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Voice Hardware Installation

Guide

Copyright © 1993 Dialogic Corporation


All Rights Reserved
© Dialogic Corporation, 1993.

This document is copyrighted and all rights are reserved by Dialogic.

This document may not, in whole or in part, be reduced, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system,
translated, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without the express
written consent of Dialogic.

The contents of this document are subject to change without notice. Every effort has been made to
ensure the accuracy of this document. However, due to ongoing Product improvements and revisions,
Dialogic cannot guarantee the accuracy of printed material after the date of publication nor can it
accept responsibility for errors or omissions. Dialogic will publish updates and revisions to this
document as needed.

The software referred to in this document is provided under a Software License Agreement. Refer to
the Software License Agreement for complete details governing the use of the software.

DIALOGIC is a registered trademark of Dialogic Corporation. The following are also trademarks of
Dialogic Corporation:

AC/101, AC/200, D/40, D/xxx, D/xx-MC, D/41, D/41-MC, D/81-MC, DIALOG/,


LSI/80-MC, PEB, SA/120, SpringBoard, TTS, VR/xxx, VR/xx-MC, VR/41-MC and
VR/81-MC

BeSTspeech and T-T-S are trademarks of BeSTspeech Products, Inc.


AMPHENOL_ is a registered trademark of Allied Corporation.
Intel_ is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
Micro Channel_, IBM_, Personal System/2_, PS/2_, PS/2 Model 80_, PS/2 Model 65SX_ and OS/2 _
are registered trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation.
MITEL_ is a registered trademark of Mitel Corporation
MS-DOS_ is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

UNIX is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories, Inc.

Date: December 9, 1993


HARDWARE LIMITED WARRANTY

Dialogic Corporation warrants to the original purchaser (Purchaser) of this Dialogic


hardware product (Product) that the Product will perform in substantial conformance to
Dialogic’s published hardware specifications for a period of 18 months for D/121A,
D/121B, D/81A, LSI/120, and DTI/101 boards and 3 years for D/240SC-T1, D/320SC,
D/240SC, D/41D, and D/41E boards from the date of purchase from Dialogic or an
authorized Dialogic dealer. Should the Product, in Dialogic’s opinion, malfunction at any
time during the warranty period, Dialogic will, at its option as Purchaser’s sole and
exclusive remedy, repair or replace the Product at no additional charge except as set forth
below. This Limited Warranty is limited to the 18-month period and does not include
service to repair damage to the Product resulting from accident, misuse, abuse or
alterations, modifications and repairs that have not been authorized by Dialogic.

THE WARRANTY DESCRIBED ABOVE IS IN LIEU OF ANY OTHER


WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO
THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Products requiring Limited Warranty service during the warranty period should be delivered
to Dialogic at 300 Littleton Road, Parsippany, New Jersey 07054 with proof of purchase, a
Return Material Authorization (RMA) number, and, if a *CHK.LOG diagnostic is provided,
a printed copy of the appropriate *CHK.LOG file. This file must be created using the
procedure described in this manual. RMA numbers can be obtained by calling Dialogic at
201-334-8450. If delivery is by mail, purchaser shall insure the Product or assume the risk
of loss or damage in transit. Dialogic will accept for Limited Warranty service only
Products that have prepaid shipping charges, a valid RMA number, and a printed copy of
the *CHK.LOG file.

Except for the exclusive remedy provided above, Dialogic shall have no liability to
Purchaser or any third party for any claim, loss or damage of any kind, including but not
limited to lost profits, incidental, consequential, punitive or special damages, arising out of
or in connection with (a) performance of the Product, or any data, software or equipment
related thereto or used in connection therewith; or (b) infringement of any patent, copyright
or trademark. In no event shall Dialogic’s liability for damages, whether arising out of
contract, negligence, warranty, or patent or copyright infringement, exceed the purchase
price paid by Purchaser for the Product.

This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of New Jersey.

iii
Table of Contents

Table of Contents ........................................................................... iv


About This Guide...................................................................................xiv
Product Terminology ............................................................................xvii
1.1 Voice Product Line ..........................................................................1-2
1.1.1 D/320SC and D/240SC Boards.......................................1-2
1.1.2 D/240SC-T1 Board .........................................................1-4
1.1.1 D/121A Board.................................................................1-5
1.1.2 D/121B Board .................................................................1-7
1.1.3 D/81A Board...................................................................1-8
1.1.4 D/41D Board ..................................................................1-9
1.1.5 D/41E Board .................................................................1-10
1.2 Network Interface Product Line .....................................................1-11
1.2.1 LSI/120 Network Interface Board ................................1-11
1.2.1 DTI/101 Network Interface Board ................................1-12
1.3 Typical Applications ......................................................................1-12
1.3.1 Basic Analog Configuration..........................................1-12
1.3.2 Basic Digital Configuration (Terminating) ...................1-13
1.3.3 Drop-and-Insert Digital Configurations ........................1-16
1.3.4 Other Hardware Configurations....................................1-19

2. Quick Reference Guide............................................................ 2-1


Installing D/320SC or D/240SC Boards ................................................2-3
Installing D/240SC-T1 Boards...............................................................2-5
Installing D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Boards .......................................2-7
Installing LSI/120 Boards ....................................................................2-13
Installing DTI/101 Boards....................................................................2-15

iv
3. Board Installation .....................................................................3-1
3.1 Conventions for Naming the Parts on the Board..............................3-1
3.2 Installation Requirements.................................................................3-1
3.2.1 Hardware Installation Requirements...............................3-2
3.2.1 Software Requirements...................................................3-4
3.3 Installation Sequence .......................................................................3-4
3.4 Prepare the PC Chassis for Board Installation .................................3-6
3.5 Determine the Installation Sequence................................................3-6
3.5.1 Configurations with an LSI/120......................................3-6
3.5.2 Configurations with a DTI Network Interface
Board .........................................................................3-7
3.6 Unpack the Boards ...........................................................................3-7
3.6.1 Remove the Boards from the Carton/Packing
Checklist....................................................................3-9
3.6.2 Unpack the Boards from the Static Shielding Bags ......3-10
3.7 Check/Adjust the Hardware Settings .............................................3-11
3.7.1 D/320SC or D/240SC Hardware Settings .....................3-11
D/320SC or D/240SC Board Identification
Number (Rotary Switch SW1) ................................3-11
3.7.2 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Settings ...................................3-14
D/240SC-T1 Board Identification Number
(Rotary Switch SW1) ..............................................3-14
D/240SC-T1 Remote Loopback Test Switch
(Rear Bracket) .........................................................3-15
3.7.3 D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Hardware Settings ...........3-17
I/O Base Port Address (SW1):...............................................3-17
IRQ Level (JP1).....................................................................3-19
Interrupt Terminator (JP7).......................................3-20
Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16)....................................3-21
3.7.2 D/41D Hardware Settings .............................................3-22
D/41D Multiple Board Configuration (JP7) ............3-22
D/41D Base Memory Address Segment (JP5,
JP6)..........................................................................3-22
D/41D Offset Address (SW1: 1, 2, 3)......................3-24
D/41D Default Line State (SW1: 4) ........................3-26
D/41D Board Interrupt Request (IRQ) Level
(JP1) ........................................................................3-26

v
3.7.3 D/41E Board Hardware Settings...................................3-27
D/41E Board Identification Number (SW2: 2) ........3-29
D/41E Default Line State (SW2: 1)........................3-30
3.7.4 LSI/120 Hardware Settings...........................................3-31
LSI/120 Timeslots (SW1: 1)...................................3-33
LSI/120 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 3) ................3-34
LSI/120 Default Line State (SW1: 4) .....................3-34
LSI/120 AEB Signaling (SW1: 6) ..........................3-35
LSI/120 Operating Mode (SW2) .............................3-35
3.7.5 DTI/101 Hardware Settings ..........................................3-36
DTI/101 I/O Port Range (SW1: 1,2,3).....................3-36
DTI/101 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 4).................3-39
DTI/101 IRQ Level (JP1) ........................................3-39
DTI/101 Interrupt Terminator (JP2) ........................3-40
DTI/101 Mode of Operation: Normal/Remote
Loopback Test .........................................................3-40
DTI/101 in Channel Bank Mode (JP1; JP2;
SW1: 1, 2, 3, 4).......................................................3-41
3.8 Install or Remove PEB Terminators ..............................................3-42
3.8.1 PEB Terminators in Analog Configurations .................3-43
3.8.2 PEB Terminators in Digital Configurations..................3-43
3.8.3 Install the PEB Terminator ...........................................3-45
3.8.4 How to Remove the PEB Terminator ...........................3-45
3.9 Attach the PEB Ribbon Cable to the Board ...................................3-47
3.10 Install the Boards in the PC Chassis.............................................3-49
3.10.1 Attach the DTI/101 Crossover Cable for Drop -and-Insert
Configurations .........................................................3-52
3.11 Restore the PC for Operation .......................................................3-56

vi
3.12 Make the Network Connections...................................................3-57
3.12.1 Connecting the D/41D Board to Telephone Lines
for Loop Start Application (Domestic)...................3-57
3.12.2 Connecting the Telephone Cables for
the D/41D Board .....................................................3-59
3.12.3 Connecting the D/41E Board to Telephone Lines ......3-60
3.12.4 Connecting the Telephone Cables for the
D/41E Board ...........................................................3-60
3.12.5 Connecting the LSI/120 to Analog Service ................3-61
3.12.6 Connecting the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable and RJ-11 Assembly
(LSI/120) .................................................................3-61
3.12.7 Connect the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable (LSI/120) ..............3-63
3.12.8 Connecting the SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly....................3-64
3.12.9 Connecting the DTI Board or D/240SC-T1
(Network Interface Module) Board to
Digital Service.........................................................3-67
3.13 Run Diagnostic Programs to Verify Board Operation...............3-68

4. D/320SC and D/240SC Boards ................................................4-1


4.1 D/320SC and D/240SC Boards: General Description ......................4-1
4.2 D/320SC and D/240SC Boards: Hardware Overview......................4-3
4.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/320SC and D/240SC ..................4-4
4.4 D/320SC and D/240SC Physical Description ..................................4-4
4.4.1 Identifying D/320SC and D/240SC Models ...................4-6
4.5 D/320SC and D/240SC Hardware Configurations...........................4-8
4.5.1 D/320SC and DTI/212 Terminating Device Configurations
4-8
4.5.2 D/240SC and LSI/80 Hardware Configuration...............4-8
4.5.3 D/240SC and DTI/211 Terminating Device Configurations
4-9
4.5.4 D/320SC and DTI/212
Drop-and-Insert Configurations.................................4-9
4.5.4 D/240SC and DTI/211
Drop-and-Insert Configurations.................................4-9
4.5.5 D/320SC and Other Hardware Configurations .............4-10
4.6 D/320SC and D/240SC Hardware Settings....................................4-10
4.6.1 Board Identification Number
(Rotary Switch SW1) ..............................................4-10
4.7 D/320SC and D/240SC Hardware Specifications ..........................4-11

vii
5. D/240SC-T1 Boards.................................................................. 5-1
5.1 D/240SC-T1 Board General Description .........................................5-1
5.2 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Overview....................................................5-2
5.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/240SC-T1...................................5-3
5.4 D/240SC-T1 Physical Description ...................................................5-3
5.4.1 Identifying D/240SC-T1 Models ....................................5-3
5.5 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Configurations............................................5-8
5.5.1 D/240SC-T1 Terminating Device Configuration............5-8
5.6 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Settings.......................................................5-8
5.6.1 Resource Module: Board Identification Number
(Rotary Switch SW1).................................................5-9
5.6.2 Network Interface Module: Remote Loopback
Test Switch ..............................................................5-10
5.7 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Specifications ...........................................5-11
5.7.1 Network Interface Module (Daughterboard) ................5-11
Telephony Interface ...............................................................5-11
Host Interface.........................................................................5-12
Hardware Defaults .................................................................5-12
Electrical Specifications ........................................................5-12
Environmental Specifications ................................................5-12
Network Interface ..................................................................5-13
PCM Expansion Bus Interface...............................................5-13

6. D/121A Board ........................................................................... 6-1


6.1 D/121A Board General Description .................................................6-1
6.2 D/121A Hardware Overview............................................................6-2
6.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/121A ..........................................6-3
6.4 D/121A Physical Description...........................................................6-3
6.4.1 Identifying D/121A Models ............................................6-3
6.5 D/121A Hardware Configurations ...................................................6-7
6.5.1 D/121A and LSI/120 Hardware Configuration ...............6-7
6.5.2 D/121A and DTI/101 Terminating Device
Configurations ...........................................................6-7
6.5.3 D/121A and DTI/101 Drop-and-Insert
Configurations ...........................................................6-8
6.5.4 D/121A and Other Hardware Configurations .................6-8

viii
6.6 D/121A Hardware Settings ..............................................................6-8
6.6.1 Base I/O Port (SW1) .......................................................6-9
6.6.2 IRQ Level (JP1)..............................................................6-9
6.6.3 Interrupt Terminator (JP7) ............................................6-10
6.6.4 Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16) ........................................6-10
6.7 D/121A Hardware Specifications ..................................................6-11
Host Interface ..........................................................6-11
Electrical .................................................................6-12
Environmental .........................................................6-12
Physical ...................................................................6-12

7. D/121B Board ............................................................................7-1


7.1 D/121B Board General Description .................................................7-1
7.2 D/121B Hardware Overview............................................................7-3
7.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/121B ..........................................7-3
7.4 D/121B Physical Description ...........................................................7-3
FIGURE 7-2. Components on the D/121B Board ..................7-5
7.4.1 Identifying D/121B Models ............................................7-6
7.5 D/121B Hardware Configurations ...................................................7-7
7.5.1 D/121B and LSI/120 Hardware Configuration ...............7-7
7.5.2 D/121B and DTI/101 Terminating Device
Configurations...........................................................7-7
7.5.3 D/121B and DTI/101 Drop-and-Insert
Configurations...........................................................7-8
7.5.4 D/121B and Other Hardware Configurations .................7-8
7.6 D/121B Board Hardware Settings....................................................7-8
7.6.1 Base I/O Port (SW1) .......................................................7-9
7.6.2 IRQ Level (JP1)............................................................7-10
7.6.3 Interrupt Terminator (JP7) ............................................7-10
7.6.4 Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16) ........................................7-11
7.7 D/121B Hardware Specifications...................................................7-11
Host Interface ..........................................................7-12
Electrical .................................................................7-12
Environmental .........................................................7-12
Physical ...................................................................7-13

ix
8. D/81A Board ............................................................................. 8-1
8.1 D/81A Board General Description ...................................................8-1
8.2 D/81A Hardware Overview..............................................................8-2
8.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/81A ............................................8-2
8.4 D/81A Physical Description.............................................................8-4
8.4.1 Identifying D/81A Models ..............................................8-4
8.5 D/81A Board Hardware Configurations...........................................8-6
8.5.1 D/81A and DTI/101 Drop-and-Insert
Configurations ...........................................................8-7
8.5.2 D/81A Board and Other Hardware
Configurations ...........................................................8-7
8.6 D/81A Hardware Settings ................................................................8-8
8.6.1 Base I/O Port (SW1) .......................................................8-8
8.6.2 IRQ Level (JP1) ..............................................................8-9
8.6.3 Interrupt Terminator (JP7) ............................................8-10
8.6.4 Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16) .........................................8-10
8.7 D/81A Hardware Specifications.....................................................8-11
Host Interface ..........................................................8-11
Electrical..................................................................8-11
Environmental .........................................................8-11
Physical ...................................................................8-12

9. D/41D Board ............................................................................. 9-1


9.1 D/41D Board General Description ...................................................9-1
9.2 D/41D Hardware Overview .............................................................9-2
9.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/41D ............................................9-3
9.4 D/41D Physical Description.............................................................9-3
9.5 D/41D Hardware Configurations .....................................................9-5
9.6 D/41D Board Hardware Settings......................................................9-5
9.6.1 Multiple D/41D Board Configuration (JP7) ...................9-5
9.6.2 Base Memory Address Segment (JP5, JP6) ....................9-5
9.6.3 Offset Address (SW1: 1, 2, 3).........................................9-6
9.5.4 Default Line State (SW1: 4) ...........................................9-7
9.6.5 Board’s Interrupt Level (JP1)..........................................9-8

x
9.7 D/41D Specifications .......................................................................9-8
Telephone Interface...................................................9-8
Host Interface ............................................................9-9
Electrical ...................................................................9-9
Environmental ...........................................................9-9
Physical ...................................................................9-10
Audio Signal............................................................9-10
Audio Digitizing......................................................9-10
Tone Dialing............................................................9-10
Pulse Dialing ...........................................................9-11
DTMF Tone Detection ............................................9-11
MF Tone Detection .................................................9-11
P3 Analog Expansion Bus (AEB)
Specifications ..........................................................9-11

10. D/41E Board ..........................................................................10-1


10.1 D/41E General Description ..........................................................10-1
10.2 D/41E Board Hardware Overview ...............................................10-2
10.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/41E.........................................10-2
10.4 D/41E Board Physical Description ..............................................10-2
10.5 D/41E Board Hardware Configuration ........................................10-6
10.6 D/41E Hardware Settings.............................................................10-6
10.6.1 D/41E Board Identification Number (SW2: 2) ..........10-6
10.6.2 D/41E Default Line State (SW2: 1) ...........................10-7
10.7 D/41E U.S. Specifications ...........................................................10-8
Telephone Interface.................................................10-8
Host Interface ..........................................................10-8
Electrical .................................................................10-9
Environmental .........................................................10-9
Physical ...................................................................10-9
Audio Signal............................................................10-9
Audio Digitizing....................................................10-10
Tone Dialing..........................................................10-10
Pulse Dialing .........................................................10-10
DTMF Tone Detection ..........................................10-11
MF Tone Detection ...............................................10-11
P3 Analog Expansion Bus (AEB)
Specifications ........................................................10-11

xi
11. LSI/120 Network Interface Board ...................................... 11-1
11.1 LSI/120 General Description .......................................................11-1
11.2 LSI/120 Hardware Overview .......................................................11-2
11.3 LSI/120 Physical Description.......................................................11-2
11.4 LSI/120 Board Hardware Settings ...............................................11-5
11.4.1 LSI/120 Timeslots (SW1: 1, 2) ..................................11-6
11.4.2 LSI/120 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 3) ...................11-6
11.4.3 LSI/120 Default Line State (SW1: 4) ........................11-6
11.4.4 LSI/120 AEB Signaling (SW1: 6) .............................11-7
11.4.5 LSI/120 Operating Mode (SW2) ................................11-7
11.5 LSI/120 Board Physical Description ............................................11-7
11.6 LSI/120 Hardware Specifications ................................................11-8
General ....................................................................11-8
Electrical..................................................................11-8
Environmental .........................................................11-8
Physical ...................................................................11-9
LSI/120 Audio Connector (AEB) Pin-out
Specifications ..........................................................11-9
SA/120 RJ-21 Cable ..............................................11-11

12. DTI/101 Network Interface Board...................................... 12-1


12.1 DTI/101 Board General Description ............................................12-1
12.2 DTI/101 Board Hardware Overview ...........................................12-1
12.3 DTI/101 Board Physical Description ...........................................12-2
12.4 DTI/101 Hardware Configuration ................................................12-5
12.4.1 Terminate Configurations ...........................................12-5
12.4.2 Drop-and-Insert Digital Configurations ......................12-5
12.5 DTI/101 Hardware Settings .........................................................12-6
12.5.1 DTI/101 Base I/O Port (SW1: 1, 2, 3) ........................12-6
12.5.2 DTI/101 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 4) ....................12-7
12.5.3 DTI/101 IRQ Level (JP1) ...........................................12-8
12.5.4 DTI/101 Board Interrupt Terminator (JP2) ................12-8
12.5.5 DTI/101 Normal/Remote Loopback Test
Mode of Operation ..................................................12-8
12.5.6 DTI/101 in Channel Bank Mode
(J1; J2; SW1: 1, 2, 3, and 4) ...................................12-9

xii
12.6 DTI/101 Hardware Specifications ...............................................12-9
Host Interface ..........................................................12-9
Electrical .................................................................12-9
Transmitter ............................................................12-10
Receiver.................................................................12-10
Environmental .......................................................12-10
Physical .................................................................12-10
CSU to DTI/101 Cable ..........................................12-11

Appendix A. Electrostatic Discharge Procedures.....................A-1

Appendix B. Troubleshooting..................................................... B-1


B.1 Troubleshooting Checklist for Common Installation Errors........... B-1
B.2 Testing for Suspected Failures ....................................................... B-2
B.3 Error Codes Returned in D40CHK.LOG ....................................... B-4

Appendix C. The Return MaterialAuthorization (RMA)


Process...........................................................................................C-1
C.1 Before You Call ............................................................................. C-1
C.2 Contacting Dialogic........................................................................ C-1
C.3 Procedure for Removing the Board ................................................ C-2
C.4 Returning the Board and Test Results ............................................ C-3

Appendix D: Related Publications .............................................D-1

Appendix E: Regulatory Requirements..................................... E-1

Glossary ............................................................................Glossary-1

Index....................................................................................... Index-1

xiii
List of Figures

Figure 1-1. Basic Digital 24-Channel Terminate Configuration.......................1-15


Figure 1-2. One-Way Drop-and-Insert Digital Configuration ..........................1-17
Figure 1-3. Two-Way Drop-and-Insert Digital Configuration..........................1-18
Figure 2-1. D/320SC or D/240SC Board............................................................2-2

Figure 2-2. D/240SC-T1 Board ...........................................................................2-4


Figure 2-3. Components on the D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Board....................2-6
Figure 2-4. D/41D Board.....................................................................................2-8
Figure 2-4. D/41D Board...................................................................................2-10
Figure 2-6. Components on the LSI/120 Network Interface Board...................2-12
Figure 2-7. Components on the DTI/101 Board ................................................2-14

Figure 3-1. Board Part Naming Conventions.......................................................3-3


Figure 3-2. Configuration with Two Voice Boards with One DTI Board ...........3-8
Figure 3-3. DTI Board Placement with Drop-and-Insert Configuration.............3-8
Figure 3-4. Typical DIP Switch.........................................................................3-12
Figure 3-5. D/320SC or D/240SC Board...........................................................3-13
Figure 3-6. D/240SC-T1 Board .........................................................................3-16
Figure 3-7. Components on the D/A, D/121B, or D/81A Board.......................3-18
Figure 3-8. D/41D Board...................................................................................3-23
Figure 3-9. D/41E Board ...................................................................................3-28
Figure 3-10. Components on the LSI Network Interface Board ........................3-32
Figure 3-11. Components on the DTI/101 Board ..............................................3-38
Figure 3-12. PEB Terminator ............................................................................3-42
Figure 3-13. Configuration with PEB Terminator.............................................3-44
Figure 3-14. Installing the PEB Terminator ......................................................3-46
Figure 3-15. Seating the PEB Cable Connector.................................................3-48
Figure 3-16. Position of the PC Chassis during Board Installation....................3-50
Figure 3-17. Installing the Voice Board in the PC Chassis................................3-51
Figure 3-18. Fold the PEB Cable to Lie Flat .....................................................3-52
Figure 3-19. Attaching the Crossover Cable to the DTI/101 Board...................3-54
Figure 3-20. Folding the Crossover Cable Flat..................................................3-55
Figure 3-21. Voice Board RJ-14 Jack Channel Assignments ............................3-58
Figure 3-22. D/41E Board RJ-11 Jack Channel Assignments ...........................3-62

xiv
Figure 3-23. Inserting the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable.................................................3-63
Figure 3-24. SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly...............................................................3-66

Figure 4-1. Block Diagram of the Main Components on the D/320SC or D/240SC
Board...........................................................................................4-5
Figure 4-2. Components on the D/320SC or D/240SC Board.............................4-7

Figure 5-1. Block Diagram of the D/240SC-T1 Main Components (Resource


Module and Network Interface Module) .....................................5-4
Figure 5-2. Components on the D/240SC-T1 Board ...........................................5-7

Figure 6-1. Block Diagram of the D/121A Main Components...........................6-4


Figure 6-2. Components on the D/121A Board..................................................6-6

Figure 7-1. Block Diagram of the D/121B Main Components...........................7-4

Figure 8-1. Block Diagram of the D/81A Main Components.............................8-3


Figure 8-2. Components on the D/81A Board....................................................8-5

Figure 9-1. Block Diagram of the D/41D Main Components.............................9-2


Figure 9-2. D/41D Jumpers, Switches and P3 Connector...................................9-4

Figure 10-1. Block Diagram of the D/41E Main Components .........................10-3


Figure 10-2. D/41E Board ................................................................................10-4

Figure 11-1. Block Diagram of the LSI/120 Main Components.......................11-3


Figure 11-2. Components on the LSI/120 Network Interface Board................11-4

Figure 12-1. DTI/101 Network Interface Board Block Diagram......................12-2


Figure 12-2. Components on the DTI/101 Board .............................................12-4

Figure A-1. Static-safe Workstation..................................................................A-2

xv
List of Tables

Table 3-1. Summary of Voice Board Installation Sequence................................3-5


Table 3-2. Remote Loopback Test Switch Settings...........................................3-15
Table 3-3. I/O Base Address for D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Board ................3-17
Table 3-4. SW1 Switch Positons .......................................................................3-19
Table 3-5. IRQ Settings for the D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Board..................3-20
Table 3-6. Bus Mode for D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Boards ..........................3-21
Table 3-7. D/41D Board Offset Addresses........................................................3-24
Table 3-8. D/41D Board Offset Address Settings..............................................3-25
Table 3-9. D/41D Board Default Line State Switch ..........................................3-26
Table 3-10. D/41D Board Interrupt Request (IRQ) Level .................................3-26
Table 3-11. Setting the D/41E Board Identification Number ............................3-30
Table 3-12. Setting the D/41E Board Default Line State...................................3-31
Table 3-13. LSI/120 Hardware Settings: SW1 Switch Positions.......................3-33
Table 3-14. I/O Port Range Settings for the DTI/101 Board .............................3-37
Table 3-15. DTI/101 Board Timing Clock Source ............................................3-39
Table 3-16. DTI/101 Board Mode of Operation................................................3-41

Table 4-1. Description of the Components on the D/320SC or


D/240SC Board ...........................................................................4-6

Table 5-1. Description of Components on the Resource Module


of the D/240SC-T1 Board ...........................................................5-5
Table 5-2. Description of Components on the Network Interface Module
of the D/240SC-T1 Board ...........................................................5-6
Table 5-3. T-1 Service to Network Interface Module Pin Designations............5-13
Table 5-4. PCM Expansion Bus Connector Pinout............................................5-14

Table 6-1. Description of Components on the D/121A Board............................6-5

Table 7-1. Description of Components on the D/121B Board............................7-6

Table 8-1. Components on the D/81A Board .....................................................8-6

Table 9-1. Components on the D/41D Board .....................................................9-3

xvi
Table 10-1. D/41E Board Switch, Jumper, and Connector Functions ..............10-5
Table 10-2. D/41E Board P3 Pin Descriptions ...............................................10-12

Table 11-2. Components on the LSI/120 Network Interface Board .................11-5


Table 11-2. LSI/120 Board P4, P5, P6 Pin Descriptions ................................11-10

Table 12-1. Components on the DTI/101 Board...............................................12-3

Table B-1. Selecting Which Diagnostic Test to Run......................................... B-3

xvii
About This Guide
We strongly recommend that you read this entire guide before attempting to install
or use Dialogic boards.

The Voice Hardware Installation Guide provides an introduction to Dialogic’s


voice boards, LSI/120 network interface boards, and DTI/101 network interface
boards. In addition, this Guide provides instructions for installing the boards in an
IBM PC/XT/AT computer or compatible computer.

NOTE: For D/42-SX, D/42-SL, and D/42-NS hardware installation, refer to the
D/42-SX Hardware Reference, D/42-SL Hardware Reference, and
D/42-NS Hardware Reference.

The information before Chapter 1 provides an overview of each chapter of this


guide and defines Dialogic product terminology.

Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the D/320SC, D/240SC, D/240SC-T1,


D/121B, D/121A, D/81A, D/41D, D/41E, LSI/120, and DTI/101 boards; and
provides an overview of possible analog and digital configurations.

Chapter 2 provides a quick reference for configuring and installing the boards in a
system. The reference is intended for experienced users.

Chapter 3 contains the steps to follow when installing Dialogic voice and network
interface boards in a PC and PC-compatible computer. The procedures also
describe proper board handling techniques to ensure efficient installation and avoid
damage to the board components.

Chapter 4 contains the following information on the D/320SC and D/240SC


boards: general description, hardware overview, compatible interface boards,
physical description, hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Chapter 5 contains the following information on the D/240SC-T1 board: general


description, hardware overview, compatible interface boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

xviii
Chapter 6 contains the following information on the D/121A board: general
description, hardware overview, compatible interface boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Chapter 7 contains the following information on the D/121B board: general


description, hardware overview, compatible interface boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Chapter 8 contains the following information on the D/81A board: general


description, hardware overview, compatible interface boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Chapter 9 contains the following information on the D/41D board: general


description, hardware overview, compatible interface boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Chapter 10 contains the following information on the D/41E board: general


description, hardware overview, compatible interface boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Chapter 11 contains the following information on the LSI/120 board: general


description, hardware overview, compatible voice boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Chapter 12 contains the following information on the DTI/101 board: general


description, hardware overview, compatible voice boards, physical description,
hardware configurations, settings, and specifications.

Appendix A contains the procedures for creating and working in a static-safe


workstation.

Appendix B contains troubleshooting aids for identifying installation errors.

Appendix C contains the procedures for the Return Material Authorization


(RMA) process.

Appendix D provides a list of related publications.

xix
Appendix E provides regulatory requirements for components and systems.

A glossary and index are provided at the end of this guide.

This guide is intended for programmers, engineers, and users who want to become
familiar with the Dialogic Multi-Line Voice Communication System (MVSC) and
those interested in learning about the design and operation of Dialogic products.

xx
Product Terminology
The following product terminology is used throughout this guide:

AMX/ refers to Dialogic’s crosspoint switch expansion board.

D/ refers to Dialogic’s voice-store-and-forward expansion boards. D/320SC,


D/240SC, D/240SC-T1, D/121A, D/121B, D/81A, D/41D, and D/41E are specific
models of these boards.

DTI/ refers to Dialogic’s digital telephony interface boards. DTI/101, DTI/211,


and DTI/212 are specific models of these boards.

LSI/ refers to Dialogic’s loop start interface expansion boards. The LSI/120 and
LSI/80 are specific models of these boards.

PEB-I is the bus connecting the D/320SC, D/240SC, D/240SC-T1, D/121A, or


D/121B to the network interface boards.

SpringBoard refers to the hardware platform used with the D/320SC, D/240SC,
D/240SC-T1, D/121A, and D/121B boards.

xxi
1. Introduction to the Voice Board
Product Line

This chapter provides an introduction to the Dialogic Voice product line and
contains the following information:
• General description of each board in the voice product line:
- D/320SC and D/240SC
- D/240SC-T1 (includes onboard network interface module)
- D/121A
- D/121B
- D/81A
- D/41D (includes onboard network interface module)
- D/41E (includes onboard network interface module)
• General description of two boards in the network interface product line:
- DTI/101
- LSI/120
For information on other boards in the network interface product line, see the
Network Interface Board Hardware Reference.
• Typical applications
For up-to-date product information, check the release notes supplied on disk with
the System Release Package.

1-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

1.1 Voice Product Line


The Dialogic line of voice products includes the following boards:
• D/320SC and D/240SC
• D/240SC-T1
• D/121A
• D/121B
• D/81A
• D/41D
• D/41E
The following paragraphs provide a brief description of each board.

1.1.1 D/320SC and D/240SC Boards

The D/320SC and D/240SC boards are single-slot, high-density voice processing
boards for use with separate network interface boards. The D/320SC board
supports up to 30 voice ports, and the D/240SC board supports up to 24 voice
ports.

The D/320SC and D/240SC boards provide the following capabilities on up to 30


channels (D/320SC board) or up to 24 channels (D/240SC board):
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time.
• Play back previously recorded files.
• Initiate and receive calls through the network interface module
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and loop and dial pulse generation.
• Monitor the progress of an out-bound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques.

