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CENTRIFUGAL LIQUID CHILLERS

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE Supersedes: 160.75-O1 (508) Form 160.75-O1 (211)

MODEL YK (STYLE G)
R-134a
WITH OPTIVIEWTM CONTROL CENTER
FOR ELECTRO-MECHANICAL STARTER,
SOLID STATE STARTER AND VARIABLE SPEED DRIVE

LD15222
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

IMPORTANT!
READ BEFORE PROCEEDING!
GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES
This equipment is a relatively complicated apparatus. which it is situated, as well as severe personal injury or
During installation, operation maintenance or service, death to themselves and people at the site.
individuals may be exposed to certain components or
conditions including, but not limited to: refrigerants, This document is intended for use by owner-authorized
materials under pressure, rotating components, and operating/service personnel. It is expected that this in-
both high and low voltage. Each of these items has the dividual posseses independent training that will enable
potential, if misused or handled improperly, to cause them to perform their assigned tasks properly and safe-
bodily injury or death. It is the obligation and respon- ly. It is essential that, prior to performing any task on
sibility of operating/service personnel to identify and this equipment, this individual shall have read and un-
recognize these inherent hazards, protect themselves, derstood this document and any referenced materials.
and proceed safely in completing their tasks. Failure This individual shall also be familiar with and comply
to comply with any of these requirements could result with all applicable governmental standards and regula-
in serious damage to the equipment and the property in tions pertaining to the task in question.

SAFETY SYMBOLS
The following symbols are used in this document to alert the reader to specific situations:

Indicates a possible hazardous situation Identifies a hazard which could lead to


which will result in death or serious injury damage to the machine, damage to other
if proper care is not taken. equipment and/or environmental pollu-
tion if proper care is not taken or instruc-
tions and are not followed.

Indicates a potentially hazardous situa- Highlights additional information useful


tion which will result in possible injuries to the technician in completing the work
or damage to equipment if proper care is being performed properly.
not taken.

External wiring, unless specified as an optional connection in the manufacturers product line, is
not to be connected inside the OptiView cabinet. Devices such as relays, switches, transducers and
controls and any external wiring must not be installed inside the micro panel. All wiring must be in
accordance with Johnson Controls published specifications and must be performed only by a qualified
electrician. Johnson Controls will NOT be responsible for damage/problems resulting from improper
connections to the controls or application of improper control signals. Failure to follow this warning
will void the manufacturers warranty and cause serious damage to property or personal injury.

2 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

CHANGEABILITY OF THIS DOCUMENT


In complying with Johnson Controls policy for contin- Operating/service personnel maintains the responsi-
uous product improvement, the information contained bility of the applicability of these documents to the
in this document is subject to change without notice. competitive equipment the kit is installed on. If there
While Johnson Controls makes no commitment to up- is any question regarding the applicability of these
date or provide current information automatically to documents, the technician should verify whether the
the manual owner, that information, if applicable, can equipment has been modified and if current literature
be obtained by contacting the nearest Johnson Controls is available with the owner of the equipment prior to
Service office. performing any work on the chiller.

ASSOCIATED LITERATURE
MANUAL DESCRIPTION FORM NUMBER
Variable Speed Drive Operation 160.00-O1
Solid State Starter Operation and Maintenance 160.00-O2
Floor Mounted MV SSS Operation 160.00-O5
Unit Mounted MV SSS Operation 160.00-O7
Installation Unit 160.75-N1
Optiview Control Center Operation and Maintenance 160.54-O1
Wiring Diagram Field Connections for YK Chiller (Style G) OptiView Control Center with Remote Low
160.75-PW1
or Medium Voltage EMS or Unit Mounted Low or Medium Voltage SSS
Wiring Diagram Field Connections for YK Chiller (Style G) OptiView Control Center with Remote
160.75-PW2
Medium Voltage SSS
Wiring Diagram Field Connections for YK Chiller (Style G) OptiView Control Center with Remote
160.75-PW3
Medium Voltage VSD
Wiring Diagram Field Control Modifications for YK Chiller (Style G) 160.75-PW4
Wiring Diagram YK Chiller (Style G) OptiView Control Center with Remote Low or Medium Voltage EMS 160.75-PW5
Wiring Diagram YK Chiller (Style G) OptiView Control Center with Unit Mounted Low or Medium
160.75-PW6
Voltage SSS, Unit Mounted Low Voltage VSD with Modbus, or Remote Medium Voltage VSD
Wiring Diagram YK Chiller (Style G) OptiView Control Center with LTC I/O Board with Remote Low or
160.75-PW7
Medium Voltage EMS
Wiring Diagram YK Chiller (Style G) OptiView Control Center w/ LTC I/O Board with Unit Mounted Low
160.75-PW8
or Medium Voltage SSS, Unit Mounted Low Voltage VSD with Modbus or Remote Medium Voltage VSD
Renewal Parts Unit 160.75-RP1
Renewal Parts OptiView Control Center 160.54-RP1

JOHNSON CONTROLS 3
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

NOMENCLATURE
YK KC K4 H9 CY G

STYLE (Design Level)

MOTOR CODE
POWER SUPPLY
for 60 Hz
5 for 50 Hz

COMPRESSOR CODE*

CONDENSER CODE*

EVAPORATOR CODE*
* Refer to YK Engineering Guide for (Form 160.75-EG1)
MODEL* Shell/Motor/Compressor combinations.

4 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION 1 - DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM AND FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATION........................................... 7


