is to be made as part of each Phase Inspection.

4. Inspection discrepancies found as a result of conducting a Phase Inspection are to be noted and
corrected as necessary before approving the aircraft for return to service.

5. As the Phase Inspection is completed, the aircraft inspector is to fill out and sign the Aircraft Log
Books. Any Service Information Letters, Service Bulletins, or Airworthiness Directives that are
accomplished during the Phase Inspection are also to be entered on the appropriate record sheet
for future reference.

6. LOG ENTRY

An entry consisting of the Phase(s) number is to be made signifying the inspection(s) that have
been accomplished. The Phase(s) number is required to define which items have been inspected.
in addition, the accomplishment of any component time limits overhaul or replacement item(s)
must be signified in the log
book.

86
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION (continued)

7. PROPJET CESCOM

Refer to the PROPJET CESCOM Operations Manual for information regarding completion of the
CESCOM records and reports.

8. COMPONENT OVERHAUL AND REPLACEMENT LOG

a) Prepare a Component Overhaul and Replacement Log for each airplane using the Cessna
Continuous Inspection Program. The Log is kept with the aircraft maintenance records and
serves as a periodic reminder to maintenance personnel when various components are due
for overhaul or replacement. A copy of this form has been provided in the Appendix.

b) The Component Overhaul and Replacement Log is not required to be used when the
owner/operator is utilizing Cessna's Computerized Maintenance Records System (CESCOM).

87
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS

1. a) It is important that the time limits set for the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program are not
exceeded. This paragraph will highlight the basic requirements of the Cessna Continuous
Inspection Program.

b) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program requires that the entire aircraft must receive a
Complete Airplane Inspection every 600 hours or 24 months Time in Service, whichever
occurs first. A Complete Airplane Inspection consists of all 100, 200, and 600 hour items.
(Phases 2, 3, and D or Phases 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.

c) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program also has other calendar time limits. There are
inspection items with intervals of 100 hour or 12 months whichever occurs first, and 200 hour
or 12 months whichever occurs first.

d) With all of the time limits in mind, let's look at some different situations

100 HOUR/12 MONTH ITEMS


200 HOUR/12 MONTH ITEMS
600 HOUR/24 MONTH ITEMS

88
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS (continued)

2. Example Number One: Conditions - Inspection Method 1, Program Startup at 1100 hours in
January 1995.

a) The situation may arise when the aircraft experiences low utilization for a period of time. What
inspection is due if the owner/operator does not fly the aircraft 200 hours within the 12 month
time limit? Let's look at the inspection Schedule and the actual dates and times when the
Inspections were accomplished.

SCHEDULED INSPECTIONS ACTUAL INSPECTIONS


Phase Due Aircraft Time Aircraft Time Date
2 1200 1202 April 1995
2, 3, & 4 1300 Now at 1232 hours January 1996
2 1400
2,3,& 5 1500
2 1600
2,3,& 6 1700

b) For this example, the date is now January 1996 and the aircraft is at 1232 hours. It has been
12 months since the Phase 2, 3, and D were accomplished in January 1995 for Program
Startup and the aircraft has only flown 132 hours. It is not necessary to accomplish the
Phases 2, 3, & 4 at this time. You would only be required to accomplish the Phases 2 and 3
which would satisfy the 12-month requirements due at this time.

c) What would the schedule look like following this example?

Twelve months remain until the 600 hour/24-month requirements are due. If the aircraft uti-
lization remains low, a Phase 2 will be due at the next 100 hour point (1332 hours) and/or the
Phases 2, 3, and D will be due by January 1997. If the utilization increases significantly the
aircraft could return to the Method 1 schedule, however all three 600 hour/24 month Phase
interval inspections (Phases 4, 5, and 6) must be completed by January 1997.

89
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS(continued)

3. Example Number Two: Conditions - Inspection Method 2, Program Startup at 1100 hours in
January 1995.

a) The situation may arise when the aircraft experiences low utilization for a period of time. What
inspection is due if the owner/operator does not fly the aircraft 100 hours within the 12 month
time limit? Let's look at the Inspection Schedule and the actual dates and times when the
Inspections were accomplished.