1-2
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

The D/320SC and D/240SC boards use Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to
implement the voice processing features; the Digital Signal Processors require
firmware that is downloaded from disk during software installation. This firmware
is called SpringWare. For detailed information on voice software features, see the
appropriate Voice Software Reference for your operating system. The D/320SC
and D/240SC boards are compatible with PEB systems and can be used in existing
applications.
In addition, the D/320SC and D/240SC boards are typically used in conjunction
with network interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment to connect to the
telephone network through PEB-compatible products.
The D/320SC board can be connected to any of the following network interface
boards:
• DTI/212, a 32-channel digital telephony interface board for E-1 digital
applications.
• European primary rate ISDN interface board for E-1 digital applications.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.
The D/240SC board can be connected to any of the following network interface
boards:
• Up to 2 LSI/120 boards, each with a 12-channel loop start interface board for
analog applications.
• Up to 3 LSI/80 boards, each with an 8-channel loop start interface board for
analog applications.
• DTI/211, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for T-1 digital
applications.
• PRI/211, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for T-1 digital
applications.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.

1-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The advantages of the D/320SC and D/240SC boards are as follows:


• Increased system density with higher voice port density per PC slot.
• Fewer slots required for system installation:
- 30-channel E-1 voice processing applications can be installed in two slots
(one DTI/212 and one D/320SC board).
- 24-channel loop start applications can be installed in four slots (one
D/240SC board and three LSI/80 boards).
- 24-channel T-1 voice processing applications can be installed in two slots
(one DTI/211 and one D/240SC board).
- 24-channel loop start applications can be installed in three slots (one
D/240SC board and two LSI/120 boards).
- LSI/80, LSI/120, DTI/212, and DTI/211 boards can be installed in either
8-bit or 16-bit slots. This feature lets you make use of all the expansion
slots in your PC-AT or compatible machine.

1.1.2 D/240SC-T1 Board

The D/240SC-T1 board combines a single-slot, high-density voice processing


resource module (base board) with a T-1 network interface module
(daughterboard). The D/240SC-T1 resource module supports up to 24 voice ports
and provides the following capabilities on up to 24 channels:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time.
• Play back previously recorded files.
• Initiate and receive calls through the network interface module
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation.
• Monitor the progress of an outbound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques.

1-4
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

The D/240SC-T1 board is compatible with PEB systems and can be used in
existing applications in terminate configuration.
The resource module (base board) of the D/240SC-T1 board uses Digital Signal
Processors (DSPs) to implement the voice processing features; the Digital Signal
Processors require firmware that is downloaded from disk during software
installation. This firmware is called SpringWare. For detailed information on
voice software features, see the appropriate Voice Software Reference for your
operating system.
The network interface module on the daughterboard of the D/240SC-T1 board
enables the board to interface directly to a T-1/DSX-1 service termination.
The advantages of the D/240SC-T1 board are as follows:
• Increased system density with higher voice port density per PC slot;
24-channel T-1 voice processing applications can be installed in a single slot
since both resource module and network interface module are included with
the board.
• Fewer slots required for system installation.
• Simplified management of complex resource-sharing systems.
• Easier installation and cable configuration.

1.1.1 D/121A Board

The D/121A board is a high-density, 12-channel voice processing board that


provides the following functionality:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time.
• Play back previously recorded files.
• Initiate and receive calls through the network interface module
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation.
• Monitor the progress of an outbound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques.

1-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The D/121A board uses Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to implement the voice
processing features; the Digital Signal Processors require firmware that is
downloaded from disk during software installation. This firmware is called
SpringWare. For detailed information on voice software features, see the Voice
Software Reference.
In addition, the D/121A boards are typically used in conjunction with network
interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment to connect to the telephone
network through PEB-compatible products:
• LSI/120, a 12-channel loop start interface board for analog applications.
• DTI/101, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for digital
applications. See Section 1.2 of this chapter for more information on the
DTI/101 board.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.
The advantages of the D/121A boards are as follows:
• Higher voice port density per PC slot than D/41D products.
• Fewer slots required for system installation:
- 24-channel T-1 voice processing applications (one DTI/124 and six D/41D
boards) can be installed in three slots (one DTI/101 and two D/121A
boards).
- 24-channel loop start applications (six D/41D boards) can be installed in
four slots (two D/121A boards and two LSI/120 boards).
- LSI/120 and DTI/101 boards can be installed in either 8 -bit or 16-bit slots.
This feature lets you make use of all the expansion slots in your PC-AT or
compatible machine.
- LSI/120 and DTI/101 boards can be installed in either 8 -bit or 16-bit slots.
The D/121A requires a 16-bit slot.

1-6
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

1.1.2 D/121B Board

The D/121B board is a performance enhanced, high-density, 12-channel voice


processing board that provides the following functionality:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time
• Play back previously recorded files
• Speed control
• Improved DTMF detection
• Initiate and receive calls through the network interface module
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation
• Monitor the progress of an outbound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques.
The D/121B board uses Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to implement the voice
processing features; the Digital Signal Processors require firmware that is
downloaded from disk during software installation. This firmware is called
SpringWare. For detailed information on voice software features, see the Voice
Software Reference.
In addition, the D/121B boards are typically used in conjunction with network
interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment to connect to the telephone
network through PEB-compatible products:
• LSI/120, a 12-channel loop start interface board for analog applications.
• DTI/101, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for digital
applications. See Section 1.2 of this chapter for more information on the
DTI/101 board.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.

1-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

1.1.3 D/81A Board

The D/81A board is a high-density, 8-channel voice processing board that


provides the following functionality:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time.
• Play back previously recorded files.
• Initiate and receive calls through the loop start interface
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation.
• Monitor the progress of an outbound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques.
The D/81A boards uses Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to implement the voice
processing features; the Digital Signal Processors require firmware that is
downloaded from disk during software installation. This firmware is called
SpringWare. For detailed information on voice software features, see the Voice
Software Reference.
In addition, the D/81A boards are typically used in conjunction with network
interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment connect to the telephone
network:
• LSI/80, an 8-channel loop start interface board for analog applications.
• DTI/212, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for digital
applications. For further information on the DTI/212, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.

1-8
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

1.1.4 D/41D Board

D/41D board includes the following capabilities on up to 4 channels:


• Record, digitize, and compress audio in real time
• Playback previously recorded files
• Generate and detect DTMF tones
• Generate and detect MF tones
• Pulse dialing
• Initiate and receive calls through the loop start telephone interface
• Perform call progress analysis for outbound dialing
• UL1459 compliance
The D/41D board uses Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to implement the voice
processing features; the Digital Signal Processors require firmware that is
downloaded from disk during software installation. This firmware is called
SpringWare. For detailed information on voice software features, see the Voice
Software Reference.
All D/41D boards provide a built-in loop start telephone line interface. D/41D
board can be installed in either an 8-bit or 16-bit PC expansion slot.

1-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

1.1.5 D/41E Board

D/41E board is a 4-channel store-and-forward voice board with world


approvability, access to resource modules, and additional power for future
firmware features.
The D/41E board provides the following capabilities on up to 4 channels:
• Record, digitize, and compress audio in real time
• Playback previously recorded files
• Generate and detect DTMF tones
• Generate and detect MF tones
• Pulse dialing
• Initiate and receive calls through the loop start telephone interface
• Perform call progress analysis for outbound dialing
• UL1459 compliance
The D/41E board uses Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to implement the voice
processing features; the Digital Signal Processors require firmware that is
downloaded from disk during software installation. This firmware is called
SpringWare. For detailed information on voice software features, see the Voice
Software Reference.
The D/41E board provides four built-in loop start telephone line interfaces. It is
designed for approvability in many countries.
The D/41E board behaves as a 16-bit card in a 16-bit slot, or if necessary, an 8-bit
card in a 16-bit slot. The D/41E board runs in 8-bit mode when the PC powers up.
If the other boards in the system are running in 16-bit mode, the D/41E board
switches to 16-bit mode.
The FAX/40 four channel fax processing daughterboard is designed to work with
the D/41E board. For more information on installation and programming
considerations, see the FAX/40 Hardware Installation Guide.

1-10
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

1.2 Network Interface Product Line


Two boards in the Dialogic line of network interface products are described in this
section:
• LSI/120
• DTI/101

1.2.1 LSI/120 Network Interface Board

The LSI/120 network interface board connects loop start (analog) telephone lines,
via the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB), to the voice processing resources of a digital
D/121A or D/121B board.
The features of the LSI/120 network interface board include:
• Independent loop start interfaces
• Independent loop current and ring voltage detectors
• Independently controlled solid-state hookswitches
• Toll-quality voice encoding and decoding
• Compatible with Dialogic's PCM Expansion Bus

The LSI board also contains circuitry to support the following features:
• Signaling control
• Digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion
• Ring voltage and loop current detection
• Electromagnetic interference suppression
The LSI/120 supports up to 12 telephone lines. The LSI/120 also contains three
audio connectors for attaching to Dialogic AMX/81 boards, or any
AEB-compatible, user-supplied devices. These connectors are functionally
compatible with the P3 Audio Expansion Bus (AEB) connector on the D/41D.

1-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

1.2.1 DTI/101 Network Interface Board

The DTI/101 network interface board provides a DSX-1 interface that allows you
to connect D/121A or D/121B boards to a T -1 digital service. The DTI/101 board
can also be connected to another DTI/101 board for drop-and insert-
configurations.

1.3 Typical Applications


The Dialogic voice boards can be configured for a variety of applications,
including:
• Basic analog configurations
• Basic digital configurations (terminating)
• Drop-and-insert digital configurations
• Other network configurations

1.3.1 Basic Analog Configuration

The D/41D boards and the D/41E boards contain everything needed for the basic
4-channel analog configuration. Higher density 8-channel and 12-channel boards
use a SpringBoard connected via PEB cable to an LSI board.
The basic 24-channel analog application uses a D/240SC board connected via a
PEB cable to two LSI/120 boards. This configuration will handle up to 24
telephone lines. A PEB terminator must be installed on either end of the PEB
cable; however, boards installed in the middle of the PEB cable do not require a
PEB terminator.
Another 24-channel analog application uses a D/240SC board connected via a
PEB cable to three LSI/80 boards. This configuration will handle up to 30
telephone lines. A PEB terminator must be installed on either end of the PEB
cable; however, boards installed in the middle of the PEB cable do not require a
PEB terminator. You can mix D/240SC board-to-LSI/80 and D/81A board-to-
LSI/80 boards in the same application if the addresses of the boards you are
installing do not overlap.

1-12
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

You can mix D/240SC board-to-LSI/120, D/121A board-to-LSI/120 and D/41D or


D/41E boards in the same application if the addresses of the boards you are
installing do not overlap.
The basic 12-channel analog application uses a D/121A board or D/121B board
connected via a PEB cable to one LSI/120 board. This configuration will handle
up to 12 telephone lines. A PEB terminator must be installed on either end of the
PEB cable; however, boards installed in the middle of the PEB cable do not
require a PEB terminator. You can mix D/121A - LSI/120 combinations and
D/41D or D/41E boards in the same application if the addresses of the boards you
are installing do not overlap.
The basic 8-channel analog configuration consists of one Dialogic SpringBoard
(D/81A) connected via a PEB cable to one LSI/80 board. This configuration will
handle up to 8 telephone lines. A PEB terminator must be installed on both the
voice board and the LSI/80. You can mix D/81A - LSI/80 combinations and
D/41D or D/41E boards in the same application if the addresses of the boards you
are installing do not overlap.

1.3.2 Basic Digital Configuration (Terminating)

The basic digital configuration is one where SpringBoards and DTI network
interface boards are installed in a terminate configuration. Two terminate
configurations are possible:
• 24-channel
• 30-channel

1-13
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The 24-channel terminate configuration is used in North America and some


Asian countries and consists of either of the following:
• One D/240SC-T1 board, which includes a resource module for 24 channels
and a network interface module that terminates a T-1 digital service; see
Figure 1-1.
• One D/240SC cabled to a DTI/211. This configuration terminates a T-1
digital service. This configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable with two
connectors.
• One or two D/121A boards or D/121B boards cabled to a DTI/101 or
DTI/211 board. This configuration terminates a T-1 digital service. This
configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable with three connectors.

The 30-channel terminate configuration is used in Europe and Asia and consists
of either of the following:
• One D/320SC board cabled to a a DTI/212 board. This configuration
terminates an E-1 digital service.
• Four D/81A boards cabled to a DTI/212 board. This configuration
terminates an E-1 digital service.

1-14
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

HOST PC
T-1
NETWORK NETWORK INTERFACE
SPAN BOARD
Rx

Tx

D/240SC, D/121A, OR
D/121B BOARD

CONFIGURATION WITH D/240SC, D/121A, or D/121B BOARDS

HOST PC
D/240SC - T1 BOARD

T-1 NETWORK INTERFACE


NETWORK DAUGHTERBOARD
SPAN
Rx

Tx

VOICE
RESOURCE
BOARD

CONFIGURATION WITH D/240SC-T1 BOARDS

FIGURE 1-1. Basic Digital 24-Channel Terminate Configuration

1-15
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

1.3.3 Drop-and-Insert Digital Configurations

Voice boards can also be installed in a drop-and-insert configuration for digital


telephony applications. In digital drop-and-insert configurations, two DTI boards
are connected to allow communication between separate T-1 spans.
In a drop-and-insert configuration, the two network interface boards are connected
together by a PEB crossover cable and continuously pass data in all time slots
through to each other. In other words, the time slot data is "dropped" from the
network interface board and "inserted" into the time slot data stream on the voice
board. The voice board transmits and receives data to and from the network; the
opposite network interface board "inserts" timeslot data from the voice board into
the outgoing timeslot data stream.

NOTE: A voice board can transmit data only to the network interface board on
the same side of the PEB crossover cable.
One or two network interface modules are connected to PEB-compatible voice
boards for 1-way drop-and-insert or 2-way drop-and-insert respectively.
The voice boards may be connected to various DTI network interface boards as
follows:
• One D/240SC board cabled to two DTI/211 boards; th is configuration is
known as "one-way drop-and-insert"; see Figure 1-2.
• Two D/240SC boards cabled to two DTI/211 boards; this configuration is
known as "two-way drop-and-insert"; see Figure 1-3.
• One D/320SC board cabled to two DTI/212 boards
Two D/320SC boards cabled to two DTI/212 boards
• Two D/121A or D/121B boards cabled to two DTI/101 boards
• Four D/121A or D/121B boards cabled to two DTI/101 boards
To use D/121A or D/121B boards with two DTI/101 boards in a drop-and-insert
configuration, install two DTI/101 boards and two D/121A or D/121B boards, or
install two DTI/101 boards and four D/121A or D/121B boards.

1-16
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

HOST PC

T-1 PEB CROSSOVER T-1


DTI/211 CABLE DTI/211
NETWORK NETWORK
SPAN SPAN/PBX
Rx
Rx

Tx Tx

D/240SC BOARD

FIGURE 1-2. One-Way Drop-and-Insert Digital Configuration

1-17
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

HOST PC

T-1 PEB CROSSOVER T-1


DTI/211 DTI/211
NETWORK CABLE NETWORK
SPAN SPAN/PBX
Rx
Rx

Tx Tx

D/240SC D/240SC
BOARD BOARD

FIGURE 1-3. Two-Way Drop-and-Insert Digital Configuration

1-18
Introduction to the Voice Board Product Line

1.3.4 Other Hardware Configurations

The voice board can be connected to other network interface boards, including the
DID/120, a 12-channel analog interface to DID trunk. In addition, although not
described in this manual, other system configurations are possible, including
connection with a switch such as the Dialogic DMX board or connection with a
station interface such as the Dialogic MSI board.

1-19
2. Quick Reference Guide
Quick reference board installation procedures for the boards described in this
guide are contained in this chapter:
• D/320SC or D/240SC boards
• D/240SC-T1 boards
• D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A boards
• D/41D boards
• D/41E boards
• LSI/120 boards
• DTI/101 boards
These quick reference procedures are intended for users who are experienced in
Dialogic hardware installation. Users who are installing Dialogic hardware for the
first time should use the detailed instructions in the Board Installation chapter.
For up-to-date product information, check the release notes supplied on disk with
the System Release Package.

2-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

PCM EXPANSION BUS


(PEB) CONNECTOR (P5)
XTERM SOCKET (R112)
ROTARY SWITCH

REAR BRACKET

EDGE CONNECTOR

FIGURE 2-1. D/320SC or D/240SC Board

2-2
Quick Reference Guide

INSTALLING D/320SC or D/240SC BOARDS (Figure 2-1)

• Prepare an electrostatic-free environment (see Appendix A).

• Set the Board Identification Number (Rotary Switch)


NOTE: If only one D/320SC or D/240SC board is being installed in the
system, no adjustment to this setting is required.

• Install a PEB terminator if the board is at the end of a PEB cable.

• Attach the PEB cable to the voice board PEB connector.

• Seat the board in the PC expansion slot. Boards must be installed in a PC-AT
bus slot (16-bit).

2-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

PCM EXPANSION BUS


(PEB) CONNECTOR (P5)

XTERM SOCKET (R112)


ROTARY SWITCH
RESOURCE MODULE
(BASEBOARD)

NETWORK INTERFACE
MODULE
(DAUGHTERBOARD)

ALARM INDICATOR (RED)


ALARM INDICATOR (YELLOW)
SIGNAL PRESENT
INDICATOR (GREEN)
REMOTE LOOPBACK
TEST SWITCH
REMOTE LOOPBACK
INDICATOR (RED)
EDGE CONNECTOR
RJ-48C CONNECTOR
JACK

REAR BRACKET

FIGURE 2-2. D/240SC-T1 Board

2-4
Quick Reference Guide

INSTALLING D/240SC-T1 BOARDS (Figure 2-2)

• Prepare an electrostatic-free environment (see Appendix A).


• On the resource module (base board), set the Board Identification Number
(Rotary Switch)
NOTE: If only one D/240SC-T1 board is being installed in the system,
no adjustment to this setting is required.

• On the network interface module (daughterboard), make sure the remote


loopback test switch is set to the off position.
• Seat the board in the PC expansion slot. Boards must be installed in a PC-AT
bus slot (16-bit).

2-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

8 - BI T BUS MODE (JP1 6 8 )


PCM EXPANSI ON BUS (PEB)
CONNECTOR BASE l/O SWI TCH BLOCK (SW1 )
PEB TERMI NATOR SOCKET

1 6 - BI T BUS MODE (JP1 6 )


DS P’s

2/9 3 4 5 6 7 1 0 11 12 14 15
JP1

JP7

l RQ JUMPER BLOCK (JP1 ) I NTERRUPT TERMI NATOR BLOCK (JP7 )


DEFAULT SETTI NG - 3

FIGURE 2-3. Components on the D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Board

2-6
Quick Reference Guide

INSTALLING D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A BOARDS (Figure 2-3)

• Prepare an electrostatic-free environment (see Appendix A).


• Set the I/O port used to select the board base memory address (SW1). Each
D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A board you are installing must use a different I/O
port range.
Switch Position: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 I/O Port Range
(default) off off ON off ON ON ON ON 340H-343H
off off ON off ON ON ON off 344H-347H
off off ON off ON ON off ON 348H-34BH
off off ON off ON ON off off 34CH-34FH
off off ON off ON off ON ON 350H-353H
off off ON off ON off ON off 354H-357H
off off ON off ON off off ON 358H-35BH
off off ON off ON off off off 35CH-35FH
• Set the IRQ level (JP1) for the board. All D/121A, D/121B, D/81A, D/41D
boards installed in the same machine must have the same IRQ level. This
IRQ level must be different from that set for D/41E, D/320SC, D/240SC,
D/240SC-T1 boards.

Jumper Available Jumper Available Jumper Available


Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ
1 IRQ 2/9 5 IRQ 6 9 IRQ 12
2 IRQ 3 (def) 6 IRQ 7 10 IRQ 14
3 IRQ 4 7 IRQ 10 11 IRQ 15
4 IRQ 5 8 IRQ 11
• Set Interrupt Terminator (JP7 ) on one and only one board in the PC.
• Set the board to use 8-bit or 16-bit bus mode.
Bus Mode JP168 JP16
8-Bit* IN OUT
16-Bit OUT IN
* = default, IN = jumper installed, OUT = jumper removed
• Install a PEB terminator if the board is at the end of a PEB cable.
• Attach the PEB cable to the voice board PEB connector.
• Seat the board in the PC expansion slot. Boards must be installed in a PC-AT
bus slot (16-bit).

2-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

P2 P3

JP8

1 2 3 4
O
N

SW1

JP6 JP5

2/9 3 4 5 6 7
JP1

JP7

Figure 2-4. D/41D Board

2-8
Quick Reference Guide

INSTALLING D/41D BOARDS (FIGURE 2-4)


• Prepare an electrostatic-free environment (see Appendix A).
• Set Base Memory Address Segment (JP5 and JP6)
JP5 JP6 Base Address
out out D000H (default)
in out A000H
out in C000H
in in B800H
• Set Offset Address (SW1, switch positions 1, 2 and 3)
Offset from Base Memory
Switch Position: 1 2 3 Address (hex)
(default) off off off 0000
off off ON 2000
off ON ON 4000
off ON ON 6000
ON off off 8000
ON off ON A000
ON ON off C000
ON ON ON E000

• Set Default Line State (SW1, switch position 4)


Line State SW1: 4 Board’s Response to Incoming Call
on-hook off (factory) Ringing, no answer
off-hook ON Busy Signal

• Set Interrupt Request Level (JP1)

Jumper Available Jumper Available Jumper Available


Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ
1 IRQ 2/9 3 IRQ 4 5 IRQ 6
2 IRQ 3 (def) 4 IRQ 5 6 IRQ 7
• Set the Interrupt Terminator (JP7 ) on one and only one board in the PC.
• For T-1 applications using an external T-1 interface, remove jumper JP8.
• Select an empty 8-bit or 16-bit PC expansion slot and install the board in the
selected expansion slot.

2-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

2 1 P3
ON
0

P5
X T E R M S oc k e t SW1
SW2 J1
J5 U43 JP 1 01 J P 10 2
J2
J7
JP 201 J P 20 2

JP 301 J P 30 2
U42
J3
J P 401 J P 40 2

J4
J6

Figure 2-4. D/41E Board

2-10
Quick Reference Guide

INSTALLING D/41E BOARDS (FIGURE 2-5)

• Prepare an electrostatic-free environment (see Appendix A).


• Set the Board Identification Number (Rotary Switch SW1 and SW2: 2).

Board ID Number Configurations


Factory
= 1
Default

S1 S2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

NOTE: If only one D/41E board is being installed in the system, no


adjustment to this setting is required.
• Set the Default Line State (SW2: 1).
Line State SW2: 1 Board’s Response to
Incoming Call

on-hook off (factory setting) Ringing, no answer

off-hook ON Busy Signal

• Select an empty 8-bit or 16-bit PC expansion slot and install the board in the
selected expansion slot.
NOTE: See the Voice Software Reference to set the Base Memory
Segment and Offset Address.

2-11
2-12
A U D IO E X P A N S IO N B U S C O N N E C T O R S (P 4 , P 5 , P 6 )
P C M E X P A N S IO N B U S (P E B )
CONNECTOR 2 5 -P IN D B -T Y P E C O N N E C T O R (M A L E )
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

P E B T E R M IN A T O R
SOCKET
N O R M /L O O P D IA G N O S T IC S W IT C H
S W I T C H B L O C K (S W 1 )

FIGURE 2-6. Components on the LSI/120 Network Interface Board


Quick Reference Guide

INSTALLING LSI/120 BOARDS (FIGURE 2-6)


• Prepare an electrostatic-free environment (see Appendix A).
• Set the proper switches on switch block SW1.
NOTE: For a simple D/12x and LSI/120 configuration, the default settings
do not need to be changed.
SW1 Switch Position
Hardware Setting 1 2 3 4 5 6
LSI/120 Time Slots:
• 1-12 (default) off
• 13-24 ON
Timing Clock Source:
• Independent Timing (on- off
board); default
• PEB Timing ON
Default Line State:
• Ringing, no answer; on- off
hook (default)
• Busy signal; off-hook ON
Audio Expansion Bus
Signaling:
• Signaling between PEB & off
LSI telephony Interface.
P4, P5, P6 disabled; audio
enabled. (default)
• Signaling between PEB & ON
AEB (P4, P5, P6); LSI
telephony interface
disabled.
Mandatory Settings off off

• Install a PEB terminator on either end of the PEB cable where the board is.
• Attach the PEB cable to the board PEB connector.
• Select an empty 8-bit or 16-bit PC expansion slot and install the board in the
selected expansion slot
• Attach the PEB cable to other boards in your system configuration as
necessary.
• Attach the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable to P3.

2-13
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

SIGNAL PRESENT INDICATOR


(G REEN)

PCM EXPANSION BUS YELL OW ALARM INDICATOR


(PEB) CONNECTOR
REMOTE LOOPBACK
TEST SWITCH (SW2)
(SHOWN IN 'OFF' POSITION)

LOSS OF
DTI/CROSSOVER SYNC
CABLE CONNECTOR INDICA TOR

REMOTE
LOOPBACK
TIMING CLOCK SOURCE
INDICATOR
AND BASE ADDRESS
SWITCH BLOCK (SW1)
IRQ SETTING
INTERRUPT JUMPER BLOCK
TERMINATOR (JP1)
JUMPER BLOCK
(JP2) 15 -P IN D SU B-MINIATU RE FE MAL E CON NE CTOR
(FOR DTI/1xx TO CSU/DSX-1 COMPATIBLE
EQUIP MEN T CON NE CTION) (J1 )

FIGURE 2-7. Components on the DTI/101 Board

2-14
Quick Reference Guide

INSTALLING DTI/101 BOARDS (FIGURE 2-7)


• Prepare an electrostatic-free environment (see Appendix A).
• Set the I/O Port Range (SW1). Each DTI/101 installed in the same PC must
have a different I/O port range.
Switch Position: 1 2 3 I/O Port Range (hex)
(default) off off off 320H - 327H
ON off off 328H - 32FH
off ON off 330H - 337H
ON ON off 338H - 33FH
off off ON 3E0H - 3E7H
ON off ON 3E8H - 3EFH
off ON ON reserved
ON ON ON reserved
• Set the Clock Source (SW1: 4)
Clock Source SW1: 4
Independent timing. (default) off
Loop timing. On
• Set JP1 (the IRQ level) for the board. All DTI boards installed in the same
machine must have the same IRQ level; however, the IRQ level set for the
DTI board must be different than that set for the voice boards.
Jumper Available Jumper Available Jumper Available
Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ
1 IRQ 2/9 5 IRQ 6 9 IRQ 12
2 IRQ 3 (def) 6 IRQ 7 10 IRQ 14
3 IRQ 4 7 IRQ 10 11 IRQ 15
4 IRQ 5 8 IRQ 11
• Set JP7 (Interrupt Terminator) on one and only one DTI board in the PC.
• For channel bank emulation mode:
- Remove the jumper from JP1 and JP2.
- Set SW1: 1, 2, 3, and 4 to ON.
• The DTI/101 board must be installed at either end of the PEB cable. Select
an empty 8-bit or 16-bit PC expansion slot and install the board in the
selected expansion slot
• Attach the PEB cable to the DTI/101 PEB connector.
• For drop-and-insert configurations, see the Installation chapter for cabling
requirements.

2-15
3. Board Installation

This chapter details the steps to follow when installing Dialogic voice and network
interface boards in PC and PC-compatible computers. The procedures provided in
this chapter are intended for customers who are unfamiliar with installing Dialogic
boards. The procedures also describe proper board handling techniques to ensure
efficient installation and avoid damage to board components.

NOTE: Use this chapter to complete the first step in the installation
sequence.

3.1 Conventions for Naming the Parts on the


Board
Figure 3-1 shows a standard PC bus voice board with the names used in this guide
when referring to different board parts.

3.2 Installation Requirements


Board installation requires both hardware and software installation.

3-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.2.1 Hardware Installation Requirements

The following minimum hardware is required to install the voice and network
interface boards:
• IBM PC-AT or PC-compatible computer (referred to as a "PC " in this guide)
with at least 512K of conventional memory.
• One Dialogic voice board (for example, D/240SC, or D/121A, or D/81A).
• One Dialogic loop start interface board (for example, LSI/120 or LSI/80) or
one digital telephony interface board (for example, DTI/101 or DTI/211).
• Voice board-to-telephone line cable connectors (see Section 3.12 for
connector requirements)
• A PBX, two telephone lines or Dialogic's AC/101 or Promptmaster Audio
Coupler (required if you plan to run the loopback test using the diagnostic
programs).

3-2
Board Installation

TOP EDGE

NOTCH

FRONT
EDGE REAR
EDGE

RETAINING BRACKET,
END BRACKET,
BOTTOM EDGE O R
COMPONENT SIDE REAR BRACKET
EDGE CONNECTOR

SOLDER SIDE

FIGURE 3-1. Board Naming Conventions

3-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.2.1 Software Requirements

The following software is required to run Dialogic voice or network interface


boards; for details, see the appropriate Voice Software Reference.
• MS-DOS Version 3.3, 4.01, 5.0, or 6.0 (unstacked) for running diagnostics
• Appropriate System Release Dialogic Development Package to match your
operating system.

3.3 Installation Sequence

The recommended sequence for installing the voice and network interface boards
in the PC is described in the following sections. For a summary of the installation
sequence and where to find the associated details, see Table 3-1.

CAUTION
All Dialogic boards and computer equipment are electrostatic sensitive. For
correct handling procedures, see Appendix A in this guide.

WARNING
To avoid possible shock hazard or damage to the equipment, before installing the
board(s), make sure the PC and any connected peripherals are turned off.

3-4
Board Installation

TABLE 3-1. Summary of Board Installation Sequence

Step: For Details, See:

1. Prepare an electrostatic-free environment. Appendix A

2. Prepare the PC chassis for board installation. Section 3-4

3. Determine the installation sequence. Section 3-5

4. Unpack the boards. Section 3-6

5. Check/adjust the hardware settings on the boards. Section 3-7

6. If required, install the PEB terminators. Section 3-8

7. If required, install the PEB ribbon cable. Section 3-9

8. Install voice and network interface boards in the PC chassis. Section 3-10

9. Restore the PC for operation. Section 3-11

10. Make appropriate network connections. Section 3-12

11. Run diagnostic programs to verify proper board operation. Section 3-13 ;
Appendix B; Voice
Hardware Diagnostic
Guide

3-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.4 Prepare the PC Chassis for Board Installation

NOTE: Before installing the Dialogic board(s) in the PC chassis, be sure you
have prepared the board(s) as described in Appendix A.
Follow these steps to prepare the PC chassis for the Dialogic board installation:
01. Prepare an static-safe workstation as described in Appendix A.
2. Set the power switch(es) on the PC and any connected peripheral(s) to the
OFF position.
3. Remove the cover of the PC.

3.5 Determine the Installation Sequence

NOTE: Do not install the boards at this time. Instructions for attaching the cables
and inserting the boards in the PC are in later sections. Use this section to
plan the board installation sequence.
Select an arrangement for easy cabling by starting with the right-most PC
expansion slot.

As a general rule, we recommend that you install the first board in the inner-most
slot (the slot farthest right when viewing the PC from the front), and then install
each subsequent board to the left of the previous board. This method is only a
guideline; to fit a configuration in a certain machine, you may have to install
boards differently.

3.5.1 Configurations with an LSI/120


Install either the voice board or the LSI network interface board first. The LSI/120
network interface board can be installed to the right or the left of the voice board.

3-6
Board Installation

3.5.2 Configurations with a DTI Network Interface Board

DTI/101: Install the first voice board. Then attach the second voice board to the
next available cable connector (the middle one) and install the second voice board
to the left of the first voice board. Install the DTI/101 network interface board in
the next available expansion slot to the left of the two voice boards. The
installation of two voice boards and one DTI/101 network interface board is
shown in Figure 3-2.

