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Transport Design

Manual

Milaha Explorer on Osprey


OHT-5360-102
Revision History

Rev. Date Description Made by Eng chk Ops chk

Creation date: 17.06.2016 Made by: JF Eng chk: PKB Ops chk: KB
Port of Loading: Huludao, Bohai Port of Discharge: Vung Tau, Vietnam Time of Departure: Mid July 2016

Summary
This transport design manual has been prepared for the float on and transport of Milaha Explorer on Osprey.
Stability and strength have been checked and found within limits.
Seafastening capacity and cribbing pressure are calculated based on seastate Hs=4.0 m. This is the statistical 10
year return storm for the route.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
OHT-5360-102 Transport Design Manual revision: 00 2 of 23
15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

Table of Contents
1 General 3
1.1 Scope of document 3
2 Vessel and Cargo Particulars 4
2.1 M/V OSPREY 4
2.2 Cargo particulars, Milaha Explorer 5
2.3 Cargo preparation 6
3 Osprey sailing transit condition 6
4 Environmental Conditions 7
5 Response calculation 8
5.1 Motion and acceleration 8
5.2 Leg bending moments 9
6 Sea fastening 9
7 Cribbing 9
8 Guidepost 9
9 Loading and discharge operations 9
9.1 General weather limitations for HTV operations 9
9.2 Assistings tugs during HTV operations 10
10 Emergency response plan 11
10.1 Propulsion Machinery Breakdown 11
10.2 Engine room Flooding 12
10.3 Heavy Weather Speed / Manoeuvring 12
10.4 Grounding/Stranding 13
10.5 Collision 15
10.6 Fire 18
10.7 Engine Room Fire 18
10.8 Pumproom Fire / Explosion 19
10.9 Bunker/Cargo spills 19
10.10 Hull Damage / Flooding 19

Appendix OHT-5360-102-A, Appendix A - Transit Condition


OHT-5360-102-B, Appendix B - Motions
OHT-5360-102-C, Appendix C - Cribbing
OHT-5360-102-D, Appendix D - Drawings
OHT-5360-102-E, Appendix E - Sea fastening
OHT-5360-102-F, Appendix F - Loading draft
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
OHT-5360-102 Transport Design Manual revision: 00 3 of 23
15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

1 General

1.1 Scope of document


This document includes technical information for the transport of Milaha Explorer from Huludao,
Bohai in China to Vung Tau, Vietnam onboard M/V Osprey. This document is used as guideline for the
voyage, loading- and discharge operation.

The calculations/drawings contained in this document are based on the currently available cargo
properties given by the cargo owner. Neither OHT AS nor any of its employees warrants the accuracy
of these cargo properties.

Note all measurements in this documents are metric unless stated otherwise.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

2 Vessel and Cargo Particulars

2.1 M/V OSPREY

Length Overall 223.07 m Free Deck Area 6,900 m2


Length PP 214.07 m Main Engine Output MAN B&W 6S70 18,175 BHP
Breadth Moulded 44.50 m Bow/Stern Thruster 2,000/1,000 kW
Depth Moulded 13.00 m Cruise Speed 13 kn
Summer Draft 10.00 m Cruise Range 25,000 nm
Deadweight 54,000 MT Accommodation 40 people
Submerged Depth above Deck >10.00 m Flag Norwegian
2
Max. Deck load 25-30 MT/m DnV No/IMO No Osprey 15303/8616568
Free Deck Length 157.00 m GRT / NRT 38,722/11,617

For stability and motions the vessel is modelled with a coordinate system which has its origin in the Aft
Perpendicular (frame 0). X is in the longitudinal direction, Y in the transverse direction and Z is in the vertical
direction.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

2.2 Cargo particulars, Milaha Explorer

Milaha Explorer is a constructuon support jack-up vessels

The transport weight has been informed by client to be about 7200 mt. Corresonding draft will be
2.88 m, no heel, no trim.

The below weight calculation is earlier receivedfrom client. It has been used to modify COG to the
transport weight by removing liquid variables accordingly to get to 7200 mt.

Hence, the cargo properties during tarnsport used in this manual is :

Transport weight 7200 mt


LCG 30.12 m (from frame 0)
TCG 0 m
VCG 17.00 m
Draft 2.88 m
Heel 0
Trim 0
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

2.3 Cargo preparation


The cargo should be loaded to the loading condition as shown above. In addition sides need to be
clear 4 m from each guide post and paint mark(s) drawn as specied in the relevant drawings.

Towing bridles for the cargo must not be interfering with the ships lines duirng loading operation.
Any bridle must be completely removed or tied up to the satisfaction of the OHT load master.

3 Osprey sailing transit condition

Transit conditions are calculated in AutoLoad. The Vessel will transit at a draft of approximately 9.6 meters
amidships resulting in about 3.4 meters freeboard at midship. A summary of the loading conditions for the Ship
is shown below. It is further concluded that stability and longitudinal strength are satisfactory.
Ref. Appendix A for details.