SCHEDULED INSPECTIONS ACTUAL INSPECTIONS


Phase Due Aircraft Time Aircraft Time Date
2 1200 Now at 1170 hours January 1996
2& 3 1300
2 1400
2& 3 1500
2 1600
2 &3 1700

b) For this example, the date is now January 1996 and the aircraft is at 1170 hours. It has been
12 months since the Phase 2, 3, and D were accomplished in January 1995 for Program
Startup and the aircraft has only flown 70 hours. Phases 2 & 3 must now be accomplished to
complete the 12-month requirements due for this 12-month time period

c) What would the schedule look like following this example?

Twelve months remain until the 600 hour/24 month requirements are due. If the aircraft utiliza-
tion remains low, a Phase 2 will be due at the next 100-hour point (1332) and/or the Phases 2,
3, and D will be due by January 1997, whichever occurs first.

90
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS(continued)

4. Example Number Three: Conditions - Inspection Method 1, Program Startup at 1100 hours in
January 1995.

a) What inspection is due if the owner/operator does not fly the aircraft 600 hours within the 24
month time limit? Let's look at the Inspection Schedule and the actual dates and times when
the Inspections were accomplished.

SCHEDULED INSPECTIONS ACTUAL INSPECTIONS


Phase Due Aircraft Time Aircraft Time Date
2 1200 1202 May 1995
2, 3, & 4 1300 1307 November 1995
2 1400 1394 April 1996
2, 3, 5 1500 1504 September 1996
2 1600 Now at 1575 hours January 1997
2, 3, &6 1700

b) For this example, the date is now January 1997 and the aircraft is at 1575 hours. It has been
24 months since program startup and the aircraft has only flown 475 hours. Phases 2, 3, & 6
must now be accomplished to complete the remaining 600-hour requirements due for this 24-
month time period.

c) What would the schedule look like following this example?

SCHEDULED INSPECTIONS
Phase Due Aircraft Time
2 1675
2, 3, & 4 1775
2 1875
2, 3, & 5 1975
2 2075
2, 3,& 6 2175

d) Special attention should be given to assure that 24 months does not lapse between the
accomplishment of one Phase 4 to the next Phase 4, and similarly with Phase 5 and Phase 6.

91
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS(continued)

5. Example Number Four: Conditions - Inspection Method 2, Program Startup at 1100 hours in
January 1995.

a) What inspection is due if the owner/operator does not fly the aircraft 600 hours within the 24
month time limit? Let's look at the Inspection Schedule and the actual dates and times when
the Inspections were accomplished.

SCHEDULED INSPECTIONS ACTUAL INSPECTIONS


Phase Due Aircraft Time Aircraft Time Date
2 1200 1202 May 1995
2& 3 1300 1307 November 1995
2 1400 1394 April 1996
2& 3 1500 1504 September 1996
2 1600 Now at 1575 hours January 1997
2,3, & D - 1700

b) For this example, the date is now January 1997 and the aircraft is at 1575 hours. It has been
24 months since program startup and the aircraft has only flown 475 hours. Phases 2, 3, & D
must now be accomplished to complete the remaining 600-hour requirements due for this 24-
month time period.

c) What would the schedule look like following this example?

SCHEDULED INSPECTIONS
Phase Due Aircraft Time
2 1675
2 &3 1775
2 1875
2& 3 1975
2 2075
2, 3, & D 2175

92
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

VI THE CARAVAN II (MODEL 406) CONTINUOUS INSPECTION PROGRAM


A. Introduction ............................................... ................................... 94
B. Choosing the proper inspection program ............... .................... ........................ 96
C. Manual and forms required ......................................................................... 100
D. Starting the Continuous Inspection Program ............................ .................. .... 101
E. Use of the Operation Schedules............................................................................. 102
F. Conducting the Phase Inspections ......... ...................................................... 104
G. Special Emphasis Items .............................. .......................... ............. 108

93
A. INTRODUCTION

1. a) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program has been revised to assist the owner/operator of
a Cessna Caravan II (Model 406) aircraft, in performing inspections in a logical, simple and
cost effective manner.

b) Federal Aviation Regulation 91.409 (e) defines the inspection requirements for turbo-propeller
multi-engine airplanes. You, the owner/operator may select one of the following inspection
programs:

(1) A currently approved inspection program


(2) A program established by the owner/operator
(3) A manufacturers inspection program

c) This section presents the Continuous Inspection Program recommended by the Cessna
Aircraft Company for the following Cessna models:

Model 406/F406 ............................. Caravan II

94
A. INTRODUCTION

2. a) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program is divided into five primary phases which are
numbered 2 through 6. These five phases will cover the inspection requirements that become
due on the aircraft with inspection intervals of 600 hours or less and those inspection require-
ments that become due every 18 months or less.

b) This chart illustrates the inspections that will be performed during the appropriate phase.

