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KAPLAN UNIVERSITY

HW410 Stress: Critical Issues in


Management and Prevention

Stress
Management and
Prevention

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Program Resource
Guide

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KA P L A N U N I V E R S I T Y

Stress Management and Prevention


Program Resource Guide

By

Monaliza Tatekawa

Kaplan University

HW410: Stress: Critical Issues in Management and Prevention

January 17, 2017


Revised: June 5, 2017
Table of Contents
UNIT 1 THE NATU RE OF STRESS

Information to Remember
........................................ 4
Self-Assessment
Exercise. 4

UNIT 2 THE PHYSIO LOGY OF STRESS

Information to Remember
6
Self-Assessment
Exercises 6

UNIT 3 PSYCHOLOGY OF STRESS

Information to
Remember 8
Self-Assessment Exercises
8

UNIT 4 PERSONAL ITY TRAITS AND THE HUM AN SPIRITUAL ITY

Information to
Remember. 10
Self-Assessment
Exercises. 10

UNIT 5 DEAL ING WITH STRESS: COPING STRATE GIES

Information to
Remember... 12

UNIT 6 REL AXATIO N TECHI QUES 1 : BREATHI NG , M EDITATI ON,

AND M ENTAL IM AGE RY

Information to
Remember 13
Self-Assessment
Exercises 13
UNIT 7 NUTRITI ON AND STRESS

Information to
Remember. 15

UNIT 8 PHYSIC AL EXERCISE AND ACTIV ITY


Information to
Remember 16
Self-Assessment
Exercises 16

UNIT 9 APPLYING STRESS: CRITICAL ISSUES F OR M ANAGEM EN T

AND PREVE NTIO N TO YOUR PROF ESSI ONAL L IF E

Information to
Remember. 19

ADDITI ONAL INF ORM ATIO N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 0

REF EREN CES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 2

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Unit

Unit 1: The Nature of Stress


Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Stress. There are many definitions to stress. According to Seaward, stress is the wear
and tear of the body, it is the inability to deal with problems, it is the loss of emotional control and the
absence of inner peace. It is a perceived threat, rational or irrational, to the body, mind and spirit.
(Seaward, 2006).
Key Learning Point: Stress reaction, the human bodys response to stress. The fight or flight response is
the first reaction to a perceived threat which involves four stages, with the body returning to
homeostasis in phase four. The stress response is initiated in all types of threats; mental, emotional
and spiritual. If left untreated, the repercussions can and do prove to be fatal. (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Types of stresses. Eustress is categorized as a good type of stress such as a wedding
or passing an exam. Neustress is stress that is neither good or bad. It is described as a sensory stimuli
that have no consequential effect such as a natural disaster that happens on the other side of the
world. Distress, is considered bad stress and is simply called stress. There are two types of
distress/stress, acute and chronic. (Seaward, 2006).

Self-Assessment Exercise:
The purpose of this self-assessment exercise was to develop a self-awareness of
stress reactions. We were to create a circle/mandala that was categorized in four
primary parts; mental, physical, emotional and spiritual. Although the mandala
was separated in four parts, it represented the humans health as a whole. To be
balanced, to be in a state of homeostasis, each of the four parts of the mandala
are supposed to be cared for, which ultimately will link together as one creating a
balanced effect. (Seaward, 2015).

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2
Unit

References

Seaward, B. (2015). Managing stress: Principles and strategies for health and

well-being. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Stahl, B., & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction

workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

Unit 2: The Physiology of Stress


Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Psychophysiology is a term used to described the physiological response to stress,
signifying that the response is a mind-body phenomenon. The nervous system, the endocrine
system, and the immune system are the three systems that are directly linked to the stress response.

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Fear is first registered in the amygdala which is part of the limbic system of the brain. (Seaward,
2015)
Key Learning Point: Allostatic load is a term used to describe the state of being stressed out. The
allostatic (stress) response can cause damage to the body such as organ functions. Research also
suggests that chronic stress causes damage to the brain. (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Neuroplasticity is a new term that describes that the human brain is far more plastic
than what was formerly thought. Because of this new discovery, we now know that the brain can
generate new connections to various brain cells, recruit various brain tissue for a host of functions,
and generate new cell growth (which was previously thought to be impossible (Seaward, 2015).