Loading Condition summary, intact condition


Floating status

Floating Stability Margins


Draft FP (molded) 8.809 m VCG (Solid) 12.142 m DirectStab-Sailing NOT REQUIRED
Draft MS (molded) 9.572 m FSM Corr 0.073 m MaxVCG 0.276 m
Draft AP (molded) 10.335 m VCG (fluid) 12.215 m BendMoment-Sea 93.41%
Heel 0.00 deg GM-upr.(fluid) 9.131 m Shear Force-Sea 90.72%
Trim 1.526a m GM-equil(fluid) 9.131 m
Displacement 71547.8 MT
Deadweight 48744.1 MT
Sea Density 1.025

Graphic representation of the model used in Autoship.


Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

4 Environmental Conditions
The ship will sail from Huludao, Bohai to Vung Tau, Vietnam around the middle of July 2016.

Sea fastening and cribbing pressures will be calculated based on Hs = 4.0 m. It is important to note that, due to
uncertainties in weather forecasts and also for operational reasons the captain may elect to deviate from the
intended route or speed for the safety of the cargo or personnel. This will typically be to avoid slamming, uplift,
or excessive green sea that may damage cribbing or represent a danger to personnel on inspection.

The table below shows the most probable extreme significant wave height for each route sector, which the
vessel will pass on this voyage.

Area Season Hours Direction Hs


28 July-Aug 28 0.00-360.00 3.21
41 June-Aug 28.4 0.00-360.00 3.94
40 June-Aug 52.1 0.00-360.00 3.99
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

5 Response calculation

5.1 Motion and acceleration


Motion analyses have been run in Octopus. The transit condition presented in Appendix A is basis for
the analyses. The combined ship, ballast and cargo dynamic inertia values is calculated by AutoHydro
to:

Roll radius of gyration - Rxx 17.93 m


Pitch radius of gyration - Ryy 54.96 m
Yaw radius of gyration - Rzz 55.68 m

The following single amplitude extreme motions have been found for the design sea state of Hs= 4.0
m.

Final maximum design values for chosen locations and motions :

Significant waveheight (Hs) 3.99 [m]

Surge Motion 0.83 [m]


Surge Acceleration 0.24 [m/s^2] 0.024 [g]
Sway Motion 1.61 [m]
Sway Acceleration 0.62 [m/s^2] 0.063 [g]
Heave Motion 3.08 [m]
Heave Acceleration 1.13 [m/s^2] 0.115 [g]
Roll Motion 8.71 [deg]
Roll Acceleration 2.09 [deg/s^2] 0.0365 [rad/s^2]
Pitch Motion 2.62 [deg]
Pitch Acceleration 1.04 [deg/s^2] 0.0181 [rad/s^2]
1_Milaha Enabler COG (X-Acc+g) 0.61 [m/s^2] 0.062 [g]
1_Milaha Enabler COG (Y-Acc+g) 2.43 [m/s^2] 0.248 [g]
1_Milaha Enabler COG (Z-Acc) 1.14 [m/s^2] 0.116 [g]
1_ME Leg AP x-dir 3311 [t-m]
1_ME Leg AP y-dir 9099 [t-m]
1_ME Leg FP x-dir 3311 [t-m]
1_ME Leg FP y-dir 9083 [t-m]
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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15.06.2016
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

5.2 Leg bending moments


Maximum leg bending moments are calculated to 9269 t-m This inclused all dinamit motion forces,
heel angles and direct wind forces.

The client have not informed OHT the maximum allowable leg bending moment.

6 Sea fastening
Based on the motions presented above together with wind force estimates a set of required sea fastening
capacities have been calculated and shown in detail in Appendix E.
The layout of sea fasteners is shown in the drawing 5360-21-103 Sea Fastening
For details refer to the drawings and Appendix D.

7 Cribbing
Cribbing will be laid out on deck according to Appendix C and the drawing 5360-21-102 Cribbing Arrangement
and associated OHT standard cribbing drawings.

195 m Total length cribbing is laid out for Milaha Explorer with 300mm wide and 1950mm high cribbing. The
cribbing height is made up from 1.65 m high steelsupports tohgether with 0.3 m high wood cribbing.

Cribbing pressures in the design sea state will be below 2.64 N/mm2.

8 Guidepost
It will be required that cargo is free for outfitting 4m from GP location. Paintmarks on the cargo will be needed
to line up with Guidepost location.

See drawing 5360-21-105 Paint marks on cargo and 5360-21 004 Guide post arranement

9 Loading and discharge operations


Milaha Explorer will be loaded onboard the HTV vessel by float-on method. The HTV submerges to a depth giving
enough clearance between the floating cargo and the top of the cribbing on the HTV deck. The cargo is floated on
by use of the HTVs own winches together with tugs connected to the cargo.