The recommended DTI board placement for a 6-board drop-and-insert


configuration is shown in Figure 3-3.
DTI/211: Install the D/240SC board. Install the DTI/211 network interface board
in the next available expansion slot to the left of the voice board.
DTI/212: Install the D/320SC board. Install the DTI/212 network interface board
in the next available expansion slot to the left of the voice board.

3.6 Unpack the Boards


Unpacking the boards involves removing the boards from the cartons, checking
that the required parts were received, and unpacking the boards from their
static-shielding bags.

3-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/12x's
REAR

DTI/101 FRONT

FIGURE 3-2. Configuration with Two Voice Boards with One DTI
Board

D TI/1 01 's
REAR

FRONT

D/12x's

FIGURE 3-3. DTI Board Placement with Drop-and-Insert


Configuration (6 Boards)

3-8
Board Installation

3.6.1 Remove the Boards from the Carton/Packing Checklist

NOTE: Do not remove the boards from the static shielding bags at this time.
Follow the instructions in the installation procedure for when to remove
the boards.
Remove the boards from the carton, and check that you received the following
components:
• Each D/320SC box should contain the following components:
- D/320SC board in a static shielding bag
- Container with a PEB terminator inside
• Each D/240SC box should contain the following components:
- D/240SC board in a static shielding bag
- Container with a PEB terminator inside
• Each D/240SC-T1 box should contain the following components:
- D/240SC-T1 board in a static shielding bag
- Container with a PEB terminator inside
• Each D/121A box should contain the following components:
- D/121A board in a static shielding bag
- Box containing a PEB terminator
• Each D/121B box should contain the following components:
- D/121B board in a static shielding bag
- Box containing a PEB terminator
• Each D/81A box should contain the following components:
- D/81A board in a static shielding bag
- Box containing a PEB terminator
• Each D/41D box should contain the following components:
- D/41D board in a static shielding bag
• Each D/41E box should contain the following components:
- D/41E board in a static shielding bag

3-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

NOTE:Where appropriate due to PTT regulations, some D/41E boards may


come with a conversion cable.
• Each LSI/120 box should contain the following:
- LSI/120 network interface board in a static shielding bag
- 2-connector PEB ribbon cable
- PEB terminator in box
• Each DTI/101 box should contain the following:
- DTI/101 network interface board in a static shielding bag
- 3-connector PEB ribbon cable
- DTI crossover ribbon cable
NOTE: You can identify the specific model of a Dialogic board by the
model name on the FCC sticker located on the adapter board’s
retaining bracket.

3.6.2 Unpack the Boards from the Static Shielding Bags

After preparing an electrostatic-free workstation as described in Appendix A,


unpack the boards according to the following steps:
1. Carefully remove the board(s) from the static shielding bag(s). Handle each
board by the edges and avoid touching the board's edge connector and
components.
2. Lay each board on the static-dissipative mat (or static shielding bag) on a flat
surface.

WARNING
On D/41D boards, do not remove the P2 connector protection cover, even if you
do not use the P2. The cover prevents Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) damage.

When handling any Dialogic board, handle it with care. To prevent damage to the
board due to electrostatic discharge, always follow the instructions in contained in
Appendix A, Electrostatic Discharge Procedures.

3-10
Board Installation

3.7 Check/Adjust the Hardware Settings


Before the board is installed, check the settings on the board jumpers and switches
and make necessary adjustments. To change a DIP switch setting, use the tip of a
small slotted-head screwdriver or ballpoint pen. A drawing of a typical DIP
switch is provided in Figure 3-4.

3.7.1 D/320SC or D/240SC Hardware Settings

The only setting to check on the D/320SC board or the D/240SC board is the
Board Identification Number. See Figure 3-5.

D/320SC or D/240SC Board Identification Number (Rotary Switch


SW1)

Each D/320SC and D/240SC board in your system must have a unique board
identification number. The Dialogic Voice driver uses this number to detect which
voice board is sending a signal. This enables you to address all of the D/320SC or
D/240SC boards to the same base memory address. This address is selected via
the software configuration file.

NOTES: 1. If you are only installing one board, use the default setting. There is
no need to set the board identification number.

2. See the corresponding System Release Voice Software Reference for


more information on the software configuration and addressing.

3-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

=POSITI0N OF SWITCH
Positions 1, 2, and 4 are shown in "OFF" position
Positions 3, 5, 6, and 7 are shown in "ON" position

O1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
N

FIGURE 3-4. Typical DIP Switch

The board identification number is configured using a rotary switch with 16


possible settings (0-9 and A-F) for board identification numbers (0-15).
To set the board identification number, dial the rotary switch to select a number or
letter. Choose one of sixteen settings, 0-9 and A-F. The default board
identification number is 1. While there is no required numbering order for the
board identification numbers, you should number the boards sequentially.

NOTES: 1. Do not set two boards to the same board identification number. The
system will be unable to find the boards.

2. If only one voice board is being installed in the system, no


adjustment to this setting is required.

3-12
Board Installation

PCM EXPANSION BUS


(PEB) CONNECTOR (P5)
XTERM SOCKET (R112)
ROTARY SWITCH

REAR BRACKET

EDGE CONNECTOR

FIGURE 3-5. D/320SC or D/240SC Board

3-13
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.7.2 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Settings

The only settings to check on the D/240SC-T1 board are the board identification
number and the remote loopback test switch. See Figure 3-6.

D/240SC-T1 Board Identification Number (Rotary Switch SW1)

Each D/240SC-T1 board in your system must have a unique board identification
number. The Dialogic Voice driver uses this number to detect which voice board
is sending a signal. This enables you to address all of the D/240SC-T1 boards to
the same base memory address. This address is selected via the software
configuration file.

NOTES: 1. If your are only installing one board, use the default setting. There is
no need to set the board identification number.

2. See the corresponding System Release Voice Software Reference for


more information on the software configuration and addressing.
The board identification number is configured using a rotary switch with 16
possible settings (0-9 and A-F) for board identification numbers (0-15).
To set the board identification number, dial the rotary switch to select a number or
letter. Choose one of sixteen settings, 0-9 and A-F. The default board
identification number is 1. While there is no required numbering order for the
board identification numbers, you should number the boards sequentially.

NOTES: 1. Do not set two boards to the same board identification number. The
system will be unable to find the boards.

2. If only one voice board is being installed in the system, no


adjustment to this setting is required.

3-14
Board Installation

D/240SC-T1 Remote Loopback Test Switch (Rear Bracket)

Make sure the remote loopback test switch is set to the OFF position. This switch,
located on the rear bracket, is used to test the system and is normally set to the
OFF position.
The loopback switch should be set to the ON position only if you are going to test
the system. When ON, the network interface module will transmit what it receives
back to the network, and the Remote Loopback Indicator will be lit.
See Table 3-2 for a description of loopback switch operation.

TABLE 3-2. Remote Loopback Test Switch Settings


Switch Description

OFF Normal mode (default).


ON Loopback mode. When the switch is set to this position (red LED
indicator light ON), the network interface module will transmit back
to the network what it receives.

NOTES: 1. The remote loopback test switch can be set at any time after
firmware download. Setting the switch to ON overrides any board
modes set by your application.

2. When the remote loopback switch is set to ON, a termination event


is generated. When the switch is returned to OFF, the application
receives another event and then continues.

3. When power is applied to the system, the network interface module


remote loopback LED and all other LED indicators will remain unlit
until the network interface module firmware is downloaded to the
board; see the appropriate System Release Voice Software Reference
for your operating system.

3-15
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

PCM EXPANSION BUS


(PEB) CONNECTOR (P5)

XTERM SOCKET (R112)


ROTARY SWITCH
RESOURCE MODULE
(BASEBOARD)

NETWORK INTERFACE
MODULE
(DAUGHTERBOARD)

ALARM INDICATOR (RED)


ALARM INDICATOR (YELLOW)
SIGNAL PRESENT
INDICATOR (GREEN)
REMOTE LOOPBACK
TEST SWITCH
REMOTE LOOPBACK
INDICATOR (RED)
EDGE CONNECTOR
RJ-48C CONNECTOR
JACK

REAR BRACKET

FIGURE 3-6. D/240SC-T1 Board

3-16
Board Installation

3.7.3 D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Hardware Settings

The D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A board contains the following adjustable jumper
and DIP switch settings :
• I/O base port address (SW1)
• IRQ level (JP1)
• Bus mode (JP168 and JP16)
• Interrupt terminator (JP7)
See Figure 3-6 for the location of the hardware components.

I/O Base Port Address (SW1):

Each D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A board you are installing must use a different I/O
port range. See Table 3-3 for switch settings.

TABLE 3-3. I/O Base Port Address for D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A
Board
Switch Position: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 I/O Port Range
off off ON off ON ON ON ON 340H-343H
off off ON off ON ON ON off 344H-347H
off off ON off ON ON off ON 348H-34BH
off off ON off ON ON off off 34CH-34FH
off off ON off ON off ON ON 350H-353H
off off ON off ON off ON off 354H-357H
off off ON off ON off off ON 358H-35BH
off off ON off ON off off off 35CH-35FH

3-17
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

8 - BI T BUS MODE (JP1 6 8 )


PCM EXPANSI ON BUS (PEB)
CONNECTOR BASE l/O SWI TCH BLOCK (SW1 )
PEB TERMI NATOR SOCKET

1 6 - BI T BUS MODE (JP1 6 )


DS P’s

2/9 3 4 5 6 7 1 0 11 12 14 15
JP1

JP7

l RQ JUMPER BLOCK (JP1 ) I NTERRUPT TERMI NATOR BLOCK (JP7 )


DEFAULT SETTI NG - 3

FIGURE 3-7. Components on the D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A


Board

3-18
Board Installation

The SW1 switch positions represent the I/O port address as three 4-bit
hexadecimal digits. Table 3-4 illustrates this representation. The first and second
bit positions of the lowest hex digit and the third and fourth positions of the
highest hex digit are not represented by a switch position; they are understood to
be zeros and appear as asterisks in the table. For all SW1 positions, "ON" = 0 and
"off" = 1.
The representation for I/O port 354H is shown in the example below.
TABLE 3-4. SW1 Switch Positions
High Digit Middle Digit Low Digit

Switch Position: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 * *
Switch Setting: off off ON off ON off ON off
Bit Value: 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0
Hex Digit Value: 3 5 4
* represents a bit position that is not represented by a switch
position and whose value is zero.

IRQ Level (JP1)

Set the IRQ (interrupt request) level using jumper block JP1. Table 3-5 shows the
available IRQs.
The default IRQ level is 3. Set the IRQ level by placing a jumper over the
appropriate pin pair. If you have other non-voice boards in your system using IRQ
level 3, move the jumper on JP1 to an unused IRQ level setting.
The voice boards share an IRQ level that is not used by other types of boards in
the system. All D/121A, D/121B, D/81A, and D/41D boards in the system must
use the same IRQ. This IRQ level must be different from that set for D/41E,
D/320SC, D/240SC, or D/240SC-T1 boards.
In PC-AT computers, interrupts from the second 8259 controller are cascaded to
IRQ 2, so the interrupt associated with this pin is actually IRQ 9.

3-19
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 3-5. IRQ Settings for the D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A Board
Jumper Pin Position Available IRQ

1 IRQ 2/9
2 IRQ 3 (default)
3 IRQ 4
4 IRQ 5
5 IRQ 6
6 IRQ 7
7 IRQ 10
8 IRQ 11
9 IRQ 12
10 IRQ 14
11 IRQ 15

Interrupt Terminator (JP7)

The D/121A Interrupt Terminator (JP7) is located directly above the D/121A edge
connector, immediately to the right of JP1. Leave the jumper on JP7 if you have
only one D/121A (and no other D/121A boards or D/41D boards) installed in a
system. In systems with more than one board, install a jumper on the Interrupt
Terminator of one and only one board (the board may be a D/121A or a D/41D).
Ideally, this will be the voice board physically farthest from the host PC’s 8259
Interrupt Controller chips. Jumpering the board farthest from the 8259 chips
provides the best AC termination.
The JP7 default setting is "in" (jumper installed).

3-20
Board Installation

Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16)

The 8-bit bus mode is the default setting for the D/121A board. In most cases, this
setting will work for all configurations; however, in some cases, you will need to
set the board to the 16-bit bus mode before installing the board.
You should first determine which memory segments you are going to use for the
voice boards. A list of valid memory segments is provided in the Voice Software
Installation Guide in the Voice Software Reference. During the software
installation procedure, you will specify in the SpringWare configuration file the
base memory segment for each board.
A requirement of IBM PC-AT architecture (ISA) is that all boards installed within
a memory segment pair (A/B, C/D, E/F) must have the same interface mode (either
8-bit or 16-bit). For D/121B boards used in the E000 memory segment, configure
the board in the 16-bit bus mode since many PCs have a 16-bit BIOS installed at
F000.
The 16-bit bus mode does not provide any performance benefit over the 8-bit bus
mode but provides more flexibility when installing the board.
The bus mode is set using both JP168 and JP16, Table 3-6. To set the bus mode,
install or remove the jumper as shown in the following table. Make sure that the
jumper is installed on only one of the locations.

TABLE 3-6. Bus Mode for D/121A, D/121B, and D/81A Boards
Bus Mode JP168 JP16
8-Bit* IN OUT
16-Bit OUT IN
* = default, IN = jumper installed, OUT = jumper removed

For earlier models of the board, if JP16 has 4 pins, place the jumper on the lower
pair.

3-21
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.7.2 D/41D Hardware Settings

The D/41D board contains the following programmable jumper and DIP switch
settings:
• Multiple board configuration (JP7)
• Base memory address segment (JP5, JP6))
• Offset address (SW1: 1, 2, 3)
• Default line state (SW1: 4)
• Interrupt request (IRQ) level (JP1)
See Figure 3-8 for the location of the hardware components.

D/41D Multiple Board Configuration (JP7)

Up to 16 D/41D boards may be installed in a single PC chassis. If more than one


D/41D board is being installed in a single PC chassis, remove the jumper from
jumper JP7 from all but one D/41D board in the system. It is not critical which
board contains the jumper, just that only one D/41D board has JP7 installed. If
there is only one D/41D board in the system, leave the jumper installed on jumper
JP7 (default).

D/41D Base Memory Address Segment (JP5, JP6)

The PC and the D/41D board communicate with each other through a shared
memory block which resides within the memory address space of the PC.
The D/41D board’s base memory address segment is set to D000H (default). Leave
the base memory address segment set to the default for the D/41D board(s) unless
you have one of the following hardware configurations:
• More than eight D/41D boards in your system.
• Other non-Dialogic devices in your system that must use the D000H segment
On the D/41D board, the default base memory address segment (D000H) can be
changed to either the A000H or C000H segment to allow a maximum of 16 D/41D
boards in a single PC chassis.

3-22
Board Installation

P2 P3

JP8

1 2 3 4
O
N

SW1

JP6 JP5

2/93 4 5 6 7
JP1

JP7

FIGURE 3-8. D/41D Board

3-23
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

NOTE: If you are using MS-DOS and you have a VGA monitor card that uses
segment A000H, you should set the D/41D board’s base memory address
to the D000H or C000H segment
Select segment A000H or C000H by installing a jumper on jumper block JP5 or
JP6 as defined in Table 3-7Error! Bookmark not defined.. You can use one of
the jumpers you removed from JP7 if you are installing more than one D/41D
board in your system.

TABLE 3-7. D/41D Board Offset Addresses


(from the base segment address)
JP5 JP6 Base Address
out out D000H (default)
in out A000H
out in C000H
in in B800H

D/41D Offset Address (SW1: 1, 2, 3)

The D/41D board’s offset address is set with switch block SW1. The default offset
address (from the selected base memory segment) is set at the factory to zero
offset (0000H). The default offset address can be changed by setting three dip
switches contained on switch block SW1.
If you only have a single D/41D board in your system, switch positions 1, 2 and 3
on switch block SW1 will generally not have to be touched. If, however, you are
installing more than one D/41D board, you must set the D/41D board switch block
SW1 switches so that each D/41D board has a unique offset address.

NOTE: The offset address you select for each D/41D board cannot overlap with
any other boards addressed within the segment.If you have other
expansion peripherals that use addresses within the segment, it will be
necessary to set the D/41D board switch block SW1 switches to an offset
address not used by the other expansion peripherals.

3-24
Board Installation

If you need to change the default offset address on a D/41D board, select an offset
address and set switch positions 1, 2 and 3 of switch block SW1 as defined in
Table 3-8.

TABLE 3-8. D/41D Board Offset Address Settings


Offset from Base Memory
Switch Position: 1 2 3 Address (hex)
(default) off off off 0000
off off ON 2000
off ON ON 4000
off ON ON 6000
ON off off 8000
ON off ON A000
ON ON off C000
ON ON ON E000

NOTE: As a general rule for configurations with more than one D/41D board, it
is recommended that you select the offset address for each D/41D board
in the segment as described in Table 3-8 beginning with board number 1.

It is not a requirement that the address for each D/41D board be


contiguous within the segment. The board with the lowest address will be
board number 1 (channels 1-4); the board with the next lowest address
will be board number 2 (channels 5-8), etc.

NOTE: During the D/41D Dialogic software installation, if you are instructed to
specify each D/41D board’s segment and offset address in a
Configuration File, the segment and offset address you specify for each
board must match the segment and offset address set on each physical
board.

3-25
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/41D Default Line State (SW1: 4)

A D/41D board can be started or stopped via software without affecting the
operation of other D/41D boards in the system. The state of the telephone lines on
a stopped D/41D board can be configured to be either in the "on -hook" (ringing,
no answer) or "off-hook" (busy signal) state by correctly setting switch position 4
of switch block SW1 as defined in Table 3-9.
TABLE 3-9. D/41D Board Default Line State Switch

Board’s Response to
Line State SW1: 4 Incoming Call

on-hook off (factory setting) Ringing, no answer


off-hook ON Busy Signal

You do not have to set all D/41D boards in your system to the same default line
state.

D/41D Board Interrupt Request (IRQ) Level (JP1)

You can select the hardware interrupt request level (IRQ) on D/41D boards to be
other than the default by setting jumper JP1 on the D/41D board as described in
Table 3-10.

TABLE 3-10. D/41D Board Interrupt Request (IRQ) Level (JP1)


Jumper Available Jumper Available Jumper Available
Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ Pin Pos. IRQ
1 IRQ 2/9 3 IRQ 4 5 IRQ 6
2 IRQ 3 (def) 4 IRQ 5 6 IRQ 7
4 IRQ 5

The default setting of jumper block JP1 is to IRQ level 3.

3-26
Board Installation

If you have other voice board devices in your system that already use the D/41D
default interrupt, you have to select a different interrupt request level for the
D/41D boards in your system.

NOTE: D/41D board interrupt request level 3 is supported on AT-class PCs,


except when using a Dialogic MS-DOS Device Driver (D40DRV)
version earlier than 2.95.

To select interrupt request level 2/9, 4-7, move the jumper on jumper
block JP1 to a level not used by other devices (see Table 3-9 0 for IRQ
level locations on jumper JP1).

NOTE: If you are installing more than one D/41D board in your system, set all
D/41D boards to the same interrupt request level.

3.7.3 D/41E Board Hardware Settings

The D/41E board contains the following programmable jumper and DIP switch
settings:
• Board identification number (SW2: 2)
• Default line state (SW2: 1)
See Figure 3-9 for the location of the hardware components.

3-27
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

2 1 P3
O N

0
P5
X T ER M S oc k e t SW1
SW2 J1
J5 U43 JP 1 01 J P 10 2
J2
J7
JP 201 J P 20 2

JP 301 J P 30 2
U42
J3
J P 401 J P 40 2

J4
J6

FIGURE 3-9. D/41E Board

3-28
Board Installation

D/41E Board Identification Number (SW2: 2)

Each D/41E board in your system must have a unique board identification number.
The Dialogic Voice device driver uses this number to detect which D/41E board is
sending a signal. This enables you to address all of the D/41E boards to the same
base memory address. This address is selected via the software configuration file.

NOTES: 1. If your are only installing one board, use the default setting. There is
no need to set the board identification number.

2. See the corresponding Voice Software Reference for more


information on the software configuration and addressing.
The board identification number is configured using a combination of two
switches, a rotary switch (SW1) and a switch block (SW2 switch 2). SW1 has 16
possible settings (0-9 and A-F) and SW2 switch 2 has 2 possible positions (ON
and OFF). The combination of SW1 and SW2 switch 2 yields 32 possible board
identification numbers (0-31).
When SW2 switch 2 is in the OFF position, the settings on SW1 correspond to
board identifications number 0-15. When SW2 switch 2 is in the ON position, the
settings on SW1 correspond to the board identification numbers 16-31. The
following are examples of switch settings to set board numbers 0, 1, 16, and 17:
• 0 - set SW1 to 0 and SW2 switch 2 to OFF.
• 1 - set SW1 to 1 and SW2 switch 2 to OFF.
• 16 - set SW1 to 0 and SW2 switch 2 to ON.
• 17 - set SW1 to 1 and SW2 switch 2 to ON.
To set the board identification number, see Table 3-11 and the steps below. The
default board identification number is 1. While there is no required numbering
order for the board identification numbers, you should number the boards
sequentially.

3-29
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 3-11. Setting the D/41E Board Identification Number


Board ID Number Configurations
Factory
= 1
Default

S1 S2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

1. Dial the rotary switch (SW1) to select a number or letter. Choose one of
sixteen settings, 0-9 and A-F.
2. Set SW2 switch 2 to OFF, to access the low numbers, 0-15. Set SW2 switch
2 to ON, to access the high numbers, 16-31.

NOTE: Do not set two boards to the same board identification number. The
system will be unable to find the boards.

NOTE: If only one D/41E board is being installed in the system, no adjustment to
this setting is required.

D/41E Default Line State (SW2: 1)

Configure the on-hook (ringing, no answer) or off-hook (busy signal) state of the
telephone lines on a D/41E board by setting position 1 on switch block SW2. This
setting is only effective before the voice driver is started and the system power is
applied.
A D/41E board can be started or stopped via software without affecting the
operation of the other D/41E boards in the system. See Table 3-12 for the
corresponding positions The factory default setting of the switch is off or "on-
hook."

3-30
Board Installation

TABLE 3-12. Setting the D/41E Board Default Line State

Board’s Response to
Line State SW2: 1 Incoming Call

on-hook off (factory setting) Ringing, no answer


off-hook ON Busy Signal

It is not necessary to set all of the D/41E boards in the system to the same default
line state; however, off-hook is the recommended setting to provide the customer
with a busy signal rather than ringing with no answer if the customer calls while
the system is down.

3.7.4 LSI/120 Hardware Settings

The following paragraphs describe the hardware settings on the LSI/120 board.
Tables 3-13 summarizes LSI hardware settings (SW1).

NOTE: For a simple D/12x board and LSI/120 network interface board
configuration, the default settings do not need to be changed.
The LSI/120 has no jumpers. See Figure 3-10 for the location of the hardware
components.

3-31
3-32
A U D IO E X P A N S IO N B U S C O N N E C T O R S ( P 4 , P 5 , P 6 )
P C M E X P A N S IO N B U S ( P E B )
C ON NEC TO R P 3 : 2 5 - P IN D B - T Y P E C O N N E C T O R ( M A L E )
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

P E B T E R M IN A T O R
SOCKET
N O R M /L O O P D IA G N O S T IC S W IT C H
S W IT C H B L O C K ( S W 1 )

FIGURE 3-10. Components on the LSI/120 Network Interface Board


Board Installation

TABLE 3-13. LSI/120 Hardware Settings: SW1 Switch Positions

SW1 Switch Position


Hardware Setting 1 2 3 4 5 6
LSI/120 Time Slots:
• 1-12 (default) off
• 13-24 ON
Timing Clock Source:
• Independent Timing (on- off
board); default
• PEB Timing ON
Default Line State:
• Ringing, no answer; on- off
hook (default)
• Busy signal; off-hook ON
Audio Expansion Bus
Signaling:
• Signaling between PEB & off
LSI telephony Interface.
P4, P5, P6 disabled; audio
enabled. (default)
• Signaling between PEB & ON
AEB (P4, P5, P6); LSI
telephony interface
disabled.
Mandatory Settings off off

LSI/120 Timeslots (SW1: 1)

Information passed along the Dialogic PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) is organized
into 24 channels, or timeslots. The LSI/120 board can be configured to provide
data to timeslots 1-12 or 13-24 from the PCM Expansion Bus. Timeslots are
assigned to the PEB in the configuration file at download time (refer to the Voice
Software Reference). You must also assign the timeslot group to a particular
LSI/120.

3-33
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

For system hardware configurations with more than one LSI/120 board, leave the
first LSI/120 board set to the low time slot setting and set the second LSI/120
board to the next time slot setting.

LSI/120 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 3)

If the LSI/120 network interface board will receive timing from another network
device such as a DMX or another LSI/120 network interface board, set the
LSI/120 board timing clock source to PEB timing. When this switch is set to ON,
PEB timing is selected; when this switch is set to off, independent timing is
selected.
- If the LSI network interface board is connected to a DMX, set the LSI timing
clock source to PEB timing (S3 is ON).
- If two LSI network interface boards are connected on one PEB, set one LSI
to PEB timing (S3 is ON) and set the other LSI to independent timing (S3 is
off).

LSI/120 Default Line State (SW1: 4)

Set the Default Line State switch based on how you want the phone lines
connected to the LSI adapter board to respond to incoming calls during a system
reset or start-up condition:
- Ringing, no answer; on-hook (set switch to off; this setting is the default)
- Busy Signal; off-hook (set switch to ON)
When no power is applied to the PC, the system will present a ring/no answer
condition. When power is applied to the PC, the reset condition line state that you
selected for the adapter board will remain in effect until the driver is functioning
(for UNIX and OS/2 systems) or until the application software is functioning (MS-
DOS systems).

3-34
Board Installation

LSI/120 AEB Signaling (SW1: 6)

When SW1 switch 6 is set ON, signaling over the Audio Expansion Bus will not
function properly unless no connection is made to the DB-25 connector on the rear
bracket of the LSI/120.

LSI/120 Operating Mode (SW2)

SW2, located between PEB connector P2 and audio connector P4 near the top and
front edges of the LSI/120 board, directs the transmit serial data stream of the PEB
bus.
For normal operation on all LSI/120 boards in your system, leave the
NORM/LOOP switch, labeled SW2 on the LSI/120 board, set to the default
setting (OFF).
The switch can be toggled to one of the following two modes:
NORM (left position, LED off, default)
This is the normal operating mode of the LSI/120 board. This mode directs
the transmit serial data stream to the D/A converters and to the loop start
interface. Audio received from the loop start interface is digitized by the A/D
converters and passed to the PEB.
LOOP (right position, LED on)
This loopback mode allows diagnostic testing of the LSI/120. When the SW2
switch is set to loopback mode, the transmit serial data stream is directed to
the receive serial data stream (back to the PEB). The audio received from the
loop start interface is ignored and the transmitted audio is substituted in its
place.

NOTE: The transmit stream still travels to the D/A converters and to the
loop start interface.

3-35
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.7.5 DTI/101 Hardware Settings

The DTI/101 network interface board contains the following programmable


jumper and DIP switch settings:
• I/O port range (SW1: 1,2,3)
• Timing clock source (SW1: 4)
• IRQ level (JP1)
• Channel bank mode (JP1, JP2, SW1:1,2,3,4)
See Figure 3-11 for the location of the hardware components.

DTI/101 I/O Port Range (SW1: 1,2,3)

The DTI/101 communicates with the host PC through an I/O-mapped interface.


The addresses used for this communication can be set to one of six ranges of I/O
addresses. Set the base addresses with switch block SW1, located approximately
one inch above the PC bus interface P1A. Table 3-14 shows the switch settings for
all of the DTI/101 base address ranges. The default base address setting is for
range 320H - 327H. If two DTI/101 boards are installed in the system, set the
second DTI/101 to an address range different from the first DTI/101.

3-36
Board Installation

TABLE 3-14. I/O Port Range Settings for the DTI/101 Board

SW1 Switch Position: 1 2 3 I/O Port Range (hex)

(default) off off off 320H - 327H

ON off off 328H - 32FH

off ON off 330H - 337H

ON ON off 338H - 33FH

off off ON 3E0H - 3E7H

ON off ON 3E8H - 3EFH

off ON ON reserved

ON ON ON reserved

3-37
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

SIGNAL PRESENT INDICATOR


(G REEN)

PCM EXPANSION BUS YELL OW ALARM INDICATOR


(PEB) CONNECTOR
REMOTE LOOPBACK
TEST SWITCH (SW2)
(SHOWN IN 'OFF' POSITION)

LOSS OF
DTI/CROSSOVER SYNC
CABLE CONNECTOR INDICA TOR

REMOTE
LOOPBACK
TIMING CLOCK SOURCE
INDICATOR
AND BASE ADDRESS
SWITCH BLOCK (SW1)
IRQ SETTING
INTERRUPT JUMPER BLOCK
TERMINATOR (JP1)
JUMPER BLOCK
(JP2) 15 -P IN D SU B-MINIATU RE FE MAL E CON NE CTOR
(FOR DTI/1xx TO CSU/DSX-1 COMPATIBLE
EQUIP MEN T CON NE CTION) (J1 )

FIGURE 3-11. Components on the DTI/101 Board

3-38
Board Installation

DTI/101 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 4)

Switch 4 on switch block SW1 selects the clock source the DTI/101 transmitter
uses in synchronizing the T-1 bit stream. Set switch 4 before the DTI/101 board is
powered up. Table 3-15 shows the SW1 switch 4 settings.
TABLE 3-15. DTI/101 Board Timing Clock Source
SW1 Switch Position Off/On Description
(default) 4 Off Independent timing. The DTI/101 uses
an on-board oscillator as its clock
source.
ON Loop timing. The DTI/101 derives its
transmit clock from the received T-1 bit
stream. Use the loop timing setting if
your application does not invoke a
DTI/101 device driver.

NOTE: If your application uses a DTI/101 device driver (or low level
communications protocol), you should set the DTI to use the appropriate
clock source until the application is functioning, and you must also set the
appropriate clock source in your application; the application setting will
overwrite the setting of SW1 switch 4.

DTI/101 IRQ Level (JP1)

Set the DTI/101 board IRQ (interrupt request level) using jumper block JP1. JP1 is
located above the PC interface bus P1A . IRQ 3 through IRQ 7, and IRQ 2/9 are
available. The default IRQ is 3. Set the IRQ by placing a jumper over the
appropriate pin pair. If you have other network interface boards in your system
using IRQ 3, move the jumper on JP1 to an unused IRQ setting. In PC-AT
computers, interrupts from the second 8259 controller are cascaded to IRQ 2, so
the interrupt associated with this pin is actually IRQ 9.

NOTES: 1. Be sure to select an IRQ level that is different from the one
occupied by the voice board.

3-39
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

2. To be supported by a DTI/101 device driver, all DTI/101 boards


installed in a system must be set to the same IRQ level.

DTI/101 Interrupt Terminator (JP2)

The DTI/101 interrupt terminator (JP2) is located immediately above jumper block
JP1. Leave the jumper on JP2 if a single DTI/101 is installed in a system. In
systems with a second DTI/101, leave jumper JP2 on one and only one of the
DTI/101 boards. Ideally, this will be the DTI/101 board physically farthest from
the host system’s 8259 Interrupt Controller chips. Jumpering the board farthest
from the 8259 chips provides the best AC termination.
The JP2 default setting is "in" (jumper installed).

DTI/101 Mode of Operation: Normal/Remote Loopback Test

The DTI/101 can operate in normal mode or remote loopback test mode.
When the Remote Loopback Test mode is on, input from the network to the
DTI/101 is output to the network. This mode allows you to test your T-1 line
without disconnecting the cable from the DTI/101. Remote loopback test mode
does not allow you to test the DTI/101 board.
Set the mode of operation by setting the Remote Loopback Test Switch, a two-
position switch located below the top three LED’s on the end bracket of the
DTI/101 board. A fourth LED, located below the test switch, lights (red) when the
switch is on. Table 3-16 shows the two modes of this switch.

3-40
Board Installation

TABLE 3-16. DTI/101 Board Mode of Operation


Remote
Loopback
On/Off Description

(default) Off Normal DTI/101 operation

On Remote loopback test. The


DTI/101 transmits what it
receives (red LED indicator light
is ON).