Self-Assessment Exercise:
For this assignment, we were to define neuroscience and neuroplasticity, and
explain why it is important to the brain. Neuroscience is the study of the nervous
system. Neuroplasticity is a new term that describes that the human brain is far
more plastic than what was formerly thought. Because of this new discovery, we
now know that the brain can generate new connections to various brain cells,
recruit various brain tissue for a host of functions, and generate new cell growth
(which was previously thought to be impossible (Seaward, 2015). Neuroscience
and neuroplasticity is important to the brain because it allows us to understand
the physiology of the brain.

We were also to describe five diseases that occur when the nervous system is
affected by stress. Bronchial asthma, Migraine headaches, Temporomandibular
joint dysfunction (TMJD), Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and Coronary heart
disease. One disease that occurs in the immune system when affected by stress is
the common cold and influenza. (Seaward, 2015)

References

Seaward, B. (2015). Managing stress: Principles and strategies for health and

well-being. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Stahl, B., & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction

workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

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Unit 3: Psychology of Stress

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Unit

Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: There are several theoretical concepts from Carl Jung, Elisabeth
Kubler-Ross, Viktor Frankl, Wayne Dyer, Leo Buscaglia, Abraham Maslow,
Martin Seligman to the Tibetan perspective. But one common ground from all
the theories, is that we begin to understand that stress begins in the mind and
that our minds create ways to combat these stressor, whether they were
brewed internally or influenced by external stimuli. According to the theories,
self-awareness is a critical process to move beyond the defensive action and
into the realm of resolution (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Time and money are the primary resources needed to navigate a
stressful life. However, people tend to unaware of that and waste it. Time
management is defined as the ability to prioritize, schedule, and execute
responsibilities to personal satisfaction (Seaward, 2015). Money is a primary
resource for survival. It is used to feed us, to clothe us, to house us and to buy
anything necessary for us to live. However, we live in a time where people
spend money frivolously. This is one of the major barriers to financial freedom.
(Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Communication is important. Effective communication is key.
There are several vehicles to communicate such as social media, emails, phone
call, texts, a hand-written letter, or face to face. Communication is not only
about speaking but also about listening attentively. There are several ways to
improve your communication skills. The tips a listed below. (Seaward, 2015).

Self-Assessment Exercise:
There is a great lesson to be learned about the mind and stress from the Tibetan
culture. (Seaward, 2015). The philosophy of Buddhism about the mind and

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stress, articulates that stress (suffering) is believed to be a consequence of
desires with strong attachments (Seaward, 2015). Tibetan lama Sakyong
Mipham suggests taming the mind, so that the self and higher Self can connect to
reach its full protentional.

From all the theories, we begin to understand that stress begins in the mind and
that our minds create ways to combat these stressor, whether they were brewed
internally or influenced by external stimuli. According to the theories, self-
awareness is a critical process to move beyond the defensive action and into the
realm of resolution (Seaward, 2015).

There are several therapies that help to manage and resolve fear. While each
therapy offers a different approach, each of them have one common principle, and
that is the fear must be confronted.

The following are five ways to improve your communication skills.

Establish boundaries: Establishing healthy boundaries for yourself is a great


way to start. You want to allow yourself some quiet time, free from phone calls,
texts, emails, etc. setting a time block such as 9:00pm to 9:00am where you are
technology free is a good way to establish boundaries. Technology is supposed to
serve you, not enslave you.

Touch it once rule: If youre like me, who opens emails and texts and has
the intention of replying at a later time but never do, then this skill is for you. The
touch it once rule implies that when you open an email or text, reply in some
way immediately, even if its only a short message.

Be courteous: When you are interacting with someone, especially in a face-


to-face conversation, put your phone on slient. It is very rude to be in a
conversation and attending to your phone at the same time. This includes phone
calls, text messages, social media, etc. This I feel is very important.