The ovarall method is described in the drawing 5360-21-106/107. A similar operation will take place at float-off.
The HLV vessel will stay anchored with a single anchor out at the operation site.

The client will inform OHT where the loading and discharging will be located.

9.1 General weather limitations for HTV operations


The general weather limitations for the loading/discharge operations are as shown below, but the
actual condition and location to be considered at all times. The loading or discharge operation shall
not start unless the forecast weather for the operational period is within acceptable limits. The
decision will be made by the Captain and OHT Load master and subject to approval by Charterer and
MWS. The decision will be based on visual observation of the sea and weather conditions at the time
of loading or discharge.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
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Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

Cargo Max. wind Max. Max. Max. current


Waves/Period Swell/Period
Skid out 15 knots 0.2 m 0.0 1.0 knot
Roll out 20 knots 0.5 m 0.0 1.0 knot
Floating cargo < 2,000 t 15 knots 0.5 m / 6 s 0.0 1.5 knots
Floating cargo < 20,000 t 15 knots 0.5 m / 6 s 0.3 m /6 s 1.0 knot
Floating cargo > 20,000 t 10 knots 0.5 m / 6 s 0.3 m / 6 s 0.5 knots
Note: Tide should be evaluated, and operation performed as close to slack water as possible.

9.2 Assistings tugs during HTV operations


Tugs with adequate bollard pull of should be nominated for the operation depending on the size and
configuration of cargo, wind as well as current. These figures are to be confirmed by the appointed
MWS. A general guideline can be found below.

Cargo Tugs at loading Tugs at discharging


Floating cargo < 2,000 t 2 tugs BP 20 t 2 tugs BP 20 t
Floating cargo < 20,000 t 3 tugs BP 50 t 2 tugs BP 60 t
Floating cargo > 20,000 t 4 tugs BP 60 t 4 tugs BP 60 t

It is imperative that the tugs are under command by a tug master who speaks English fluently.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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15.06.2016 23
Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

10 Emergency response plan


The following sections are taken from the ships safety management system.

10.1 Propulsion Machinery Breakdown


Damage
a) Machinery breakdown occurs as a failure/breakdown in a single component or part of a system.
The cause of the breakdown may be due to defects in the component, it may also be due to
malfunctioning of other parts of the system which may cause overloading and breakdown of a
component.

b) Following the failure/breakdown of one component, other components in the system may be
exposed to overloading so that the damage is further spread in the system, so-called consequential
damages.

c) The machinery may have been damaged due to dislocation and high stresses caused by external
effects like collision, touching of ground etc., and may only be possible to discover by accurate
control measurements.

Extent of Damage
a) Before it is possible to determine the extent of the damage, it is necessary with the aid of system
diagrams to consider which components may have suffered overload due to the damage, and to check
these.

b) If, due to external causes the machinery may have been damaged, measurements must be taken
before engine start-up. Indents in the hull may have propagated further and caused dislocation of
foundations, pipe systems and bearings.

Actions
a) Based on the type of the damage and determined extent of damage, consider if the damage may
be:

Repaired permanently
Repaired provisionally, in order to complete the voyage
Counteracted by emergency repair so that own help may reach the nearest harbour or protected
waters.

b) Inform the Company immediately about the present situation and how the possibilities are
evaluated on board.

c) If the damage may be repaired on board, but if the circumstances are such that the ship may
experience difficulties before the repair is finished, an urgency message with the necessary
information should be sent.

d) If the damage cannot be repaired on board and there is no imminent danger to the ship, request
the Company to arrange for the necessary assistance.

e) If in heavily trafficked waters, safety messages should be sent regularly.

f) If the ship is in imminent danger due to engine breakdown and loss of manoeuv-rability, distress
message and request for immediately assistance should be sent.

g) If the ship is in danger of drifting ashore, consider the possibility for anchoring/stranding.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

In addition to the above actions,


Heavylift Vessels with Cargo on board must immediately resolve to maintain heading to the
prevailing wind and seas direction to avoid the effect beam seas may have on the transport design
criteria of the sea fastenings. This may be achieved by using the Bow Thruster and utilising the
anchors as a sea-anchor to keep the heading.
If the prevailing conditions are expected to deteriorate out with the design capacity of the sea
fastening before repairs can be completed then Tug assistance must be immediately requested.

10.2 Engine room Flooding


The engine room flooding can occur due to a number of different reasons:
Ruptured sea water inlet pipe.
Stern tube seal damage due to propeller grounding.
Grounding damage to hull plates.
Collision damage to hull plates.
A timely and coordinated action will in most cases limit the damage or at least prevent a total
constructive loss and possible loss of life.
In producing a plan of action, the following items should be considered but need not be limited to:-
Maintaining the ship in stable upright position.
Maintaining bending moment and shearing forces within tolerable limits.
Closing all watertight doors and compartments.
Trimming the vessel by the head to reduce or eliminate sea water pressure.
Reducing free surface action (use of SW Cooling System Suction, Fire/GS pump, Fire/Bilge Pump)
Switch to emergency Engine Room suction
Reducing or eliminating water ingress with collision mats or plugs.
Obtaining external assistance (e.g. tugs)
Preparing for abandonment of ship.