The Remote Loopback Test Switch can be turned on at any time during board
operation. If your application is using a DTI/1xx device driver (or low-level
communications protocol), the following conditions will occur after the Remote
Loopback Test Switch is set:
• Overrides any board modes set by the application.
• Generates a termination event (T_DTRMOTE).
• When this switch is returned to OFF, you should restart the application.

DTI/101 in Channel Bank Mode (JP1; JP2; SW1: 1, 2, 3, 4)

If you are going to use the DTI/101 in Channel Bank Mode (where the DTI/101 is
a passive device without firmware, device driver, or other low level
communications protocol), perform the following procedures on the DTI/101
before installing the board. This will set the board to use loop timing and will
prevent the board from interfering with any other device and from responding to
any I/O addressing.
• Remove the jumper from JP1 (IRQ level).
• Remove the jumper from JP2 (Interrupt Terminator).
• Set SW1 S1, S2, S3, and S4 to ON.

3-41
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.8 Install or Remove PEB Terminators

A PEB ribbon cable is used to connect the D/121A to an LSI/120, or two D/121A
boards to a DTI/101. To ensure that the proper electrical characteristics exist on
the PCM Expansion Bus, a PEB terminator must be on the D/121A and LSI
boards connected at the ends of the PEB ribbon cable. The DTI board does not
require a PEB terminator.
The PEB terminator is a 20-pin dual in-line package (DIP) (Figure 3-12).

FIGURE 3-12. PEB Terminator

The PEB terminator is installed in a socket located by the 26-pin PEB connector
on both the network interface board and the D/320SC or D/240SC, D/121A, or
D/121B. The following conditions must be met:
Based on your board configuration and the PEB termination requirements
described below, you may have to install or remove PEB terminators.
Figure 3-13 shows two configurations with a PEB terminator. Install or remove
the PEB terminator before cabling or placing the board in the PC.

3-42
Board Installation

3.8.1 PEB Terminators in Analog Configurations

The basic 24-channel analog application uses a D/240SC board connected via a
PEB cable to two LSI/120 boards. A PEB terminator must be installed on either
end of the PEB cable; however, boards installed in the middle of the PEB cable do
not require a PEB terminator.
Another 24-channel analog application uses a D/240SC board connected via a
PEB cable to three LSI/80 boards. A PEB terminator must be installed on either
end of the PEB cable; however, boards installed in the middle of the PEB cable do
not require a PEB terminator.
The basic 12-channel analog application uses a D/121A board or D/121B board
connected via a PEB cable to one LSI/120 board. A PEB terminator must be
installed on either end of the PEB cable; however, boards installed in the middle
of the PEB cable do not require a PEB terminator.
The basic 8-channel analog configuration consists of one Dialogic SpringBoard
(D/81A) connected via a PEB cable to one LSI/80 board. A PEB terminator must
be installed on both the voice board and the LSI/80.

3.8.2 PEB Terminators in Digital Configurations

If two D/xxx boards and a DTI/xxx board are on the same cable, a PEB terminator
must be installed on the D/xxx end of the PEB cable; however, boards installed in
the middle of the PEB cable do not require a PEB terminator. The DTI/xxx board
does not require a PEB terminator.
For the D/240SC-T1 board (terminate configuration), you must install a 20-pin
connector in the RES position of the XTERM socket (R112).

3-43
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

DTI/10 1 D/12x D/12x

LS I/120 D/12x

= REQUIRES TE RMINATOR

FIGURE 3-13. Configurations with PEB Terminator

3-44
Board Installation

3.8.3 Install the PEB Terminator

The procedure for installing a PEB terminator is the same for the D/121A and the
LSI/120 boards.
⋅ Lay the board with its component side up on an electrostatic-free surface.
The socket for the DIP is located near the top and front edges of the board,
directly under the 26-pin PEB connector (Figure 3-14).
⋅ Hold the DIP by its edges and align the pins over the socket (Figure 3-14).
Insert the pins into the socket. When the DIP is inserted in the D/121A, pin 1
is in the lower left of the DIP, as viewed from the component side of the
board. When inserted in the LSI/120, pin 1 is in the upper right. Check to see
that no pins are bent or misaligned. Press down on the edges of the DIP until
it is securely seated in the socket.

3.8.4 How to Remove the PEB Terminator

If you need to remove PEB terminators from your D/121A or LSI adapter boards
to meet the PEB termination requirements, remove them before cabling or
installing the adapter boards in the PC.
To remove the PEB terminator from the board:
⋅ Prepare an electrostatic-safe workstation according to Appendix A.
⋅ Lay the board on a static dissipative mat.
⋅ Using an IC extractor, extract the PEB terminator. Be careful not to damage
the terminator pins.

3-45
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

26-PIN P EB CO NN EC TO R

PE B TERMINATOR S OCKE T

Locate PEB Terminator Socket

Align the PEB Terminator Pins over the Socket and Insert

FIGURE 3-14. Installing the PEB Terminator

3-46
Board Installation

3.9 Attach the PEB Ribbon Cable to the Board

The instructions in this section describe how to attach the PEB ribbon cable to the
board.

NOTE: For DTI boards, the PEB connector socket faces the top of the board
(rather than facing the side); you can install the board and then attach the
PEB cable, but make sure that you have secured the board with the
retaining screw so the downward pressure that you apply to the connector
does not unseat or twist the board.

To attach the PEB cable connector to the Dialogic board:


⋅ Lay the board on a static-dissipative mat or on the static shielding bag.
⋅ Locate the PEB connector socket on the adapter board:
D/320SC, D/240SC, D/240SC-T1: The PEB cable connector socket is
accessible from the top edge of the board.
LSI/120, D/81A, D/121A, and D/121B: The PEB cable connector socket is
accessible from the component side of the board.
DTI/101 or DTI/211: The PEB cable connector socket is accessible from
the top edge of the board.
⋅ When connecting the PEB cable to the board:
• Check that the LSI/120 and voice boards attached to the end PEB cable
connectors have PEB terminators installed.
• Check that any boards attached to middle PEB cable connectors DO
NOT have PEB terminators installed.
⋅ Line up the PEB cable connector keys with the keys of the PEB socket on the
board as shown in Figure 3-15. Line up socket 1 with pin 1 of the connector
on the board. On some boards, a "1" is silk-screened on the board next to pin
1. Socket 1 is marked by an arrow on the side of the cable connector.
⋅ Gently insert the PEB connector into the PEB socket.

3-47
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

ALIGN KEYED SOCKET TO


PIN 1 OF BOARD CONNECTOR
STEADY BOARD
WITH BALL OF THUMB
AGAINST BACK OF
BOARD CONNECTOR

WHEN CONNECTING CABLE


HOLD BOARD BY ITS EDGES

FIGURE 3-15. Seating the PEB Cable Connector

3-48
Board Installation

3.10 Install the Boards in the PC Chassis

See Figures 16 and 17 for reference in placing the Dialogic board in the selected
PC expansion slot:
⋅ Remove the retaining screw and remove the coverplate for the selected PC
expansion slot. Set the screw aside to use later.
⋅ Locate the board guides for the expansion slot you have selected and slide the
board’s front edge into the guides.
⋅ Insert the board’s edge connector into the selected expansion slot. Press down
on the board’s top edge with both thumbs (taking care to avoid forcing any
components) until the board is securely seated in the slot. You may have to
rock the board gently from front to back to make it seat properly.
⋅ Align the notch in the board bracket over the screw hole in the PC’s rear
panel. Replace and tighten the retaining screw to secure the board in place.
⋅ For each subsequent board, select the next available connector on the PEB
cable, attach it to the board, and place the board in the slot according to the
preceding instructions.
⋅ After all Dialogic boards in your configuration are installed in the PC and
properly connected to the PEB cable, fold the PEB cable so that it lies flat as
shown in Figure 3-18. Flattening the cable keeps it out of the way when
replacing the PC cover.
⋅ If you have a DTI drop-and-insert configuration, attach the DTI crossover
cable before replacing the PC cover; see the next section for instructions.
⋅ To replace the PC cover and prepare the PC for operation, follow the
instructions later in this chapter.

3-49
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

8-BIT EXPANSION SLOT


REAR 16-BIT EXPANSION SLOT

POWER
SUPPLY

DISK DISK
DRIVE DRIVE

FRONT

REAR INSTALLED BOARDS

FRONT
LAST FIRST
BOARD BOARD

FIGURE 3-16. Position of the PC Chassis during Board Installation

3-50
Board Installation

GROUNDED S TA TIC-DISSIPA TIVE WRIS T STRA P

APPLY PRESSURE TO TOP


EDGE OF BOARD ONLY

ROCK BOARD FORWARD


AND BACKWARD TO SEAT
EDGE CONNECTOR
INTO SLOT

FIGURE 3-17. Installing the Voice Board in the PC Chassis

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Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/12x's

DTI/101

PIN 1 IS HERE

FIGURE 3-18. Fold the PEB Cable to Lie Flat

3.10.1 Attach the DTI/101 Crossover Cable for Drop-and-Insert


Configurations

Some applications may use two DTI boards to connect T-1 digital service; other
applications may connect D/240SC boards or D/121A boards to only one DTI
board.

3-52
Board Installation

The cabling example below describes a drop-and-insert configuration using two


DTI/101 boards. After installing the second DTI/101 board, you must connect the
two DTI/101 boards with the crossover cable provided.
⋅ Make sure the DTI/101 boards have been secured with retaining screws so
that the downward pressure you are applying to the connectors will not
unseat or twist the boards.
⋅ Attach the connector on the unfolded end of the crossover cable to the
DTI/101 board installed farthest to the right in the PC (you are standing in
front of the PC) as shown in Figure 3-19. Make sure socket 1 (marked with
an arrow) is lined up with pin 1 of the connector on the DTI/101 board (a "1"
is silk-screened on the board next to pin 1).
⋅ Press down on the cable connector gently until it is completely seated on the
board connector pins. You may have to rock the cable connector back and
forth to get it to seat completely on the pins.
⋅ Attach the free connector of the crossover cable (nearest the folded end) to
the second DTI/101. Make sure socket 1 of the cable connector lines up with
pin 1 of the board connector.
⋅ Press down on the cable connector gently until it is completely seated on the
second DTI/101 board connector pins. You may have to rock the cable
connector gently back and forth to get it to seat completely on the pins.
⋅ Flatten the crossover cable by pinching it about one-half inch from the
unfolded end (Figure 3-20). Flattening the cable keeps it out of the way when
replacing the PC cover.

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Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/12x's

PIN 1 IS HERE

SECOND RIGHTMOST
DTI/101 DTI/101

FIGURE 3-19. Attaching the Crossover Cable to the DTI/101 Board

3-54
Board Installation

FOLD
CABLE
FLAT

FIGURE 3-20. Folding the Crossover Cable Flat

3-55
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.11 Restore the PC for Operation

Use the instructions in this section after board installation to prepare the PC for
operation.

WARNING
To avoid a shock hazard, do not connect or disconnect any cables or perform
installation, maintenance or reconfiguration of this product during an electrical
storm.

WARNING
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communications cables is
hazardous. To avoid shock hazard, connect and disconnect cables as described
below when installing, moving or opening the covers of this product or attached
devices.

1. Replace the PC cover.


2. Connect the power cables.

WARNING
To avoid shock hazard, the power cord must be connected to a properly wired
and earthed receptacle and any equipment to which this product will be attached
must also be connected to properly wired receptacles.

NOTE: According to the law in the UK, the telephone cable must be connected
after the power cord.

3-56
Board Installation

3.12 Make the Network Connections

The following paragraphs describe how to connect the voice boards to telephone
lines.

3.12.1 Connecting the D/41D Board to Telephone Lines for Loop Start
Application (Domestic)

This section describes how to connect the Dialogic voice board to telephone lines
for a loop start application.

NOTE: Only connect telephone lines to the voice board’s RJ-14 female jacks
when the voice board(s) are used in a loop start application. If you have
an external T-1 interface board in your configuration, refer to your T-1
interface board’s installation guide for T-1 line connection information.
If the voice board’s loop start connection is to telephone company lines, refer to
and follow the FCC procedures at the beginning of this guide. For connection to
Canadian telecommunications network lines, refer to the Canadian Department of
Communications Notice found at the beginning of this guide.
The voice board has two RJ-14 female jacks on the rear bracket which carry two
telephone lines (channels) each. The top jack is for channels 1 and 2. The bottom
jack is for channels 3 and 4. Channel 1 (3) is the inside pair of wires, channel 2 (4)
is the outside pair of wires as illustrated in Figure 3-21.
If you have single line, RJ-11 type, telephone line terminations (normal phone
lines), you will need RJ-11 to RJ-14 splitting cables which are available for a
nominal cost from most electronics stores. Each splitting cable consists of an
RJ-14 female jack and a "Y" cable terminated with two RJ-11 plugs. Examples of
this type of cable are Radio Shack catalog number 279-401 and Fordham Radio
(Hauppauge, NY) part number TA-1343. A standard 4-wire modular cable can be
used to connect each splitter cable to the D/41D RJ-14 jacks.
If you have RJ-14 terminations for your telephone lines, then you need a pair of
standard 4-wire modular cables.

3-57
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/4X REAR BRACKET

RJ-14 JACK

CHANNEL 1 CHANNEL 2

RJ-14 JACK

CHANNEL 3 CHANNEL 4

FIGURE 3-21. Voice Board RJ-14 Jack Channel Assignments

For other types of telephone line terminations, you will need the proper adapters
and/or cables which terminate in RJ-14 modular plugs.

NOTE: Dialogic voice boards do not supply loop current; therefore, a standard
telephone will not function when directly attached to a Dialogic voice
board jack.

3-58
Board Installation

3.12.2 Connecting the Telephone Cables for the D/41D Board

NOTE: In hardware configurations with more than one Dialogic voice board, the
telephone line cables you connect to the Dialogic voice board with the
lowest address will be connected to board number 1 with channels 1-4.
The telephone line cables you connect to the Dialogic voice board with
the next lowest address will be connected to board number 2 with
channels 5-8, etc.
0 ⋅ With the gold contacts on the RJ-14 modular plug facing to the left side of
the PC (when viewing the PC from the rear), insert the plug into the RJ-14
jack on the rear bracket of the voice board. The plug will slide in easily and
snap in place when the connection is made.
⋅ Connect RJ-14 modular plug terminated cables to the remaining RJ-14 jacks
on the rear bracket of the voice board(s) for as many RJ-14 terminations as
necessary for your application.
⋅ Connect the remaining end, or ends, of the telephone cable to your telephone
line terminations.

NOTE: To connect the voice board to a single telephone line terminated with an
RJ-11 connector, a standard 2-wire modular cable will allow connection
to line 1 when inserted into the upper RJ-14 jack and line 3 when inserted
into the lower RJ-14 jack on the Dialogic voice board’s rear bracket.

3.12.3 Connecting the D/41E Board to Telephone Lines

This section describes the procedure to connect the D/41E board to telephone lines
for a loop start application. See your country’s PTT requirements.

3-59
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The D/41E board has four RJ-11 female jacks on the rear bracket which carry one
telephone line each. The top jack is for channel 1 and the bottom jack is for
channel 4 as illustrated in Figure 3-22.

NOTE: A standard telephone will not function when directly attached to a D/41E
board jack.

3.12.4 Connecting the Telephone Cables for the D/41E Board

NOTE: In hardware configurations with more than one D/41E board, the
telephone line cables you connect to the D/41E board with the lowest
board ID will be connected to board number 1 with channels 1-4. The
telephone line cables you connect to the D/41E board with the next
lowest address will be connected to board number 2 with channels 5-8,
etc.
For each channel, connect one end of a terminated cable into the RJ-11 jack on the
board and the other end into your telephone line termination. You need one
terminated cable for each channel.

3.12.5 Connecting the LSI/120 to Analog Service

After you have installed the boards, you must provide additional cabling to
connect the LSI/120 network interface board to telephone company lines.
You can choose from the following connection options:
⋅ Use Dialogic’s SA/120 RJ-21 Cable. This cable has a DB-25 connector on
one end (to connect to the LSI/120) and a 50-pin connector on the other end
that provides 12 tip and ring pin pairs that are compatible with a standard
RJ-21X USOC jack.

3-60
Board Installation

⋅ Use Dialogic’s SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly. This assembly accepts the 50-pin
male connector from the SA/120 RJ-21 cable described above and terminates
with 12 RJ-11 connectors. This cable will allow you to connect individual
subscriber lines to the LSI/120.
⋅ Build your own Station Adapter cable. See the Specifications in the LSI/120
Board chapter for the pin pair specifications needed for the cable connecting
an LSI/120 board to a standard RJ-21X USOC telephone interface.

3.12.6 Connecting the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable and RJ-11 Assembly


(LSI/120)

The following procedure explains how to connect the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable and
SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly from the LSI/120 board to the telephone company lines.

3-61
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/4 1E Rea r B ra cke t

R J-11 Ja ck

1
2
J 1 3
4

1
2
J 2
3
4 Co n n e c t o rs J 1 -J 4

1 Unused
2 Tip
3 Ring
4 E ar t h Re c al l
1
2
J 3 3
4

1
2
J 4
3
4

FIGURE 3-22. D/41E Board RJ-11 Jack Channel Assignments

3-62
Board Installation

3.12.7 Connect the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable (LSI/120)

To connect the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable:


01. Insert the 25-pin female connector of the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable into connector
socket P3 on the rear bracket of the LSI/120 (Figure 3-23).
2. Tighten the cable connector’s two retaining screws.

DB CONNECTOR
ON LSI/120

STATION
ADAPTER
CABLE

FIGURE 3-23. Inserting the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable

3-63
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

3.12.8 Connecting the SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly

Refer to Figure 3-24 during the following installation instructions to assemble the
SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly and hook up telephone lines.

NOTE: If the SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly and SA/120 RJ-21 Cable come
preassembled, skip steps 1 through 5 in this section.

CAUTION
Do not pull the backplate lever or try to remove the backplate from the base
without first removing the cover, or else you could break the plastic.

13. Remove the cover of the SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly:


- Grasp the base of the assembly in one hand.
- Locate the 2 snap-lock tabs along the shorter sides of the assembly.
Select the snap-lock tab that does not have the backplate lever adjacent
to it.
- Lift this snap-lock tab out and away from the base to remove the cover.
24. Connect the SA/120 RJ-21 Cable to the SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly:

3-64
Board Installation

- Locate the cable guide at the top right side of the base (the RJ-21 Cable
will be placed in this guide).
- Orient the contact side of the 50-pin female connector in the RJ-11
Assembly towards this side of the base (the right side).
- Mate the 50-pin male connector on the RJ-21 Cable to the 50-pin
female connector in the RJ-11 Assembly, but do not tighten the screws
yet.
35. Place the mated connectors onto the assembly base:
- Place the cable in the cable guide at the top right side of the base.
- Align the middle of the connectors with the plastic retainer posts on the
base of the assembly.
- Push the 50-pin connection firmly onto the base. (The connector shell
will force the plastic T-bar at the bottom right of the base to bend out of
the way.)
- Tighten each of the two retaining screws on the 50-pin connection,
making sure that the screw fits under the notch on the retainer post.
(The retainer posts "hook" over the retainer screws and hold the 50-pin
connection onto the assembly base.)
46. The RJ-11 Assembly can be mounted to the selected surface using screws or
double-sided tape.

To mount the assembly using screws:


- Remove the assembly backplate by pulling the backplate lever slightly
away from the base and sliding the backplate off the base.
- Note that the "top" of the assembly backplate is labeled (the backplate
lever is at the bottom). Place the backplate against the mounting surface
and mark the keyhole cut-out locations.
- Drill a hole in the tip of each keyhole mark on the mounting surface,
and start two #6-type screws.
- Mount the backplate onto the screws, and tighten the screws.

3-65
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

- Snap the assembly base onto the backplate (both have labels indicating
the "top").

3-66
Board Installation

KEYHOLE
CUTOUT TOP

ASSEMBLY BACKPLATE
(REMOVED)

ASSEMBLY COVER
(REMOVED)
SNAP-LOCK
TAB

KEYHOLE
BACKPLATE CUTOUT
LEVER

CABLE ACCESS
CUTOUT
PLASTIC TABS
STATION ADAPTER RETAINING
CABLE T-BAR SCREW
(50-PIN MALE) RETAINER
CONNECTOR POST (ON BASE)
(50-PIN FEMALE)
ASSEMBLY
BASE

CABLE GUIDE

GROUND
BLOCK
RETAINER
POST (ON BASE) TOP
RETAINING
SCREW
CONNECT
TELEPHONE
SNAP-LOCK LINES
TAB

FIGURE 3-24. SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly

3-67
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

To mount the assembly using double-sided tape:


- Peel off the protective backing from one side of the tape and apply it to
the back of the assembly.
- Remove the backing from the other side of the tape and mount the unit
in the selected location.
57. Replace the SA/120 RJ-11 Assembly cover:
- Snap off one of the cable access cut-outs along the shorter side of the
assembly cover.
- Snap the assembly cover over the base.
68. Connect the telephone lines:
- The RJ-11 jacks are numbered along the outside of the base. Locate the
plastic tabs along the sides of the cover that protect the telephone jacks,
and snap off the tabs that correspond to the number of individual
subscriber lines that are supported (e.g., for an LSI/120, remove tabs 1
through 12).
- Connect the telephone lines to the RJ-11 jacks using telephone cable
with standard RJ-11 terminations.

3.12.9 Connecting the DTI Board or D/240SC-T1 (Network Interface


Module) Board to Digital Service

You must supply the cable connecting the T-1 line from the Channel Service Unit
(CSU) or other DSX-1 equipment to the DTI board or network interface module of
the D/240SC-T1 board. See the "Specifications" section in the DTI chapter or
D/240SC-T1 chapter for network interface cable specifications. For other DTI
cable specifications see the Network Interface Board Hardware Reference.
For DTI/101 boards, attach the appropriate end of this cable to the 15-pin
D-subminiature female connector located on the rear bracket of the DTI/101 board
and tighten the locking screws. Attach the free end of the cable to the CSU and
secure appropriately.

3-68
Board Installation

To cable the D/240SC-T1 board to the network:


1. Align the RJ-48C plug at the D/240SC-T1 end of the "T-1 to D/240SC-T1"
cable with RJ-48C connector jack on the rear bracket of the D/240SC-T1
board.
2. Gently push the cable plug into the RJ-48C jack until it snaps into place.

NOTE: The DSX-1 input should not be connected directly to the Public Switched
Telephone Network (PSTN). A CSU is required between the DTI/101 or
D/240SC-T1 and the local telephone company point of demarcation.

You must notify your local telephone company when connecting any new
service. Consult your CSU literature for the appropriate registration
numbers.

3.13 Run Diagnostic Programs to Verify Board


Operation

Follow these steps to test the check board operation:


1. Run the Dialogic diagnostic tests to verify the voice board is functioning
properly. Refer to the Voice Hardware Diagnostic Guide in this
hardware reference. For network interface board diagnostic tests, see
the Network Interface Board Hardware Reference.
2. If necessary, use the Troubleshooting Table in Appendix B.

3-69
4. D/320SC and D/240SC Boards

This chapter provides an introduction to the D/320SC and D/240SC boards and
contains the following information about each board:
• General description
• Hardware overview
• Network interface boards used with each board
• Physical description that indicates the locations of the components on each
board
• Hardware configurations
• Hardware settings
• Hardware specifications

4.1 D/320SC and D/240SC Boards: General


Description
The D/320SC and D/240SC boards are single-slot, high-density voice processing
boards for use with separate network interface boards. The D/320SC board
supports up to 30 voice ports, and the D/240SC board supports up to 24 voice
ports.

The D/320SC and D/240SC boards provide the following capabilities on up to 30


channels (D/320SC board) or up to 24 channels (D/240SC board):
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time.
• Play back previously recorded files.
• Initiate and receive calls through the network interface module
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and loop and dial pulse generation.
• Monitor the progress of an outbound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques.

4-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The D/320SC and D/240SC boards use Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to
implement the voice processing features; the Digital Signal Processors require
firmware that is downloaded from disk during software installation. This firmware
is called SpringWare. For detailed information on voice software features, see the
appropriate Voice Software Reference for your operating system. The D/320SC
and D/240SC boards are compatible with PEB systems and can be used in existing
applications.
In addition, the D/320SC and D/240SC boards are typically used in conjunction
with network interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment to connect to the
telephone network through PEB-compatible products.

The D/320SC board can be connected to any of the following network interface
boards:
• DTI/212, a 32-channel digital telephony interface board for E-1 digital
applications.
• European primary rate ISDN interface board for E-1 digital applications.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.

The D/240SC board can be connected to any of the following network interface
boards:
• Up to 2 LSI/120 boards, each with a 12-channel loop start interface board for
analog applications.
• Up to 3 LSI/80 boards, each with an 8-channel loop start interface board for
analog applications.
• DTI/211, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for T-1 digital
applications.
• PRI/211, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for T-1 digital
applications.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.

4-2
D/320SC and D/240SC Boards

The advantages of the D/320SC and D/240SC boards are as follows:


• Increased system density with higher voice port density per PC slot.
• Fewer slots required for system installation:
- 30-channel E-1 voice processing applications can be installed in two slots
(one DTI/212 and one D/320SC board).
- 24-channel loop start applications can be installed in four slots (one
D/240SC board and three LSI/80 boards).
- 24-channel T-1 voice processing applications can be installed in two slots
(one DTI/211 and one D/240SC board).
- 24-channel loop start applications can be installed in three slots (one
D/240SC board and two LSI/120 boards).
- LSI/80, LSI/120, DTI/212, and DTI/211 boards can be installed in either
8-bit or 16-bit slots. This feature lets you make use of all the expansion
slots in your PC-AT or compatible machine.

4.2 D/320SC and D/240SC Boards: Hardware


Overview
A block diagram of the D/320SC and D/240SC main components is shown in
Figure 4-1:
• Two 80286 microprocessors
• Digital Signal Processors
• PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector
• Private RAM, which stores downloaded firmware
The D/320SC and D/240SC boards receive data and control information from a
DTI or LSI network interface board that links the D/320SC or D/240SC to the
telephone network via the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB). This information is passed
to the Digital Signal Processors. The Digital Signal Processors provide signal
analysis on the incoming bitstream and, together with the 80286 microprocessors,
perform the voice processing functions. Communication between the voice board
and the host PC is accomplished through a shared RAM buffer.

4-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

4.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/320SC and


D/240SC
The D/320SC and D/240SC boards can be used in conjunction with
PEB-compatible network interface boards.
The D/320SC board can be connected to any of the following network interface
modules:
• DTI/212, a 32-channel digital telephony interface board for E-1 digital
applications.
• European primary rate ISDN interface board for E-1 digital applications
The D/240SC board can be connected to any of the following network interface
modules:
• Up to 2 LSI/120 boards, each with a 12-channel loop start interface board for
analog applications.
• Up to 3 LSI/80 boards, each with an 8-channel loop start interface board for
analog applications.
• DTI/211, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for T-1 digital
applications.
• PRI/211, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for T-1 digital
applications.

4.4 D/320SC and D/240SC Physical Description


An illustration of the D/320SC or D/240SC board is shown in Figure 4-2Error!
Bookmark not defined.. The D/320SC or D/240SC board can be identified by its
16-bit extended edge connector and by the two Digital Signal Processors located
near the board’s front edge. A rotary switch (SW1), XTERM socket (R112), and
26-pin male PEB connector (P5) are located in the corner at the board’s top and
front edges. The D/320SC and D/240SC are PC-AT form factor boards.
A description of each component on the D/320SC or D/240SC board is provided in
Table 4-1.

4-4
D/320SC and D/240SC Boards

TO BE SUPPLIED

FIGURE 4-1. Block Diagram of the Main Components on the D/320SC


or D/240SC Board

4-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

4.4.1 Identifying D/320SC and D/240SC Models

You can identify the specific model of a Dialogic board by the model name on the
FCC sticker located on the board’s retaining bracket.

TABLE 4-1. Description of Components on the D/320SC and


D/240SC Board

Component Description

PEB (P5) 26-pin male PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector. Located
at the top left corner.

Rotary Switch Sets the board identification number.

XTERM Socket Socket labeled NET (on top of socket) and RES (on bottom).
(R112) Terminates the PEB cable as either a network module or
resource module. You must install a 20-pin connector in RES
socket for all terminate configurations. Socket is located to
the left of the rear bracket.

4-6
D/320SC and D/240SC Boards

PCM EXPANSION BUS


(PEB) CONNECTOR (P5)
XTERM SOCKET (R112)
ROTARY SWITCH

REAR BRACKET

EDGE CONNECTOR

FIGURE 4-2. Components on the D/320SC and D/240SC Board

4-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

4.5 D/320SC and D/240SC Hardware


Configurations

IMPORTANT
Keep a written record of your hardware configuration, including the switch and
jumper settings for all Dialogic boards that you install. You will use some of this
information, such as the base I/O port settings, when you perform the software
installation. It is also necessary to have this information if you ever need to contact
Dialogic technical support.

4.5.1 D/320SC and DTI/212 Terminating Device Configurations

Terminating device configurations are those in which one DTI/212 network


interface board connected to one D/320SC board terminates an E-1 digital service
and will handle 30 telephone lines. This configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable
with two connectors.
You must install a PEB terminator on the D/320SC board. The DTI/212 network
interface board does not require a PEB terminator.

4.5.2 D/240SC and LSI/80 Hardware Configuration

The basic analog configuration consists of one D/240SC board cabled to three
LSI/80 boards and will handle 24 telephone lines. This configuration uses a PEB
ribbon cable with four connectors.
A PEB terminator must be installed on both the D/240SC board and the LSI/80
board. Refer to the Board Installation chapter of this guide for instructions about
installing the PEB terminator.

4.5.3 D/240SC and DTI/211 Terminating Device Configurations

Terminating device configurations are those in which one DTI/211 connected to


one D/240SC board terminates a T-1 span and will handle 24 telephone lines. This
configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable with two connectors.

4-8
D/320SC and D/240SC Boards

You must install a PEB terminator on the D/240SC. The DTI/211 does not require
a PEB terminator.

4.5.4 D/320SC and DTI/212 Drop-and-Insert Configurations

In one-way DTI drop-and-insert configurations, two DTI/212 boards are


connected to allow communication between separate T-1 spans. D/320SC boards
may be connected to a DTI/212 to perform voice processing functions. This
configuration uses two PEB ribbon cables with two connectors each and one
crossover cable.
To use D/320SC boards with DTI/212 boards in a two-way drop-and-insert
configuration, install two DTI/212 boards and two D/320SC boards.

4.5.4 D/240SC and DTI/211 Drop-and-Insert Configurations

In DTI drop-and-insert configurations, two DTI/211 boards are connected to allow


communication between separate T-1 spans. D/240SC boards may be connected to
a DTI/211 board to perform voice processing functions.
To use D/240SC boards with two DTI/211 boards in a drop-and-insert
configuration, install two DTI/211 boards and two D/240SC boards.

4-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

4.5.5 D/320SC and Other Hardware Configurations

The D/320SC board can be connected to numerous network interface boards,


including the following:
• LSI/80: 8-channel Loop Start Interface (analog)
• DTI/212: 30-channel E-1 Interface (compatible with Dialogic DMX board)
• European primary rate ISDN interface for E-1 digital applications

4.6 D/320SC and D/240SC Hardware Settings


The board identification number is the only hardware settings that is set on the
D/320SC or D/240SC board. For specific switch settings, see the Board
Installation chapter or Quick Reference chapter in this guide.

4.6.1 Board Identification Number (Rotary Switch SW1)

Each D/320SC board or D/240SC board in your system must have a unique board
identification number. The Dialogic Voice device driver uses this number to
detect which D/320SC board or D/240SC board is sending a signal. This enables
you to address all of the D/320SC boards or D/240SC boards to the same base
memory address. This address is selected via the software configuration file.

NOTES: 1. If you are only installing one board, use the default setting. There is
no need to set the board identification number.