Listening, attending and responding skills are also very important in


communication.

Assume the role of listener: Listening requires that all attention be paid to
what the speaker is saying (Seaward, 2015). Try and steer clear of all thoughts
while listening because this takes away direct attention from the speaker. This is
the "primary reason for bad listening habits (Seaward, 2015). While the role of
speaker and listener go back and forth, dont formulate your comments while you
are in the listening mode.

Maintain eye contact: Good eye contact is considered essential to effective


listening (Seaward, 2015). A wandering eye or lack of eye contact can convey
wandering thoughts or lack of interest in the conversation. Good eye contact does
not mean starring, good eye conveys respect to the speaker.

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Unit 4: Personality Traits and the Human

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Unit

Spirituality
Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Stress prone and stress resistant personalities. Personalities,
which is comprised of traits, characteristics, behaviors, expressions, moods
and feelings as perceived by others (Seaward, 2015) Everyone poses a
different personality. Personalities can be classified as either stress prone or
stress resistant (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Human Spirituality and Stress. Two terms that really stuck with
me in this lesson are spiritual hunger and spiritual bankruptcy. Spiritual
hunger is the journey to understanding life and the big questions about it, its
also the journey to find out how we all fit into it. Spiritual Bankruptcy is a term
that describes the lack of spiritual direction suggesting moral decay
(Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Behavior modification and the Stages of Change. This lesson
was very useful not only for myself, but for anyone that I will work with in the
future that will need assistance in behavior modification. Stages of Changes is
a behavior modification model by James Prochaska. There are six stages;
precontemplation, contemplative, determination, action, maintenance, and the
relapse stage. (Seaward, 2015)

Self-Assessment Exercise:
Self-esteem is the sense of undermining self-values, self-acceptance, and
self-love (Seaward, 2015). It is reflected in how we carry ourselves; what we

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say, what we wear, and our behaviors. A high self-esteem is harmony between
your actual-self and your ideal-self (Seaward, 2015). There are several ways to
enhance ones self-esteem, these methods are known as the Six Pillars of Self-
Esteem;

The focus on action


The practice of living consciously
The practice of del-acceptance
The practice of self-responsibility
The practice of self-assertiveness
The practice of living purposefully
The practice of personal integrity

Stress can affect many aspects of ones life. It affects relationships, values,
as well as finding meaningful purpose in life. According to a 2015 study by the
Greater Good, stressed partners received less support when their partner was
also stressed (Newman, 2016). As one matures, their personal values may
shift, according Carl Jung this shift is known as value conflicts. These value
conflicts are what causes a great deal of stress within. Jung refers this sort of
stress as a spiritual crisis.

A persons values, beliefs and attitude are an essential aspect of who we are
as a whole. These values are instilled primarily during childhood but as one
matures and creates his/her own experiences, these values shift. Our personal
values and beliefs determine our attitude towards life.

According to Viktor Frankl, a life mission can be accomplished through the


design and achievement of a series of life goals, and through the experience of a
value conflict or emotional suffering (Seaward, 2015). People may go through a
time of suffering (stress) when a goal has ended. Frankl believed that emotional
suffering was a necessary part of the process of moving on and continuing with
ones purposeful meaning. (Seaward, 2015).

References

Seaward, B. (2015). Managing stress: Principles and strategies for health and

well-being. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Stahl, B., & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction

workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

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Unit 5: Dealing with Stress: Coping Strategies

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Unit

Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Cognitive Restructuring: Reframing. Cognitive restructuring
which also is called reappraisal, relabeling, reframing, and attitude
adjustment, means changing a perception from a negative interpretation to a
neutral or positive one, making it less stressful (Seaward, 2015). When
information is processed, it goes through four components; sensory input,
sensory manipulation, cognitive/behavioral output, and a feedback system.
And negative thoughts are toxic which can suppress the immune system.
(Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Humor Therapy. Believe it or not, laughter is always the best
medicine. Humor is not a positive emotion, but it can elicit several positive
emotions. Humor like stress is a perception (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Time management and money. To avoid any unneeded stress,
time and money management are important. Time management means to
prioritize, create a schedule, and execute responsibilities. Money management
means to budget your finances and avoid frivolous spending. (Seaward, 2015).