System Operation Description .......................................................................................................................... 7
Capacity Control................................................................................................................................................ 8
SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES............................................................................................ 11
Oil Heaters...................................................................................................................................................... 11
Oil Heater Operation....................................................................................................................................... 11
Checking The Oil Level In The Oil Reservoir.................................................................................................. 11
Start-Up Procedure......................................................................................................................................... 11
Start-Up........................................................................................................................................................... 11
Chiller Operation............................................................................................................................................. 13
Condenser Water Temperature Control........................................................................................................... 13
Operating Log Sheet....................................................................................................................................... 13
Operating Inspections..................................................................................................................................... 13
Need For Maintenance Or Service.................................................................................................................. 15
Stopping The System...................................................................................................................................... 15
Prolonged Shutdown....................................................................................................................................... 15
SECTION 3 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS DESCRIPTION........................................................................................17
General............................................................................................................................................................ 17
Compressor..................................................................................................................................................... 17
Capacity Control.............................................................................................................................................. 17
Compressor Lubrication System .................................................................................................................... 17
Oil Pump.......................................................................................................................................................... 17
Oil Heater........................................................................................................................................................ 21
Motor Driveline................................................................................................................................................ 21
Heat Exchangers............................................................................................................................................. 21
Refrigerant Flow Control................................................................................................................................. 22
Optional Service Isolation Valves.................................................................................................................... 22
Optional Hot Gas Bypass................................................................................................................................ 22
OptiView Control Center.................................................................................................................................. 22
Solid State Starter (Optional).......................................................................................................................... 22
Variable Speed Drive (Optional)...................................................................................................................... 22
SECTION 4 - OPERATIONAL MAINTENANCE......................................................................................................23
Oil Return System........................................................................................................................................... 23
Changing The Dehydrator............................................................................................................................... 23
The Oil Charge................................................................................................................................................ 24
Oil Charging Procedure................................................................................................................................... 24
SECTION 5 - TROUBLESHOOTING.......................................................................................................................25
SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE.................................................................................................................................27
Renewal Parts................................................................................................................................................. 27
Checking System For Leaks........................................................................................................................... 27
Conducting R-22 Pressure Test...................................................................................................................... 27
Vacuum Testing............................................................................................................................................... 28
Vacuum Dehydration....................................................................................................................................... 29
Operation......................................................................................................................................................... 29
Refrigerant Charging....................................................................................................................................... 29
Checking The Refrigerant Charge During Unit Shutdown............................................................................... 30
Handling Refrigerant For Dismantling And Repairs......................................................................................... 30

JOHNSON CONTROLS 5
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT'D)


MeggingTheMotor.......................................................................................................................................... 30
Compressor..................................................................................................................................................... 33
Electrical Controls........................................................................................................................................... 34
SECTION 7 - PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE.........................................................................................................35
Compressor..................................................................................................................................................... 35
Compressor Motor........................................................................................................................................... 35
Greased Bearings .......................................................................................................................................... 35
Leak Testing.................................................................................................................................................... 36
Evaporator And Condenser............................................................................................................................. 36
Oil Return System........................................................................................................................................... 36
Electrical Controls........................................................................................................................................... 36

LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE 1 - Model YK Chiller7
FIGURE 2 - Compressor Prerotation Vanes8
FIGURE 3 - Refrigerant Flow-Thru Chiller (Falling Film Evaporator) 9
FIGURE 4 - Refrigerant Flow-Thru Chiller (Flooded Evaporator)10
FIGURE 5 - Oil Level Indicator  11
FIGURE 6 - Chiller Starting Sequence And Shutdown Sequence (Em Starter And Solid State Starter) 12
FIGURE 7 - Chiller Starting Sequence And Shutdown Sequence (Variable Speed Drive) 12
FIGURE 8 - Liquid Chiller Log Sheets14
FIGURE 9 - System Components Front View18
FIGURE 10 - System Components Rear View19
FIGURE 11 - Schematic Drawing (YK) Compressor Lubrication System 20
FIGURE 12 - Oil Return System23
FIGURE 13 - Charging Oil Reservoir With Oil24
FIGURE 14 - Evacuation Of Chiller27
FIGURE 15 - Saturation Curve29
FIGURE 16 - Diagram, Megging Motor Windings30
FIGURE 17 - Motor Starter Temperature And Insulation Resistances 31

LIST OF TABLES
TABLE 1 - Operation Analysis Chart25
TABLE 2 - System Pressures28
TABLE 3 - Bearing Lubrication35

6 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

SECTION 1 - DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM AND


FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATION

SYSTEM OPERATION DESCRIPTION nent to operation of the chiller are automatically dis-
played and read on a graphic display. Other displays
The YORK Model YK Chiller is commonly applied
to large air conditioning systems, but may be used
can be observed by pressing the keys as labeled on the 1
Control Center. The chiller with the OptiView Control
on other applications. The chiller consists of an open
Center is compatible with an electro-mechanical start-
motor mounted to a compressor (with integral speed
er, YORK Solid State Starter (optional), or Variable
increasing gears), condenser, evaporator and variable
Speed Drive (optional).
flow control.
In operation, a liquid (water or brine to be chilled)
The chiller is controlled by a modern state of the art
flows through the evaporator, where boiling refrigerant
Microcomputer Control Center that monitors its opera-
absorbs heat from the liquid. The chilled liquid is then
tion. The Control Center is programmed by the opera-
piped to fan coil units or other air conditioning terminal
tor to suit job specifications. Automatic timed start-ups
units, where it flows through finned coils, absorbing
and shutdowns are also programmable to suit night-
heat from the air. The warmed liquid is then returned to
time, weekends, and holidays. The operating status,
the chiller to complete the chilled liquid circuit.
temperatures, pressures, and other information perti-

COMPRESSOR
CONTROL
CENTER

MOTOR
CONDENSER

LD15222

EVAPORATOR

Figure 1 - MODEL YK CHILLER

JOHNSON CONTROLS 7
SECTION 1 - DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM AND FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATION FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

from the refrigerant vapor, causing it to condense. The


condenser water is supplied to the chiller from an ex-
ternal source, usually a cooling tower. The condensed
refrigerant drains from the condenser into the liquid
return line, where the variable orifice meters the flow
of liquid refrigerant to the evaporator to complete the
refrigerant circuit.
The major components of a chiller are selected to han-
dle the refrigerant, which would be evaporated at full
load design conditions. However, most systems will be
called upon to deliver full load capacity for only a rela-
tively small part of the time the unit is in operation.

CAPACITY CONTROL
The major components of a chiller are selected for full
load capacities, therefore capacity must be controlled
to maintain a constant chilled liquid temperature leav-
ing the evaporator. Prerotation vanes (PRV), located at
the entrance to the compressor impeller, compensate
for variation in load (Refer to Figure 2 on Page 8).
7619A(D)

The position of these vanes is automatically controlled


Figure 2 - COMPRESSOR PREROTATION VANES
through a lever arm attached to an electric motor lo-
cated outside the compressor housing. The automatic
The refrigerant vapor, which is produced by the boil- adjustment of the vane position in effect provides the
ing action in the evaporator, flows to the compressor performance of many different compressors to match
where the rotating impeller increases its pressure and various load conditions from full load with vanes wide
temperature and discharges it into the condenser. Wa- open to minimum load with vanes completely closed.
ter flowing through the condenser tubes absorbs heat

8 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 1 - DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM AND FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATION

Refrigerant Flow-Thru Chiller


YK Mod G
(Falling Film Evaporator)
Refrigerant Flow-Thru Cross-Section Diagram
(Falling-Film Evaporator)