PHASE INSPECTION ITEMS PERFORMED


1 Not Used (Reference Cessna SNL87-5)
2 100 Hour or 12 Month Inspection Items
3 100/200 Hour or 12 Month Inspection Items
4 100/200 Hour or 12 Month and 600 Hour/18 Month Items (Nose and Tailcone)
5 100/200 Hour or 12 Month and 600 Hour/18 Month Items (Cockpit and Cabin)
6 100/200 Hour or 12 Month and 600 Hour/18 Month Items (Wings, Engine,
Landing Gear and Hydraulics)

For Special Inspection requirements refer to the applicable Maintenance Manual (Chapter 5).

95
B. CHOOSING THE PROPER INSPECTION PROGRAM

1. The owner/operator must make a choice between the NORMAL and OPTIONAL inspection pro-
grams offered by Cessna Aircraft Company before beginning to use the Cessna Continuous
Inspection Program. The following text will describe both inspection programs.
*************************** ******
a) * NORMAL INSPECTION PROGRAM
* ****************************** *
NORMAL INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT TIME (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


100 ..... INITIAL INSPECTION ...... 4,5,6 100/200/600
200 2 100
300 4 * 100/200 (part of 600 hour items)
400 2 100
500 5 * 100/200 (part of 600 hour items)
600 2 100
700 6 * 100/200 (part of 600 hour items)

*The NORMAL inspection program allows the operator the freedom to spread the Six Hundred Hour
Requirements over three different inspections. This method of accomplishing the Phase inspections pro-
vides even distribution of maintenance and manpower usage for each 200 hours of operation. This
inspection program works effectively when the aircraft is flown a MINIMUM of 600 hours every 18
months.

NOTE

Phase 3 is not normally utilized with the NORMAL inspection program because the inspection items in
Phase 3 are included in Phases 4, 5, and 6 which are due at 200-hour intervals.

96
B. CHOOSING THE PROPER INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)
**** ***** *** *************

* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *
*****

b) THE FIRST 100 HOUR INSPECTION

The INITIAL inspection is a one-time inspection due at 100-hours Total Time in Service or 12
months whichever comes first. This will require the completion of Phases 4, 5, and 6. This
meets the requirement to perform all 100, 200, and 600 hour inspection requirements.

97
B. CHOOSING THE PROPER INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)

1. (continued)

c) OPTIONAL INSPECTION PROGRAM *

OPTIONAL INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT TIME (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


100 ..... INITIAL INSPECTION ...... 4,5,6 100/200/600
200 2 100
300 3 100/200
400 2 100
500 3 100/200
600 2 100
700 4,5,6 * 100/200/600

*The OPTIONAL inspection program is very similar to the NORMAL inspection program.
This program lets the operator perform all of the 600 hour inspection items during one inspec-
tion. The OPTIONAL program should be used by all operators who do not expect to fly the
aircraft 600 hours in 18 months. The OPTIONAL inspection program works best when the
operator wants to schedule all of the 600 hour inspection items at one time.
******* ******* ****** ********* *****
* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *

d) THE FIRST 100 HOUR INSPECTION


The INITIAL inspection is a one-time inspection due at 100-hours Total Time in service or 12
months whichever comes first. This will require the completion of Phases 4, 5, and 6. This
meets the requirement to perform all 100, 200, and 600 hour inspection requirements.