2. See the corresponding System Release Software Installation


Reference for more information on the software configuration and
addressing.
The PC and the D/320SC board or D/240SC board communicate with each other
through a shared memory block which resides within the memory address space of
the PC. No matter how many D/320SC boards or D/240SC boards are installed,
the boards will only take up a total of 32K bytes of shared RAM. Range is from
80000 to FE000H. All the D/320SC boards or D/240SC boards can reside at the
same base address.
The board identification number is configured using a rotary switch (SW1).

4-10
D/320SC and D/240SC Boards

NOTE: Do not set two boards to the same board identification number. The
system will be unable to find the boards.

4.7 D/320SC and D/240SC Hardware


Specifications

For specifications on the D/320SC or D/240SC board, call your Dialogic sales
representative for the Data Sheet.

4-11
5. D/240SC-T1 Boards
This chapter provides an introduction to the D/240SC-T1 board and contains the
following information about each module on the board:
• General description
• Hardware overview
• Network interfaces supported
• Physical description that indicates the locations of the components on each
board
• Hardware configurations
• Hardware settings
• Hardware specifications

5.1 D/240SC-T1 Board General Description


The D/240SC-T1 board combines a single-slot, high-density voice processing
resource module (base board) with a T-1 network interface module
(daughterboard). The D/240SC-T1 resource module supports up to 24 voice ports
and provides the following capabilities on up to 24 channels:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time
• Play back previously recorded files
• Initiate and receive calls through the network interface module
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation
• Monitor the progress of an outbound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques
The D/240SC-T1 board is compatible with PEB systems and can be used in
existing applications in terminate configuration.

5-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The resource module (base board) of the D/240SC-T1 board uses Digital Signal
Processors (DSPs) to implement the voice processing features; the Digital Signal
Processors require firmware that is downloaded from disk during software
installation. This firmware is called SpringWare. For detailed information on
voice software features, see the appropriate Voice Software Reference for your
operating system.
The network interface module on the daughterboard of the D/240SC-T1 board
enables the board to interface directly to a T-1/DSX-1 service termination.
The advantages of the D/240SC-T1 board are as follows:
• Increased system density with higher voice port density per PC slot.
• Fewer slots required for system installation
• Easier installation and cable configurations

5.2 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Overview


A block diagram of the main components on the is shown in Figure 5-1:
• Two 80286 microprocessors
• Digital Signal Processors
• PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector
• Private RAM, which stores downloaded firmware
The network interface module links the D/240SC-T1 board to the telephone
network. The resource module on the D/240SC-T1 board (located on the base
board) receives data and control information from the network interface module
(located on the daughterboard) via the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB). This
information is passed to the Digital Signal Processors on the resource module.
The Digital Signal Processors provide signal analysis on the incoming bitstream
and, together with the 80286 microprocessors, perform the voice processing
functions. Communication between the board and the host PC is accomplished
through a shared RAM buffer.

5-2
D/240SC-T1 Boards

5.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/240SC-T1


The D/240SC-T1 contains the network interface on its daughterboard and is not
used in conjunction with other network interface boards.

5.4 D/240SC-T1 Physical Description


An illustration of the modules on the D/240SC-T1 board is shown in Figure 5-2.
The D/240SC-T1 board can be identified by its 16-bit extended edge connector
and by the alarm indicators and remote loopback test switch and RJ-48C connector
jack on the rear bracket. A rotary switch (SW1), XTERM socket (R112) and 26-
pin male PEB connector (P5) are located in the corner at the board’s top and front
edges. The D/240SC-T1 is a PC-AT form factor board.
A description of each component on the D/240SC-T1 board is provided in Table
5-1.

5.4.1 Identifying D/240SC-T1 Models

You can identify the specific model of a Dialogic board by the model name on the
FCC sticker located on the board’s retaining bracket.

5-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

new graphic to be inserted

FIGURE 5-1. Block Diagram of the D/240SC-T1 Main Components


(Resource Module and Network Interface Module)

5-4
D/240SC-T1 Boards

TABLE 5-1. Description of Components on the Resource Module of


the D/240SC-T1 Board

Component Description

PEB (P5) 26-pin male PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector. Located
at the top left corner.

Rotary Switch Sets the board identification number.

XTERM Socket Socket labeled NET (on top of socket) and RES (on bottom).
(R112) Terminates the PEB cable as either a network module or
resource module. You must install a 20-pin connector in RES
socket for all terminate configurations. Socket is located to
the left of the rear bracket..

5-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 5-2. Description of Components on the Network Interface


Module of the D/240SC-T1 Board (Visible on Rear Bracket)

Component Description

Alarm Indicator Indicates loss of frame synchronization on incoming line


(Red) from the external network.

Alarm Indicator Indicates loss of frame synchronization at external network.


(Yellow)

Signal Present Indicates system is powered up and network interface module


Indicator is receiving signal from external T-1 source.
(Green)

Remote Switches network interface module to loopback mode for test


Loopback Test purposes.
Switch

Remote Indicates remote loopback test switch on network interface


Loopback module is set to ON position.
Indicator (Red)

RJ-48C Connects T-1 digital service to network interface module.


Connector Jack

5-6
D/240SC-T1 Boards

FIGURE 5-2. Components on the D/240SC-T1 Board

PCM EXPANSION BUS


(PEB) CONNECTOR (P5)

XTERM SOCKET (R112)


ROTARY SWITCH
RESOURCE MODULE
(BASEBOARD)

NETWORK INTERFACE
MODULE
(DAUGHTERBOARD)

ALARM INDICATOR (RED)


ALARM INDICATOR (YELLOW)
SIGNAL PRESENT
INDICATOR (GREEN)
REMOTE LOOPBACK
TEST SWITCH
REMOTE LOOPBACK
INDICATOR (RED)
EDGE CONNECTOR
RJ-48C CONNECTOR
JACK

REAR BRACKET

5-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

5.5 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Configurations

IMPORTANT
Keep a written record of your hardware configuration, including the switch and
jumper settings for all Dialogic boards that you install. You will use some of this
information, such as the base I/O port settings, when you perform the software
installation. It is also necessary to have this information if you ever need to contact
Dialogic technical support.

5.5.1 D/240SC-T1 Terminating Device Configuration

The D/240SC-T1 board can only be used in a terminating device configuration. In


a terminating condition the network interface module on the D/240SC-T1 board
terminates a T-1 span and will handle 24 telephone lines.
You must install a PEB terminator on the resource module on the D/240SC-T1
board. The network interface module on the daughterboard does not require a PEB
terminator.

5.6 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Settings

The board identification number is set on the resource module of the D/240SC-T1
board. On the network interface module, a remote loopback test switch is
available.
For specific switch settings, see the Board Installation chapter or Quick Reference
chapter in this guide.

5-8
D/240SC-T1 Boards

5.6.1 Resource Module: Board Identification Number (Rotary Switch


SW1)

Each D/240SC-T1 board in your system must have a unique board identification
number. The Dialogic Voice driver uses this number to detect which board is
sending a signal. Having a unique board identification number enables you to
address all of the D/240SC-T1 boards to the same base memory address. This
address is selected via the software configuration file.

NOTES: 1. If you are only installing one board, use the default setting. There is
no need to set the board identification number.

2. See the corresponding Voice Software Reference for more


information on the software configuration and addressing.

The PC and the D/240SC-T1 board communicate with each other through a shared
memory block which resides within the memory address space of the PC. No
matter how many D/240SC-T1 boards are installed, the boards will only take up a
total of 8K bytes of shared RAM. Range is from 80000 to FE000H. All the
D/240SC-T1 boards can reside at the same base address.
The board identification number is configured using a rotary switch SW1.

NOTE: Do not set two boards to the same board identification number. The
system will be unable to find the boards.

5-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

5.6.2 Network Interface Module: Remote Loopback Test Switch

The loopback switch is normally set to OFF and is set to ON only for testing the
system. When ON, the network interface module will transmit what it receives
back to the network, and the Remote Loopback Indicator will be lit.

NOTES: 1. The remote loopback test switch can be set at any time after the
firmware has been downloaded. Setting the switch to ON overrides
any board modes set by your application.
2. When the remote loopback switch is set to ON, a termination event
is generated. When the switch is returned to OFF, the application
receives another event and then continues.
3. When power is applied to the system, the remote loopback test LED
and all other LED indicators will remain unlit until the firmware is
downloaded to the board (see the appropriate System Release
Software Installation Reference).

5-10
D/240SC-T1 Boards

5.7 D/240SC-T1 Hardware Specifications


Hardware specifications are given for the network interface modules on the
D/240SC-T1 board. For hardware specifications on the resource module, contact
the Dialogic sales representative for a data sheet.

5.7.1 Network Interface Module (Daughterboard)

Telephony Interface

Transmitter:
Clock: 1.544 Mbits/sec
Level: 3.0 Vpk (nominal)
Pulse width: 324 ns (nominal)
Source impedance: 100 Ohms resistive, balanced
Line coding: AMI, AMI with bit-7 stuffing, B8ZS

Receiver:
Clock: 1.544 Mbits/sec
Jitter tolerance: Meets AT&T Pub 43801
Sensitivity: 10 dB below DSX-1
Terminating impedance: 100 Ohms resistive, balanced
Line coding: AMI, B8ZS
Connector: RJ-48C
Loopback configurations: Remote loopback (software/hardware selectable)
Local loopback (software selectable only)
Signaling Modes: Insertion
Transparent

5-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Host Interface

Form factor: PC AT
Bus structure: IBM PC AT compatible
I/O map: 96 locations selectable from 100H-3FFH
Interrupts: IRQ 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 14, or 15.

Hardware Defaults

NOTE: Hardware defaults are those in effect on startup of the board and before
firmware download is complete.

Clock source: Loop timed


Signaling protocol: E&M Signaling
Signaling mode: Transparent Mode
Alarm handling mode: Terminate Alarm Mode
Idle pattern: 7FH

Electrical Specifications

Power requirements: +5Vdc ± 5% @ 1.0 A (nominal)

Environmental Specifications

Temperature:
Operating: 0° C to +50° C
Storage: -20° C to +70° C
Operating humidity: 80% maximum non-condensing

Network Interface

On the rear bracket of the network interface module is an RJ-48C jack for
connecting to the T-1 network. The cabling between this jack and the CSU or

5-12
D/240SC-T1 Boards

other DSX-1 equipment should be 4-pair telephone line or equivalent. The


network interface module board end of the cable should consist of an RJ-48C plug.
The user is responsible for supplying an appropriate cable for these connections.
The pin designations for the network interface module cable end are given in
Table 5-3.

TABLE 5-3. T-1 Service to Network Interface Module Pin


Designations
Signal
Pin(s)
Receive ring: input to network interface module 1
Receive tip: input to network interface module 2
No connection 3,6
Transmit ring: output from network interface module 5
Transmit tip: output from network interface module 4
Optional shield 7,8

PCM Expansion Bus Interface

The PCM Expansion Bus is connected to the network interface module via P5. The
pin designations for the header are shown in Table 5-4.

5-13
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 5-4. PCM Expansion Bus Connector Pinout


Pin # Name I/O Function

1 CLKT I transmit clock to network


2 GND signal ground
3 FSYNCT I transmit frame sync to network
4 MSYNCT I transmit multi-frame sync to network
5 SERT I transmit voice data to network
6 SIGT I transmit signaling data to network
7 L-CLKT O local resource transmit clock
8 GND signal ground
9 L-FSYNCT O local resource transmit frame sync
10 L-MSYNCT O local resource transmit multi-frame sync
11 L-TSX I local resource time slot transmit enable
12 L-SERT I local resource transmit voice data
13 L-SIGT I local resource transmit signaling data
14 CLKR I receive clock from network
15 GND signal ground
16 FSYNCR I receive frame sync from network
17 MSYNCR I receive multi-frame sync from network
18 SERR I receive voice data from network
19 SIGR I receive signaling data from network
20 R-CLKT O remote resource receive clock
21 GND signal ground
22 R-FSYNCT O remote resource receive frame sync
23 R-MSYNCT O remote resource receive multi-frame sync
24 R-TSX I remote resource time slot receive enable
25 R-SERT I remote resource receive voice data
26 R-SIGT I remote resource receive signaling data

5-14
6. D/121A Board

This chapter provides an introduction to the D/121A board and contains the
following information:
• General description of the D/121A board
• Hardware overview of the D/121A board
• Interface boards used with the D/121A board
• Physical description of the D/121A showing the locations of its components
• D/121A hardware configurations
• D/121A hardware settings
• D/121A hardware specifications

6.1 D/121A Board General Description


The D/121A board is a high-density, 12-channel voice processing board that
provides the following functionality:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time.
• Play back previously recorded files.
• Initiate and receive calls through the network interface module
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation.
• Monitor the progress of an out-bound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques.
The D/121A board is a SpringBoard-based voice board that uses Digital Signal
Processing (DSP) to implement the voice processing features. D/121A boards
require SpringWare firmware installation. For detailed information on voice
software features, see the Voice Software Reference.

6-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

In addition, the D/121A boards are typically used in conjunction with network
interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment to connect to the telephone
network through PEB-compatible products:
• LSI/120, a 12-channel loop start interface board for analog applications.
• DTI/101, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for digital
applications. See Section 1.2 of this chapter for more information on the
DTI/101 board.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.
The advantages of the D/121A boards are as follows:
• Higher voice port density per PC slot than D/41D products
• Fewer slots required for system installation:
- 24-channel T-1 voice processing applications (one DTI/124 and six D/41D
boards) can be installed in three slots (one DTI/101 and two D/121A
boards).
- 24-channel loop start applications (six D/41D boards) can be installed in
four slots (two D/121A boards and two LSI/120 boards).
- LSI/120 and DTI/101 boards can be installed in either 8 -bit or 16-bit slots.
This feature lets you make use of all the expansion slots in your PC-AT or
compatible machine.
- LSI/120 and DTI/101 boards can be installed in either 8 -bit or 16-bit slots.
The D/121A requires a 16-bit slot.

6.2 D/121A Hardware Overview

A block diagram of the D/121A main components is shown in Figure 6-1:


• 80286 microprocessor
• Digital Signal Processors
• PCM Expansion Bus (PEB)
• Private RAM, which stores downloaded firmware

6-2
D/121A Board

The D/121A board receives data and control information from a DTI or LSI
network interface board that links the D/121A to the telephone network via the
PCM Expansion Bus (PEB). This information is passed to the Digital Signal
Processors. The Digital Signal Processors provide signal analysis on the incoming
bitstream and, together with the 80286 microprocessor, perform the voice
processing functions. Communication between the voice board and the host PC is
accomplished through a shared RAM buffer.

6.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/121A

The D/121A board can be used in conjunction with PEB-compatible network


interface boards.

6.4 D/121A Physical Description

An illustration of the D/121A board is shown in Figure 6-2Error! Bookmark not


defined.. The D/121A board can be identified by its 16-bit extended edge
connector and by the two Digital Signal Processors located near the board’s front
edge. A 26-pin male PEB connector is located in the corner at the board’s top and
front edges. The D/121A board is a PC-AT form factor board.
A description of each component on the D/121A board is provided in Table 6-1.

6.4.1 Identifying D/121A Models

You can identify the specific model of a Dialogic board by the model name on the
FCC sticker located on the board’s retaining bracket.

6-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

NETWORK INTERFACE

PCM EXPANSION BUS

PRIVATE RAM
DSP

80286
MICROPROCESSOR

DSP
SPRINGBOARD - PC
DUAL-PORT RAM

PC/AT BUS

FIGURE 6-1. Block Diagram of the D/121A Main Components

6-4
D/121A Board

TABLE 6-1. Description of Components on the D/121A board

Component Description

PEB 26-pin male PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector. Located


at the top left corner.

JP1 Sets the interrupt request level (IRQ). Located above the
edge connector.

JP7 Sets the interrupt terminator. Located above the edge


connector, to the right of JP1.

JP168 Sets 8-bit bus mode. Located to the left of the rear bracket.

JP16 Sets 16-bit bus mode. Located above the edge connector, to
the left of JP1.

SW1 Sets the base I/O port.

6-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

8 - BI T BUS MODE (JP1 6 8 )


PCM EXPANSI ON BUS (PEB)
CONNECTOR BASE l/O SWI TCH BLOCK (SW1 )
PEB TERMI NATOR SOCKET

1 6 - BI T BUS MODE (JP1 6 )


DS P’s

2/9 3 4 5 6 7 1 0 11 12 14 15
JP1

JP7

l RQ JUMPER BLOCK (JP1 ) I NTERRUPT TERMI NATOR BLOCK (JP7 )


DEFAULT SETTI NG - 3

FIGURE 6-2. Components on the D/121A Board

6-6
D/121A Board

6.5 D/121A Hardware Configurations

IMPORTANT
Keep a written record of your hardware configuration, including the switch and
jumper settings for all Dialogic boards that you install. You will use some of this
information, such as the base I/O port settings, when you perform the software
installation. It is also necessary to have this information if you ever need to contact
Dialogic technical support.

6.5.1 D/121A and LSI/120 Hardware Configuration

The basic analog configuration consists of one D/121A board cabled to one
LSI/120 network interface board and will handle 12 telephone lines. This
configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable with two connectors.
A PEB terminator must be installed on both the D/121A and the LSI/120. Refer to
the Board Installation chapter of this guide for instructions about installing the
PEB terminator.

6.5.2 D/121A and DTI/101 Terminating Device Configurations

Terminating device configurations are those in which one DTI/101 connected to


one or two D/121A boards terminates a T-1 span.
The basic DTI terminating device configuration consists of one or two D/121A
boards cabled to a DTI/101 network interface board and will handle 12 or 24
telephone lines. This configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable with three connectors.
If you are installing one D/121A board in this configuration, you must install a
PEB terminator on the D/121A board. If you are installing two D/12A boards in
this configuration, you must install a PEB terminator on the D/121A board at the
end of the cable. The PEB terminator must be removed from the D/121A board in
the center of the cable. The DTI/101 network interface board does not require a
PEB terminator.

6-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

6.5.3 D/121A and DTI/101 Drop-and-Insert Configurations

In DTI/101 drop-and-insert configurations, two DTI/101 network interface boards


are connected to allow communication between separate T-1 spans. D/121A
boards may be connected to a DTI/101 network interface boards to perform voice
processing functions.
To use D/121A boards with two DTI/101 boards in a drop-and-insert
configuration, install two DTI/101 boards and two D/121A boards, or install two
DTI/101 boards and four D/121A boards.

6.5.4 D/121A and Other Hardware Configurations

The D/121A board can be connected to numerous network interface boards,


including the following:
• LSI/120: 12-channel loop start interface (analog)
• DTI/101: 24-channel T-1 interface
• DTI/211: 24-channel T-1 interface (compatible with Dialogic DMX board)
• PRI/211: 23-channel ISDN Primary Rate Interface
• DID/120: 12-channel analog interface to DID trunk

6.6 D/121A Hardware Settings


The following paragraphs describe the hardware settings that are programmable on
the D/121A board:
• Base I/O port (SW1)
• IRQ level (JP1)
• Bus mode (JP168 and JP16)
• Interrupt terminator (JP7)
For specific switch or jumper settings, see the Board Installation chapter or Quick
Reference chapter in this guide.

6-8
D/121A Board

6.6.1 Base I/O Port (SW1)

The D/121A base I/O port address is set by using switch block SW1 (Figure 4-2).
The switch block is located toward the center of the board, about two inches from
the rear edge. Available I/O port ranges (hex) are as follows:

(default) 340H - 343H


344H - 347H
348H - 34BH
34CH - 34FH
350H - 353H
354H - 357H
358H - 35BH
35CH - 35FH

The D/121A -host PC communication interface is both I/O-mapped and


memory-mapped. During the download procedure, the SpringWare Downloader
writes the base memory address specified in the SpringWare configuration file to
the I/O port specified in the configuration file. Code will not be downloaded to the
board unless the I/O port switches you set at this time match the I/O port you enter
when you create the configuration file (refer to the Voice Software Reference).
Each D/121A board you are installing must use a different I/O port range.
The SW1 switch positions represent the I/O port address as three 4-bit
hexadecimal digits.

6.6.2 IRQ Level (JP1)

Set the D/121A IRQ (interrupt request level) using jumper block JP1. The
following IRQs are available:

6-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Jumper Pin Position Available IRQ


1 IRQ 2/9
2 IRQ 3 (default)
3 IRQ 4
4 IRQ 5
5 IRQ 6
6 IRQ 7
7 IRQ 10
8 IRQ 11
9 IRQ 12
10 IRQ 14
11 IRQ 15

The default IRQ is 3. All voice boards in the system should use the same IRQ.
When mixing D/121A boards and D/81A or D/41D boards in your application,
configure all boards to use the same IRQ. In PC-AT computers, interrupts from the
second 8259 controller are cascaded to IRQ 2, so the interrupt associated with this
pin is actually IRQ 9.

6.6.3 Interrupt Terminator (JP7)

The D/121A Interrupt Terminator (JP7) is located directly above the D/121A edge
connector, immediately to the right of JP1. One and only one voice board in the
system should have JP7 installed.

6.6.4 Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16)

The 8-bit bus mode is the default setting for the D/121A board. In most cases, this
setting will work for all configurations. However, in some cases, you will need to
set the voice board to the 16-bit bus mode before installing the board.
You should first determine which memory segments you are going to use for the
voice boards. A list of valid memory segments is provided in the Voice Software
Reference. During the software installation procedure, you will specify in the
SpringWare configuration file the base memory segment for each voice board.

6-10
D/121A Board

For any voice board that you are going to use in the E000 memory segment, you
will most likely need to configure the voice board in the 16-bit bus mode.
A requirement of IBM PC-AT architecture (ISA) is that all boards installed within
a memory segment pair (A/B, C/D, E/F) must have the same interface mode (either
8-bit or 16-bit). Since many PCs have a 16-bit BIOS installed at F000, set any
board that you install in the E000 segment to the 16-bit bus mode.
The 16-bit bus mode does not provide any performance benefit over the 8-bit bus
mode. 16-bit bus mode provides more flexibility when installing the voice board,
such as when the 16-bit bus mode is required for installing the board in the E000
memory segment.

6.7 D/121A Hardware Specifications

All signal measurements refer to the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) interface.

Host Interface

Bus Structure: IBM PC-AT-compatible


Interrupt Levels: IRQ 2/9, 3-7, 10-12, 14, or 15
Jumper selectable; one IRQ line may be shared by
all voice boards.
Maximum Recommended
D/121A’s per PC: 5
Memory: D/121A: Three contiguous 8 kb pages.
Pages are mapped under software control; see the
Voice Software Installation Guide in the Voice
Software Reference for the segments and offset
addresses supported by the voice boards.

6-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Base I/O Port Ranges: Switch selectable at:


340H-343H, 344H-347H, 348H-34BH, 34CH-
34FH, 350H-353H, 354H-357H, 358H-35BH,
35CH-35FH

Electrical

Power Requirements: +5 Volt ±5% @ 2.5 amp

Environmental

Operating Temperature: 0 to +50 °C


Storage Temperature: -20 to +70 °C
Humidity: 8 to 80% noncondensing

Physical

Length: 13.3 inches


Width: 0.527 inches
Height: 4.5 inches (excluding edge connector)

6-12
7. D/121B Board
This chapter provides an introduction to the D/121B board and contains the
following information:
• General description of the D/121B board
• Hardware overview of the D/121B board
• Interface boards used with the D/121B board
• Physical description of the D/121B board showing the locations of its
components
• D/121B board hardware configurations
• D/121B board hardware settings
• D/121B board hardware specifications

7.1 D/121B Board General Description


The D/121B board is a performance-enhanced, high-density, 12-channel voice
processing board that provides the following functionality:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time.
• Play back previously recorded files.
• Initiate and receive calls through the loop start interface
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation.
• Monitor the progress of an out-bound call using patented Call Progress
Analysis techniques.
The D/121B board is a SpringBoard-based voice board that uses Digital Signal
Processing (DSP) to implement the voice processing features. D/121B boards
require SpringWare firmware installation. For detailed information on voice
software features, see the Voice Software Reference.

7-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

In addition, the D/121B boards are typically used in conjunction with network
interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment to connect to the telephone
network through PEB-compatible products:
• LSI/120, a 12-channel loop start interface board for analog applications.
• DTI/101, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for digital
applications. See the DTI/101 Board chapter for more information.
• For information on other network interface products, see the Network
Interface Board Hardware Reference.

The advantages of the D/121B boards are as follows:


• Higher voice port density per PC slot than D/41D products.
• Fewer slots required for system installation:
- 24-channel T-1 voice processing applications (one DTI/124 and six D/41D
boards) can be installed in three slots (one DTI/101 and two D/121B
boards).
- 24-channel loop start applications (six D/41D boards) can be installed in
four slots (two D/121B boards and two LSI/120 boards).
- LSI/120 and DTI/101 boards can be installed in either 8 -bit or 16-bit slots.
This feature lets you make use of all the expansion slots in PC.
- LSI/120 and DTI/101 boards can be installed in either 8 -bit or 16-bit slots.
The D/121B requires a 16-bit slot.

7-2
D/121B Board

7.2 D/121B Hardware Overview

A block diagram of the D/121B main components is shown in Figure 7-1:


• 80286 microprocessor
• Digital Signal Processors
• PCM Expansion Bus (PEB)
• Private RAM, which stores downloaded firmware
The D/121B board receives data and control information from a DTI or LSI
network interface board that links the D/121B board to the telephone network via
the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB). This information is passed to the Digital Signal
Processors. The Digital Signal Processors provide signal analysis on the incoming
bitstream and, together with the 80286 microprocessor, perform the voice
processing functions. Communication between the voice board and the host PC is
accomplished through a shared RAM buffer.

7.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/121B

The D/121B board can be used in conjunction with PEB-compatible network


interface boards

7.4 D/121B Physical Description

An illustration of the D/121B board is shown in Figure 7-2Error! Bookmark not


defined.. The D/121B board can be identified by its 16-bit extended edge
connector and by the two Digital Signal Processors located near the board's front
edge. A 26-pin male PEB connector is located in the corner at the board's top and
front edges. The D/121B board is a PC-AT form factor board.
A description of each component on the D/121B board is provided in Table 7-1.

7-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

NETWORK INTERFACE

PCM EXPANSION BUS

PRIVATE RAM
DSP

80286
MICROPROCESSOR

DSP
SPRINGBOARD - PC
DUAL-PORT RAM

PC/AT BUS

FIGURE 7-1. Block Diagram of the D/121B Main Components

7-4
D/121B Board

FIGURE 7-2. Components on the D/121B Board

7-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

7.4.1 Identifying D/121B Models

You can identify the specific model of a Dialogic board by the model name on the
FCC sticker located on the board’s retaining bracket.

TABLE 7-1. Description of Components on the D/121B board

Component Description

PEB 26-pin male PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector. Located


at the top left corner.

JP1 Sets the interrupt request level (IRQ). Located above the
edge connector.

JP7 Sets the interrupt terminator. Located above the edge


connector, to the right of JP1.

JP168 Sets 8-bit bus mode. Located to the left of the rear bracket.

JP16 Sets 16-bit bus mode. Located above the edge connector, to
the left of JP1.

SW1 Sets the base I/O port.

7-6
D/121B Board

7.5 D/121B Hardware Configurations

IMPORTANT
Keep a written record of your hardware configuration, including the switch and
jumper settings for all Dialogic boards that you install. You will use some of this
information, such as the base I/O port settings, when you perform the software
installation. It is also necessary to have this information if you ever need to contact
Dialogic technical support.

7.5.1 D/121B and LSI/120 Hardware Configuration

The basic analog configuration consists of one D/121B cabled to one LSI/120 and
will handle 12 telephone lines. This configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable with
two connectors.
A PEB terminator must be installed on both the D/121B and the LSI/120. Refer to
the Board Installation chapterError! Bookmark not defined. of this guide for
instructions about installing the PEB terminator.

7.5.2 D/121B and DTI/101 Terminating Device Configurations

Terminating device configurations are those in which one DTI/101 network


interface board connected to one or two D/121B boards terminates a T -1 span.
The basic DTI terminating device configuration consists of one or two D/121B
boards cabled to a DTI/101 network interface board and will handle 12 or 24
telephone lines. This configuration uses a PEB ribbon cable with three connectors.
If you are installing one D/121B board in this configuration, you must install a
PEB terminator on the D/121B board. If you are installing two D/121B boards in
this configuration, you must install a PEB terminator on the D/121B board at the
end of the cable. The PEB terminator must be removed from the D/121B board in
the center of the cable. The DTI/101 network interface board does not require a
PEB terminator.

7-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

7.5.3 D/121B and DTI/101 Drop-and-Insert Configurations

In DTI drop-and-insert configurations, two DTI boards are connected to allow


communication between separate T-1 spans. D/121B boards may be connected to
a DTI/101 to perform voice processing functions.
To use D/121B boards with two DTI/101 boards in a drop-and-insert
configuration, install two DTI/101 boards and two D/121B boards, or install two
DTI/101 boards and four D/121B boards.

7.5.4 D/121B and Other Hardware Configurations

The D/121B board can be connected to numerous network interface boards,


including the following:
• LSI/120: 12-channel loop start interface (analog)
• DTI/101: 24-channel T-1 interface
• DTI/211: 24-channel T-1 interface (compatible with Dialogic DMX)
• PRI/211: 23-channel ISDN Primary Rate Interface
• DID/120: 12-channel analog interface to DID trunk

7.6 D/121B Board Hardware Settings

The following paragraphs describe the hardware settings that are programmable on
the D/121B board:
• Base I/O port (SW1)
• IRQ level (JP1)
• Bus mode (JP168 and JP16)
• Interrupt terminator (JP7)
For specific jumper or switch settings, see the Board Installation chapter or Quick
Reference chapter in this guide.

7-8
D/121B Board

7.6.1 Base I/O Port (SW1)

The D/121B board base I/O port address is set by using switch block SW1 (Figure
7-2Error! Bookmark not defined.). The switch block is located toward the
center of the board, about two inches from the rear edge. Available I/O port ranges
(hex) are as follows:

(default) 340H - 343H


344H - 347H
348H - 34BH
34CH - 34FH
350H - 353H
354H - 357H
358H - 35BH
35CH - 35FH

The D/121B board-host PC communication interface is both I/O-mapped and


memory-mapped. During the download procedure, the SpringWare Downloader
writes the base memory address specified in the SpringWare configuration file to
the I/O port specified in the configuration file. Code will not be downloaded to the
board unless the I/O port switches you set at this time match the I/O port you enter
when you create the configuration file (refer to the Voice Software Reference).
Each D/121B board you are installing must use a different I/O port range.

7-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

7.6.2 IRQ Level (JP1)

Set the D/121B IRQ (interrupt request level) using jumper block JP1. JP1 is
located directly above the gap in the middle of the D/121B extended edge
connector. The following IRQs are available:

Jumper Pin Position Available IRQ


1 IRQ 2/9
2 IRQ 3 (default)
3 IRQ 4
4 IRQ 5
5 IRQ 6
6 IRQ 7
7 IRQ 10
8 IRQ 11
9 IRQ 12
10 IRQ 14
11 IRQ 15

The default IRQ is 3. Set the IRQ by placing a jumper over the appropriate pin
pair. If you have other voice boards in your system using IRQ 3, move the jumper
on JP1 to an unused IRQ setting.
All voice boards in the system should use the same IRQ. When mixing D/121B
boards and D/8x or D/41D boards in your application, configure all voice boards
to use the same IRQ.
In PC-AT computers, interrupts from the second 8259 controller are cascaded to
IRQ 2, so the interrupt associated with this pin is actually IRQ 9.

7.6.3 Interrupt Terminator (JP7)

One and only one voice board in the system should have JP7 installed. The
D/121B interrupt terminator is set by JP7, which is located directly above the edge
connector, immediately to the right of JP1. The JP7 default setting is "in" (jumper
installed).