COMPRESSOR

HOT GAS PRE-ROTATION


BYPASS VALVE VANES

SUCTION

OPTIONAL HOT GAS


DISCHARGE BYPASS LINE

OPTIONAL LIQUID LEVEL


ISOLATION VALVE
VALVE

EVAPORATOR
CONDENSER

SUCTION
BAFFLE

LIQUID LEVEL
LIQUID LEVEL

SUB-COOLER

OPTIONAL
ISOLATION LD00924A
VALVE

Rev. 2 (10-11-2010)
Figure 3 - REFRIGERANT FLOW-THRU CHILLER (FALLING FILM EVAPORATOR) Dan Sowers
dan.sowers-ext@jci.com
(717) 771-7535

JOHNSON CONTROLS 9
SECTION 1 - DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM AND FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATION FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

Refrigerant Flow-Thru Chiller


(Flooded Evaporator)
YK Mod G
Refrigerant Flow-Thru Cross-Section Diagram
(Flooded Evaporator)

COMPRESSOR

HOT GAS PRE-ROTATION


BYPASS VALVE VANES

SUCTION

DISCHARGE OPTIONAL HOT GAS


BYPASS LINE

OPTIONAL
ISOLATION
VALVE MESH ELIMINATORS or
SUCTION BAFFLE

EVAPORATOR
CONDENSER

LIQUID LEVEL

LIQUID LEVEL

SUB-COOLER

OPTIONAL LIQUID LEVEL


ISOLATION VALVE
LD00924B
VALVE

Rev. 2 (12-09-2010)
Dan Sowers
dan.sowers-ext@jci.com
Figure 4 - REFRIGERANT FLOW-THRU CHILLER (FLOODED EVAPORATOR) (717) 771-7535

10 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES

OIL HEATERS If the oil level during operation is in the OVER


FULL region of the oil level indicator, oil should
If the oil heater is de-energized during a shutdown pe-
be removed from the oil reservoir, This reduces
riod, it must be energized for 12 hours prior to starting
the oil level to the OPERATING RANGE.
compressor, or remove all oil and recharge compres-
sor with new oil. (Refer to Oil Charging Procedure on If the oil level during operation is in the LOW
Page 24.) OIL region of the oil level indicator, oil should be
added to the oil reservoir. (Refer to Oil Charging
OIL HEATER OPERATION Procedure on Page 24.)
The oil heater operation is controlled by the OptiV-
Comply with EPA and local regulations
iew Control Center. The heater is turned on and off
when removing or disposing of refrigera-
to maintain the oil temperature differential to a value
tion system oil!
50F (27.8C) above the condenser saturation tem-
perature. This target value is maintained by the control
panel. 2
If the target value is greater than 160F (71C), the tar-
get defaults to 160F (71C). If the target value is less START-UP PROCEDURE
than 110F (43.3C), it defaults to 110F (43.3C).
Pre-Starting
To prevent overheating of the oil in the event of a con-
Prior to starting the chiller, observe the Optiview
trol center component failure, the oil heater thermostat
Control Center Operation and Maintenance (Form
(1HTR) is set to open at 180F (82C).
160.54-O1). Make sure the display reads SYSTEM
CHECKING THE OIL LEVEL IN THE READY TO START.
OIL RESERVOIR Vent any air from the chiller waterboxes
Proper operating oil level During operation, the oil prior to starting the water pumps. Failure
level should fall to the OPERATING RANGE identified to do so will result in pass baffle damage.
on the vertical oil level indicator label (Refer to Figure 5
on Page 11).

START-UP
1. If the chilled water pump is manually operated,
start the pump. The Control Center will not al-
low the chiller to start unless chilled liquid flow is
established through the unit. If the chilled liquid
pump is wired to the Microcomputer Control Cen-
ter the pump will automatically start, therefore,
this step is not necessary.
2. To start the chiller, press the COMPRESSOR
START switch. This switch will automatically
spring return to the RUN position. (If the unit
was previously started, press the STOP/RESET
side of the COMPRESSOR switch and then press
the START side of the switch to start the chill-
LD08647
er.) When the start switch is energized, the Con-
Figure 5 - OIL LEVEL INDICATOR trol Center is placed in an operating mode and
any malfunction will be noted by messages on a
graphic display.

JOHNSON CONTROLS 11
SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

LD15609

** Not for all shutdowns. Refer to Display Messages in manual Optiview Control Center Operation and Maintenance (Form 160.54-O1).

Figure 6 - CHILLER STARTING SEQUENCE AND SHUTDOWN SEQUENCE (EM STARTER AND SOLID
STATE STARTER)

LD15610

** Not for all shutdowns. Refer to Display Messages in manual Optiview Control Center Operation and Maintenance (Form 160.54-O1).

Figure 7 - CHILLER STARTING SEQUENCE AND SHUTDOWN SEQUENCE (VARIABLE SPEED DRIVE)

12 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES

For display messages and information pertaining to the At start-up, the entering condenser water temperature
operation refer to Optiview Control Center Opera- may be as much as 25F (14C) colder than the stand-
tion and Maintenance (Form 160.54-O1). by return chilled water temperature. Cooling tower fan
Any malfunctions which occur during cycling will normally provide adequate control of the
STOP/RESET are also displayed. entering condenser water temperature on most instal-
lations.
Heat recovery chillers and chillers using optional head
pressure control would use a signal provided by the
microprocessor to control main condenser bundle heat
CHILLER OPERATION rejection or pressure, respectively.