98

98
B.. CHOOSING THE PROPER INSPECTION PROGRAM (continued)

2. PHASE INSPECTION DUE

AIRCRAFT TIME (HRS) NORMAL PROGRAM OPTIONAL PROGRAM


100 INITIAL 4,5,6 4,5,6
200 2 2
300 4 ----------------- 3 (200 HR)
400 2 2
500 5 ------------------ 3 (200 HR)
600 2 2
700 6 ------------------ 4,5,6 (200 HR)

This chart compares the two programs side by side. The first difference occurs between the
two programs at 300 hours time in service. Both inspections require all 200-hour inspection
items to be accomplished but the NORMAL inspection also allows accomplishment of a por-
tion of the 600 hour requirements. The differences occur every 200 hours.

99
C. MANUAL AND FORMS REQUIRED

The following manual and forms are used in the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program.

1. OPERATIONS MANUAL

The purpose of this manual is to provide the necessary information for promoting, establishing
and conducting the Continuous Inspection Program for Cessna owners and operators.

2. PHASE SCHEDULES

As an aid in performing the inspection, the Phase Schedules have been prepared as work forms
for use in the shop. These Schedules detail the inspection items for each Phase Inspection and a
place is provided for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to initial as each item is performed.

* NOTE

The manual and forms used in the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program are available from the
Cessna Parts Distribution. Ordering information has been included in the Appendix.

100
D. STARTING THE CESSNA CONTINUOUS INSPECTION PROGRAM

1. NEW DELIVERY AIRCRAFT

Choose either the NORMAL or OPTIONAL inspection program and enter this choice in the air-
craft log books. The Normal inspection program is recommended for aircraft that are utilized more
than 600 hours every 18 months and the Optional inspection program is recommended for aircraft
that are utilized less than 600 hours every 18 months. Begin using the inspection program by per-
forming Phases 4, 5, and 6 at the initial inspection point which occurs at 100 Hours Total Time in
service or 12 months whichever occurs first.

2. ALL OTHER AIRCRAFT

To start using the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program, the following steps must be accom-
plished for aircraft with more than 100 hours TOTAL TIME.

a) Choose either the NORMAL or OPTIONAL inspection program and enter this choice in the
aircraft log books.

b) Conduct a Complete Airplane Inspection by performing Phases 4, 5, and 6.

c) Start the Continuous Inspection Program by accomplishing a Phase 2 Inspection, 100 hours
after the Complete Airplane Inspection was performed.

d) Continue performing the required inspections as they become due.

** NOTE
NOTE **
*** *** ****

Variations to 1 and 2 above for utilizing the Continuous Inspection Program can be found in
Paragraph F of this section.

101
E. USE OF THE PHASE SCHEDULES

1. a) Phase Schedules have been developed for the specific models listed and incorporated into
their respective Maintenance Manuals. Additional copies of these Phase Schedules are
available from the Cessna Parts Distribution and are listed by part number in the Appendix.

MODEL
406/F406 ..................... Caravan II

b) Each Phase Schedule has been prepared as a work form to be used in the service shop.
Page 1 of each Phase Schedule gives very useful information about the particular Phase
Inspection and should be reviewed.

2. PAGE 1 INFORMATION

a) This page will list time intervals for the inspection items that are to be inspected and serviced.

EXAMPLE: Phase 2 inspection items consist of 100-hour or 12-month interval inspection


items.

b) This page will also list the applicable access panels that will require removal to accomplish
the inspection and will refer the mechanic/inspector to the appropriate engine Maintenance
Manual for the periodic inspection requirements and checks.

102
E. USE OF THE PHASE SCHEDULES (continued)

3. VERIFICATION / INITIALING

A space is provided on the right side of each sheet for the mechanic and the aircraft inspector to
verify and initial as each item is accomplished.

4. ITEMS THAT ARE NOT APPLICABLE

Some of the items listed on the Phase Schedule may not be applicable to your specific aircraft. In
this case, the mechanic is to check off the item(s) as not applicable by entering the letters "NA"
(not applicable) preceding his initials.

5. FIGURES

Inspection items are divided into airplane zones. A figure is included in the Phase Schedule illus-
trating the location of the zone and precedes the inspection items in that zone. Zone numbers
also follow each inspection item.

EXAMPLE: Battery -Recondition (Zone 132) [24]

Figures having numbers in ( ) indicate that the item is on the right side of the aircraft. Numbers in
[ ] indicate a chapter reference.

6. COMBINING PHASES 4, 5, AND 6

When combining Phases 4, 5, and 6, items listed in the Phase Schedules with an asterisk indi-
cate duplicate items and need to be accomplished only once.