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Unit 6: Relaxation Techniques 1: Breathing,

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Unit

Meditation, and Mental Imagery


Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Diaphragmatic breathing is the most basic relaxation
techniques; breathing form the lower stomach or diaphragm rather than the
thoracic area (Seaward, 2015). There are many benefits to diaphragmatic
breathing, it decreases the resting heart rate, it promotes relaxation, it
decreases muscle tension, it improves mental clarity, it increases the oxygen
capacity in the lungs and helps one deal with stress. (Seaward, 2015)
Key Learning Point: Meditation and mindfulness. Meditation is a practice that
increases concentration leading to an increased awareness. Meditation is
beneficial in many ways. One way is to train the mind to combat sensory
overload. Mindfulness is a type of meditation. It involves all the senses and
concentrates on the present moment, whatever it may be; reading, playing,
cooking, etc. (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Mental imagery and visualization. Mental imagery is helpful for
acute stress. It is defined as using the imagination to observe, in the first-
person images created by the unconscious mind (Seaward, 2015). There are
three categories to mental imagery; images of peaceful scenery; images that
substitutes an undesirable behavior with a more desirable behavior; images
that help heal body tissue. Visualization is the directed exercise of mental
imagery. (Seaward, 2015)

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Self-Assessment Exercise:
Diaphragmatic breathing is the most basic relaxation technique (Seaward,
2015). It is defined as controlled deep breathing and involves the movement of
the lower abdomen (Seaward, 2015). There are three important steps to help
engage in this technique. Assume a comfortable position, concentrate, and
visualization. Concentration is the next step. External and internal factors can
disrupt ones focus, this is common. Concentration can be improved further by
focusing on each phase of the breath. The third important step is visualization.
The three common visualization exercises are breathing clouds, alternate nostril
breathing, and energy breathing.

Meditation has been known to have many positive effects on the mind and
body. According to a vast majority of studies, meditation has been observed to
have a remarkable influence on mood states, immune function, sleep, chronic
pain, and various aspects of mental, emotional, and physical well-being
(Seaward, 2015). Meditation has been known to have significant effects on the
brain as well. To name a few, meditation has been observed to increase gamma
brain wave activity. It has also been found that portions of the brain used in
meditation practice grow in size and undergo neural rewiring, now known as
neuroplasticity (Seaward, 2015). Meditation has also had effects on the process
of sustained attention and emotional regulation as well as the physiology of the
brain and the immune system.

Mental imagery and visualization is used to promote relaxation. There are


three ways to use mental imagery and visualization for relaxation. The first one is
imagining tranquil natural scenes such as a tropical beach, a mountain vista, or
a path through an evergreen forest. The second one is a process of mental
imagery created by Joseph Wolpe called systematic desensitization. In this
process, a person uses his or her imagination to help overcome anxiety related to
a specific situation by building up a tolerance to the stressor through progressive
exposure to it (Seaward, 2015). The third types of mental imagery involve direct
changes in physiological by using imagination to see a particular body region in a
healthy state (Seaward, 2015). The purpose of imagining internal body images
is to heal a disease or illness. (Seaward, 2015).

References

Seaward, B. (2015). Managing stress: Principles and strategies for health and

well-being. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Stahl, B., & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction

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workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

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Unit Unit

Unit 7: Nutrition and Stress


Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Physical exercise and stress. In the fight-or-flight response, the
body gets ready for immediate physical movement. Physical exercise
perpetuates the stress response while in motion, but when physical exercise
comes to a halt, the body is returned back to homeostasis. (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Types of exercises. There are six components of fitness:
cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, agility,
power and balance. There are two types of exercises that address these six
components. Anaerobic and aerobic exercise/activities. (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: Nutrition and stress. There are certain foods that can contribute
to stress and have a major impact on our physical health. Toxins in our food for
example, compromises our immune system. The dynamics of food, stress and
our health is like a domino effect. (Seaward, 2015).