10.3 Heavy Weather Speed / Manoeuvring


It is important that during heavy weather, all precautions are taken to ensure safety of crew, vessel,
cargo and environment.

Should a vessel encounter seas and swell of such strength that pounding is possible or damage to the
ship and/or cargo is likely to occur, then engine speed shall be reduced accordingly and if weather
conditions are severe, consideration must be given to sheltering or hoving too rather than risking
structural damage and breaching safety. If reduction of speed alone is not sufficient to avoid heavy
pounding, adjusting the ship's course is recommended. Any manoeuvring to alter course must be
carefully thought through, as some times it will be beneficial to complete the manoeuvre in as short a
time as possible, whereas in other circumstances gradual alterations may be required. If any heavy
rolling or pitching is anticipated, all personnel should be warned in advance and the main deck area
should be vacated in case large seas are shipped.

In such circumstances a revised ETA must be advised to the Charterer/Operator, copied to The
Company, as soon as possible. This shall clearly specify reasons for the revision. The information shall
be updated as necessary as the circumstances change.

It is expected that vessels in exposed areas are inspected daily and any damage reported to the
technical department. Masters are reminded to call Glasgow office at any time should cause for
concern arise.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

10.4 Grounding/Stranding
In all cases of oil leakage and/or structural damage, the procedures laid down in the oil spill
contingency plan must be followed. SOPEP/SMPEP.

Touching Ground
a) In case of unusual shaking or vibrations of the hull, unexplainable movements or changes in
revolutions, touching the ground may be suspected;
1. If a pilot is on board, ask for possible explanation.
2. Stop engine, observe any unexpected speed reduction.
3. Observe accurate position, check depth information on chart and echo sounder.
4. Check for visible oil along the hull/in the wake.
5. Take soundings of all tanks and rooms, note the draft.

b) If due to a noticeable jolt, momentary angle of heel, unexplainable change of course, it is obvious
that the ship has touched ground;
1. Stop engine, consider reducing speed by reversing propellers.
2. Observe accurate position, check depth information.
3. Take soundings of all tanks and rooms. Note the draft.
4. Check for oil leakages along the hull.
5. If the ship has stopped, take soundings around the ship and make a sketch of the results

c) If due to touching of ground we get:


1. Oil Leakages
Try to stop/reduce the leakage
Make assessment of the fire hazard
Notify local authorities about oil release SOPEP/SMPEP
Try to limit the pollution with all available means on board.

2. Increasing Angle of Heel/Draft


Calculate probable maximum angle of heel and maximum drafts
Try to reduce/delay the heeling by trimming
Consider stranding of the vessel
If stranding is not possible, seek to shallow water
Call for immediate assistance. Prepare for ship abandonment.

d) If the ship is aground, consider possible actions in case of:


1. Imminent danger to the complement, if:-

The ship may sink if she slides off the shoal


The ship may break or be broken by the sea
Health hazardous substances may be released in dangerous

concentrations
Fires may start due to release of flammable substances
Possibilities for evacuations are reduced or blocked

2. Imminent danger to the ship, and possible actions to reduce further damage
If she is stuck in the fairway
If she is exposed to torsion
If there is a large tidal difference in the area
If there are strong tidal current in the area
If the ship may drift further up on the shore, due to high tide, wind or waves
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
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Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

3. Imminent danger of damage to environment, and possible actions to reduce further damage

If oil release has occurred


If leakages may not be stopped
If there is a danger of new leakages

e) If the situation does not seem to involve imminent dangers, consider:


1. The possibilities of getting off the shoal by own means. Before any attempts are made, it must
be
determined if:-
The damage to the ship is so great that she may sink, break or capsize after getting off
after getting off she may manoeuvre out of the dangerous area by own means
machinery, rudder or propeller may be damaged in the process of getting off
the ship may be trimmed/lightened sufficiently to avoid damage while getting off
it there is time/reason to await improvement in weather or tide
the risk to further damage to hull and machinery is greater in an attempt to get the ship off
than
it is by remaining in the grounded position until professional assistance may be obtained

2. The possibilities to prevent further damages while awaiting professional assistance should be
considered if vessel cannot refloat by her own means must always be considered:
Evacuation of part of the complement if the situation easily may deteriorate
Make attempts to prevent the ship from moving
Trying to reduce the longitudinal strain on the hull
Reducing the risk of fire
Preventing pollution from occurring or spreading

Other Precautions
a) Salvage Contract
If circumstances permit it is the principal underwriter who can best arrange external assistance
either on request from the Master, the Company or according to their own judgement of the
situation. They will then make a contract with the salvage firm.
If the ship is in imminent danger the Master has both the right and the duty to sign a salvage
contract. However this right shall ONLY be exercise under situations of extreme danger where
failure to do so will immediately give rise to loss of life, the vessel or her cargo.
When using Lloyd's Open Form it is sufficient to note on the contract own and ship's name and
own signature.