103
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION

The following suggestions and recommendations are provided to assist you when conducting a
Phase Inspection.

1. Perform the Phase Inspections as they become due using the applicable Phase Schedule.
************************
IMPORTANT INFORMATION *
******************************

Each inspection interval can be exceeded by 10 hours or can be performed early at any time prior
to the regular interval as provided below:

a) In the event of late compliance of any Phase Inspection scheduled, the next Phase
Inspection in sequence retains a due point from the time the last Phase inspection was origi-
nally scheduled.
************** **********
*EXAMPLE: NORMAL PROGRAM*

PHASE PHASE SCHEDULED PHASE ACCOMPLISHED


2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
4 300 HOURS 300 HOURS
2 400 HOURS 409 HOURS"
5 DUE AT 500 HOURS
**Phase Number 2, due at 400 hours, was performed nine (9) hours late. The next Phase
Inspection retains a DUE POINT 100 hours from the time when Phase Number 2 was origi-
nally scheduled. In this example, Phase Number 5 is due at 500 hours.

104
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION (continued)

1. b) In the event of early compliance of any Phase Inspection scheduled, that occurs 10 hours or
less ahead of schedule, the next Phase Inspection due point may remain where originally set.

**************** ***
EXAMPLE: NORMAL PROGRAM*
*******' ***** *************

PHASE PHASE SCHEDULED PHASE ACCOMPLISHED


2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
4 300 HOURS 300 HOURS
2 400 HOURS 395 HOURS**
5 DUE AT 500 HOURS
"Because Phase Number 2, due at 400 hours, was performed five (5) hours early (within the 10
hour grace period), Phase Number 5 will retain the DUE POINT originally scheduled.

c) In the event of early compliance of any Phase Inspection scheduled that occurs more than
10 hours ahead of schedule, the next Phase Inspection due point must be rescheduled to
establish a new due point from time of early accomplishment.
********* ***************
*EXAMPLE: NORMAL PROGRAM*
******** *****************

PHASE PHASE SCHEDULED PHASE ACCOMPLISHED


2 200 HOURS 200 HOURS
4 300 HOURS 300 HOURS
2 400 HOURS 385 HOURS*
5 DUE AT485 HOURS
*Because Phase Number 2, due at 400 hours, was performed fifteen (15) hours early, Phase
Number 5 must be rescheduled to have a DUE POINT 100 hours after Phase Number 2 was
actually performed. In this example, Phase Number 5 was rescheduled to be due at 485
hours.

105
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION (continued)

2. Prior to actually starting a Phase Inspection, a check is to be made of the following.

a) Aircraft Log and the Inspection Schedule Chart to determine which Phase Inspection is due.

b) Airworthiness Directives, Service Letters, and Service Bulletins for previous compliance and
items that are due.

c) Engine Maintenance Manual for applicable inspection items.

d) Special Inspection Items (Phases)


These remaining Phases are to be accomplished concurrently with one of the five primary
Phases which fall closest to that interval without exceeding it.

e) The Component Time Limits Section, 5-11-00 of the aircraft maintenance manual is to be con-
sulted to provide accomplishment of any component overhaul/replacement requirement that
is due.

3. The intent of the Phase Schedules is to provide the inspection personnel with a checklist of the
items requiring inspection. Therefore, when conducting a Phase Inspection, the inspection per-
sonnel should have available the following additional information:

a) Applicable Maintenance Manuals, Parts Catalogs, and Wiring Diagram Manuals since these
are to be utilized to obtain the technical information necessary for accomplishing the inspec-
tion items and servicing the aircraft as required.

b) Cessna Service Information Letters, Service Bulletins, and FAA Airworthiness Directives
since a compliance check of these items is to be made as part of each Phase Inspection.

4. Inspection discrepancies found as a result of conducting a Phase Inspection are to be noted and
corrected as necessary before approving the aircraft for return to service.

106
F. CONDUCTING THE PHASE INSPECTION (continued)

5. As the Phase Inspection is completed, the aircraft inspector is to fill out and sign the Aircraft
Logbooks. Any Service Information Letters, Service Bulletins or Airworthiness Directives that are
accomplished during the Phase Inspection are also to be entered on the appropriate record sheet
for future reference.