7-10
D/121B Board

7.6.4 Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16)

The 8-bit bus mode is the default setting for the D/121B board. In most cases, this
setting will work for all configurations. However, in some cases, you will need to
set the voice board to the 16-bit bus mode before installing the board.
You should first determine which memory segments you are going to use for the
voice boards. A list of valid memory segments is provided in the Voice Software
Installation Guide in the Voice Software Reference. During the software
installation procedure, you will specify in the SpringWare configuration file the
base memory segment for each voice board.
A requirement of IBM PC-AT architecture (ISA) is that all boards installed within
a memory segment pair (A/B, C/D, E/F) must have the same interface mode (either
8-bit or 16-bit). For D/121B boards used in the E000 memory segment, configure
the voice board in the 16-bit bus mode since many PCs have a 16-bit BIOS
installed at F000.
The 16-bit bus mode does not provide any performance benefit over the 8-bit bus
mode but provides more flexibility when installing the voice board.

7.7 D/121B Hardware Specifications

All signal measurements refer to the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) interface.

7-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Host Interface

Bus Structure: IBM PC-AT-compatible


Interrupt Levels: IRQ 2/9, 3-7, 10-12, 14, or 15
Jumper selectable; one IRQ line may be shared by
all voice boards.
Maximum Recommended
D/121B’s per PC: 5
Memory: D/121B: Three contiguous 8 kb pages.
Pages are mapped under software control; see the
Voice Software Installation Guide in the Voice
Software Reference for the segments and offset
addresses supported by the voice boards.
Base I/O Port Ranges: Switch selectable at:
340H-343H, 344H-347H, 348H-34BH, 34CH-
34FH, 350H-353H, 354H-357H, 358H-35BH,
35CH-35FH

Electrical

Power Requirements: +5 Volt ±5% @ 2.5 amp

Environmental

Operating Temperature: 0 to +50 °C


Storage Temperature: -20 to +70 °C
Humidity: 8 to 80% noncondensing

7-12
D/121B Board

Physical

Length: 13.3 inches


Width: 0.527 inches
Height: 4.5 inches (excluding edge connector)

7-13
8. D/81A Board
This chapter provides an introduction to the D/81A board and contains the
following information:
• General description of the D/81A board
• Hardware overview of the D/81A board
• Interface boards used with the D/81A board
• Physical description of the D/81A showing the locations of its components
• D/81A hardware configurations
• D/81A hardware settings
• D/81A hardware specifications

8.1 D/81A Board General Description


The D/81A board is a high-density, 8-channel voice processing board that
provides the following functionality:
• Record, digitize and compress audio in real time
• Play back previously recorded files
• Initiate and receive calls through the loop start interface
• Detect and generate signals using the following methods: DTMF, MF, R2
MF, Socotel, user-defined signals (Global Tone Detection and Generation),
and dial pulse generation
• Monitor the progress of an out-bound call using Call Progress Analysis
techniques
The D/81A board is a SpringBoard-based voice board that uses Digital Signal
Processing (DSP) to implement the voice processing features. D/81A boards
require SpringWare firmware installation. For detailed information on voice
software features, see the Voice Software Reference.

8-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

In addition, the D/81A boards are typically used in conjunction with network
interface boards that enable the Dialogic equipment connect to the telephone
network:
• LSI/80, an 8-channel loop start interface board for analog applications.
• DTI/212, a 24-channel digital telephony interface board for digital
applications. For further information on the DTI/212 and other network
interface products, see the Network Interface Board Hardware Reference.

8.2 D/81A Hardware Overview

A block diagram of the D/81A main components is shown in Figure 8-1:


• 80286 microprocessor
• Digital Signal Processors
• PCM Expansion Bus (PEB)
• Private RAM, which stores downloaded firmware
The D/81A board receives data and control information from a DTI or LSI
network interface board that links the D/121B to the telephone network via the
PCM Expansion Bus (PEB). This information is passed to the Digital Signal
Processors. The Digital Signal Processors provide signal analysis on the incoming
bitstream and, together with the 80286 microprocessor, perform the voice
processing functions. Communication between the voice board and the host PC is
accomplished through the dual-port RAM area.

8.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/81A

The D/81A board can be connected to numerous network interface boards,


including the following:
• LSI/80: 8-channel loop start interface (analog)
• DTI/212: 30-channel E-1 Interface
• PRI/212: 30-channel ISDN Primary Rate Interface

8-2
D/81A Board

NETWORK INTERFACE

PCM EXPANSION BUS

PRIVATE RAM
DSP

80286
MICROPROCESSOR

DSP
SPRINGBOARD - PC
DUAL-PORT RAM

PC/AT BUS

FIGURE 8-1. Block Diagram of the D/81A Main Components

8-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

8.4 D/81A Physical Description

An illustration of the D/81A board is shown in Figure 8-2Error! Bookmark not


defined.. The D/81A board can be identified by its 16-bit extended edge connector
and by the two Digital Signal Processors located near the board’s front edge. A 26-
pin male PEB connector is located in the corner at the board’s top and front edges.
The D/81A board is a PC-AT form factor board.
A description of each component on the D/81A board is provided in Table 8-1.

8.4.1 Identifying D/81A Models

You can identify the specific model of a Dialogic board by the model name on the
FCC sticker located on the board’s retaining bracket.

8-4
D/81A Board

FIGURE 8-2. Components on the D/81A Board

8-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 8-1. Components on the D/81A Board

Component Description

PEB 26-pin male PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector. Located


at the top left corner.

JP1 Sets the interrupt request level (IRQ). Located above the
edge connector.

JP7 Sets the interrupt terminator. Located above the edge


connector, to the right of JP1.

JP168 Sets 8-bit bus mode. Located to the left of the rear bracket.

JP16 Sets 16-bit bus mode. Located above the edge connector, to
the left of JP1.

SW1 Sets the base I/O port.

8.5 D/81A Board Hardware Configurations

IMPORTANT
Keep a written record of your hardware configuration, including the switch and
jumper settings for all Dialogic boards that you install. You will use some of this
information, such as the base I/O port settings, when you perform the software
installation. You will also need this information when contacting Dialogic
technical support.

8-6
D/81A Board

8.5.1 D/81A and DTI/101 Drop-and-Insert Configurations

This section describes how to install D/81A boards and DTI/101 network interface
boards in a drop-and- insert configuration for digital telephony applications. In
DTI drop-and-insert configurations, two DTI network interface boards are
connected to allow communication between separate T-1 spans. D/81A boards
may be connected to a DTI/101 network interface board to perform voice
processing functions.
To use D/81A boards with two DTI/101 network interface boards in a drop-and-
insert configuration, install two DTI/101 boards and two D/81A boards, or install
two DTI/101 boards and four D/81A boards.

8.5.2 D/81A Board and Other Hardware Configurations

The D/81A board can be connected to numerous network interface boards,


including the following:
• LSI/80: 8-channel Loop Start Interface (analog)
• DTI/101: 24-channel T-1 Interface
• DTI/211: 24-channel T-1 Interface (compatible with Dialogic DMX)
• PRI/211: 23-channel ISDN Primary Rate Interface
• DID/120: 12-channel analog interface to DID trunk

8-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

8.6 D/81A Hardware Settings

The following paragraphs describe the hardware settings that are programmable
the D/81A board:
• Base I/O port (SW1)
• IRQ level (JP1)
• Bus mode (JP168 and JP16)
• Interrupt terminator (JP7)
For specific jumper or switch settings, see the Board Installation chapter or Quick
Reference chapter in this guide.

8.6.1 Base I/O Port (SW1)

The D/81A board base I/O port address is set by using switch block SW1 (Figure
8-2). The switch block is located toward the center of the board, about two inches
from the rear edge. Available I/O port ranges (hex) are as follows:

(default) 340H - 343H


344H - 347H
348H - 34BH
34CH - 34FH
350H - 353H
354H - 357H
358H - 35BH
35CH - 35FH

The D/81A board-host PC communication interface is both I/O-mapped and


memory-mapped. During the download procedure, the SpringWare Downloader
writes the base memory address specified in the SpringWare configuration file to
the I/O port specified in the configuration file. Code will not be downloaded to the
board unless the I/O port switches you set at this time match the I/O port you enter
when you create the configuration file (refer to the Voice Software Reference).
Each D/81A board you are installing must use a different I/O port range.

8-8
D/81A Board

8.6.2 IRQ Level (JP1)

Set the D/81A IRQ (interrupt request level) using jumper block JP1. JP1 is located
directly above the gap in the middle of the D/81A extended edge connector. The
following IRQs are available:

Jumper Pin Position Available IRQ


1 IRQ 2/9
2 IRQ 3 (default)
3 IRQ 4
4 IRQ 5
5 IRQ 6
6 IRQ 7
7 IRQ 10
8 IRQ 11
9 IRQ 12
10 IRQ 14
11 IRQ 15

The default IRQ is 3.


All voice boards in the system should use the same IRQ. When mixing D/81A
boards and D/81A or D/41D boards in your application, configure all voice boards
to use the same IRQ.
In PC-AT computers, interrupts from the second 8259 controller are cascaded to
IRQ 2, so the interrupt associated with this pin is actually IRQ 9.

8.6.3 Interrupt Terminator (JP7)

One and only one voice board in the system should have JP7 installed. The
D/121B interrupt terminator is set by JP7, which is located directly above the edge
connector, immediately to the right of JP1. The JP7 default setting is "in" (jumper
installed).

8-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

8.6.4 Bus Mode (JP168 and JP16)

The 8-bit bus mode is the default setting for the D/81A board. In most cases, this
setting will work for all configurations; however, in some cases you will need to
set the voice board to the 16-bit bus mode before installing the board.
You should first determine which memory segments you are going to use for the
voice boards. A list of valid memory segments is provided in the Voice Software
Installation Guide in the Voice Software Reference. During the software
installation procedure, you will specify in the SpringWare configuration file the
base memory segment for each voice board.
A requirement of IBM PC-AT architecture (ISA) is that all boards installed within
a memory segment pair (A/B, C/D, E/F) must have the same interface mode (either
8-bit or 16-bit). For D/121B boards used in the E000 memory segment, configure
the voice board in the 16-bit bus mode since many PCs have a 16-bit BIOS
installed at F000.
The 16-bit bus mode does not provide any performance benefit over the 8-bit bus
mode but provides more flexibility when installing the voice board.

8.7 D/81A Hardware Specifications

Host Interface

Bus Structure: IBM PC-AT-compatible


Interrupt Levels: IRQ 2/9, 3-7, 10-12, 14, or 15
Jumper selectable; one IRQ line may be shared by
all voice boards.
Maximum D/81A’s per PC: 8
Memory: Two contiguous 8 Kb pages.
Pages are mapped under software control; see the
Voice Software Installation Guide in the Voice

8-10
D/81A Board

Software Reference for the segments and offset


addresses supported by the voice boards.
Base I/O Port Ranges: Switch selectable at:
340H-343H, 344H-347H, 348H-34BH, 34CH-
34FH, 350H-353H, 354H-357H, 358H-35BH,
35CH-35FH

Electrical

Power Requirements: +5 Volt ±5% @ 2.5 amp

Environmental

Operating Temperature: 0 to +50 °C


Storage Temperature: -20 to +70 °C
Humidity: 8 to 80% noncondensing

Physical

Length: 13.3 inches


Width: 0.527 inches
Height: 4.5 inches (excluding edge connector)

8-11
9. D/41D Board
This chapter provides an introduction to the D/41D board and contains the
following information:
• General description of the D/41D board
• Hardware overview of the D/41D board
• Interface boards used with the D/41D board
• Physical description of the D/41 showing the locations of its components
• D/41D hardware configurations
• D/41D hardware settings
• D/41D hardware specifications

9.1 D/41D Board General Description


D/41D board includes the following capabilities on up to 4 channels:
• Record, digitize, and compress audio in real time
• Playback previously recorded files
• Generate and detect DTMF tones
• Generate and detect MF tones
• Pulse dialing
• Initiate and receive calls through the loop start telephone interface
• Perform call progress analysis for outbound dialing
• UL1459 compliance
The D/41D board is a SpringBoard-based voice board that uses Digital Signal
Processing (DSP) to implement the voice processing features. D/41D boards
require SpringWare firmware installation. For detailed information on voice
software features, see the Voice Software Reference.
All D/41D boards provide a built-in loop start telephone line interface. The
D/41D board can be installed in either an 8-bit or 16-bit PC expansion slot.

9-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

9.2 D/41D Hardware Overview


The D/41D board consists of several modules including a shared RAM interface
section for communicating with the PC, an onboard microprocessor, a high-speed
digital signal processor and four independent voice I/O channels that include
telephone line interfaces. The D/41D board requires firmware to be downloaded to
the D/41D board.

A block diagram of the D/41D board is shown in Figure 9-10.

P3 AEB INTERFACE

TELEPHONE LINE A/D


LINE CONTROLLER
INTERFACE D/A
PROCESSOR
HIGH-
SPEED
DIGITAL
TELEPHONE LINE A/D SHARED
SIGNAL
LINE INTERFACE D/A MEMORY
PROCESSOR
BUFFER

TELEPHONE LINE A/D


LINE PC/XT/AT
INTERFACE D/A INTERFACE

TELEPHONE LINE A/D


LINE INTERFACE D/A

FIGURE 9-1. D/41D Board Block Diagram

9-2
D/41D Board

9.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/41D

The D/41D board can be used in conjunction with LSI/120 and DTI/101 network
interface boards

9.4 D/41D Physical Description

The D/41D board can be identified by its 8-bit edge connector, the SW1 switch
block, jumpers labeled JP1, JP7, JP5 and JP8, and a P3 Analog Expansion Bus
(AEB) connector socket near the top edge of the board. The D/41D board also
includes a jumper labeled JP6.

TABLE 9-1. Components on the D/41D Board


Board
Component Function
JP7 Sets D/41D board for multiple D/41D board configuration.
JP5 Sets A000H base memory segment for the D/41D board.
JP6 Sets C000H base memory segment for D/41D board.
SW1 Sets D/41D board’s offset address and default line state.
JP1 Sets D/41D board’s interrupt level.
JP8 Install JP8 to select built-in loop start interface or external T-1
interface.
P2 Microprocessor interface.
P3 Analog Expansion Bus (AEB) connector socket used when
connecting D/41D boards with other system boards.

An illustration of the D/41D board showing the location of the jumpers, switches,
P2 and the P3 AEB connector is shown in Figure 9-2 0.

9-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Prepare the board’s jumpers and switches as described in Chapter 3 before


installing the board in the PC chassis.

P2 P3

JP8

1 2 3 4
O
N

SW1

JP6 JP5

2/9 3 4 5 6 7

JP7 JP1

FIGURE 9-2. D/41D Jumpers, Switches, and P3 Connector Locations

9-4
D/41D Board

9.5 D/41D Hardware Configurations

The D/41D board contains everything needed for the basic 4-channel analog
configuration.

9.6 D/41D Board Hardware Settings

The following paragraphs describe the hardware settings that are programmable on
the D/41D board:
• Multiple board configuration (JP7)
• Base memory address segment (JP5, JP6))
• Offset address (SW1: 1, 2, 3)
• Default line state (SW1: 4)
• Interrupt request (IRQ) level (JP1)
For specific jumper or switch settings, see the Board Installation chapter or Quick
Reference chapter in this guide.

9.6.1 Multiple D/41D Board Configuration (JP7)

Up to 16 D/41D boards may be installed in a single PC chassis. Use JP7 to set


whether one or more D/41D boards will be installed. The default is for only one
D/41D board in the system.

9.6.2 Base Memory Address Segment (JP5, JP6)

The PC and the D/41D board communicate with each other through a shared
memory block which resides within the memory address space of the PC.
The D/41D board’s base memory address segment is set to D000H (default). Leave
the base memory address segment set to the default for the D/41D board(s) unless
you have one of the following hardware configurations:

9-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

• More than eight D/41D boards in your system


• Other non-Dialogic devices in your system that must use the D000H segment
On the D/41D board, the default base memory address segment (D000H) can be
changed to either the A000H or C000H segment to allow a maximum of 16 D/41D
boards in a single PC chassis.

NOTE: If you are using MS-DOS and you have a VGA monitor card that uses
segment A000H, you should set the D/41D board's base memory address
to the D000H or C000H segment.
Select segment A000H or C000H by installing a jumper on jumper block JP5 or
JP6.

9.6.3 Offset Address (SW1: 1, 2, 3)

The D/41D board's offset address is set with switch block SW1 (see Figure 7-20
for location of switch block SW1). The default offset address (from the selected
base memory segment) is set at the factory to zero offset (0000H). The default
offset address can be changed by setting three dip switches contained on switch
block SW1.
If you only have a single D/41D board in your system, switch positions 1, 2 and 3
on switch block SW1 will generally not have to be touched. If, however, you are
installing more than one D/41D board, it will be necessary to set the D/41D board
switch block SW1 switches so that each D/41D board has a unique offset address.

9-6
D/41D Board

NOTES: 1. The offset address you select for each D/41D board cannot overlap
with any other boards addressed within the segment If you have
other expansion peripherals that use addresses within the segment,
it will be necessary to set the D/41D board switch block SW1
switches to an offset address not used by the other expansion
peripherals.

2. As a general rule for configurations with more than one D/41D


board, it is recommended that you select the offset address for
each D/41D board in the segment beginning with board number 1.

3. It is not a requirement that the address for each D/41D board be


contiguous within the segment. The board with the lowest address
will be board number 1 (channels 1-4), the next lowest address,
board number 2 (channels 5-8), etc.

4. During the D/41D System’s Dialogic software installation , if you


are instructed to specify each D/41D board’s segment and offset
address in a Configuration File, the segment and offset address you
specify for each board must match the segment and offset address
set on each physical board. For information on software
installation, see the appropriate Voice Software Reference.

9.5.4 Default Line State (SW1: 4)

A D/41D board can be started or stopped via software without affecting the
operation of other D/41D boards in the system. The state of the telephone lines on
a stopped D/41D board can be configured to be either in the "on -hook" (ringing,
no answer) or "off-hook" (busy signal) state by correctly setting switch position 4
of switch block SW1Error! Bookmark not defined..
You do not have to set all D/41D boards in your system to the same default line
state.

9-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

9.6.5 Board’s Interrupt Level (JP1)

You can select the hardware interrupt level (IRQ) on D/41D boards to be other
than the default by setting jumper JP1 on the D/41D board as described in this
section. The JP1 jumper block is located above the D/41D board’s edge connector
as shown in Figure 9-2.
The default setting of jumper block JP1 is to IRQ level 3.
If you have other voice board devices in your system that already use the D/41D
default interrupt, you have to select a different interrupt level for the D/41D boards
in your system.

NOTE: If you are installing more than one D/41D board in your system, set all
D/41D boards to the same interrupt level.

9.7 D/41D Specifications

Telephone Interface

Support: Loop start


Ground start (answer only)
Connectors: RJ-14
Impedance: 600 Ohms nominal
Ring detection: 15.3Hz to 68.0Hz
Ring duty cycle: 50% nominal
Loop current: 20mA to 120mA DC (polarity insensitive)
Receive signal range: -60dBm to +5.5dBm
Signal/noise ratio: 70dB (referenced to -15dBm)
Channel-to-channel crosstalk: -70dB at 1KHz
Frequency response: 300Hz to 3400Hz ±3dB (transmit and
receive)
Ring Duty Cycle: 50% nominal

9-8
D/41D Board

Host Interface

Bus structure: IBM PC/XT/AT, ISA and compatible


Bus speed: 4MHz - 12MHz, 70ns back-to-back bus cycle
min.
Interrupt level used: IRQ2 - IRQ7 (jumper selectable)
All D/41D boards in the system must
use the same IRQ interrupt level.
Maximum D/41D boards
per PC: 16

Memory: 8 kb pages (switch selectable). Base


segments supported:
D000H (default), A000H, C000H
The following offset addresses are
valid within the supported segment(s):
0000H, 2000H, 4000H, 6000H, 8000H,
A000H, C000H and E000H.

Electrical

Power requirements: +5Vdc @ 1.25A


+12Vdc @ 40mA
-12Vdc @ 40mA

Environmental

Operating temperature: 0° to +50°C


Storage temperature: -20° to +70°C
Humidity: 8% to 80% non-condensing

9-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Physical

Length: 13.3 inches


Width: 0.652 inches
Height: 3.85 inches (excluding edge connector)
Other D/41D specifications are determined by the version of the firmware file
downloaded to the D/41D board (refer to the firmware data sheet for specification
details).

Audio Signal

Transmit: -9.5 dBm (weighted average)


Receive range: -60 to +5.5 dBm (AGC above -18 dBm)
Silence detection: -40 dBm, software adjustable
Frequency response:
24 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 2600 Hz + 3 dB
32 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 3400 Hz + 3 dB
48 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 2600 Hz + 3 dB
64 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 3400 Hz + 3 dB

Audio Digitizing

Method: ADPCM, µ-law PCM


Sampling rates: 6 kHz, 8 kHz
Data rates:
ADPCM: 24 Kbps and 32 Kbps
PCM: 48 Kbps and 64 Kbps

Tone Dialing

DTMF digits: 0-9, *, #, ABC


MF digits: 0-9, KP, ST, ST1, ST2, ST3
Level: Network compatible
Rate: 10 digits/s maximum, software adjustable

9-10
D/41D Board

Pulse Dialing

10 digits: 0-9
Pulsing rate: 10 pulses/s nominal
Break ratio: 60%

DTMF Tone Detection

DTMF digits: 0-9, *, #, ABCD


Dynamic range: -36 dBm to +3 dBm per tone
Minimum tone duration: 32 ms, software adjustable
Acceptable twist: 10 dB
Signal/noise ratio: 10 dB (referenced to lowest amplitude tone)
Talk off: Detects less than 20 digits while monitoring
Bellcore TR-TSY-000763 standard speech
tapes (LSSGR requirements specify detecting
no more than 470 total digits).

MF Tone Detection

MF digits: 0-9, KP, ST, ST1, ST2, ST3

P3 Analog Expansion Bus (AEB) Specifications

The pin descriptions for P3 are provided in Table 7-2.

9-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 9-2. D/41D Board P3 Pin Descriptions

Pin Setting Description


AUDx Two-wire audio signal point. Audio present on the Tip-Ring
will appear here at a level of -2.7 ± .25 dB relative to the
Tip-Ring levels. You may connect a device to this point to
monitor the audio if the device’s input impedance is not less
than 5000 Ohms.

SIGRx Digital signaling input to the D/41D.


Positive true TTL, one LSTTL-equivalent load.

SIGXx Digital signaling output from the D/41D.


Positive true TTL.
Drive capability: Iol = 8 ma
Ioh = -2 ma (at 2.4V)

RFU Reserved for future use

+12V +12 Volts supply, 50 ma

-12V -12 Volts supply, 50 ma

GND Audio signal ground, digital ground,


and ±12 Volts supply return.
A pin setting followed by an "x" refers to all pins of that setting. For example,
AUDx includes AUD1 through AUD12.
Contact your Dialogic Salesperson for an AEB Design Package.

9-12
10. D/41E Board
This chapter provides a description of the D/41E board and contains the following
information:
• General description of the D/41E board
• Hardware overview of the D/41E board
• Network interface boards used with the D/41E board
• Physical description of the D/41E showing the locations of its components
• D/41E hardware configurations
• D/41E jumper and switch settings
• D/41E hardware specifications

10.1 D/41E General Description

The D/41E board is a 4-channel store-and-forward voice board with world


approvability, access to resource modules, and additional power for future
firmware features.
The D/41E board provides the following capabilities on up to 4 channels:
• Record, digitize, and compress audio in real time
• Playback previously recorded files
• Generate and detect DTMF tones
• Generate and detect MF tones
• Pulse dialing
• Initiate and receive calls through the loop start telephone interface
• Perform call progress analysis for outbound dialing
• UL1459 compliance
The D/41E board is a SpringBoard-based voice board that uses Digital Signal
Processing (DSP) to implement the voice processing features. D/41E boards
require SpringWare firmware installation. For detailed information on voice
software features, see the Voice Software Reference.

10-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The D/41E board provides four built-in loop start telephone line interfaces. It is
designed for approvability in many countries.
The D/41E board behaves as a 16-bit card in a 16-bit slot, or if necessary, an 8-bit
card in a 16-bit slot. The D/41E board runs in 8-bit mode when the PC powers up.
If the other boards in the system are running in 16-bit mode, the D/41E board
switches to 16-bit mode.
The FAX/40 four channel fax processing daughterboard is designed to work with
the D/41E board. For more information on installation and programming
considerations, see the FAX/40 Hardware Installation Guide.

10.2 D/41E Board Hardware Overview

The D/41E board consists of several modules including a shared RAM interface
section for communicating with the PC, an on-board microprocessor, a high-speed
digital signal processor, and four independent voice I/O channels that include
telephone line interfaces. The D/41E board requires firmware to be downloaded to
the D/41E board.
A block diagram of the D/41E board is shown in Figure 10-1.

10.3 Interface Boards Used with the D/41E

The D/41E board can be used in conjunction with any AEB-compatible product.

10.4 D/41E Board Physical Description

The D/41E board can be identified by its 16-bit edge connector, the rotary switch
SW1, switch block SW2, jumpers JP101 - 402, a P3 Analog Expansion Bus
(AEB) connector socket, ASIC, HDLC, and XTERM Socket. See Figure 10-2.
Table 10-1 lists the functions of the board parts.

NOTE: Due to safety regulations, come components on the D/41E board may be
covered.

10-2
D/41E Board

P3 AEB INTERFACE

TELEPHONE CONTROLLER
LINE HIGH
LINE PROCESSOR
INTERFACE SPEED
DSLAC DIGITAL
SIGNAL
PROCESSOR
TELEPHONE
LINE SHARED
LINE
INTERFACE MEMORY
BUFFER

TELEPHONE
LINE
LINE
INTERFACE DSLAC PC/XT/AT
INTERFACE

TELEPHONE
LINE
LINE
INTERFACE

FIGURE 10-1. D/41E Board Block Diagram

10-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

2 1 P3
ON

0
P5
X T ER M S oc k e t SW1
SW2 J1
J5 U43 JP 1 01 J P 10 2
J2
J7
JP 201 JP 20 2

JP 301 JP 30 2
U42
J3
J P 401 J P 40 2

J4
J6

FIGURE 10-2. D/41E Board

10-4
D/41E Board

TABLE 10-1. D/41E Board Switch, Jumper, and Connector Functions

BOARD COMPONENT FUNCTION

J1 - J4 Connectors to interface D/41E board with PBX or CO


line.

J5 and J7 CPU expansion for daughterboard connector.

J6 AEB connector for daughterboards.

SW1 Switch to set the D/41E Board ID Number with SW2


switch 2.

SW2 Switch to set the Default Line State (SW 2 switch 1) and
the Board ID Number (SW2 switch 2) with SW1.

U42 Socket for Application Specific Integrated Circuit


(ASIC).Reserved for future use with
the SCbus or the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB).

U43 Socket for High Level Data Link Controller


(HDLC).Reserved for future use with the SCBus for use
with SCSA.

P3 Connector to Analog Expansion Bus (AEB).

P5 Connector for SCbus or PCM Expansion Bus (PEB).

JP 101 - 402 Front end configuration jumpers for international


countries. Factory configured for your country. Any
change could violate PTT regulation.

XTERM Socket Socket for the Network/Resource Module. Reserved for


future use with SCSA.

NOTE: The standard JP8 on D/41D boards, used to select signaling from the built -in
loop start interface or AEB, is not required on the D/41E board. Switching
between a telephony interface and a SCSA interface is now software
programmable. SCSA support is not available on this initial release.

10-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

10.5 D/41E Board Hardware Configuration

The D/41E board contains everything needed for the basic 4-channel analog
configuration.

NOTE: Due to PTT regulations, some boards come with conversion cables.

10.6 D/41E Hardware Settings

The following paragraphs describe the hardware settings that are programmable on
the D/41E board:
• Board Identification Number (SW2: 2)
• Default Line State (SW2: 1)
For specific switch settings, see the Board Installation chapter or Quick Reference
chapter in this guide.

10.6.1 D/41E Board Identification Number (SW2: 2)

Each D/41E board in your system must have a unique board identification number.
The Dialogic Voice driver uses this number to detect which D/41E board is
sending a signal. This enables you to address all of the D/41E boards to the same
base memory address. This address is selected via the software configuration file.

NOTES: 1. If your are only installing one board, use the default setting. There is
no need to set the board identification number.

2. See the corresponding Voice Software Reference for more


information on the software configuration and addressing.
The PC and the D/41E expansion board communicate with each other through a
shared memory block which resides within the memory address space of the PC.
No matter how many D/41E boards are installed, the boards will only take up a
total of 8K bytes of shared RAM. Range is from 80000 to FE000H. All the
D/41E boards can reside at the same base address.

10-6
D/41E Board

The board identification number is configured using a combination of two


switches, a rotary switch (SW1) and a switch block (SW2 switch 2).

NOTE: Do not set two boards to the same board identification number. The
system will be unable to find the boards.

10.6.2 D/41E Default Line State (SW2: 1)

Configure the on-hook (ringing, no answer) or off-hook (busy signal) state of the
telephone lines on a D/41E board by setting switch position 1 on switch block
SW2. This setting is only effective before the voice driver is started and the
system power is applied.
A D/41E board can be started or stopped via software without affecting the
operation of the other D/41E boards in the system.
The factory default setting of the switch is off or "on-hook."
It is not necessary to set all of the D/41E boards in the system to the same default
line state; however, off-hook is the recommended setting to provide the customer
with a busy signal rather than ringing with no answer if the customer calls while
the system is down.

10-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

10.7 D/41E U.S. Specifications

Telephone Interface

Support: Loop start


Ground start (answer only)
Connectors: RJ-11
Loop current: 8 mA min
Channel-to-channel crosstalk: 70dB min, channel to channel at 1KHz
Frequency response: 300Hz to 3400Hz ±3dB (transmit and
receive)

Host Interface

Bus structure: IBM PC/XT/AT, ISA and compatible


Bus speed: 4MHz - 12MHz, 70ns back-to-back bus cycle
Interrupt level used: IRQ 2/9,3,4,5,7,10,11,12 (software
selectable)
(All D/41E boards in the system
use the same IRQ interrupt level.)
Maximum D/41E boards
per PC: 16
Memory: 8Kb pages (switch selectable). Base
segments supported:
Any base address between addresses
80000 and EE000 on 32k boundaries.
See the appropriate Voice Software Guide for
more information.

10-8
D/41E Board

Electrical

Power requirements: +5Vdc @ 1.25A


+12Vdc @ 85mA max.
-12Vdc @ 85mA max.

Environmental

Operating temperature: 0° to +50°C


Storage temperature: -20° to +70°C
Humidity: 8% to 80% non-condensing

Physical

Length: 13.3 inches


Width: 0.793 inches
Height: 4.5 inches (excluding edge connector)
Other D/41E board specifications are determined by the version of the firmware
file downloaded to the D/41E board (refer to the firmware data sheet for
specification details).

Audio Signal

Transmit: -9 dBm ; configurable by parameterReceive


range: -55 to +2.5 dBm nominal;
configurable by parameter
Silence detection: -38 dBm, configurable by parameter
Frequency response:
24 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 2600 Hz + 3 dB
32 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 3400 Hz + 3 dB

10-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

48 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 2600 Hz + 3 dB


64 Kb/s: 300 Hz to 3400 Hz + 3 dB
AGC Application can enable or disable; above
-18dBm results in full-scale recording;
configurable by parameter.

Audio Digitizing

Method: ADPCM, PCM


Sampling rates: 8 KHz, default 6 KHz, software selectable
Data rates:
ADPCM: 32 Kb/s, default 24 Kb/s
PCM: 64 Kb/s, default 48 Kb/s

Tone Dialing

DTMF digits: 0-9, *, #, ABCD


MF digits: 0-9, KP, ST, ST1, ST2, ST3
Level: Network compatible
Rate: 10 digits/s maximum, software adjustable

Pulse Dialing

10 digits: 0-9
Pulsing rate: 10 pulses/s nominal
Break ratio: 60%, software adjustable

DTMF Tone Detection

DTMF digits: 0-9, *, #, ABCD

10-10
D/41E Board

Minimum tone duration: 32 ms, software adjustable


Acceptable twist: 10 dB
Signal/noise ratio: 10 dB (referenced to lowest amplitude tone)

MF Tone Detection

MF digits: 0-9, KP, ST, ST1, ST2, ST3

P3 Analog Expansion Bus (AEB) Specifications

The pin descriptions for P3 are provided in Table 10-2.