The unit capacity will vary to maintain the leaving OPERATING LOG SHEET
CHILLED LIQUID TEMPERATURE setpoint by the
Pre-rotation Vanes which are modulated by an actua- A permanent daily record of system operating condi-
tor under the control of the Microprocessor Board. The tions (temperatures and pressures) recorded at regular
vane control routine employs proportional plus deriva- intervals throughout each 24 hour operating period
tive (rate) control action. A drop in chilled liquid tem- should be kept.
2
perature will cause the actuator to close the Prerotation An optional status printer is available for this purpose
Vanes to decrease chiller capacity. When the chilled or Figure 8 on Page 14 shows a log sheet used by
liquid temperature rises, the actuator will open the Pre- Johnson Controls Personnel for recording test data on
rotation Vanes to increase the capacity of the chiller. chiller systems. It is available from the factory in pads
However, the current draw (amperes) by the compres- of 50 sheets each under Form 160.44-F7 and may be
sor motor is also limited to FLA setpoint by the micro- obtained through the nearest Johnson Controls office.
processor. Automatic data logging is possible by connecting the
optional printer and programming the DATA LOG-
If the load continues to decrease, after the Prerotation GER function.
Vanes are entirely closed, the chiller will be shut down
by the Leaving Chilled Liquid Low Temperature An accurate record of readings serves as a valuable ref-
Control. erence for operating the system. Readings taken when
a system is newly installed will establish normal condi-
CONDENSER WATER TEMPERATURE tions with which to compare later readings.
CONTROL For example, an increase in condenser approach tem-
The YORK chiller is designed to use less power by tak- perature (condenser temperature minus leaving con-
ing advantage of lower than design temperatures that denser water temperature) may be an indication of
are naturally produced by cooling towers throughout dirty condenser tubes.
the operating year. Exact control of condenser water
such as a cooling tower bypass, is not necessary for OPERATING INSPECTIONS
most installations. The minimum entering condenser By following a regular inspection using the display
water temperature for full and part load conditions is readings of the Microcomputer Control Center, and
specified in the chiller engineering guide. maintenance procedure, the operator will avoid serious
where: operating difficulty. The following list of inspections
and procedures should be used as a guide.
% Load
Min. ECWT = LCWT C RANGE + 5F + 12 ( 100 )
% Load Daily
Min. ECWT = LCWT C RANGE + 2.8C + 6.6 ( 100 )
1. Check OptiView Control Center displays.
ECWT = Entering Condensing Water Temperature
2. If the compressor is in operation, check the bear-
LCWT = Leaving Chilled Water Temperature ing oil pressure on the SYSTEM Screen. Also
check the oil level in the oil reservoir. Operating
C Range = Condensing water temperature range at the
oil level should be operating range of oil indicator.
given load condition.
Drain or add oil if necessary.

JOHNSON CONTROLS 13
SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

3. Check entering and leaving condenser water pres- Weekly


sure and temperatures for comparison with job 1. Check the refrigerant charge. (Refer to Checking
design conditions. Condenser water temperatures The Refrigerant Charge During Unit Shutdown
can be checked on the SYSTEM Screen. on Page 30.)
4. Check the entering and leaving chilled liquid tem-
Monthly
peratures and evaporator pressure for compari-
son with job design conditions on the SYSTEM 1. Leak check the entire chiller.
Screen.
Quarterly
5. Check the condenser saturation temperature
1. Perform chemical analysis of oil.
(based upon condenser pressure sensed by the
condenser transducer) on the SYSTEM Screen. Semi-Annually (or more often as required)
6. Check the compressor discharge temperature on 1. Change and inspect compressor oil filter element.
the SYSTEM Screen. During normal operation
2. Oil return system.
discharge temperature should not exceed 220F
(104C). A. Change dehydrator.
7. Check the compressor motor current on the B. Check nozzle of eductor for foreign par-
SYSTEM Screen. ticles.
8. Check for any signs of dirty or fouled condenser 3. Check controls and safety cutouts.
tubes. (The temperature difference between water
leaving condenser and saturated condensing tem-
perature should not exceed the difference recorded
for a new unit by more than 4F (2.2C)).

LD00467

23889A
*NOTE: These items can be printed by an electronic printer connected to the Microboard
and pressing the PRINT key on the Keypad, or automatically using the Data Logger feature.

Figure 8 - LIQUID CHILLER LOG SHEETS

14 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES

Annually (more often if necessary) 1. Push the soft shutdown key on the homescreen on
1. Drain and replace the oil in the compressor oil the OptiView panel or rapid stop with the COM-
sump. (Refer to Oil Charging Procedure on Page PRESSOR STOP/RESET switch. The compressor
24.) will stop automatically. The oil pump will contin-
ue to run for coastdown period. The oil pump will
2. Evaporator and Condenser. then stop automatically.
A. Inspect and clean water strainers. 2. Stop the chilled water pump (if not wired into the
B. Inspect and clean tubes as required. Microcomputer Control Center, in which case it
will shut off automatically simultaneously with the
C. Inspect end sheets. oil pump.) (The actual water pump contact opera-
3. Compressor Drive Motor (See motor manufactur- tion is dependent upon the position of Microboard
ers maintenance and service instruction supplied jumper J54.)
with unit) 3. Open the switch to the cooling tower fan motors,
A. Clean air passages and windings per manu- if used.
facturers instructions.
4. The compressor sump oil heater is energized when
B. Meg motor windings Refer to Figure 16 on the unit is stopped. 2
Page 30 for details.
PROLONGED SHUTDOWN
C. Lubricate per motor manufacturer recom-
mendations. If the chiller is to be shut down for an extended period
of time (for example, over the winter season), the fol-
4. Inspect and service electrical components as neces- lowing paragraphs outline the procedure to be followed.
sary.
1. Test all system joints for refrigerant leaks with a
5. Perform refrigerant analysis. leak detector. If any leaks are found, they should
If quarterly inspection indicates oil is fine, be repaired before allowing the system to stand
replacing the oil is not necessary for a long period of time.
During long idle periods, the tightness of the sys-
tem should be checked periodically.
2. If freezing temperatures are encountered while
the system is idle, carefully drain the cooling wa-
NEED FOR MAINTENANCE OR SERVICE
ter from the cooling tower, condenser, condenser
If the system is malfunctioning in any manner or the pump, and the chilled water system-chilled water
unit is stopped by one of the safety controls, consult pump and coils.
the Operation Analysis Chart, Table 1 on Page 25 of
this manual. After consulting this chart, if you are un- Open the drains on the evaporator and condenser
able to make the proper repairs or adjustments to start liquid heads to assure complete drainage. (If a
the compressor or the particular trouble continues to Variable Speed Drive, drain its cooling system.
hinder the performance of the unit, please call the near- If Solid State Starter equipped drain liquid from
est Johnson Controls District Office. Failure to report starter cooling loop.)
constant troubles could damage the unit and increase 3. If freezing temperatures are encountered for peri-
the cost of repairs. ods longer than a few days, the refrigerant should
be recovered to containers to prevent leakage from
STOPPING THE SYSTEM O-ring joints.
The Optiview Control Center can be programmed to 4. On the SETUP Screen, disable the clock. This
start and stop automatically (maximum, once each day) conserves the battery.
whenever desired. Refer to the Optiview Control
Center Operation and Maintenance (Form 160.54- 5. Open the main disconnect switches to the com-
O1). To stop the chiller, proceed as follows: pressor motor, condenser water pump and the
chilled water pump. Open the 115 volt circuit to
the Control Center.