6. LOG ENTRY
Any entry consisting of the Phase(s) number is to be made signifying the inspection(s) that have
been accomplished. The Phase(s) number is required to define which items have been inspected.
In addition, the accomplishment of any component time limits overhaul or replacement item(s)
must be signified in the logbook.

7. PROPJET CESCOM
Refer to the PROPJET CESCOM Operations Manual for information regarding completion of the
CESCOM records and reports.

8. COMPONENT OVERHAUL AND REPLACEMENT LOG

a) Prepare a Component Overhaul and Replacement Log for each airplane using the Cessna
Continuous Inspection Program. The Log is kept with the aircraft maintenance records and
serves as a periodic reminder to maintenance personnel when various components are due
for overhaul or replacement. A copy of this form has been provided in the Appendix.

b) The Component Overhaul and Replacement Log is not required to be used when the
owner/operator is utilizing Cessna's Computerized Maintenance Records System (CESCOM).

107
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS

1. a) It is important that the time limits set for the Cessna Continuous Inspection Program are not
exceeded. This paragraph will highlight the basic requirements of the Cessna Continuous
Inspection Program.

b) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program requires that the entire aircraft must receive a
Complete Airplane Inspection every 600 hours or 18 months Time in Service, whichever
occurs first. A Complete Airplane Inspection consists of all 100, 200, and 600 hour items
(Phases 4, 5, and 6).

c) The Cessna Continuous Inspection Program also has other calendar time limits. There are
inspection items with inspection intervals of 100 hour or 12 months whichever occurs first.

d) With both of the time limits in mind, let's look at some different situations.
200 HOUR/12 MONTH ITEMS
600 HOUR/18 MONTH ITEMS

108
G.. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS (continued)

2. Example Number One:

a) What inspection is due if the owner/operator has not flown the aircraft 600 hours and the air-
craft has reached the 18 month time limit?

NORMAL INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


100 *INITIAL INSPECTION * 4,5,6 100/200/600
200 2 100
300 4 100/200 (PART OF 600)
400 2 100

...... 500....... 575 Hours ---------


5 -100/200 - 100/200 (PART OF 600)-
600 (18 Months Elapsed) 2 100
700 6 100/200 (PART OF 600)

b) This chart illustrates the complete inspection program for an 18-month cycle on the NORMAL
inspection program beginning after the initial inspection at 100 hours. In this example, the line
represents the aircraft after 18 months of operation. Total Time is 575 hours and aircraft has
been utilized 475 hours in the 18-month period. Phase 6 must now be accomplished to com-
plete the remaining 600 hour requirements due in this 18-month time period.

109
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS (continued)

3. Example Number Two:

OPTIONAL INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


100 INITIAL INSPECTION 4,5,6 100/200/600
200 2 100
300 3 100/200
400 475.-......
Hours--------2
2 --------- 100
400.-
500 (18 Months Elapsed) 3 100/200
600 2 100
700 4,5,6 100/200/600

a) This chart illustrates the complete inspection program for an 18-month cycle on the
OPTIONAL inspection program beginning after the initial inspection at 100 hours. In this
example, the line represents the aircraft after 18 months of operation. Total Time is 475 hours
and aircraft has been utilized 375 hours in the 18-month period. Phases 4, 5, and 6 must now
be accomplished to complete the remaining 600 hour requirements due in this 18-month time
period.

110
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS(continued)

4. Example Number Three: The use of the Phase 3 inspection with the Normal inspection program.

a) The situation may arise when the aircraft experiences low utilization for a period of time. This
chart represents the requirementto perform an early inspection to complete the 200 hour/12
month requirements.

NORMAL INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


700 CYCLE COMPLETED 6 100/200 and part of 600
800
--------800
-----...... 825
825 hours
hours --- 2 100
2------------100-----------------
900 (12 Month Elapsed) 4 100/200 (part of 600)
1000 2 100
1100 5 100/200 (part of 600
1200 2 100
1300 6 100/200 (part of 600)

b) The chart represents an aircraft that has only flown 125 hours in the last twelve (12) months.
In this example, the line represents the aircraft after 12 months of operation. Total Time is
825 hours and the aircraft has been utilized 125 hours in the last 12 months. Even though uti-
lization has only been 125 hours, the 200/12 month inspection items are now due. To accom-
plish the 200 hour/12 month inspection requirements, accomplish a Phase 3 inspection.