Unit 8: Physical Exercise and Activity


Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Hatha Yoga. Hatha Yoga is just one of the five yogic paths. Hatha
Yoga is the path of physical balance. Hatha Yoga is helpful in relieving chronic
pain. (Seaward, 2015).

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Key Learning Point: Tai Chi Chuan. Tai Chi Chuan is a relaxation technique
originating among the Chinese; a succession of movements to bring the body
into harmony with the universal energy (Chi); a moving meditation. Tai Chi
promotes balance, boosts the immune system, and enhances the effectiveness
of vaccines for influenza. (Seaward, 2015).
Key Learning Point: More on nutrition and stress. Food not only affects our physical
health but it also affects our mental, emotional and spiritual health as well.
Eating a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and grains is considered spiritually
nutritious and nurtures the well-being of the seven primary chakras.
(Seaward, 2015)

Self-Assessment Exercises:
In this assignment, we created a workplace wellness program to reduce
stress. Stress is a definite factor in the workplace. The individuals position in
the workplace predicts their stress level, and not everyone manages stress the
same way. The purpose of this program is to reduce stress in the workplace, but
how can we create a universal stress reduction program, with the focus on mind
and body exercises that would benefit all positions and all personalities, and
require little to no capital outlay?
The first thing we need to do is teach employees about stress, what it is,
how it affects their health and how to implement effective strategies to reduce
the effects of stress. There are several ways to reduce stress in the workplace.
The following relaxation exercises have been proven to be effective in reducing
stress and can be implemented in the office, at ones desk or a quiet corner;
mindfulness, being in the moment, engaging your senses, meditation, walking
meditation, visualization, and laughter.
Another effective way to reduce stress is a good workout. There are
several exercises that require little to no equipment. A cardio workout such as
Zumba or a high intensity interval training workout (HIIT) requires little to no
equipment and provides a full body workout. If an employee prefers a different
style of workout, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong are also great too, and they have
also been proven to reduce stress. Designating an area, either indoors or
outdoors in the workplace is a great way to make the program accessible and
convenient. Recruiting instructors to lead the exercise program can encourage
employees to have fun with it and stay consistent with the practice. Having a
variety of exercise classes which will be scheduled on certain days and times
can help employees plan their day to make time for their favorite class.
Recruit an onsite therapist that specializes in stress reduction. Provide a
designated area or office in the workplace so he/she is available to provide
assistance and support to any employee who may need services. Although this
idea is really not a mind body exercise, I think it would be a great option to
consider to further help employees take control of their health. Setting aside

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time or breaks in the day/week for each employee to engage in a stress
reduction exercise is vital in reducing stress in the workplace.
The following is a list of practices and exercises that I would like to see
implemented in the stress reduction program.

Mindfulness and Relaxation Exercises


Mindfulness/Being in the moment
Engage your senses
Meditation
Walking meditation
Visualization
Yoga
Tai Chi Chuan
Laughter

Physical Exercise
Anaerobic activities:
High Intensity Interval Training is is a form of interval training, a
cardiovascular exercise strategy alternating short periods of intense
anaerobic exercise with less intense recovery periods ("High-intensity
interval training", n.d.) HIIT requires a little equipment while providing
high intensity anaerobic activities.
Les Mills Body Pump: is a weight-based group-fitness program
("BodyPump", n.d.). It also requires little equipment while providing high
intensity exercises for any fitness level.
Aerobic activities:
Zumba: Zumba is a dance fitness program that only requires music. This
aerobic exercise is also great for all fitness levels.