10-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 10-2. D/41E Board P3 Pin Descriptions

Pin Setting Description


AUDx Two-wire audio signal point. Audio present on the Tip-Ring
will appear here at a level of -2.7 ± .25 dB relative to the
Tip-Ring levels. You may connect a device to this point to
monitor the audio if the device’s input impedance is not less
than 5000 Ohms.

SIGRx Digital signaling input to the D/41E.


Positive true TTL, one LSTTL-equivalent load.

SIGXx Digital signaling output from the D/41E.


Positive true TTL.
Drive capability: Iol = 8 ma
Ioh = -2 ma (at 2.4V)

RFU Reserved for future use

+12V +12 Volts supply, 50 ma

-12V -12 Volts supply, 50 ma

GND Audio signal ground, digital ground,


and ±12 Volts supply return.
A pin setting followed by an "x" refers to all pins of that setting. For example,
AUDx includes AUD1 through AUD12.
Contact your Dialogic Salesperson for an AEB Design Package.

10-12
11. LSI/120 Network Interface Board
This chapter provides an introduction to the LSI/120 network interface board and
contains the following information:
• General description of the LSI/120 board
• Hardware overview of the LSI/120 board
• Voice boards used with the LSI/120 board
• Physical description of the LSI/120 showing the locations of its components
• LSI/120 hardware configurations
• LSI/120 hardware settings
• LSI/120 hardware specifications

11.1 LSI/120 General Description

The LSI/120 network interface board connects loop start (analog) telephone lines,
via the PCM Expansion Bus (PEB), to the voice processing resources of a digital
D/121A or D/121B board.
The features of the LSI/120 network interface board include:
• Independent loop start interfaces
• Independent loop current and ring voltage detectors
• Independently controlled solid-state hookswitches
• Toll-quality voice encoding and decoding
• Compatible with Dialogic's PCM Expansion Bus
The LSI network interface board also contains circuitry to support the following
features:
• Signaling control
• Digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion
• Ring voltage and loop current detection
• Electromagnetic interference suppression

11-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The LSI/120 network interface board supports up to 12 telephone lines. The


LSI/120 also contains three audio connectors for attaching to Dialogic AMX/81
boards or any AEB-compatible, user-supplied devices. These connectors are
functionally compatible with the P3 Audio Expansion Bus (AEB) connector on the
D/41D.
See the Specifications section in this chapter for the electrical specifications for
these connectors.

11.2 LSI/120 Hardware Overview

A block diagram of the LSI/120 network interface board appears in Figure 11-1.
Twelve loop-start telephone lines are terminated by the LSI/120 board through an
external connector and pass through a section providing transient protection and
EMI (electromagnetic interference) suppression. From here the lines travel
through a loop start terminate interface and then enter an array where analog-to-
digital conversion takes place. The lines (which are now carrying digital signals)
pass to the PEB (PCM Expansion Bus) section, which transfers the digital signals
to the D/12x processors. Communication also occurs in the opposite direction,
from the D/12x through the LSI/120 to the central office or PBX.

11.3 LSI/120 Physical Description

An LSI/120 board is shown in Figure 11-2. The LSI/120 can be identified by the
location of its connectors along the board’s top edge. At the corner of the top and
front edges is a 26-pin male connector labeled P2. To the immediate right of this
connector are three 20-pin male connectors labeled P4, P5, and P6.
The LSI/120 is an PC-AT form factor board with an 8-bit bus. The bus size allows
you to install the LSI/120 in either an 8-bit or 16-bit expansion slot in your PC.

11-2
LSI/120 Board

D/12x

AUDIO EXPANSION BUS PCM EXPANSION BUS

S IG N A L IN G

TIME DIVISION
MULTIPLEXER
A U D IO

A /D FI L TE R D/A

HYBRID DUPLEXER

RING A ND
TRANSFORMER
LOOP CURRENT
DETECTOR

TRA NS IE NT P ROTE CTION


AND EMI SUPPRESSION

EXTERNAL CONNECTOR

PSTN

Figure 11-1. LSI/120 Block Diagram

11-3
11-4
A U D IO E X P A N S IO N B U S C O N N E C T O R S (P 4 , P 5 , P 6 )
P C M E X P A N S IO N B U S (P E B )
C ON NEC TO R P 3 : 2 5 -P IN D B -T Y P E C O N N E C T O R (M A L E )
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

P E B T E R M IN A T O R
SOCKET
N O R M /L O O P D IA G N O S T IC S W IT C H
S W IT C H B L O C K (S W 1 )

FIGURE 11-2. Components on the LSI/120 Network Interface Board


LSI/120 Board

TABLE 11-1. Components on the LSI/120 Network Interface Board

Component Description

P2 26-pin male PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector. Located


at the top left corner.
P3 DB-25 male connector for connecting an external
communications cable. Located on the rear bracket.
P4,P5,P6 20-pin male Audio Expansion Bus (AEB) connectors.
Located along the top of the board and to the right of the
PEB connector.
SW1 Sets the timeslots, default line state, AEB signaling, and
timing clock source. Located at the top left below the PEB
connector.
SW2 Norm/Loop switch redirects the transmit serial data stream of
the PEB. Located at the top left, to the right of the PEB
connector and PEB terminator socket.

11.4 LSI/120 Board Hardware Settings

The following paragraphs describe SW1 hardware settings on the LSI/120 network
interface board:
• LSI/120 time slots (SW1: 1, 2)
• Timing clock source (SW1: 3)
• Default line state (SW1: 4)
• AEB signaling (SW1: 6)
The LSI/120 network interface board has no jumpers. For specific switch settings,
see the Board Installation chapter or Quick Reference chapter in this guide

11-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

11.4.1 LSI/120 Timeslots (SW1: 1, 2)

Information passed along the Dialogic PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) is organized
into 24 channels, or timeslots. The LSI/120 board can be configured to provide
data to timeslots 1-12 or 13-24 from the PCM Expansion Bus.
For system hardware configurations with more than one LSI board, leave the first
LSI set to the low time slot setting and set the second LSI to the next time slot
setting.

11.4.2 LSI/120 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 3)

Set the LSI/120 timing clock source to PEB timing if the LSI/120 will receive
timing from another network device (e.g., a DMX or another LSI/120).
- If the LSI/120 is connected to a DMX, set the LSI timing clock source
to PEB timing.
- If two LSI/120s are connected on one PEB, set one LSI/120 to PEB
timing and set the other LSI/120 to independent timing.

11.4.3 LSI/120 Default Line State (SW1: 4)

Set the Default Line State switch based on how you want the phone lines
connected to the LSI adapter board to respond to incoming calls during a system
reset or start-up condition:
- Ring/No Answer (ON-HOOK board state)
- Busy Signal (OFF-HOOK board state)
When no power is applied to the computer, the system will present a ring/no
answer condition. When power is applied to the computer, the reset condition line
state that you selected for the adapter board will remain in effect until the driver is
functioning (for UNIX and OS/2 systems) or until the application software is
functioning (MS-DOS systems).

11-6
LSI/120 Board

11.4.4 LSI/120 AEB Signaling (SW1: 6)

When SW1 S6 is set ON, signaling over the Audio Expansion Bus will not
function properly unless no connection is made to the DB-25 connector on the rear
bracket of the LSI/120.

11.4.5 LSI/120 Operating Mode (SW2)

The LSI/120 can operate in normal mode or loopback mode.


NORM (default)
Normal operating mode of the LSI adapter board. This mode directs the
transmit serial data stream to the D/A converters and to the loop start
interface. Audio received from the loop start interface is digitized by the A/D
converters and passed to the PEB.
LOOP
This loopback mode allows diagnostic testing of the LSI. When the SW2
switch is set to loopback mode, the transmit serial data stream is directed to
the receive serial data stream (back to the PEB). The audio received from the
loop start interface is ignored and the transmitted audio is substituted in its
place.

NOTE: The transmit stream still travels to the D/A converters and to the
loop start interface.

11.5 LSI/120 Board Physical Description

An LSI/120 network interface board is shown in Figure 11-2Error! Bookmark


not defined.. The LSI/120 network interface board can be identified by the
location of its connectors along the board’s top edge. At the corner of the top and
front edges is a 26-pin male connector labeled P2. To the immediate right of this
connector are three 20-pin male connectors labeled P4, P5, and P6.

11-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

The LSI/120 network interface board is an PC-AT form factor board with an 8-bit
bus. The bus size allows you to install the LSI/120 network interface board in
either an 8-bit or 16-bit expansion slot in your PC.

11.6 LSI/120 Hardware Specifications

General

Support: Loop start; ground start (answer only)


Frequency Response: 300 to 3700 Hz ±3 dB

Electrical

Power Requirements: +5 Vdc ±5% @ 0.5A


+12 Vdc ±10% @ 0.125A
-12 Vdc ±10% @ 0.125A

Line Impedance: 600 ohms nominal

Ring Detection: USA & CAN: 40 to 130 Vrms, 15.3 to 68.0 Hz


JAPAN: 75 Vrms (nominal), 16 Hz

Loop Current Range: 20 to 120 mA dc (polarity insensitive)


Ringer Equivalence Number: 0.8B

Environmental

Operating Temperature: 0 to +50 °C

11-8
LSI/120 Board

Storage Temperature: -20 to +70 °C


Humidity: 8 to 80% noncondensing

Physical

Length: 13.3 inches


Width: 0.7 inches
Height: 4.5 inches (excluding edge connector)

LSI/120 Audio Connector (AEB) Pin-out Specifications

The following pin-out specifications are for connectors P4, P5, and P6 on the
LSI/120. These connectors have the same electrical characteristics as connector P3
on the D/41D and D/41E boards. These connectors use a 20 -pin header
(AMPHENOL part number 1-87543-0 or equivalent). Signaling over SIGR will
not work properly unless switch 6 of SW1 on the LSI/120 is set to ON and no
connection is made to the DB-25 connector on the rear bracket of the LSI/120.

The electrical characteristics of the connectors are described in Table 11-2.

11-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TABLE 11-2. LSI/120 Board P4, P5, P6 Pin Descriptions

Pin Setting Description


AUDx Two-wire audio signal point. Audio present on the Tip-Ring
will appear here at a level of -2.7 ± .25 dB relative to the
Tip-Ring levels. You may connect a device to this point to
monitor the audio if the device’s input impedance is not less
than 5000 Ohms.

SIGRx Digital signaling input to the LSI/120.


Positive true TTL, one LSTTL-equivalent load.

SIGXx Digital signaling output from the LSI/120.


Positive true TTL.
Drive capability: Iol = 8 ma
Ioh = -2 ma (at 2.4V)

RFU Reserved for future use

+12V +12 Volts supply, 50 ma

-12V -12 Volts supply, 50 ma

GND Audio signal ground, digital ground,


and ±12 Volts supply return.
A pin setting followed by an "x" refers to all pins of that setting. For example,
AUDx includes AUD1 through AUD12.

11-10
LSI/120 Board

SA/120 RJ-21 Cable

The following pin-out specifications are for connector P3 on the LSI/120. This
cable uses a 25-pin female DB-25 connector (AMPHENOL part number 745495-2
or equivalent) on the LSI/120 end and a 50-pin jack (AMPHENOL part number
157-72500-3 or equivalent) that is compatible with an RJ-21X USOC jack.
25-PIN 50-PIN

TIP 8 1 14 RING 12 RING 1 1 26 TIP 1


RING 8 2 15 TIP 12 RING 2 2 27 TIP 2
TIP 9 3 16 RING 11 RING 3 3 28 TIP 3
RING 9 4 17 TIP 11 RING 4 4 29 TIP 4
TIP 4 5 18 RING 10 RING 5 5 30 TIP 5
RING 4 6 19 TIP 10 RING 6 6 31 TIP 6
TIP 7 7 20 TIP 3 RING 7 7 32 TIP 7
RING 7 8 21 RING 3 RING 8 8 33 TIP 8
TIP 6 9 22 RING1 RING 9 9 34 TIP 9
RING 6 10 23 TIP 1 RING 10 10 35 TIP 10
RIP 5 11 24 RING 2 RING 11 11 36 TIP 11
RING 5 12 25 TIP 2 RING 12 12 37 TIP 12
RESERVED 13 NC 13 38 NC
NC 14 39 NC
NC 15 40 NC
NC 16 41 NC
NC 17 42 NC
NC 18 43 NC
NC 19 44 NC
NC 20 45 NC
NC 21 46 NC
NC 22 47 NC
NC 23 48 NC
NC 24 49 NC
NC 25 50 NC

11-11
12. DTI/101 Network Interface Board
This chapter provides an introduction to the DTI/101 network interface board and
contains the following information:
• General description of the DTI/101 board
• Hardware overview of the DTI/101 board
• Voice Boards used with the DTI/101 network interface board
• Physical description of the DTI/101 showing the locations of its components
• DTI/101 hardware configurations
• DTI/101 hardware settings
• DTI/101 hardware specifications

12.1 DTI/101 Board General Description


The DTI/101 network interface board provides a DSX-1 interface that allows you
to connect D/121A or D/121B boards to a T -1 digital service. The DTI/101 board
can also be connected to another DTI/101 for drop-and insert-configurations.

12.2 DTI/101 Board Hardware Overview

A block diagram of the DTI/101 board appears in Figure 12-1. The Line Interface
Unit (LIU) converts T-1 signals to a format compatible with the board circuitry
and also recovers clocking information from the received signal. The Transceiver
(TXCVR) recovers framing information used to identify timeslots from the
received signal.
From the Transceiver, received signals are routed in two directions: to the D/121B
or other PEB-compatible products via the 26-pin PEB interface, and to another
DTI for drop and insert applications via the 40-pin PEB interface. Outgoing
signals are selected from one of these two interfaces by switching circuitry
(referred to here as a MUX) before being transmitted through the TXCVR and
LIU in a T-1-compatible format.

12-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

TO EXPANSION PRODUCTS TO DOWNSTREAM DTV

26-PIN PEB-INTERFACE 40-PIN PEB-INTERFACE

DS-1
RECEIVE MUX
PATH
DS-1 TRANSMIT
PATH
TXCVR

LIU

DSX-1
INTERFACE

FIGURE 12-1. DTI/101 Network Interface Board Block Diagram

12.3 DTI/101 Board Physical Description

The components on the DTI/101 are shown in Figure 12-2Error! Bookmark not
defined.. The DTI/101 is a PC-AT form factor board with a daughterboard
attached near the front end. A 26-pin male PEB connector is located in the corner
at the board’s top and front edges. A 40-pin male connector for drop and insert
connections is located near the top edge of the board to the right of the PEB
connector. See Table 10-1 for a summary of components on the board.

12-2
DTI/101 Board

TABLE 12.1 Components on the DTI/101 Board

Component Description

PEB 26-pin male PCM Expansion Bus (PEB) connector.


Located at the top left corner.

DTI crossover 40-pin male connector for Drop and Insert connection
using the DTI crossover cable. Located at the top, to the
right of the PEB connector.

J1 15-pin D-subminiature female connector for CSU (or


DSX-1 compatible) connection. Located on the rear
bracket.

JP1 Sets the interrupt request level (IRQ). Located to the left of
the rear bracket and below JP2.

JP2 Sets the interrupt terminator. Located to the left of the rear
bracket and above JP1.

SW1 Sets the base I/O port and timing clock source. Located to
the left of JP2.

SW2 Remote Loopback Test Switch connects DTI/101 input to


the output for testing the T-1 line. Located on the rear
bracket.

12-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

SIGNAL PRESENT INDICATOR


(G REEN)

PCM EXPANSION BUS YELL OW ALARM INDICATOR


(PEB) CONNECTOR
REMOTE LOOPBACK
TEST SWITCH (SW2)
(SHOWN IN 'OFF' POSITION)

LOSS OF
DTI/CROSSOVER SYNC
CABLE CONNECTOR INDICA TOR

REMOTE
LOOPBACK
TIMING CLOCK SOURCE
INDICATOR
AND BASE ADDRESS
SWITCH BLOCK (SW1)
IRQ SETTING
INTERRUPT JUMPER BLOCK
TERMINATOR (JP1)
JUMPER BLOCK
(JP2) 15 -P IN D SU B-MINIATU RE FE MAL E CON NE CTOR
(FOR DTI/1xx TO CSU/DSX-1 COMPATIBLE
EQUIP MEN T CON NE CTION) (J1 )

FIGURE 12-2. Components on the DTI/101 Board

12-4
DTI/101 Board

12.4 DTI/101 Hardware Configuration


DTI/101 boards can be installed in a terminate configuration or a drop-and insert
configuration.

12.4.1 Terminate Configurations

A basic digital configuration is one where SpringBoards and DTI boards are
installed in a terminate configuration. Two terminate configurations are possible:
• 24-channel terminate configuration
• 30-channel terminate configuration

The 24-channel terminate configuration is used in North America and consists of


one or two D/121A boards or D/121B boards cabled to a DTI/101 board. This
configuration terminates a T-1 digital service. This configuration uses a PEB
ribbon cable with three connectors.

The 30-channel terminate configuration is used in Europe and Asia and consists of
four D/81A boards cabled to a DTI/212 board. This configuration terminates an
E-1 digital service.

12.4.2 Drop-and-Insert Digital Configurations

D/121A or D/121B boards and DTI/101 network interface boards can also be
installed in a drop-and-insert configuration for digital telephony applications. In
digital drop-and-insert configurations, two DTI network interface boards are
connected to allow communication between separate T-1 spans. D/121A or
D/121B boards may be connected to a DTI/101 network interface board to
perform voice processing functions.
To use D/121A or D/121B boards with two DTI/101 network interface boards in a
drop-and-insert configuration, install two DTI/101 boards and two D/121A or
D/121B boards, or install two DTI/101 boards and four D/121A or D/121B
boards.

12-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

12.5 DTI/101 Hardware Settings

The following paragraphs describe the hardware settings that are programmable on
the DTI/101 board:
• Base I/O port (SW1)
• Timing clock source (SW1: 4)
• IRQ level (JP2)
• Normal/Remote Loopback Test Mode of Operation (switch on board)
For specific jumper or switch settings, see the Board Installation chapter or Quick
Reference chapter in this guide.

12.5.1 DTI/101 Base I/O Port (SW1: 1, 2, 3)

The DTI/101 communicates with the host PC through an I/O-mapped interface.


The addresses used for this communication can be set to one of six ranges of I/O
addresses. Set the base addresses with switch block SW1. I/O port ranges (hex)
are as follows:

I/O Port Range (hex)


320H - 327H

328H - 32FH

330H - 337H
338H - 33FH
3E0H - 3E7H
3E8H - 3EFH

The default base address setting is for range 320H - 327H. If two DTI/101 boards
are installed in the system, set the second DTI/101 to an address range different
from the first DTI/101.

12-6
DTI/101 Board

12.5.2 DTI/101 Timing Clock Source (SW1: 4)

Switch S4 on switch block SW1 selects the clock source the DTI/101 transmitter
uses in synchronizing the T-1 bit stream. Timing can be derived from an
independent source or use loop timing from the T-1 bit stream.
Independent timing: The DTI/101 uses an on-board oscillator as its clock
source.
Loop timing: The DTI/101 derives its transmit clock from the
received T-1 bit stream. Use the loop timing setting if
your application does not invoke a DTI/101 device
driver.

NOTE: If your application uses a DTI/101 device driver (or low level
communications protocol), you should set the DTI to use the appropriate
clock source until the application is functioning, and you must also set the
appropriate clock source in your application. (The application setting will
overwrite the S4 setting.)

12.5.3 DTI/101 IRQ Level (JP1)

Set the DTI/101 board’s IRQ (interrupt request) level using jumper block JP1. IRQ
3 through IRQ 7, and IRQ 2/9 are available. The default IRQ level is 4.

NOTE: 1. Be sure to select an IRQ level that is different from the one
occupied by the voice board.

2. To be supported by a DTI/101 device driver, all DTI/101 boards


installed in a system must be set to the same IRQ level.

12.5.4 DTI/101 Board Interrupt Terminator (JP2)

The DTI/101 board interrupt terminator (JP2) is located immediately above jumper
block JP1 (Figure 12-2). Leave the jumper on JP2 if a single DTI/101board is

12-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

installed in a system. In systems with a second DTI/101 board, leave jumper JP2
on one and only one of the DTI/101 boards. Ideally, this will be the DTI/101
board physically farthest from the host PC’s 8259 Interrupt Controller chips.
Jumpering the board farthest from the 8259 chips provides the best AC
termination.
The JP2 default setting is "in" (jumper installed).

12.5.5 DTI/101 Normal/Remote Loopback Test Mode of Operation

The DTI/101 can operate in normal mode or remote loopback test mode.
When the DTI/101 board is in remote loopback test mode, the DTI/101 transmits
what it receives (red LED indicator light is ON), that is, input from the network to
the DTI/101 is output to the network. This mode allows you to test the T-1 line
without disconnecting the cable from the DTI/101. The remote loopback mode
does not allow you to test the DTI/101 board.
The Remote Loopback Test mode can be turned on at any time during board
operation. If your application is using a DTI/101 driver (or low-level
communications protocol), the following conditions will occur after the Remote
Loopback Test Switch is set:
• Overrides any board modes set by the application.
• Generates a termination event (T_DTRMOTE).
• When this switch is returned to OFF, you should restart the application.

12.5.6 DTI/101 in Channel Bank Mode (J1; J2; SW1: 1, 2, 3, and 4)

If you are going to use the DTI/101 in Channel Bank Mode (where the DTI/101 is
a passive device without firmware, device driver, or other low level
communications protocol), set the board to use loop timing to prevent the board
from interfering with any other device and from responding to any I/O addressing.

12-8
DTI/101 Board

12.6 DTI/101 Hardware Specifications

Host Interface

Bus Structure: IBM PC-XT, PC-AT


Base I/O Port Ranges: Switch selectable at:
320H-327H, 328H-32FH, 330H-337H, 338H-
33FH, 3E0H-3E7H, 3E8H-3EFH
Interrupt Levels: IRQ 2/9 and 3Ó7
Jumper selectable; all DTI/101 boards must use
the same IRQ (for driver support).

Electrical

Power Requirements: +5 Vdc ±5% @ 1.0 A maximum

Transmitter

Transmitter Clock: 1.544 Mbps ±75 bps


Transmit Level: 3 V (nominal)
Transmit Pulse Width: 324 ns (nominal)
Source Impedance: 100 ohms ±10%
Line Coding: AMI, AMI with B7 stuffing, B8ZS

Receiver

Receive Clock: 1.544 Mbps ±200 bps


Jitter Tolerance: meets AT&T Pub 43802
Receiver Sensitivity: 10 dB below DSX-1
Terminating Impedance: 100 ohms ±10%
Line Coding: AMI, B8ZS

12-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Environmental

Operating Temperature: +10 to +50 °C


Storage Temperature: -20 to +70 °C
Humidity: 8% to 80% noncondensing

Physical

Length: 13.3 inches


Width: 0.7 inches
Height: 4.5 inches (excluding edge connector)

12-10
DTI/101 Board

CSU to DTI/101 Cable

On the rear bracket of the DTI/101 network interface board is a 15-pin


D-subminiature type female connector (HOLMBERG part number
H5R15RA28CS or equivalent) equipped with locking posts for connecting to a
Channel Service Unit (CSU) or other DSX-1 compatible equipment. The DTI/101
end of the cable should consist of a 15-pin D-subminiature type male connector
(AMP part number 205205-2 or equivalent; use with snap-in solder cup contacts
AMP part number 66570-3 or equivalent). The male connector should also include
a slide latch assembly (AMP part number 745583-5 or equivalent) for attaching to
the locking posts of the female connector. The user is responsible for supplying an
appropriate cable for these connections.
The pin designations for the DTI/101 cable end are given below.

15-P IN

TRA NSMIT TIP 1 9 TRA NS MIT RING


RF U 2 10 RF U
RE CEIVE TIP 3 11 RECEIVE RING
RF U 4 12 RF U
RF U 5 13 RF U
RF U 6 14 RF U
RF U 7 15 RF U
RF U 8

12-11
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Pin Setting Description

1 Transmit data: output from DTI/101 (tip)

9 Transmit data: output from DTI/101 (ring)

3 Receive data: input to DTI/101 (tip)

11 Receive data: input to DTI/101 (ring)

12-12
Appendix A. Electrostatic Discharge
Procedures

CAUTION
All computer boards are electrostatic sensitive. Handle all static-sensitive
components, boards, and systems at a static safeguarded work area.

A static-safe workstation consists of a grounded static-dissipative wrist strap and a


work surface covered with or composed of a grounded static-dissipative material.
See Figure A-1.

The work surface drains electrical charges from conductive materials when the
materials are placed on the surface. The grounded static-dissipative wrist strap
drains static charge from a person wearing the strap. Both must be used any time a
person is handling any static-sensitive component.

Both components ensure that static charges are drained at a rate and current level
that is safe. Both must be used any time a person is handling any component.

1. Ground yourself to the static-safe workstation using a static-dissipative wrist


strap for the entire installation.
2. Remove the board from the shipping carton and static shielding bag at the
static-safe workstation.
3. Lay the board on the static-dissipative work surface

A-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

.
Figure A-1. Static-safe Workstation

A-2
Appendix B. Troubleshooting
This appendix contains the following troubleshooting aids for identifying
installation errors:
• Checklist for troubleshooting common installation errors
• Table of how to select which diagnostic test to run
• Summary of error codes returned in D40CHK.LOG after running the
diagnostic test
For details on running the diagnostic tests, see the D40CHK Guide.

B.1 Troubleshooting Checklist for Common


Installation Errors

This section contains a troubleshooting checklist. Often a problem is due to an


installation oversight. You should always recheck your system after completing
installation. The following list contains common installation errors.
If you are experiencing technical difficulties, check the following:
• The voice or network interface board is firmly seated in its expansion slot;
check that any daughterboard modules are firmly seated on the baseboard.
• The IRQ setting does not conflict with the other boards in your system. The
voice boards should have a unique setting.
• Each voice board has a unique board identification number.
• The boards are correctly cabled to each other.
• The Voice software is properly installed (see the appropriate Voice Software
Reference for more information).

B-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

B.2 Testing for Suspected Failures

When you suspect that a particular board is failing, the following suggestions may
help to isolate the problem:
• Use the Loopback Test with the Known Good Channel option enabled and
test the suspected board using a channel on a known good board.
• Select test options one at a time to try to narrow the range of the problem.
• When you have narrowed down the individual test or tests in which a channel
is failing, run those tests repetitively to ensure that the failure is not
intermittent.
Table B-1 shows which diagnostic tests to run for a suspected problem.

B-2
Troubleshooting

TABLE B-1. Selecting Which Diagnostic Test to Run

If You Suspect This Problem: Then, Run This Diagnostic Test:


Failure to go off hook/on hook Loopback Test
Failure to detect loop current Loopback Test
Constant loop current Loopback Test
Dialing Loopback Test with Phoneline option
Failure to detect ring Manual Testing with Phoneline option
Loopback Test with Phoneline option
Noisy line Loopback Test (Quiescent Noise Test)
Distorted audio Manual Testing/Loopback Test (Distortion
Test)
Failure to Record Manual Testing
Failure to Playback Manual Testing
Addressing Tested during D40CHK loading process
No or incorrect DTMF detection Manual Testing or Loopback Test
Interrupt Single or Multiple Board Interrupt Tests
Internal Internal Test
Silence/non-silence detection Loopback Test (Silence Tests)

B-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

B.3 Error Codes Returned in D40CHK.LOG


The following error codes may appear in D40CHK.LOG if errors occurred during
testing. These codes are used by Dialogic when diagnosing board failures and are
provided here as a reference.

GENERAL ERRORS:
EDX0001 > IRQ not found; confirm JP1 and JP7 settings

MEMORY TEST ERRORS:


EDX0010 > Idle address test failed at ####;

EDX0011 > Idle data test failed at ####;

EDX0012 > Idle random test failed at ####;

EDX0013 > Board would not start for Dual Access Memory Test

EDX0014 > Board’s CPU is not participating in Dual Access


Memory
Test

EDX0015 > Dual Access address test failed at ####;

EDX0016 > Dual Access data test failed at ####;

EDX0017 > Dual Access random test failed at ####;

EDX0018 > Error setting IEN on chan #

EDX0019 > Error initiating playback on chan #

EDX0020 > R/W error occurred during Playback Memory Test

EDX0021 > Interrupt not received during D/4x Self-Memory Test

EDX0022 > Failed D/4x Self-Memory Test

EDX0023 > Interrupt not received during D/4x Self-Memory Test


with R/W

EDX0024 > Failed D/4x Self-Memory Test with R/W

B-4
Troubleshooting

SINGLE INTERRUPT TEST ERRORS:


EDX0030 > Could not start board

EDX0031 > D/4x board did not acknowledge the first Host -> DL
Comtest

EDX0032 > D/4x acknowledged only (x) of the Host -> DL


Comtests

MULTI-BOARD INTERRUPT TEST ERRORS:


EDX0050 > Could not start board #

EDX0051 > Initial multiple board interrupt not serviced

EDX0052 > D/4x acknowledged only (x) of the multi-board


Comtests

LOOPBACK TEST ERRORS:


EDX0090 > D40DRV could not be started; D40DRV return code #

EDX0091 > Phone number for chan # not specified

EDX0092 > Error setting CST mask on chan #

EDX0093 > Never went off hook on transmission chan #

EDX0094 > D40DRV error # setting chan # off hook

EDX0095 > No loop current detected on chan #

EDX0096 > Dialing event error chan # -> #; D40DRV return code
#

EDX0097 > Ring event error chan # -> #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0098 > Couldn’t detect ring on chan #

EDX0099 > Never went off hook on receiving chan #

EDX0100 > D40DRV error # setting receiver chan # off hook

B-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

LOOPBACK TEST ERRORS:


EDX0200 > Error setting CST mask on chan #

EDX0201 > Playback error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0202 > Never received silence OFF event of tone on chan #

EDX0220 > Error setting CST mask on chan #

EDX0221 > Decay tone playback error on chan #; D40DRV return


code #

EDX0222 > Never received silence OFF event on chan #

EDX0223 > Never received silence ON event on chan #

EDX0224 > Chan # is below silence decay specification

EDX0225 > Chan # is above silence decay specification

EDX0240 > DTMF event error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0241 > Event error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0242 > Did not complete dialing DTMF on chan #

EDX0243 > Event error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0244 > Event error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0245 > DTMF detection failed from chan # -> #;

EDX0246 > Never received DTMF detection interrupt from chan #


-> #

B-6
Troubleshooting

INTERNAL TEST ERRORS:


EDX0260 > Chan # detected raw nonsilence

EDX0261 > Couldn’t open scratch file for Quiescent Noise Test

EDX0262 > Recording error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0263 > Event error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0264 > Did not receive recording completion event

EDX0265 > Error filling FFT buffer

EDX0280 > D40DRV could not be started; D40DRV return code #

EDX0281 > Couldn’t open scratch file for Crosstalk Test

EDX0282 > Playback error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0283 > Recording error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0284 > Event error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0285 > Silence to Non-Silence transition occurred

EDX0286 > Did not receive all play-record events

EDX0287 > Error filling FFT buffer

EDX0288 > Crosstalk Test failed chan #

B-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

LOOPBACK TEST ERRORS


EDX0320 > Couldn’t open scratch file for Distortion Test

EDX0321 > Recording error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0322 > Playback error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0323 > Event error on chan #; D40DRV return code #

EDX0324 > Did not receive all play-record events

EDX0325 > Error filling FFT buffer

EDX0326 > Fundamental tone not recorded on chan # -> #

EDX0327 > Sum of energy is below specification on chan # -> #

EDX0328 > Excessive peak to peak distortion on chan # -> #

EDX0340 > Error setting CST mask on chan #

EDX0341 > Chan # never went onhook

EDX0342 > D40DRV error # setting chan # onhook

EDX0343 > Constant loop current detected onhook on chan #

EDX0344 > Chan # never went off hook

EDX0345 > D40DRV error # setting chan # off hook

B-8
Appendix C. The Return Material
Authorization (RMA) Process
If you suspect you have a problem board after testing it using D40CHK, you can
return the board to Dialogic for servicing. The following sections outline the
procedures that make up the Return Material Authorization (RMA) Process.