NOTE

The accomplishment of the Phase 3 inspection satisfies the minimum inspection require-
ments by completing the 12-month inspection items. Additionally, the Phase 4, 5, and 6
inspections must be accomplished before the 18-month time period expires.

111
G. SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS(continued)

5. Example Number Four

a) The situation may arise when the aircraft experiences low utilization for a period of time using
the Optional Program. This chart represents the requirement to perform an early inspection to
complete the 200 hour/12 month requirements.

OPTIONAL INSPECTION PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT (HRS) PHASE DUE ITEMS


700 CYCLE COMPLETED 4,5,6 100/200 and part of 600
.---- 800---.. 825 hours --- 2 100
900 (12 Months Elapsed) 3 100/200 (part of 600)
1000 2 100
1100 3 100/200 (part of 600
1200 2 100
1300 4,5,6 100/200 (part of 600)

b) The chart represents an aircraft that has only flown 125 hours in the last twelve (12) months.
In this example, the line represents the aircraft after 12 months of operation. Total Time is
825 hours and the aircraft has been utilized 125 hours in the last 12 months. Even though uti-
lization has only been 125 hours, the 200/12 month inspection items are now due. To accom-
plish the 200 hour/12 month inspection requirements, accomplish a Phase 3 inspection.

c) Additionally, the Phase 4, 5, and 6 inspections must be accomplished before the 18-month
time period expires.

112
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

VII APPENDIX
A. Publications ordering information ........................................................................ 114
B. Progressive Care Inspection Program Notification Form .......................................... 116
C. Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record Sample Form ......... ........................... 117
D. Continuous Inspection Schedule Sample Form ...................................................... 118
E. Component Overhaul and Replacement Record Sample Form ................................... 119

113
VII APPENDIX

A. Publications ordering information

Shown below is a list of manuals and forms used in the Cessna Progressive and Continuous
Inspection Programs. All items are available from the Cessna Parts Distribution

1. PART NUMBER DESCRIPTION

D5552-4-13 Operations Manual (Paper)


D5552-4-13AF Operations Manual (Aerofiche)
D5553-13 Aircraft Inspection Record
D5497-1-13 Notification Form (25/Pad)
D5555-2-13 Dealer Starter Kit
1 ea. D5552-4-13 (Operations Manual)
5 ea. D5553-13 (Aircraft Inspection Record)
1 ea. D5497-1-13 (Notification Form)

2. SINGLE ENGINE OPERATION SCHEDULES (1 Set)

D5102-2-13 172 Series Operation Schedules (1977-1986)


D5101-1-13 182/T182 Operation Schedules (1977-1986)
D5103-2-13 R182/TR182 Operation Schedules (1978-1986)
D5104-2-13 206/T206 Operation Schedules (1977-1986)
D5131-13 208 Operation Schedules
D5105-1-13 210/T210 Operation Schedules (1985-1986)
D5106-1-13 P210 Operation Schedules (1985-1986)

******
* NOTE
* *

Please refer to the latest edition of the Cessna Customer Care Supplies and Publications Catalog
to determine current prices, part numbers, ordering information, etc.

114
VII APPENDIX

3 MULTI-ENGINE PISTON OPERATION SCHEDULES (1 Set)

D5267-13 T303 Schedules (1982-1984)


D5246-2-13 310R/T310R Schedules (1975-1981)
D5247-3-13 335 Schedules (1980)
D5280-1-13 340/340A Schedules (1972-1984)
D5277-1-13 402C Schedules (1979-1985)
D5250-4-13 404 Schedules (1977-1981)
D5278-1-13 414/414A Schedules (1970-1985)
D5279-1-13 421C Schedules (1976-1985)

4. MULTI-ENGINE TURBOPROP PHASE SCHEDULES

D5290-13 406 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet A)


15 ea. Phase 2
10 ea. Phase 3
D5291-13 406 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet B)
5 ea. Phase 4, 5, 6

D5311-13 425 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet A)


12 ea. Phase 2
6 ea. Phase 3
D5312-13 425 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet B)
2 ea. Phase 4, 5, 6
D5313-13 425 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet D)
2 ea. Phase D

D5308-13 441 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet A)


12 ea. Phase 2
6 ea. Phase 3
D5309-13 441 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet B)
2 ea. Phase 4,5, 6
D5310-13 441 Continuous Inspection Program (Packet D)
2 ea. Phase D

115
B. Progressive Care Inspection Program Notification Form

CESSNA PROGRESSIVE CARE PROGRAM NOTIFICATION

SERVICE FACILITY INFORMATION OWNER AND AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

ADDRESS_

LH ENG R/H ENG.


