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LESSON PLAN 1

Citations in Presentations

Grade level: 4th Grade


Length (minutes): 30 minutes
Central focus for the learning segment: Students will prepare/reflect on a short
presentation in order to explore and identify ways to be an ethical user of information,
measure their own presenting skills, and to compile a deeper understanding of presenting
ideas, both about the content (mythology in this unit), and in general, to an audience.

Standards

1. Common Core State Standards


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.8
Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from
print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list
of sources.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.8
integrate the information [from each source] while avoiding plagiarism.
2. AASL Standards for 21st Century Learner
3.1.4
Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and
understanding in ways that others can use, view and assess.
3. ISTE Standards: Students
5. Research and Information Fluency
Students apply digital media tools to gather, evaluate and use information.
b. ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
4. I-SAIL
Standard 3.5
Recognize the need for citing sources and begin to record simple bibliographies.

Learning Objective/Learning Target


Students will identify the ethical reasons for including citation information in a
presentation, and insert proper citations into their presentations.

Academic Language Demands:


Language Function: Identify
Vocabulary: Bibliography, citation, source, plagiarism, credit, ethical

Library Literacies) being taught:


Understand and synthesize
In order to become:
Ethical users of information

Assessment: Students have added a slide to their PowerPoint that includes their
sources. When discussing why citations are necessary, each student should participate in
the discussion at least once. Challenge students to reach a deeper level of thinking by
questioning their answers and asking them to relate answers to real world situations.
Assessment Criteria: Every student participates in the discussion in a meaningful way at
least once. For example, a student could ask a meaningful question, such as But isnt it
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easy to just look on Google and find where I got my information from? Or they could say
something like If I was an author, I wouldnt want people to take my words without giving
me credit.

Instructional resources & materials


Needed by you- SmartBoard, example PowerPoint
Needed by students- Mythology PowerPoint (previously worked on by students)

Instructional strategies and learning tasks


Lesson opening: Students will open their presentations to the blank slide, and make
sure that their worksheets have been completely filled out. Once they determine that
they are complete, Ill say, Since everyones done with their work, now I want
everyone to cross their names out and write Miss Librarian at the top. Great, now I
can go present this because Ive got all this work done! This leads into how not
including the names of the people who provided the information is the taking credit for
the work of others.
Lesson delivery: Begin a discussion of why having citations is necessary and
important. Also make time to mention how to highlight citations while presenting. The
class will look at the website they used to find information about their deities in order to
pull the information needed for their citations.
Guided practice: Adding citations from the mythology research they have already
completed (will use information already on their worksheets) to a blank slide at the end
of their presentations.
Closure: Going around the room, toss a ball to the person whos supposed to speak
and go through the 3 Ws- What (did we learn today) [student tosses back to teacher],
So what (relevancy) [student tosses back to teacher], Now what (where do we go from
here?) [student returns the ball to the teacher]. Repeat this process several times.

Differentiation/Planned support
Whole class: Talking about using Google images with the labeled for reuse filter.
Gifted students: Asking students who have done extra research about mythology in the
past to think about ways that they could include their extra knowledge/sources in their
presentation.
Individual students: Giving the quiet girl an opportunity to have an alternate presentation
with fewer people in the audience in order to give her a chance to practice her good skills
without the nerves.

LESSON PLAN 2
What Makes a Good Presentation?

Grade level: 4th Grade


Length (minutes): 30 minutes
Central focus for the learning segment: Students will prepare/reflect on a short
presentation in order to explore and identify ways to be an ethical user of information,
measure their own presenting skills, and to compile a deeper understanding of presenting
ideas, both about the content (mythology, in this unit), and in general, to an audience.

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Standards

1. Common Core State Standards


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.4
Report on a topicusing appropriate factsspeak clearly and at an
understandable pace.
2. AASL Standards for 21st Century Learner
3.2.1 Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both
formal and informal situations

Learning Objective/Learning Target


Students will identify areas where the presenters convey their information successfully,
and areas where a presenter should improve.