C.1 Before You Call

Before calling Dialogic to return a board, check to see if the problem is due to a
mistake or oversight in the installation process. See Appendix B for details.

C.2 Contacting Dialogic

After running D40CHK and checking for the problems listed in the Appendix B, if
you are certain a problem exists with your board, call Dialogic Corporation at
(201) 334-8450. Telephone lines are open from 9 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. EST.
Please be sure to have D40CHK test results handy and the Dialogic serial number
of the board in question when you call. This serial number is an alphanumeric
code (ex. D205543) located on a label attached to the board.
You will be referred to a customer service representative who will ask for the
board serial number and a brief description of the problem. After gathering this
information, the customer service representative will process your return request
and provide you with an RMA number. The Dialogic customer service
representative will also tell you if the board is still under warranty.

C-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Boards under warranty are repaired free of charge (you must pay for shipping).
For boards not under warranty, you will be charged a flat repair fee. The customer
service representative will also give you an estimated return date.

C.3 Procedure for Removing the Board

This procedure outlines the steps for removing a board from the PC chassis.
1. Disconnect power, telephone, and communications cables:
0 - Set the power switch to the OFF position on the computer and any connected
peripherals.
- Remove computer and peripheral power cord plugs from the electrical
outlets.
- Remove all telephone line signal cables from signal cable receptacles (for
example, from telephone line wall receptacle jacks).
- Remove all signal cables from devices, such as the cable attached rear
bracket of board(s).
2. Remove the board from the PC chassis:
0 - Prepare an electrostatic-free environment:
• Use electrostatic-dissipative mats and antistatic wrist straps.
• Ground the PC chassis, work area, and the ground end of the antistatic
wrist strap coil to the same point (must be to an unpainted surface). See
Appendix A.

CAUTION
All Dialogic board components are electrostatic sensitive. To avoid damage to the
board's components, always ensure an electrostatic-free environment when
handling the board(s) .

- Remove the PC cover.


- Take out the rear bracket retaining screw for the board you wish to remove.

C-2
Return Material Authorization (RMA) Process

- If connected, disconnect the ribbon cable from the board’s P3 AEB


socket.
- Hold the board near the top edge between your thumb and fingers, one hand
near the front edge and the other hand near the rear bracket. Avoid touching
the board’s components.
- With a constant, minimum pull, lift the board to release the board’s edge
connector from the PC chassis.
- Lift the board up and away from the PC chassis. Avoid touching any adjacent
board components.
- After board removal, place the board on an electrostatic-free surface.
- Place the board in an antistatic bag when carrying the board from station to
station.

CAUTION
Proper protective packaging is required when shipping boards to prevent damage
to the board and board components (use original shipping materials, if possible).

C.4 Returning the Board and Test Results

Dialogic requires that you send a copy of the D40CHK results when you return a
board for repair.
• Load D40CHK. Do not use the -c command line option. Enable Log All
Results (this option provides the most complete record of errors). Enable the
proper test options.
• After running D40CHK, include a paper copy of the file D40CHK.LOG with
the board you are returning.
• Repack the board, observing correct static-handling procedures. Place the
board in an anti-static bag and then put it in a shipping carton using
appropriate packing material. Use the original shipping materials if possible.

C-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

• If you are shipping the board to Dialogic, you agree to insure the board or
assume the risk of loss or damage in transit. The address of our general
offices is:
Dialogic Corporation
300 Littleton Road
Parsippany, New Jersey 07054
We recommend shipping the board by a service such as Federal Express or
UPS Second Day Air Service. These services generally handle packages
more carefully. Not only is there less danger of in-transit damage, but
delivery is faster as well.
• Be sure to write the RMA number on the outside of the box you are shipping
(for example, RMA #2201) and send the package to the attention of the
RMA number assigned.

C-4
Appendix D: Related Publications
Basic Telephony:
Fike, John L., and George E. Friend. Understanding Telephone Electronics, 2nd
ed. Indianapolis, Indiana: Howard W. Sams & Company, 1988.
Static Control:

AT&T Electrostatic Discharge Control Handbook. This manual (order Select


Code 500-000) may be ordered from AT&T by calling the following numbers:

Inside Continental U.S. 1-800-432-6600 (toll free)


Outside Continental U.S. 1-317-352-8556
T-1:
Flanagan, William A. The Guide to T-1 Networking, 3rd ed. New York: Telecom
Library, 1988.
Dialogic Publications:
For information on related Dialogic products, see these Dialogic publications:
• AMX Hardware Reference
• Voice Software Reference
• DTI Hardware and Software References
• FAX Hardware and Software References
• VR Hardware and Software References
• MSI Hardware and Software References
• PRI Hardware and Software References

D-1
Appendix E: Regulatory Requirements

FCC PART 15 REQUIREMENTS

This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy. If it is not installed
and used in strict accordance with our instructions, it may interfere with radio and television
reception. The Dialogic Micro Channel boards have been type-tested and found to comply
with the limits for Class A computing devices in accordance with the specifications in
Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC Rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable
protection against such interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial
environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference
in which case the user at his own expense will be required to take the necessary corrective
measures. If this equipment does cause interference to radio or television reception (which
can be determined by turning the equipment off and on) the user is encouraged to try to
correct the interference using one or more of the following measures:

• Reorient the receiving antenna.


• Relocate the computer in relation to the receiver. Move the computer away from the
receiver.
• Plug the computer into a different outlet so that the computer and receiver are on
different circuits.

If necessary, consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for additional


suggestions.

The following booklet, prepared by the Federal Communications Commission, may be


helpful: "How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems." This booklet is
available from the following address:

US Government Printing Office


Washington, DC 20402
Stock No. 004-000-00345-4

E-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS


NOTICE

EQUIPMENT ATTACHMENT LIMITATIONS

The Canadian Department of Communications label identifies certified equipment. This


certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network
protective, operational and safety requirements. The Department does not guarantee the
equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.

Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected
to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be
installed using an acceptable method of connection. In some cases, the company’s inside
wiring associated with the single line individual service may be extended by means of a
certified connector assembly (telephone extension cord). The customer should be aware that
compliance with the above conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some
situations.

Repairs to certified equipment should be made by a Dialogic authorized maintenance


facility. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment
malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to
disconnect the equipment.

CAUTION: Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground
connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water pipe systems, if
present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural
areas. Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact
the appropriate electric inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate.

The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the percentage of the total
load to be connected to a telephone loop which is used by the device, to prevent
overloading. The termination on a loop may consist of any combination of devices subject
only to the requirement that the total of the Load Numbers of all the devices does not
exceed 100.

E-2
Glossary

16-bit PC-AT expansion slot or 16-bit PC-AT bus slot These slots
connect additional circuit boards (expansion boards) into the bus of PC-AT
computers. One of the main features of the PC-AT bus is 16-bit memory data
transfer. PC-AT expansion slots are really two slots placed end-to-end on the
motherboard. The larger slot contains contacts for the 62 lines of the standard
PC bus. The smaller slot contains contacts for the 36 lines added to the
standard PC bus to make up the PC-AT bus.

8-bit XT expansion slot These slots connect additional circuit boards


(expansion boards) into the PC bus. The slot contains contacts for the 62 lines
of the standard PC bus.

ADPCM Adaptive differential pulse code modulation. A sophisticated


compression algorithm for digitizing audio that stores the differences between
successive samples rather than the absolute value of each sample. This method
of digitization also reduces storage requirements from 64K bits/second to as
low as 24K bits/second.
AEB Analog Expansion Bus (Audio Expansion Bus) Used to connect the
resources of the D/41E and D/41D boards with other system boards through
the board’s P3 connector.

AGC Automatic gain control. An electronic circuit used to maintain the audio
signal volume at a constant level.

AMX or AMX/8x Audio multiple crosspoint switch. A PC expansion board from


Dialogic for connecting different audio channels (using a software-controlled 8
by 8 switching matrix), the board also provides a loop current source.

Glossary-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

analog 1. A method of telephony transmission in which the information from the


source (for example, speech in a human conversation) is converted into an
electrical signal that varies continuously over a range of amplitude values.
2. Used to refer to applications that use loop start signaling instead of digital
signaling.
AT-class 1. Used to describe an IBM or IBM-compatible Personal Computer
containing an 80286 microprocessor, a 16-bit bus architecture, and a
compatible BIOS. 2. Also sometimes used to refer to machines containing the
80386 microprocessor.
AT bus The common communication channel in a PC-AT. The channel uses a
16-bit data path architecture. This bus architecture includes the standard PC
bus plus a set of 36 lines for additional data transmission, addressing, and
interrupt request handling.

Audio Expansion Bus The 20-pin connector on a D/41D board used to


transfer audio data, signaling information, and power to other expansion
boards, such as Dialogic’s AMX/81.

BIOS Basic input-output system. The set of permanently stored system service
programs needed to manage the PC and consisting of drivers and other
software to control peripheral units.

block A group of consecutive bytes in PC memory. The size of a block may


vary. Memory is commonly divided into blocks that are some multiple of 16,
for ease of manipulation in hexadecimal notation. For example, 1M (1,048,578
bytes) of PC memory is usually subdivided for discussion into 16 blocks each
of 64K (65,536 bytes).

channel 1. When used in reference to a Dialogic expansion board that is analog,


an audio path, or the activity happening on that audio path (for example, when
you say "the channel goes off-hook"). 2. When used in reference to a Dialogic
expansion board that is digital, a data path, or the activity happening on that
data path. 3. When used in reference to a bus, an electrical circuit carrying
control information and data.

CO Central office. The telephone company facility where subscriber lines are
linked, through switches, to other subscriber lines (including local and long
distance lines).

Glossary-2
Glossary

configuration file A file used by the downloader and Dialogic drivers to obtain
initialization information about specific boards in your system.

crossover cable A cable used to interconnect two Dialogic DTI boards in


order to join two T-1 lines. The cable is split and folded to "crossover" so that
the cable wires carrying transmit data and signaling information from one DTI
board are matched to the appropriate receive pins on the second DTI board.

D/120 A model of the 12-line voice processing product from Dialogic that
emulates three D/41D boards and is made up of a SpringBoard-based
expansion board and downloaded software (DXXX.FWL).

D/121 A model of the 12-line voice processing product from Dialogic with all of
the features of the D/120 plus patented call analysis algorithms for outbound
applications.

D/121A A model of the 12-line voice processing product from Dialogic with all
of the features of the D/120 plus patented call analysis algorithms for outbound
applications.

D/121B A model of the 12-line voice processing product from Dialogic with all
of the features of the D/120 plus patented call analysis algorithms for outbound
applications.

D/40 A model of the 4-channel voice store and forward expansion boards by
Dialogic with an on-board processor and shared RAM. The D/40 features
real-time digitization, compression, and playback of audio, DTMF reception,
automatic answering, DTMF or rotary pulse dialing, and direct connection to
telephone lines.

Glossary-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/41D A general term used to refer to Dialogic D/40 and D/41 4-channel voice
boards. A model of the 4-channel voice store and forward voice boards by
Dialogic that has all of the features of a D/40 plus patented call analysis
algorithms for outbound applications

D/41E 4-channel voice and store forward voice board with world approvability,
access to resource modules, and additional power for advanced firmware
features.
download The process where board level program instructions and routines are
loaded during board initialization to a reserved section of shared RAM.

downloaded code Program instructions and routines that (1) run at the board
level and were previously resident on the board in EPROM and (2) are now
loaded during board initialization to a reserved section of shared RAM. The
instructions are no longer permanently programmed, and they can be updated
easily using a new download file.

DSP 1. Digital signal processor. A microprocessor with an architecture that is


particularly optimized to perform mathematical algorithms that manipulate
digital signals. 2. Digital signal processing.

DTI/101 A model of Dialogic digital telephony interface board designed for use
with the D/121A.
DTI/124 A model of the Dialogic digital telephony interface board designed for
use with the D/4x voice board in T-1 applications.

EPROM Electrically programmable, read only memory.

firmware A set of program instructions that are resident (usually in EPROM) on


an expansion board.
hook state The state of the hookswitch on a telephone handset cradle (or
equivalent condition). The hookswitch state signals the Central Office when
the handset is removed from the cradle for outbound dialing or to answer an
incoming call (see "off-hook"), or when the handset is replaced on the cradle to
disconnect a call (see "on-hook").

Glossary-4
Glossary

interrupt terminator A jumper placed on one of several boards sharing the same
interrupt line. The jumper insures that the proper electrical resistance is in the
circuit so that all pending interrupts on the line are recognized and serviced
correctly.

IRQ Interrupt request. A signal sent to the central processing unit (CPU) to
temporarily suspend normal processing and transfer control to an interrupt
handling routine. Interrupts may be generated by conditions such as
completion of an I/O process, detection of hardware failure, power failures,
etc.
IRQ Interrupt request. A signal sent to the central processing unit (CPU) to
temporarily suspend normal processing and transfer control to an interrupt
handling routine. Interrupts may be generated by conditions such as
completion of an I/O process, detection of hardware failure, power failures,
etc.
ISA Industry Standard Architecture

loop start A method of starting (seizing) a telephone line or trunk by sending a


supervisory signal (going off-hook) to the CO. This method bridges the tip and
ring (the two conductors of a telephone cable pair) through a resistance.

ms millisecond.

MVCS Multiple-line Voice Communication System.


off-hook When a telephone handset is lifted from its cradle (or equivalent
condition), the telephone line state is said to be "off-hook."
on-hook When a telephone handset is returned to its cradle (or equivalent
condition), the telephone line state is said to be "on-hook."

P3 audio connector See Audio Expansion Bus.

paragraph A 16-byte block of contiguous memory.

paragraph boundary A memory location whose address is a multiple of 16.

PC Personal computer. In this manual, the term refers to an IBM Personal


Computer or compatible machine.

Glossary-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

PC-AT 1. Used to describe an IBM or IBM-compatible Personal Computer


containing an 80286 microprocessor, a 16-bit bus architecture, and a
compatible BIOS. 2. Also sometimes used to refer to machines containing the
80386 microprocessor.

PC-AT bus The common communication channel in a PC-AT. The channel uses
a 16-bit data path architecture. This bus architecture includes the standard PC
bus plus a set of 36 lines for additional data transmission, addressing, and
interrupt request handling.

PEB PCM expansion bus. The common communication medium for passing
signaling, audio, and control information between Dialogic D/121A, DTI/, and
LSI/120 network interface boards. Information on the PEB is encoded using
the Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) method. Non-Dialogic products using PCM
encoding may interface with Dialogic products by using this bus.

peripheral Any equipment, apart from the central processing unit, that provides a
system with outside communication or additional facilities.

PSTN Public Switched Telephone Network.


RAM Random Access Memory. The primary memory in a computer. Memory
that can be overwritten with new information. The contents of RAM memory
are lost when the electrical power to the PC is switched off.

reset 1. A D/41D in reset (also reset mode, reset state, reset condition, or hard
reset) means that all processing on the board has stopped. Power is reaching
the board, the microprocessor is on, but nothing is happening. When reset is
cleared, the microprocessor begins executing instructions resident on the
board. The D/41D is put in reset when it is first powered up (i.e., you turn on
the PC where the D/41D is installed), when a software message is issued to
reset the board, or when an unexpected interruption (such as power surge)
occurs. 2. A D/121A in reset means that one of the virtual boards (a D/121A is
three "virtual" D/41D boards) has been Îstopped.Ù In reality, an interrupt has
been issued to the microprocessor on the D/121A that stops processing for the
group of channels constituting that virtual board. The D/121A microprocessor
is still running and continuing processing for the other D/121A channels. 3. A
D/121A in reset is similar to a D/41D in reset EXCEPT there are no resident

Glossary-6
Glossary

instructions on the board. You must load the microprocessor instruction set to
the board (using a downloading routine) before clearing reset.
retaining screw The small screw used to fasten installed expansion boards to
the rear of the PC chassis.

rfu Reserved for future use.

segment 64K bytes of contiguous PC memory beginning at a paragraph


boundary.

SpringBoard A Dialogic expansion board using digital signal processing to


emulate the functions of other products. The SpringBoard is a development
platform for Dialogic products such as the D/120 and D/121.
T-1 Digital transmission link handling 24 voice conversations on two pairs of
twisted wires.

talk off The false tripping of DTMF receivers caused by human speech
mimicking DTMF tones.

timeslot In a digital telephony environment, a normally continuous and


individual communication (for example, someone speaking on a telephone) is
(1) digitized, (2) broken up into pieces consisting of a fixed number of bits, (3)
combined with pieces of other individual communications in a regularly
repeating, timed sequence (multiplexed), and (4) transmitted serially over a
single telephone line. The process happens at such a fast rate that, once the
pieces are sorted out and put back together again at the receiving end, the
speech is normal and continuous. Each individual pieced-together
communication is called a timeslot. In the North American digital telephony
environment (T-1), 24 timeslots are multiplexed on a single pair of twisted
cables.

Glossary-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

timeslot assignment The ability to route the digital information contained in a


timeslot to a specific physical channel on an expansion board.

USOC Universal Service Order Code.

Glossary-8
Index
A-B
boards
AEB signaling how to remove, C-2
LSI/120 board, 11-7 how to return, C-1
installation of, 3-1
AMX/81, 11-2 installing in the PC chassis, 3-
50
base I/O port naming conventions, 3-1
D/121B board, 7-9 unpacking, 3-7
D/81A board, 8-8
DTI/101 network interface bus mode
board, 12-6 D/121A board, 6-10
D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A, 3-
base memory address segment 21
D/41D, 3-22 D/121B board, 7-11
D/41D board, 9-5 D/81A board, 8-10

board identification number C


D/240SC-T1 board, 3-14
D/320SC board or D/240SC cabling
board, 3-11 D/41D board, 3-60
D/320SC or D/240SC default, external connections to analog
3-12 service, 3-62
D/41E board, 10-6 external connections to
D240SC-T1 board, 5-9 telephone lines, 3-58, 3-61
default for D/240SC-T1 board, SA/120 RJ-11 assembly, 3-65
3-14
description of, D/320SC board Canada limitations, E-2
or D/240SC board, 3-11
how to set on the D/240SC-T1 channel bank mode
board, 3-14 DTI/101 network interface
how to set on the D/320SC board, 12-9
board or D/240SC board, 3-11
table, 3-14 Channel Service Unit, 3-68

Index-1
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

clock source and LSI/120 network interface


DTI/101 network interface board configuration, 6-7
board, 12-7 base I/O port, 6-9
LSI/120 board, 11-6 block diagram, 6-2
bus mode, 3-21, 6-10
configuration connecting with PCM
basic analog, 1-12 Expansion Bus, 3-42
basic digital - terminating, 1-13 connection to DTI/101 network
D/121B board and drop-and- interface board, 6-2
insert, 7-8 connection to LSI/120 network
D/121B board, terminating, 7-7 interface board, 6-2
D/41D board, 9-5 connections to DTI/101 network
digital - drop-and-insert, 1-16 interface board, 1-6
drop-and-insert, D/121A and connections to LSI/120 network
DTI/101 boards, 6-8 interface board, 1-6
DTI/101 in drop-and-insert, 12- description of, 1-5, 6-1
5 drop-and-insert configuration
DTI/101 in terminate, 12-5 with DTI/101 network interface
terminating with D/121A and board, 6-8
DTI/101 boards, 6-7 hardware settings, 3-17, 6-8
I/O base port address, 3-19
crossover cable interrupt terminator, 3-20, 6-10
installing, 3-53 introduction to, 6-1
IRQ level, 3-19, 6-9
CSU network interface boards used
to DTI/101 network interface with, 6-3
board cable, 12-11 quick reference, 2-7
specifications, 6-11
CSU (Channel Service Unit), 3-68 specifications, electrical, 6-12
specifications, environmental,
customer service, C-2 6-12
specifications, host interface, 6-
11
specifications, physical, 6-12
D terminating configuration, 6-7

D/121A board D/121B board


advantages, 1-6 base I/O port, 7-9
block diagram, 7-3

Index-2
Index

bus mode, 3-21, 7-11 connecting to LSI/120 network


configuration with LSI/120 interface board, 4-2, 4-4
network interface board, 7-7 connecting to LSI/80 network
connecting with PCM interface board, 4-2, 4-4
Expansion Bus, 3-42 connecting to PRI/211 network
connection to LSI/120 network interface board, 4-2, 4-4
interface board, 1-7 connecting with PCM
connections to DTI/101 network Expansion Bus, 3-42
interface board, 1-7, 7-2 description of, 4-1
connections to LSI/120 network hardware overview, 4-3
interface board, 7-2 interface boards used with, 4-4
description of, 1-7, 7-1 introduction to, 1-2
drop-and-insert configuration network interface connections
with DTI/101 network interface to, 1-3
board, 7-8 quick reference, 2-3
hardware settings, 3-17 specifications, 4-11
I/O base port address, 3-19
interface boards used with, 7-3 D/240SC-T1 board
interrupt terminator, 3-20 block diagram, 5-2
IRQ level, 3-19, 7-10 board identification number, 3-
physical description, 7-3 14, 5-9
quick reference, 2-7 cabling, 3-68
specifications, 7-11 connecting with PCM
specifications, electrical, 7-12 Expansion Bus, 3-42
specifications, environmental, description of, 5-1
7-12 electrical specifications,
specifications, host interface, 7- network interface module, 5-12
12 environmental specifications,
specifications, physical, 7-13 network interface module, 5-12
terminating device external connections, 3-68
configuration, 7-7 hardware defaults, network
interface module, 5-12
D/240SC board hardware settings, 5-8
block diagram, 4-3 host interface, network interface
board identification number, 3- module, 5-12
11, 4-10 introduction to, 1-4
connecting to DTI/211 network network interface module, 5-2
interface board, 4-2, 4-4 network interface module cable
connections, 5-13

Index-3
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

network interface module PEB two-way drop-and-insert


interface, 5-13 configurations, 4-9
PCM Expansion Bus, 5-2
pin designations, network D/41D board
interface module to T-1, 5-13 base memory address segment,
quick reference, 2-5 3-22, 9-5
remote loopback test switch, 3- block diagram, 9-2
15 configuration, 9-5
resource module, 5-2 connecting to telephone cables,
specifications, 5-11 3-60
telephony interface connecting to telephone lines,
specifications, network interface loopstart, 3-58
module, 5-11 default line state, 3-26, 9-7
terminating device description, 9-1
configuration, 5-8 description of, 1-9
interface boards used with, 9-3
D/320SC board interrupt (IRQ) level, 9-8
block diagram, 4-3 interrupt request (IRQ) level, 3-
board identification number, 3- 26
11, 4-10 multiple board configuration, 3-
connecting to DTI/212 network 22, 9-5
interface board, 4-2, 4-4 offset address, 3-24, 9-6
connecting to E-1 network physical description, 9-3
interface board, 4-2, 4-4 quick reference, 2-9
connecting with PCM specifications, 9-8
Expansion Bus, 3-42 specifications, AEB, 9-11
description of, 4-1 specifications, audio signal, 9-
Digital Signal Processors, 4-3 10
hardware overview, 4-3 specifications, DTMF tone
interface boards used with, 4-4 detection, 9-11
introduction to, 1-2 specifications, electrical, 9-9
network interface connections specifications, environmental,
to, 1-3 9-9
one-way drop-and-insert specifications, host interface, 9-
configurations, 4-9 9
PCM Expansion Bus, 4-3 specifications, MF tone
quick reference, 2-3 detection, 9-11
specifications, 4-11 specifications, physical, 9-10

Index-4
Index

specifications, pulse dialing, 9- specifications, telephone


11 interface, 10-8
specifications, telephone specifications, tone dialing, 10-
interface, 9-8 10
specifications, tone dialing, 9-
10 D/81A board
base I/O port, 8-8
D/41E board block diagram, 8-2
block diagram, 10-2 bus mode, 3-21, 8-10
board identification number, 3- connection to DTI/212 network
29, 10-6 interface board, 1-8, 8-2
configuration, 10-6 connection to LSI/80 network
connecting to telephone lines, interface board, 1-8, 8-2
loopstart, 3-61 description of, 8-1
default line state, 3-30, 10-7 hardware settings, 3-17
description, 10-1 I/O base port address, 3-19
description of, 1-10 interface boards used with, 8-2
interface boards used with, 10-2 interrupt terminator, 3-20, 8-10
loop start interface, 1-10 introduction to, 1-8
physical description, 10-2 IRQ level, 3-19, 8-9
quick reference, 2-11 physical description, 8-4
specifications, 10-8 quick reference, 2-7
specifications, AEB, 10-11 specifications, electrical, 8-11
specifications, audio digitizing, specifications, environmental,
10-10 8-11
specifications, audio signal, 10- specifications, host interface, 8-
9 11
specifications, DTMF tone specifications, physical, 8-12
detection, 10-11
specifications, electrical, 10-9 D40CHK
specifications, environmental, codes returned from test failure,
10-9 B-4
specifications, host interface, error codes, B-4
10-8
specifications, MF tone D40CHK.LOG, B-4
detection, 10-11 including results with board
specifications, physical, 10-9 return, C-3
specifications, pulse dialing, 10-
10 default line state

Index-5
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/41D board, 9-7 loopback, 12-8


D/41E board, 10-7 mode of operation, 12-8
LSI/120 board, 11-6 MUX, 12-2
physical description, 12-2
Digital Signal Processors, 4-3, 4-4, quick reference, 2-15
5-2, 6-3, 7-3, 8-2, 8-4 specifications, 12-9
specifications, electrical, 12-9
DIP switch specifications, environmental,
how to change setting, 3-11 12-10
specifications, host inteface, 12-
drop-and-insert configuration 9
installing crossover cable, 3-53 specifications, physical, 12-10
specifications, receiver, 12-10
drop-and-insert configurations specifications, transmitter, 12-
D/81A board and DTI/101 10
network interface board, 8-7 terminate configuration, 12-5
timing clock source, 3-39, 12-7
DTI/101 board Transceiver (TXCVR), 12-2
base I/O port, 12-6
cabling, 3-68 DTI/211 network interface board
cabling for drop and insert, 3-54 connections to the D/240SC
channel bank mode, 12-9 board, 1-3
connecting with PCM installation sequence, 3-7
Expansion Bus, 3-42
CSU to DTI/101 cable DTI/212 network interface board
specifications, 12-11 connections to D/320SC board,
description, 12-1 1-3
description of, 1-12 installation sequence, 3-7
drop-and-insert configuration,
12-5
drop-and-insert configurations,
8-7 E-F
external connections, 3-68
I/O port range, 3-36 E-1 voice processing applications, 1-
installation sequence, 3-7 4, 4-3
installing crossover cable, 3-53
interrupt terminator, 3-40, 12-8 E-1 network interface, 4-10
IRQ level, 3-39, 12-8
Line Interface Unit, 12-1

Index-6
Index

E-1 network interface board G-H


connections to D/320SC board,
1-3 glossary, glossary-1

electrostatic discharge hardware requirements, 3-2


procedures to avoid, A1
static-safe workstation, A-1

Enable Log All Results, C-3 I-J


error codes, B-4
I/O base port address
D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A
expansion slot requirement, 1-10
board, 3-19
external connections to analog
installation
service
detailed information and
LSI/120, 3-62
procedures, 3-1
how to determine sequence, 3-6
external connections to telephone
PEB terminator, 3-45
cables
quick reference, 2-1
D/41D, 3-60
D/12x and D/81A, 2-7
requirements, 3-1
external connections to telephone
sequence for, 3-4
lines
D/41D, 3-58
interface
D/41E board, 3-61
loop start, 1-10
FCC
interrupt request (IRQ) level
Part 15, E-1
D/121A board, 6-9
D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A
FCC requirements, E-1
board, 3-19
D/121B board, 7-10
firmware, 1-6, 1-7, 1-9, 1-10
D/41D board, 9-8
D/81A board, 8-9
DTI/101 network interface
board, 12-8

interrupt terminator

Index-7
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

D/121A board, 6-10 attaching the SA/120 RJ-21


D/121A, D/121B, or D/81A, 3- cable, 3-64
20 block diagram, 11-2
D/81A board, 8-10 cabling, 3-64
DTI/101 network interface connecting to AMX/81, 1-11
board, 12-8 connecting to analog service, 3-
62
jack connecting with PCM
RJ-11, 3-61 Expansion Bus, 3-42
RJ-14, 3-58 connections to the D/240SC
board, 1-3
default line state, 3-34
description, 11-1
K-L description of, 1-11
hardware settings, 3-31
Known Good Channel, B-2 installation sequence, 3-6
operating mode, 3-35
Line Interface Unit, 12-1 physical description, 11-2, 11-7
SA/120 RJ-21 cable, 3-64
loop-start interface, 1-10 SA/120 RJ-21 cable
specifications, 11-11
Loopback Test, B-2 specifications, 11-8
specifications, AEB, 11-9
loopback test specifications, electrical, 11-8
DTI/101 network interface specifications, environmental,
board, 12-8 11-8
specifications, general, 11-8
LSI/120 board specifications, physical, 11-9
AEB signaling, 11-7 timeslot setting, 3-33
default line state, 11-6 timing clock source, 3-34
operating mode, 11-7
quick reference, 2-13 LSI/80 network interface board
timeslots, 11-6 connections to the D/240SC
timing clock source, 11-6 board, 1-3

LSI/120 network interface board


AEB signaling, 3-35

Index-8
Index

M-N D/121A board, 6-3


D/121B board, 7-3
memory addressing D/81A board, 8-4
change offset, 3-25
PEB connector, 4-4
MUX, 12-2 D/121B board, 7-3
DTI/101 board, 12-2
network interface module
D/240SC-T1 board, 5-2 PEB ribbon cable
attaching, 3-48

PEB terminator
O-P analog configuration, 1-12, 3-43
D/121A board, 6-7
D/240SC board and DTI/211
offset address
network interface board, 4-9
D/41D board, 9-6
D/240SC board and LSI/80
network interface board, 4-8
operating mode
D/240SC-T1 board, 5-8
LSI/120 board, 11-7
D/320SC board, 4-8
installation, 3-45
P3 Audio Expansion Bus (AEB)
connector
pin-out specification
LSI/120 board, 11-2
LSI/120 board, 11-9
LSI/120 network interface
board, 1-11
PRI/211 network interface board
connections to the D/240SC
P5, 4-4
board, 1-3
Part 15, FCC requirements, 17-1
PSTN (Public Switched Telephone
Network, 3-69
PC
preparing for installation, 3-6
Public Switched Telephone
restoring for operation, 3-57
Network, 3-69
PCM Expansion Bus, 4-3, 5-2, 6-2
publications
cable, 3-42
related, D-1
PEB, 4-3, 5-3

Index-9
Voice Hardware Installation Guide

Q RJ-11 jacks, 3-61

quick reference RJ-11


D/121A board, 2-7 telephone line terminations, 3-
D/121B board, 2-7 58
D/41D board, 2-9
D/41E board, 2-11 RJ-14 jacks, 3-58
D/81A board, 2-7
DTI/101 board, 2-15 RMA, C-1
LSI/120 board, 2-13

quick reference guide, 2-1


S

SA/120 RJ-11 assembly


R connecting, 3-65

R112, 4-4 SA/120 RJ-21 Cable


connecting to the LSI/120, 3-64
regulatory requirements, 17-1
SA/120 RJ-21 cable
related publications, D-1 specifications, 11-11

remote loopback test switch software


D/240SC-T1 board, 3-15 requirements, 3-4

requirements SpringWare, 1-6, 1-7, 1-9, 1-10


development package, 3-4
expansion slot, 1-10
hardware, 3-2
installation, 3-1 T
software, 3-4
T-1 voice processing applications, 1-
resource module 4, 1-5, 4-3
D/240SC-T1 board, 5-2
T-1 voice processing applications, 1-
returning boards, C-1 6

Index-10
Index

timeslots
LSI/120 board, 11-6

transceiver (TXCVR), 12-1

troubleshooting, B-1

U-V

unpacking
checklist for each board, 3-9
removing boards from static
shielding bags, 3-10

voice boards
introduction to the product line,
1-1
typical applications, 1-12

Warranty, iii

XTERM socket (R112), 4-4

Index-11