SERIAL SERIAL

STARTDATE

The aircraft shown above has been placed on the Cessna Progressive Care Program, and all future inspec-
tion and servicing requirements will be conducted in accordance with the Operational Schedules detailed in
the Cessna Progressive Care Program.

CHECK ONE OF THE BOXES BELOW AND FILL INTHE INFORMATION REQUESTED

This is a new delivery aircraft and the original Airworthiness Certificate (date)
(date)
is being used to qualify for the Progressive Care Program
To qualify the above aircraft for starting the Progressive Care Program our Annual inspection was
conducted at hours time in-service by

(Service Organization)
(City) (State)

Service Manager Signature

Owner/Operator Signature Service Organization


City and State

PLEASE TYPE

Form D5497-1-13

116
C. Progressive Care Aircraft Inspection Record Sample Form

- PROGRESSIVE CARE AIRCRAFT


INSPECTION
RECORD

SERVICING ORGANIZATION VERIFICATION

This aircraft was placed on the Cessna Progressive Care Program on -


(date) at hours time in service and notification forwarded to the ap-
proriate governmental agency.

-. Servicing Organization

Signature

D5553-13

OPERATION RECORD
Operation Operation
Operation Due Accomplished Work Aircraft Inspector Signature
Number (Hours) (Hours) Date Order No. Company Name and Certificate Number

Operation #

Operation #

Operation .

Operation

Operation

Operation______

Operation

Operation

Operation

Operation
"I certify that in accordance with a progressive inspection program (Cessna Progressive Care Program) the operation entered above
was performed and the aircraft is approved for return to service.

117
D. Continuous Inspection Schedule Sample Form

START POINT DATE


AIRPLANE HOURS FROM START POINT
PHASE COMPLIANCE +100 +200 +300 +400 +500 +600 +700
2 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
3 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
4 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
5 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
6 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE

START POINT DATE


AIRPLANE HOURS FROM START POINT
PHASE COMPLIANCE +100 +200 +300 +400 +500 +600 +700
2 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
3 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
4 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
5 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE
6 HOURS DUE
HOURS COMPLETE
DATE DUE
DATE COMPLETE -

118
E. Component Overhaul and Replacement Record Sample Form

COMPONENT OVERHAUL AND REPLACEMENT RECORD

COMPONENT DATE REASON FOR REPLACEMENT REPLACEMENT NEXT OVERHAUL


PART NUMBER AIRPLANE
SERIAL HOURS DATE
NUMBER

119
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK.

120
CUSTOMER EVALUATION FORM
(Operations Manual)

The purpose of this evaluation form is to give you the opportunity to tell us about our inspection
programs (good or bad). Your comments will be evaluated as future inspection programs are
developed.

Please take a few moments to complete the following. We are interested in hearing from you.

1) If applicable, why have you decided to use the Cessna Progressive Care Inspection Program?

2) Are you satisfied with the Cessna Progressive Care Inspection program or Continuous Inspec-
tion program? Please explain.

3) What suggestions do you have for improving the Progressive Care or Continuous Inspection
program?

4) Has this manual answered all of your questions about Progressive Care or Continuous Inspec-
tion programs? If not, what questions do you have?

5) Do you have any suggestions for improving the Progressive Care Operations Manual, Notifica-
tion form, Progressive Care Inspection Record, or Operation or Phase Inspection Schedules?

Name Telephone No.


Name Telephone No.
FOLD------

FOLD

PLACE
STAMP
HERE

Cessna
Cessna Aircraft Company
Support Services (Dept. 751)
P.O. Box 7706
Wichita, Kansas 67277
U.S.A.

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