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Jeff Manchur

Pianist and Teacher

Jeff Manchur Pianist and Teacher 402-309-4032 <a href=jeffmanchur@gmail.com jeff.manchur.com Speaking: Works for Piano, Toy Piano, and Voice Program: The Animist Child (1992) 5’ for vocalizing toy pianist Les Champs de Blé (2014) Jerome Kitzke (b. 1955) Samuel Lee McKnight (b. 1991) 8’ for pianist and toy pianist (one performer), based on “The Little Prince” (2014) De Profundis (1992) Frederic Rzewski (b. 1938) 30’ a melodramatic oratorio for speaking pianist I Leap through the Sky with Stars (1991) 7’ for solo piano Total Length : 50 minutes. Alexina Louie (b. 1949) Program Introduction: This recital program highlights the growth of the speaking pianist genre, a growing outlet for classical pianists to expand and challenge traditional concert experiences. The program I have selected also represents growth in terms of the performer. The pianist who speaks (and often whistles, grunts, sings, hits oneself etc.) on stage must lose all inhibitions and develop skills as an acting musician, maturing from one who just plays “on the keys”. In this program, the process of maturity is paralleled in the selections. First, transitioning from toy piano to full acoustic grand (with a stop playing both along the way). Secondly, the incoherent babbling of a toddler discovering the world (Kitzke), to the young adult discovering friendship (McKnight) to a mature adult grappling with dark matters of the world, and of the soul (Rzewski). The final work is voiceless, the only piece truly for solo piano (representing self-actualization), and is based on a Zen death poem whic h the composer used to reflect upon an artist’s eternal voice that lives on after death through their work. You may access previous performances of selections of this repertoire via the following links: McKnight , - Rzewski , Louie . " id="pdf-obj-0-6" src="pdf-obj-0-6.jpg">

402-309-4032

jeff.manchur.com

Speaking: Works for Piano, Toy Piano, and Voice

Program:

The Animist Child (1992) 5’ for vocalizing toy pianist

Les Champs de Blé (2014)

Jerome Kitzke (b. 1955)

Samuel Lee McKnight (b. 1991)

8’ for pianist and toy pianist (one performer), based on “The Little Prince” (2014)

De Profundis (1992)

Frederic Rzewski (b. 1938)

30’ a melodramatic oratorio for speaking pianist

I Leap through the Sky with Stars (1991) 7’ for solo piano

Total Length: 50 minutes.

Alexina Louie (b. 1949)

Program Introduction: This recital program highlights the growth of the speaking pianist genre, a growing outlet for classical pianists to expand and challenge traditional concert experiences. The program I have selected also represents growth in terms of the performer. The pianist who speaks (and often whistles, grunts, sings, hits oneself etc.) on stage must lose all inhibitions and develop

skills as an acting musician, maturing from one who just plays “on the keys”. In this program, the

process of maturity is paralleled in the selections. First, transitioning from toy piano to full acoustic grand (with a stop playing both along the way). Secondly, the incoherent babbling of a toddler discovering the world (Kitzke), to the young adult discovering friendship (McKnight) to a mature adult grappling with dark matters of the world, and of the soul (Rzewski). The final work is voiceless, the only piece truly for solo piano (representing self-actualization), and is based on a Zen death poem which the composer used to reflect upon an artist’s eternal voice that lives on after death through their work.

You may access previous performances of selections of this repertoire via the following links: McKnight,

m

Biography:

m Biography: Between performances in converted warehouses, basements, bars, art museums, sculpture gardens and traditional concert

Between performances in converted warehouses, basements, bars, art museums, sculpture gardens and traditional concert halls, wearing tuxedos with tails or jeans and sock feet, Jeff Manchur is committed to creating diverse and challenging musical experiences for audiences across the United States and Canada. He has performed Morton Feldman’s iconic 4 hour and 45 minute-long “For Philip Guston” (the subject of his doctoral dissertation) with

Chamber Cartel in Atlanta and regularly performs on the toy piano (he owns two), appearing across the USA at the inaugural Omaha Under the Radar, and the BGSU, Studio 300, and Tutti New Music festivals. His solo piano performances span from premieres of works by Garrett Hope to his personal takes on the classics of Beethoven, the drama of Wuorinen to the passion of Liszt, the eclecticism of Rzewski to the refinement of Mozart.

Jeff’s playing has been rewarded at the BGSU Concerto Competition (winner with

Schnittke's Concerto for Piano and Strings) and the Dr Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition (first place) for his collaboration with soprano Fidelia Esther Darmahkasih. He performed with the

Chiara String Quartet as a finalist in the “Play with the Chiaras” competition and represented

Nebraska in the MTNA Young Artist competition as their state winner. Academically, he has presented papers at the University of Toronto, Trinity College, Dublin, and the University of London. More recently, he has received grants from the Manitoba Arts Council and served as an artist in residence at both the Brush Creek Foundation for the Arts and the Hambidge Center.

His early studies were with Sandra Dowhan in Dauphin, Manitoba before completing a Bachelor of Music with Greatest Distinction, studying with Joan Miller at Brandon University. Graduate studies took him to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to work with Paul Barnes. At the same time, he studied classical performance practice with Ann Chang, leading him to take a keen research interest in the study of early recordings, most especially the eccentric Ervin Nyiregyhazi.

His love and respect of traditional music has led him into the world of new music, searching for fresh ways of musical expression beyond the conventional boundaries imposed by current customs of classical music. In May 2015 he graduated from the Doctor of Musical Arts in Contemporary Music program at Bowling Green State University where he studied with Thomas Rosenkranz and visiting professor Robert Shannon from Oberlin Conservatory. In Spring 2016, Jeff was collaborative pianist and taught at Marietta College. He continues to freelance as a solo and collaborative pianist, as well as serving on the faculty of the Toledo Symphony School of Music.