Academic Language Demands:


Language Function: Analyse, observe, identify
Vocabulary: Pace, projection, accuracy, clarity

Library Literacies being taught:


Listen to, find, understand
In order to become
Ethical users of information

Assessment: End of the lesson exit slip


Assessment Criteria: Students should be able to write one positive skill they want to
display in their presentations, one weakness they would like to avoid, and a reason for
why citations is necessary, to connect with the content from lesson 1.

Instructional resources & materials


Needed by you- Example PowerPoint for bad presentation, Word document to
record student answers for rubric criteria
Needed by students- None

Instructional strategies and learning tasks


Lesson opening: Play up how great the presentation will be, then give a bad
presentation
Lesson delivery: My example of a bad presentation vs. a good presentation, then
discussion about the differences between the two.
Guided practice: Creating a list of tasks for a rubric for grading presentations as a
class. Teacher will facilitate discussion and record their answers in a Word document
that is displayed on the Smart Board so the class can see it.
Closure: Exit slip: Each student has to write one positive skill from the good
presentation I gave, and one weakness from the bad presentation.

Differentiation/Planned support:
Whole Class: Class discussion about the differences between the good and bad
presentations.
Gifted Students: Ask the class How might you react if your teacher always taught using
some of the habits of the bad presenter? or a similar question in order to help them
relate the topic to their lives.
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Individual students: During the research process, two students became so caught up in
reading that they forgot to write down the answers that they found. Another student wrote
down No clue if he could not find an answer to a question he was researching. If these
students have a hard time responding to the exit slip, I can use the list we complied on the
board as a checklist to remind them of areas they could use in their own writing.

LESSON PLAN 3
Evaluating Presentation Growth

Grade level: 4th Grade


Length (minutes): 30 minutes
Central focus for the learning segment: Students will prepare/reflect on a short
presentation in order to explore and identify ways to be an ethical user of information,
measure their own presenting skills, and to compile a deeper understanding of presenting
ideas, both about content (mythology in this unit), and in general, to an audience.

Standards

1. Common Core State Standards


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.2
Paraphraseinformation presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and orally.
2. AASL Standards for 21st Century Learner
4.1.5 Connect ideasto previous knowledge and experience.

Learning Objective/Learning Target


Students will review feedback given on their rubrics in order to draw conclusions about
their presenting skills.

Academic Language Demands:


Language Function: Review, conclude
Vocabulary: Pace, projection, accuracy, clarity

Library Literacies being taught:


Synthesize and evaluate
In order to become:
Ethical users of information

Assessment: Written response to the prompt: If you had to present your Greek god
again, based on the feedback youve received on your rubric, how would you change your
presentation?
Assessment Criteria: Response gives one or two ways to change presentation to make
it improve using at least one vocabulary word. For example, if a student has received
feedback saying that they need to speak more loudly, they could write about increasing
their projection. If a student received feedback about stumbling over words, they could
talk about ways they could clarify their content.

Instructional resources & materials

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Needed by you- A copy of the rubric based upon the list of criteria developed by the
students during lesson 2
Needed by students- Rubrics with teacher comments and feedback

Instructional strategies and learning tasks


Lesson opening: Pass out rubrics with feedback, discuss with them how their
presentations went.
Lesson delivery: Walk through the rubric as a class, giving examples of feedback that
had been written (making sure to not mention any students specifically, and to address
common problems, not specific ones). Talk about ways to respond to specific pieces of
feedback.
Guided practice: Write response to prompt of how they could improve their
presentation skills.
Closure: Go around the room and ask for students who feel comfortable to share
about what they've written. Talk about the skills they have gained and their growth
throughout the week.

Differentiation/Planned support:
Whole class: Each student will be receiving feedback based on their personal
performance. Students can highlight the positive areas in one color and the areas they
need to improve on in another color (with everyone using the same two colors in the same
ways). This is to help students focus on key takeaways and clarify the feedback.
Gifted Students: After passing out the prompt, Ill say Think about other ways that you
could improve presentation that are not listed on the rubric. By addressing this statement
to the entire class, it gives an opportunity for deeper thinking to both students who are
gifted, and others who are feeling up to the challenge.
Individual students: When talking to students who seem to be struggling with how to
respond to the feedback, allow them to ask clarifying questions and restate the feedback
in their own words.

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