JOHNSON CONTROLS 15
SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

16 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

SECTION 3 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS DESCRIPTION

GENERAL C. Low speed thrust bearing (forward and re-


verse).
The YORK Model YK Centrifugal Liquid Chiller is
completely factory-packaged including evaporator, 2. Compressor Driven Shaft (High Speed)
condenser, compressor, motor, lubrication system,
A. Forward and reverse high speed thrust
OptiView Control Center, and all interconnecting unit
bearing.
piping and wiring.
B. Two journal bearings.
COMPRESSOR
3. Speed Increasing Gears
The compressor is a single-stage centrifugal type pow-
ered by an open-drive electric motor. A. Meshing surfaces of drive and pinion gear
teeth.
The rotor assembly consists of a heat-treated alloy steel
drive shaft and impeller shaft with a cast aluminum, To provide the required amount of oil under the neces-
fully shrouded impeller. The impeller is designed for sary pressure to properly lubricate these parts, a motor
balanced thrust and is dynamically balanced and over- driven submersible oil pump is located in a remote oil
speed tested. The inserted type journal and thrust bear- sump.
ings are fabricated of aluminum alloy. Single helical Upon pressing of the COMPRESSOR START switch
gears with crowned teeth are designed so that more
than one tooth is in contact at all times. Gears are inte-
on the Control Center, the oil pump is immediately en- 3
ergized. After a 50 second pre-lube period, the com-
grally assembled in the compressor rotor support and pressor motor will start. The oil pump will continue to
are film lubricated. Each gear is individually mounted run during the entire operation of the compressor, and
in its own journal and thrust bearings. for 150 seconds during compressor coastdown.
The open-drive compressor shaft seal is a double bel- The submerged oil pump takes suction from the sur-
lows cartridge style with ceramic internal and atmo- rounding oil and discharges it to the oil cooler where
spheric seal faces. The seal is oil-flooded at all times heat is rejected. The oil flows from the oil cooler to
and is pressure-lubricated during operation. the oil filter. The oil leaves the filter and flows to the
emergency oil reservoir where it is distributed to the
CAPACITY CONTROL
compressor bearings. The oil lubricates the compressor
Prerotation vanes (PRV) modulate chiller capacity rotating components and is returned to the oil sump.
from 100% to as low as 15% of design for normal air
conditioning applications. Operation is by an external, There is an emergency oil reservoir located at the high-
electric PRV actuator which automatically controls the est point in the lubrication system internally in the com-
vane position to maintain a constant leaving chilled liq- pressor. It provides an oil supply to the various bear-
uid temperature. ings and gears in the event of a system shutdown due
to power failure. The reservoir, located on the top of
COMPRESSOR LUBRICATION SYSTEM the compressor, allows the oil to be distributed through
the passages by gravity flow, thus providing necessary
The chiller lubrication system consists of the oil pump, lubrication during the compressor coastdown.
oil filter, oil cooler and all interconnecting oil piping
and passages. There are main points within the com- OIL PUMP
pressor which must be supplied with forced lubrication
as follows: For normal operation, the oil pump should operate at
all times during chiller operation.
1. Compressor Drive Shaft (Low Speed)
On shutdown of the system for any reason, the oil
A. Shaft seal. pump operates and continues to run for 150 seconds.
The system cannot restart during that time interval.
B. Front and rear journal bearings one on each
side of driving gear.

JOHNSON CONTROLS 17
SECTION 3 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS DESCRIPTION FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

OPTIVIEW CONTROL
CENTER

COMPRESSOR

SUCTION

RELIEF
VARIABLE
VALVES
SPEED
DRIVE

EVAPORATOR

LD15222

VARIABLE SPEED
SIGHT
OIL PUMP
GLASS
CONTROL BOX

FRONT VIEW

Figure 9 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS FRONT VIEW

18 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 3 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS DESCRIPTION

MOTOR
COMPRESSOR

DISCHARGE
LINE

LD15223

LIQUID LINE
CONDENSER OIL PUMP
HOUSING

REAR VIEW

Figure 10 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS REAR VIEW

JOHNSON CONTROLS 19
SECTION 3 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS DESCRIPTION FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

COMPRESSOR ROTOR
SUPPORT SECTION

H.S.
SHAFT
SEAL
EMERGENCY
OIL RESERVE

HIGH
PRESSURE
TRANSDUCER

MAIN JOURNAL
AND THRUST
BEARING
IMPELLER

THRUST COLLAR BEARING


(PINION GEAR
HIGH SPEED SHAFT)
THRUST COVER
(PRV)
DOUBLE INLET
BELLOWS VALVES
SHAFT SEAL

LOW SPEED- THRUST


GEAR REAR COLLAR
BEARING BEARING

LOW LOW SPEED


SPEED GEAR THRUST
COVER

REFRIG.

SIGHT
HOT GLASSES
THERMISTOR

OIL OIL
HEATER COOLER
LOW OIL
ANGLE PRESSURE
DRAIN VALVE TRANSDUCER

OIL OIL SUBMERSIBLE


SUMP OIL TEMP.
PUMP OIL PUMP CONTROL
OIL SUCTION WITH 3-PHASE MOTOR
FILTER

OIL

LD15200

Figure 11 - SCHEMATIC DRAWING (YK) COMPRESSOR LUBRICATION SYSTEM

20 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 3 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS DESCRIPTION

OIL HEATER ant charge, and maintain reliable control. A specifically


designed spray distributor provides uniform distribu-
During long idle periods, the oil in the compressor oil
tion of refrigerant over the entire length to yield opti-
reservoir tends to absorb as much refrigerant as it can
mum heat transfer. The hybrid falling film evaporator
hold, depending upon the temperature of the oil and
design has suction baffles around the sides and above
the pressure in the reservoir. As the oil temperature is
the falling film section to prevent liquid refrigerant car-
lowered, the amount of refrigerant absorbed will be
ryover into the compressor.
increased. If the quantity of refrigerant in the oil be-
comes excessive, violent oil foaming will result as the Evaporators codes M* thru Z* are flooded type, with a
pressure within the system is lowered on starting. This liquid inlet distributor trough underneath the tube bun-
foaming is caused by refrigerant boiling out of the oil dle which provides uniform distribution of refrigerant
as the pressure is lowered. If this foam reaches the oil over the entire shell length to yield optimum heat trans-
pump suction, the bearing oil pressure will fluctuate fer. Flooded evaporator designs have a suction baffle
with possible temporary loss of lubrication, causing the on M* shells with H9 compressors and an aluminum
oil pressure safety cutout to actuate and stop the sys- mesh eliminator on K* - Z* shells with K compressors
tem. Refer to Optiview Control Center Operation located above the tube bundle to prevent liquid refrig-
and Maintenance (Form 160.54-O1). erant carryover into the compressor.