A contract may be made by sending the following email/fax to the salvage firm/salvage vessel:

"ACCEPT SALVAGE SERVICES ON BASIS LLOYD'S STANDARD FORM NO CURE NO PAY


ACKNOWLEDGE REPEATING FOREGOING MASTER"

The contract may be signed at a later stage.


If the Master is pressed to accept special conditions because the ship is in imminent danger, a
court may overrule such conditions.

b) Certificate of Seaworthiness
If in doubt with regard to the nature and extent of damage, a survey for a certificate of
seaworthiness should be requested.
Haakon VIIs gt. 1, 11th floor, 0161 This document is the property of
Oslo, Norway OHT.
P.O. Box 1468 Vika, N-0116 Oslo, It is not to be disclosed, copied
Norway or in any other
Tel +47 21 01 34 50 way made use of without our
www.oht.no permission.
Document No.: Document title: Date of Rev. Page:
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Client: Project Project title: Cargo: Vessel:
Milaha No.: Milaha Explorer on Osprey Milaha Explorer Osprey
5360

10.5 Collision
Collision between ships also applies when a ship due to its manoeuvring causes damage to another
ship or persons or goods on board, even if actual contact does not take place.
When two ships collide it is the duty of every Master, provided it does not endanger his own ship,
crew or passengers, to extend to the other ship and her crew and passengers all the assistance that is
possible and required for rescue from the danger caused by the collision. Similarly it is the duty of
the other Master to give his own ship's name and port, as well as the place or the port from which he
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departed and which is his destination. The same obligation applies to a Master when his ship collides
with a boat.
If the ship comes in peril, the Master is obliged to do everything in his power to save persons on
board and protect the ship, cargo and environment. He shall ensure that the ship's logbooks and
papers are brought to safety, and as far as possible take care of the ship and her cargo.

Immediate Reaction after Collision


Sound the general alarm Muster all crew, ascertain casualty numbers if any
Communications

Communication with Other Ship


If own ship is not in imminent danger of sinking, contact should be made with the other ship for
information about the situation, and to offer assistance. The Master is obliged to provide such
assistance to the extent deemed necessary.
According to the law the ships should also exchange information about name, homeport, last port of
departure and destination.

Notification of Other Ships in the Area


If the collision has taken place in waters with high traffic density it is essential that the other traffic
be informed about the situation so that necessary precautions may be taken. This is especially of
importance if a fire or explosion hazard exists on board own or other ship.
Such information may be given by radio and/or flag/sound/light signals in accordance with
international codes.
These procedures take into account that one or both of the ships involved have lost manoeuvrability
after a collision.
Radio communication must also be established (distress or urgency message) with the nearest coastal
radio station. This must also be kept informed about the situation and the actions, which are taken on
board.

Vessels Interlocked
The following aspects must be considered before deciding on further procedures:
Is a separation going to increase the danger for own or the other ship due to reduced buoyancy.
(hull penetration below the waterline)?
Will a separation cause sparks that may ignite oil or other flammable substan-ces/liquids?
Will a separation cause pollution?
Is there a danger that a fire on one ship may be transferred to the other if the ships are not
separated?
Is there a danger that both vessels may drift aground due to lack of manoeuv-rability if they are not
separated?
Are the vessels a greater danger to other traffic if they are interlocked than if they are separated?

Reduced Buoyancy
Unless the vessel is in immediate danger of sinking no movement of ballast or cargo etc. should be
attempted until the emergency response advice has been received from the classification society. The
procedures laid down in the oil spill contingency manual should be followed.
Reduced Manoeuvrability
If the vessel's manoeuvrability is reduced, the following points should be considered:
What are the hazards if the vessel is left to drift freely?
Is it possible to let go anchor now or after a certain time? If one or two anchors should be dropped,
and how much chain should be used, depending on the local conditions with regard to waves and sea
bottom. If in doubt both anchors should be dropped.
Is it possible to receive assistance from another vessel/salvage vessel within the time available? If
this is possible, make ready towing equipment. Refer to Emergency Towing
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An alternative to use a sea anchor may be to take in ballast, or lower an anchor and several shackles
of chain.
When it is apparent that nothing more can be done to save the vessel, or the Master considers the
situation to be critical for crew and passengers, abandonment must be effected.

Collision Notice
Irrespective of the question of guilt a collision notice should be submitted to the other ship where she
is held responsible and all the economic consequences which this may have.
Example of collision notice:
"We hold you responsible for all damage consequences and losses as result of this collision."