References

Seaward, B. (2015). Managing stress: Principles and strategies for health and

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well-being. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

9
Unit

Stahl, B., & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction

workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

Unit 9: Applying Stress: Critical Issues for


Management and Prevention to your
Professional Life
Information to Remember:
Key Learning Point: Coping strategies for stress. Information seeking is a common
technique for coping. To seek information about a perceived threat can be a
relief when one acquires an increased awareness about a particular situation.
However, caution when seeking information. It can result in more stress,
especially it the information that you seek has a negative outcome. (Seaward,
2015).
Key Learning Point: Ineffective coping strategy. Avoidance. In the fight-or-flight
response, in the flight response, it is common for people to avoid a stressful
situation. According to Seaward, avoidance is the most ineffective comping
mechanism (Seaward, 2015). Rather than avoiding a stressful situation, one
should try social orchestration. (Seaward, 2015)

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Key Learning Point: Hobbies. Hobbies are a great coping mechanism for stress. For
hobbies to be an effective coping mechanism, one must not attach
perfectionism to the hobby. The hobby should be a pleasurable pursuit.
(Seaward, 2015).

Additional Information
Primary Sources:

Unit 1 Discussion:
Discuss how mindfulness can be applied to one of the components of the
wellness paradigm.
The wellness paradigm is the integration, balance and harmony of the following
four components; mental, physical, emotional and spiritual. I think the practice
of mindfulness falls under the mental well-being of the wellness paradigm.
(Seaward, 2015)
Mindfulness is about being fully aware of whatever is happening in the present
moment, without filters or the lens of judgement (Stahl & Goldstein, 2010).
Mindfulness can be applied in any situation; washing dishes, drinking coffee,
eating a raisin, playing with your kids, walking, running or even hiking.
Lets take drinking coffee for example. You can practice mindfulness from the
moment you begin to brew your coffee by being aware and focusing on the
experience, such as the aroma as it brews, the sound as the coffee maker
releases the coffee into your mug, and when you lift your mug to drink, feel the
warmness of the cup, feel the steam as it hits your nose, taste the bitterness of

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the coffee as it hits your mouth and feel it flow as it travels through your
stomach.

Unit 5 Discussion:

Using Prochaskas Stages of Change, model apply it to one lifestyle


activity, e.g., smoking.

James Prochaska was a man fascinated with behavior change and through
extensive studies, he created a process called the Stages of Change. Smoking
is one of the most difficult behaviors to change. Because it is a behavior that I
am trying to change for myself, I will use smoking as my example. The Stages of
Change consist of six steps. The following is an example of how I would apply
Prochaskas model towards my attempt to quit smoking.

In the precontemplation stage, I would be in denial that smoking is


negatively affecting my health. I would also probably make excuses as to why I
shouldnt quit such as, it being a form of stress relief for me.
In the contemplation stage, I would begin to acknowledge that smoking is
affecting my health, from the shortness of breaths, to the pain in my chest or
the apparent readings of elevated blood pressure. At this point, I would begin to
think that quitting my bad habit of smoking would be beneficial to my future
health.
In the determination stage, I would begin to put a little action into changing
the behavior. I would consider my options of how to quit and then determine a
date that I would start the process.
In the action stage, I would take action to start the quitting process. If for
example, I decided to quit cold turkey, I would throw away all of my
cigarettes/electronic cigarette, lighters, etc. to keep them out of site. I would
also probably buy packs of gum or a healthy snack to munch on for when I feel a
craving to smoke.
In the maintenance stage, at this point, I would be in the flow of being a
non-smoker, this stage is also called second nature. I would continue to
maintain this new healthy habit and deal with craving issues as they occur.
In the relapse stage, I wouldve picked up the habit again, however, only
temporarily until I readopted the stages of changes again.

Secondary Sources:

Seaward, B. L. (2013). Health of the human spirit: spiritual dimensions for

personal health (2nd ed.). Burlington,

MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

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Seaward, B. (2015). Managing stress: Principles and strategies for health and

well-being (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Stahl, B. & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction

workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

Mind Body Green http://www.mindbodygreen.com/

The American Institute of Stress http://www.stress.org/

References

Newman, K. M. (2016, February 10). Could Stress Be Causing Your Relationship

Problems?

Retrieved December 07, 2016, from

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/could_stress_be_causing_your

_relationship_problems

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Seaward, B.L. (2006). Essentials of managing stress. Jones and Bartlett
Publishers.

Seaward, B. (2015). Managing stress: Principles and strategies for health and

well-being (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Stahl, B. & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction

workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

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