MOTOR DRIVELINE A 1-1/2" (38 mm) liquid level sight glass is conve-
niently located on the side of the shell to aid in deter-
The compressor motor is an open-drip-proof, squir-
mining proper refrigerant charge. The evaporator shell
rel cage, induction type constructed to YORK design
specifications. 60 hertz motors operate at 3570 rpm. 50
contains a dual refrigerant relief valve arrangement set 3
at 180 psig (12.4 barg) on H and K compressor models;
hertz motors operate at 2975 rpm.
235 psig (16.2 barg) on P and Q compressor models;
The open motor is provided with a D-flange, cast iron or single-relief valve arrangement, if the chiller is sup-
adapter mounted to the compressor and supported by a plied with optional refrigerant isolation valves. A 1"
motor support. (25.4 mm) refrigerant charging valve is provided. The
condenser is a shell and tube type, with a discharge
Motor drive shaft is directly connected to the compres- gas baffle to prevent direct high velocity impingement
sor shaft with a flexible disc coupling. This coupling on the tubes. The baffle is also used to distribute the
has all metal construction with no wearing parts to as- refrigerant gas flow properly for most efficient heat
sure long life, and no lubrication requirements to pro- transfer. An optional cast steel condenser inlet diffuser
vide low maintenance. may be offered, on "M" and larger condensers, in lieu
For units utilizing remote Electro-Mechanical starters, of the baffle, to provide dynamic pressure recovery and
a terminal box is provided for field connected conduit. enhanced chiller efficiency. An integral subcooler is
Motor terminals are brought through the motor cas- located at the bottom of the condenser shell providing
ing into the terminal box. Jumpers are furnished for highly effective liquid refrigerant subcooling to pro-
three-lead type of starting. Motor terminal lugs are not vide the highest cycle efficiency. The condenser con-
furnished. Overload/over current transformers are fur- tains dual refrigerant relief valves set at 235 psig (16.2
nished with all units. barg).
The removable waterboxes are fabricated of steel. The
HEAT EXCHANGERS design working pressure is 150 psig (10.3 barg) and
Evaporator and condenser shells are fabricated from the boxes are tested at 225 psig (15.5 barg). Integral
rolled carbon steel plates with fusion welded seams. steel water baffles are located and welded within the
waterbox to provide the required pass arrangements.
Heat exchanger tubes are internally enhanced type. Stubout water nozzle connections with ANSI/AWWA
The evaporator is a shell and tube type with customer C-606 grooves are welded to the waterboxes. These
process fluid flowing inside the tubes and refriger- nozzle connections are suitable for ANSI/AWWA
ant removing heat on the shell side via evaporation. C-606 couplings, welding or flanges, and are capped
Evaporator codes A* to K* utilize a hybrid falling film for shipment. Plugged 3/4" (19 mm) drain and vent
design. It contains a balance of flooded and falling film connections are provided in each waterbox.
technology to optimize efficiency, minimize refriger-

JOHNSON CONTROLS 21
SECTION 3 - SYSTEM COMPONENTS DESCRIPTION FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

REFRIGERANT FLOW CONTROL OPTIONAL HOT GAS BYPASS


Refrigerant flow to the evaporator is controlled by a Hot gas bypass is optional and is used to eliminate
variable orifice. compressor surge during light load or high head op-
eration. The OptiView control panel will automatically
A level sensor senses the refrigerant level in the con- modulate the hot gas valve open and closed as required.
denser and outputs an analog voltage to the Microboard Adjustment of the hot gas control valve must be per-
that represents this level (0% = empty; 100% = full). formed by a qualified service technician following the
Under program control, the Microboard modulates a Hot Gas Set-up procedure.
variable orifice to control the condenser refrigerant
level to a programmed setpoint. Other setpoints affect Changes in chilled water flow will require
the control sensitivity and response. These setpoints re-adjustment of the hot gas control to
must be entered at chiller commissioning by a qualified insure proper operation.
service technician. Only a qualified service technician
may modify these settings.
While the chiller is shut down, the orifice will be in the
fully open position causing the sensed level to be ap- OPTIVIEW CONTROL CENTER
proximately 0%. When the chiller is started, after the The OptiView Control Center is factory-mounted,
vane motor end switch (VMS) opens when entering wired and tested. The electronic panel automatically
SYSTEM RUN, if actual level is less than the level controls the operation of the unit in meeting system
setpoint, a linearly increasing ramp is applied to the lev- cooling requirements while minimizing energy usage.
el setpoint. This ramp causes the setpoint to go from the For detailed information on the Control Center, refer to
initial refrigerant level (approximately 0%) to the pro- SECTION 2 - SYSTEM OPERATING PROCEDURES
grammed setpoint over a programmable period of time. of this manual.
If the actual level is greater than the setpoint when the SOLID STATE STARTER (OPTIONAL)
VMS opens, there is no pulldown period, it immedi-
ately begins to control to the programmed setpoint. The Solid State Starter is a reduced voltage starter that
controls and maintains a constant current flow to the
While the chiller is running, the refrigerant level is nor- motor during start-up. It is mounted on the chiller. Pow-
mally controlled to the level setpoint. However, any- er and control wiring between the starter and chiller
time the vanes fully close (VMS closes), normal level are factory installed. The starter enclosure is NEMA-1
control is terminated, any refrigerant level setpoint in with a hinged access door with lock and key. Electrical
effect is cancelled and the outputs to the level control lugs for incoming power wiring are provided.
will be constant open.
VARIABLE SPEED DRIVE (OPTIONAL)
OPTIONAL SERVICE ISOLATION VALVES
A Variable Speed Drive can be factory packaged with
If your chiller is equipped with optional service isola- the chiller. It is designed to vary the compressor mo-
tion valves on the discharge and liquid line, these valves tor speed and prerotation vane position by controlling
must remain open during operation. These valves are the frequency and voltage of the electrical power to
used for isolating the refrigerant charge in either the the motor. Operational information is contained in the
evaporator or condenser to allow service access to the Variable Speed Drive Operation (Form 160.00-O1).
system. A refrigerant pump-out unit will be required to The control logic automatically adjusts motor speed
isolate the refrigerant. and compressor prerotation vane position for maxi-
Isolation of the refrigerant in this system mum part load efficiency by analyzing information fed
must be performed by a qualified service to it by sensors located throughout the chiller.
technician.