If the collision is partly or is only caused by a third ship, a collision notice should also be submitted to
that ship.
If a collision notice or other message is received from another ship, where own ship is held
responsible for the collision, it is necessary if the other part asks for a confirmation of the:
Receipt of the message to reply in a neutral form, e.g.: "Signed as an acknowledgement of receipt
only, and not as an admission of liability."

Further correspondence with the other part concerning liability questions must be left to the
Company/underwriter. No admission in any form must be given to the other ship or any person,
authority or organisation. This applies also in cases were it is obvious that own ship must carry the
full responsibility for a collision, e.g. if the other vessel is at anchor or moored.

Assistance from Salvage Vessel


Request for assistance should be sent via the Company. All relevant information should be given so
that the most suitable assistance can be mobilised. In addition to the information concerning the
collision as such, the telegram should give information about weather conditions, the ship's condition
e.g. possible leakages, if the leakages may be controlled by pumps, if the engine is working, if
propeller or rudder are damaged, and other information (weather forecast, danger of grounding,
pollution etc.) which may help to describe the situation, and the Master's own assessment of the
situation, and the need of assistance which he considers necessary.
However if, and only if, the ship is in imminent danger, or a delay may cause large discharges of oil or
other polluting substances, the Master has both the right and the duty to accept a salvage contract.
Lloyd's standard form of Salvage Agreement based on No Cure No Pay, or similar, may then be used.

Reporting to Port State Authorities


The principal underwriter's representative and the ship's ordinary agents may assist in determining
whether the ship is obliged to submit a report the Port State authorities.
If a demand for a report is justified, and cannot be avoided or delayed, the content should be limited
to the facts concerning the casualty as noted in the ship's logbook together with the normal
information about ship's name, Company, home port, tonnage, cargo etc. The report must not contain
any admission of any form of liability, nor any assessment of guilt or circumstances concerning the
collision. The following formulation is recommended used at the end of the report:
"Submitted without prejudice and not as an admission of liability."
If the vessel is arrested, or guarantee bonds are demanded, this will be taken care of by the Company.
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10.6 Fire
Anyone may initiate an emergency response by simply pressing the emergency alarm switch where
fitted.
A person having sounded the emergency alarms must also report the location and nature of the
emergency to the Bridge.

Discovery of a Fire
Most fires are small to start with and can often be extinguished by rapid application of a portable
extinguisher or other appliance. Where it is possible to do this without risk of becoming trapped by
flames or smoke, the person discovering the fire should take such action while sending someone else
to raise the alarm.
Where smoke is seen passing a closed door, opening the door could cause the fire to flare up and
spread rapidly making it impossible to close the door again. This action should therefore be avoided.
If it is believed that there may be someone trapped inside the door should only be opened after first
feeling it to make sure it is not hot, and then keeping low and opening it very carefully. If the
compartment is thought to be unoccupied or if the door is hot, keep it closed until the emergency
squad are ready with charged hoses.

Accommodation Fire
The Emergency Team must consider the following when tackling an accommodation, storeroom or
galley fire:
The speed with which the fire is tackled is of the utmost importance.
Breathing apparatus will be necessary, as will protective clothing.
Dual-purpose nozzles will be used
Knowledge of the accommodation layout is essential - the fire fighters will be operating "blind".
Ventilation fans should be stopped and fire flaps closed in the immediate area of the fire.
Electrical currents should be isolated to avoid the danger of water acting as a conductor on "live"
circuits.
Fire fighters will always operate in pairs.
Remember every fire has 6 sides, close observation of these sides must be carried out, hoses
prepared and boundary cooling carried out as necessary.
The OSC will keep the Master informed of the situation and of progress in fighting the fire, by
walkie-talkie or telephone.

10.7 Engine Room Fire


The Engine Room is a high-risk area with most of the combustible materials being class b (oil).
Although a fire may start from an electrical source, it will, if unchecked, very likely spread to oils and
fuels.
Foam is the best fire-fighting medium to fight an oil fire and the emergency team will proceed to the
scene of a fire in the Engine Room with the portable foam making equipment (if onboard).
If an outbreak of fire occurs when the Engine Room is manned the person discovering it should, after
raising the alarm, try and extinguish it using the nearest portable appliance.
If, however, the fire is too large to be tackled in this way personnel in the Engine Room should first
assemble in the Control Room where the Senior Officer will decide whether an attempt should be
made to tackle the fire with hoses and foam or whether the Engine Room should be evacuated. He
will also contact the Bridge by telephone. Needless to say such decisions and necessary actions must
be taken quickly.

If a fire is indicated in the Engine Room when it is in the unmanned condition the Duty Engineer or
any other personnel must on no account proceed to the ER.
The fire fighting team will be formed by members of Response Team No. 2 under the direction of the
First Assistant Engineer.
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The Chief Engineer as leader of the ERT will take charge of supporting operations such as: -
Taking such actions as are necessary to prevent the spread of fire outside of the machinery spaces,
and
Ensure that emergency stops, fuel trips etc. have been activated as the situation may require.
Ensuring sufficient power is available.
Starting Emergency Fire Pump.

He will assess whether the fire can be contained by means of portable appliances or whether
activation of the CO2 system is necessary, and will advise the Master accordingly.
The fixed CO2 systems provide the means of extinguishing a fire in machinery spaces.
This is a "one off" shot and there are several important points to be considered: -
Timing can be critical. If the fire is allowed to develop and generate a large amount of heat, the
convection currents and subsequent turbulence may prevent the CO2 effectively reaching the seat of
the fire.
In general, if a serious fire cannot be brought under control within about 10 minutes the CO2 system
should be activated.
The decision to use the system will be made by the Master acting on advice from the Chief Engineer.
CO2 gases are hazardous to personnel and the Engine Room must be evacuated before they are
released.
All ventilation fans must be stopped; fire flaps shut and doors closed.
The Master should endeavour to take way off the vessel and put the ship in the most advantageous
position regarding sea and traffic conditions.

10.8 Pumproom Fire / Explosion


In the event of a fire occurring in the pump room, the procedures and knowledge obtained on the Fire
Fighting Course should be put into practice.
The alarm must be raised and simultaneously, the cargo operation must be stopped and the
pumproom / cargo system isolated. If in port, notify the shore personnel and request assistance. At
this time it is imperative that a muster be carried out which would indicate if the operation be a Fire
Fighting / Rescue Mission or a Fire Fighting only situation.
The main points to consider are:
Stop any cargo/fuel leakage by closing down the cargo system isolation.
Shut down the ventilation system, close vents and dampers
Fire fighters to be fully protected with firemens suits and CABA sets.
Use boundary cooling as appropriate
In the event of a localised controllable fire, use portable equipment.
For a situation where entry is considered to be impossible or potentially too dangerous, shut down
the pump room and inject the flooding medium (CO2 / Foam)
Check for breaches in the hull and take preventative measures to deal with possible pollution

10.9 Bunker/Cargo spills


In the event of any spill of cargo, Bunkers or any other type of oil to the deck or into the sea,
All operations will immediately be stopped.
The alarm raised
Notifications made as detailed in SOPEP/SMPEP
Containment and clean up started

10.10 Hull Damage / Flooding


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This section should be read in conjunction with the information contained in the Shipboard Marine
(Oil) Pollution Emergency Plan (SMPEP or SOPEP)

Damage Assessment
In the following, damages are considered which the ship may have sustained due to external effects
e.g.:
Touching ground
Collision with another vessel
Heavy weather (bottom damage)
Impact with pier or other stationary structures
Sailing in ice

Damage Localisation
It is important as soon as possible to determine the type and extent of the damage, so that efficient
counter measures may be taken. Also determine which parts of the ship have not been affected by
the damage.
Wherever possible, visual checking of cargo holds, cofferdams and tanks must be made.
Bilges, tanks and cofferdams in the area of damage and adjoining areas must be sounded at frequent
intervals in order to discover possible leaks.
Systematic searches must be made in the damaged area for signs of damage, such as:
Leakages
Indents
Dislocation of plates, supports

Damage Stability
The intact stability of a ship depends on the hull form, freeboard and weight distribution aboard an
undamaged ship.
The damage stability of a ship will depend on many factors: the type, extent and location of damage,
intact stability and buoyancy reserves. In most cases the damage will cause a combined effect of
angle of heel, trim change and reduced buoyancy, in addition to weakening of the ship in case the hull
damage is significant.
Before corrective actions are taken to restore safe stability conditions, the procedures laid down in
the oil spill contingency plan, regarding the use of the emergency telephone number, and the
communication to class must be followed, unless there is immediate danger of the vessel breaking up
or sinking.

Hull Inspection
It may be difficult to determine if large impressions of large hull areas have occurred. Notice
indication of damage, e.g.:
Those impressions of the bottom may be seen not only on the tank top, but also in tweendeck, due
to pressure transmission through supports, columns and other structure.
That indents on the hull side over a larger area may primarily discovered by inspection of adjacent
decks with regard to deformed bulkheads, web frames, deck angles etc.

Rudder and Propeller Inspection


After touching of ground, collision with floating objects and sailing in ice, rudder and propeller must
always be checked for damages. Similarly, abnormal shaking and vibration in the hull and slamming
or noises in the rudder give cause for investigation.
Where conditions permit, the ship may be trimmed at sea and inspection undertaken from a boat,
ladder or bosun's chair.
When possible the inspection should be carried out by qualified frogman/diver.
Registration of Damage
During the inspection, the results of soundings, changing of condition and observed damages must be
noted continuously.
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Use a camera and take as many photos as possible. Use measure band, and note, measure and mark
damaged areas with colour.
Damage indications should be plotted, e.g. on hull drawings (shell expansion plan), in order to get an
impression of the extent of damage.