22 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

SECTION 4 - OPERATIONAL MAINTENANCE

OIL RETURN SYSTEM CHANGING THE DEHYDRATOR


The oil return system continuously maintains the To change the dehydrator, use the following procedure:
proper oil level in the compressor oil sump (Refer to
Figure 12 on Page 23). 1. Isolate the dehydrator at the stop valves.
2. Remove the dehydrator (Refer to Figure 12 on
High pressure condenser gas flows continuously Page 23).
through the eductor inducing the low pressure, oil rich
3. Assemble the new filter-drier.
liquid to flow from the evaporator, through the dehy-
drator to the compressor sump. 4. Open evaporator stop valve and check dehydrator
connections for refrigerant leaks.
5. Open all the dehydrator stop valves.

COMPRESSOR

SOLENOID VALVE

CHECK VALVE OIL EDUCTOR BLOCK

SOLENOID VALVE

STOP VALVE DEHYDRATOR

STOP VALVE

LD08578

Figure 12 - OIL RETURN SYSTEM

JOHNSON CONTROLS 23
SECTION 4 - OPERATIONAL MAINTENANCE FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

THE OIL CHARGE ing valve (A) located on the remote oil reservoir
cover plate. (Refer to Figure 13 on Page 24) Do
The nominal oil charge for all H, K, and P8-P9 YK
not tighten the connection at the charging valve
compressors is 20 gallons, and for Q3-Q7 YK compres-
until after the air is forced out by pumping a few
sors is 10 gallons of type YORK K or YORK H oil.
strokes of the oil pump. This fills the lines with
New YORK Refrigeration oil must be used in the cen- oil and prevents air from being pumped into the
trifugal compressor. Since oil absorbs moisture when system.
exposed to the atmosphere, it should be kept tightly 3. Open the oil charging valve and pump oil into the
capped until used. system until oil level in the compressor oil reser-
voir is in the OVER FULL region of the oil level
OIL CHARGING PROCEDURE
indicator label. Close the charging valve and dis-
During operation the compressor oil level must be connect the hand oil pump.
maintained in the OPERATING RANGE identified
on the vertical oil level indicator. If the oil level falls 4. As soon as oil charging is complete, close the
into the lower sight glass, it is necessary to add oil to power supply to the starter to energize the oil
the compressor oil reservoir. The oil should be charged heater. This will keep the concentration of refrig-
into the oil reservoir using the YORK Oil Charging erant in the oil to a minimum.
Pump YORK Part No. 070-10654. To charge oil into When the oil reservoir is initially charged with oil, the
the oil reservoir, proceed as follows: oil pump should be started manually to fill the lines,
passages, oil cooler and oil filter. This will lower the
1. The unit must be shut down.
oil level in the reservoir. It may then be necessary to
2. Immerse the suction connection of the oil charging add oil to bring the level back into the OPERATING
pump in a clean container of new oil and connect RANGE of the oil level indicator label.
the pump discharge connection to the oil charg-

LD08648 LD08579
OIL CHARGING VALVE

Figure 13 - CHARGING OIL RESERVOIR WITH OIL

24 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

SECTION 5 - TROUBLESHOOTING

Table 1 - OPERATION ANALYSIS CHART


RESULTS POSSIBLE CAUSE REMEDY
1. SYMPTOM: ABNORMALLY HIGH DISCHARGE PRESSURE
Temperature difference between
condensing temperature and water off Air in condenser.
condenser higher than normal.
Clean condenser tubes. Check water
Condenser tubes dirty or scaled.
conditioning.
High discharge pressure. Reduce condenser water inlet tempera-
High condenser water temperature. ture. (Check cooling tower and water
circulation.)
Temperature difference between con-
denser water on and water off higher Increase the quantity of water through
Insufficient condensing water flow.
than normal, with normal evaporator the condenser to proper value.
pressure.
2. SYMPTOM: ABNORMALLY LOW SUCTION PRESSURE
Temperature difference between leaving Check for leaks and charge refrigerant
Insufficient charge of refrigerant.
chilled water and refrigerant in evapo- into system.
rator greater than normal with high
Variable orifice problem. Remove obstruction.
discharge temperature.
Temperature difference between leav-
ing chilled water and refrigerant in the
Evaporator tubes dirty or restricted. Clean evaporator tubes.
evaporator greater than normal with
normal discharge temperature.
Check prerotation vane motor operation
Temperature of chilled water too low
with with low motor amperes.
Insufficient load for system capacity. and setting of low water temperature 5
cutout.
3. SYMPTOM: HIGH EVAPORATOR PRESSURE
Check the prerotation vane motor posi-
Prerotation vanes fail to open.
tioning circuit.
High chilled water temperature. Be sure the vanes are wide open (with-
System overload. out overloading the motor) until the load
decreases.
4. SYMPTOM: NO OIL PRESSURE WHEN SYSTEM START BUTTON PUSHED
Check rotation of oil pump (Electrical
Oil pump running in wrong direction.
Low oil pressure displayed on control Connections).
center; compressor will not start. Troubleshoot electrical problem with oil
Oil pump not running.
pump VSD.
5. SYMPTOM: UNUSUALLY HIGH OIL PRESSURE DEVELOPS WHEN OIL PUMP RUNS
Unusually high oil pressure is dis-
played when the oil pressure display High oil pressure. Transducer defec- Replace low or high oil pressure trans-
key is pressed when the oil pump is tive. ducer.
running.

JOHNSON CONTROLS 25
SECTION 5 - TROUBLESHOOTING FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

TABLE 1 - OPERATION ANALYSIS CHART (CONT'D)

RESULTS POSSIBLE REMEDY


6. SYMPTOM: OIL PUMP VIBRATES OR IS NOISY
Oil pump vibrates or is extremely noisy
Oil not reaching pump suction inlet in
with some oil pressure when pressing Check oil level.
sufficient quantity.
OIL PRESSURE display key.
When oil pump is run without
an oil supply it will vibrate
and become extremely noisy.
Worn or failed oil pump. Repair/Replace oil pump.

7. SYMPTOM: REDUCED OIL PUMP CAPACITY


Excessive end clearance pump.
Inspect and replace worn parts.
Oil pump pumping capacity. Other worn pump parts.
Partially blocked oil supply inlet. Check oil inlet for blockage.
8. SYMPTOM: OIL PRESSURE GRADUALLY DECREASES (Noted by Observation of Daily Log Sheets)
When oil pump VSD frequency in-
creases to 55 + hz to maintain target oil Oil filter is dirty. Change oil filter.
pressure.
9. SYMPTOM: OIL PRESSURE SYSTEM CEASES TO RETURN AN OIL/REFRIGERANT SAMPLE
Filter-drier in oil return system dirty. Replace old filter-drier with new.
Oil refrigerant return not functioning. Remove jet, inspect for dirt.
Jet or orifice of oil return jet clogged.
Remove dirt using solvent and replace.
10. SYMPTOM: OIL PUMP FAILS TO DELIVER OIL PRESSURE
No oil pressure registers when pressing
Faulty oil pressure transducer.
OIL PRESSURE display key when oil Replace oil pressure transducer.
Faulty wiring/connectors.
pump runs.