Damage to Cargo
When the hull damage has been determined, the cargo location must be considered with regard to the
damaged area. Possible consequences for the cargo in case of leakage of water or oil must be
considered carefully.
Under certain conditions such in leakage of water may cause hazards due to:
Emission of flammable, poisonous or corrosive gases
Self ignition

If the cargo is damaged or contaminated or such damage is suspected, the following must be
arranged:
a) Inspection of the damaged cargo. This inspection shall determine the extent of damage, and, if
possible, the cause.
b) Receiver and/or cargo owner shall be informed of the inspection in order that their representatives
may be present.
c) Inform the Company. (The Company will advise concerning informing charterers).
d) The P & I representative shall be informed, and his advice should be followed. He will be
acquainted with the conditions in the area
e) Ensure that necessary log extracts from the voyage are finalised and made available to all
interested parties.
f) Note protest with Notary Public

The Master, as the Company's representative, must ensure that the extent of any
damage/contamination to the cargo is accurately described and defined in the survey
It is of utmost importance that the ship can document or prove that everything has been done to
minimise the extent of damage.
. Proof or documentation with regard to damage to cargo may be as follows:
Inspection of cargo holds/tanks(certificate of cleanliness)
Loading plan
Hatch lists/stowage plan
Mate's receipts
Bills of lading
Statement of facts
Stevedores damage reports

Entries in the Log Book concerning:


Temperature dew point during ventilation of cargo hold, type of ventilation
Opening and battening down of hatches for inspection or ventilation
Cleaning of cargo holds/tanks
In case of fire, what has been done to limit the damages? Release of CO2 etc.
Sounding books/Ullage reports
Discharge of bilge wells
Ullage reports (mixing cargo) tankers only
Sealing or other ways of securing valves/overboard valves
Own oil test taken on board tankers only
Water test of oil cargo tankers only

Note: When carrying clean products it is important to take own test. Many claims have been made
because test taken at the point of delivery was not in accordance with the cargo one should have
taken on board.
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If the cargo consists of containers or break bulk, it is very important that notes are made in the
logbook stating how the cargo was secured.

Damage Sustained with Pilot on board


Assess the damage and determine if the vessel is in a possible pollution risk situation, if yes, refer to
the SMPEP, SOPEP/VRP for further guidance.
Ensure that a remark giving brief details of the incident is written on the on the Pilot Certificate.
Make a Letter of Protest and have the pilot sign if circumstances permit. (See VPM 5.2.5)
Report immediately to the company by telephone and back up with documentation by Email. Ask for
confirmation that the company will arrange for Class to attend. Make an entry in the Deck Log Book
giving all relevant details.
Take photographs of the damage and surrounding area and where appropriate make a sketch
showing frame Nos. etc. so that the position on the hull / vessel can be determined.
Arrange via the local agent or Company for the local P& I Representative or Hull Underwriter to
attend the vessel as soon as possible.
During Transit at Great Lakes & St Lawrence vessels should also use the Damages Checklist for Transit
at Great Lakes and St Lawrence Seaway Locks (Checklist.007) as guidance.

Consequential Damages
When damages have been localised and the extent determined as accurately as possible, it must be
considered if the damage will have an effect on :-
The efficiency of or use of life saving equipment
The strength of watertight bulkheads, tank tops, etc.
Tweendecks, collision bulkheads hatches
Machinery or machinery components
Electrical systems
Pipe systems
Pipe ruptures (may cause leakage of water or liquids in areas far away from the original place of
damage)
Rudder and steering gear
Propeller and propeller shaft

Limitation of Extent of Damage


It is important in advance to have a good knowledge of the ship's intact stability.
Action must be taken with the aim of:
Preventing further damage
Reduce the consequences of damage
Provisional repairs

When actions are taken, it must first be considered the effect they will have on:
1) Stability
2) Buoyancy
3) Hull stress

These three aspects are interconnected. Each action must aim at restoring each aspect to a condition
as close as possible to the conditions for an undamaged ship. Bailing, stopping of leakages and
trimming of cargo/ballast may achieve this. Class SERS can advise on Stability and strength matters

Immediate Actions in Case of Hull Damages


In case of hull damage, speed reduction, trimming of the vessel and reduction of stress on the hull are
the first practical actions to prevent propagation of the damage. Attempts must be made to get any
leakage under control:
By use of bilge pumps and extra pumping equipment.
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By stopping of cracks in the plating from the inside


By using leakage mats from the outside

Beaching
Beaching of a ship is a deliberate and voluntary action of setting a ship aground with the intention of
saving human lives, the ship itself and environment when a casualty situation has occurred.
The following aspects must be considered:
Nature of sea bottom
Tidal differences and water level at the moment
Effects of waves on the hull when ship is aground
Possibilities of getting easily off ground
Possibilities for shifting/discharging/loading ballast
Environmental consequences (oil spill)