26 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE

RENEWAL PARTS To test with R-22, proceed as follows:


For any required Renewal Parts, refer to the Renewal 1. With no pressure in the system, charge R-22 gas
Parts Unit (Form 160.75-RP1). into the system through the charging valve to a
pressure of 2 PSIG (14 kPa).
CHECKING SYSTEM FOR LEAKS
2. Build up the system pressure with dry nitrogen to
Leak Testing During Operation approximately 75 to 100 PSIG (517 to 690 kPa).
The refrigerant side of the system is carefully pressure To be sure that the concentration of refrigerant has
tested and evacuated at the factory. reached all part of the system, slightly open the oil
charging valve and test for the presence of refrig-
After the system has been charged, the system should erant with a leak detector.
be carefully leak tested with a R-134a compatible leak
detector to be sure all joints are tight. 3. Test around each joint and factory weld. It is im-
portant that this test be thoroughly and carefully
If any leaks are indicated, they must be repaired im- done, spending as much time as necessary and us-
mediately. Usually, leaks can be stopped by tighten- ing a good leak detector.
ing flare nuts or flange bolts. However, for any major
repair, the refrigerant charge must be removed. (Refer 4. To check for refrigerant leaks in the evaporator
to Handling Refrigerant For Dismantling And Repairs and condenser, open the vents in the evaporator
on Page 30) and condenser heads and test for the presence of
refrigerant. If no refrigerant is present, the tubes
CONDUCTING R-22 PRESSURE TEST and tube sheets may be considered tight. If refrig-
erant is detected at the vents, the heads must be
With the R-134a charge removed and all known leaks
removed, the leak located (by means of soap test
repaired, the system should be charged with a small
or leak detector) and repaired.
amount of R-22 mixed with dry nitrogen so that a ha-
lide torch or electronic leak detector can be used to de-
tect any leaks too small to be found by the soap test.

6
EVACUATION AND DEHYDRATION OF UNIT

27385A(D)

LD00949

Figure 14 - EVACUATION OF CHILLER

JOHNSON CONTROLS 27
SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

Table 2 - SYSTEM PRESSURES

*GAUGE ABSOLUTE
BOILING
INCHES OF TEMPERATURES
MERCURY (HG) OF
MILLIMETERS OF
BELOW ONE PSIA MICRONS WATER
MERCURY (HG)
STANDARD F
ATMOSPHERE
0 14.696 760. 760,000 212
10.24" 9.629 500. 500,000 192
22.05" 3.865 200. 200,000 151
25.98" 1.935 100. 100,000 124
27.95" .968 50. 50,000 101
28.94" .481 25. 25,000 78
29.53" .192 10. 10,000 52
29.67" .122 6.3 6,300 40
29.72" .099 5. 5,000 35
29.842" .039 2. 2,000 15
29.882" .019 1.0 1,000 +1
29.901" .010 .5 500 11
29.917" .002 .1 100 38
29.919" .001 .05 50 50
29.9206" .0002 .01 10 70
29.921" 0 0 0
*One standard atmosphere = 14.696 PSIA NOTES: PSIA = Lbs. per sq. in. gauge pressure
= 760 mm Hg. absolute pressure at 32F = Pressure above atmosphere
= 29.921 inches Hg. absolute at 32F PSIA = Lbs. per sq. in. absolute pressure
= Sum of gauge plus atmospheric pressure

VACUUM TESTING DO NOT USE STEAM. A suggested method is


After the pressure test has been completed, the vacuum to connect a hose between the source of hot water
test should be conducted as follows: under pressure and the evaporator head drain con-
nection, out the evaporator vent connection, into
1. Connect a high capacity vacuum pump, with in- the condenser head drain and out the condenser
dicator, to the system charging valve as shown in vent. To avoid the possibility of causing leaks, the
Figure 14 on Page 27 and start the pump. (Re- temperature should be brought up slowly so that
fer to Vacuum Dehydration on Page 29.) the tubes and shell are heated evenly.
2. Open wide all system valves. Be sure all valves to 5. Close the system charging valve and the stop valve
the atmosphere are closed. between the vacuum indicator and the vacuum
pump. Then disconnect the vacuum pump leaving
3. Operate the vacuum pump in accordance with
the vacuum indicator in place.
VACUUM DEHYDRATION until a wet bulb
temperature of +32F or a pressure of 5 mm Hg is 6. Hold the vacuum obtained in Step 3 in the system
reached. Refer to Table 2 on Page 28 for cor- for 8 hours; the slightest rise in pressure indicates a
responding values of pressure. leak or the presence of moisture, or both. If, after 24
hours the wet bulb temperature in the vacuum indi-
4. To improve evacuation circulate hot water (not
cator has not risen above 40F (4.4C) or a pressure
to exceed 125F, 51.7C) through the evaporator
of 6.3 mm Hg, the system may be considered tight.
and condenser tubes to thoroughly dehydrate the
shells. If a source of hot water is not readily avail- 7. If the vacuum does not hold for 8 hours within the
able, a portable water heater should be employed. limits specified in Step 6 above, the leak must be
found and repaired.

28 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE

Be sure the vacuum indicator is valved off taken place the pressure and temperature will continue
while holding the system vacuum and be to drop until eventually a temperature of 35F (1.6C)
sure to open the valve between the vacuum or a pressure of 5 mm Hg. is reached.
indicator and the system when checking
the vacuum after the 8 hour period. When this point is reached, practically all of the air has
been evacuated from the system, but there is still a small
amount of moisture left. In order to provide a medium
VACUUM DEHYDRATION for carrying this residual moisture to the vacuum pump,
To obtain a sufficiently dry system, the following in- nitrogen should be introduced into the system to bring
structions have been assembled to provide an effective it to atmospheric pressure and the indicator temperature
method for evacuating and dehydrating a system in the will return to approximately ambient temperature. Close
field. Although there are several methods of dehydrating off the system again, and start the second evacuation.
a system, we are recommending the following, as it pro- The relatively small amount of moisture left will be
duces one of the best results, and affords a means of ob- carried out through the vacuum pump and the tem-
taining accurate readings as to the extent of dehydration. perature or pressure shown by the indicator should
The equipment required to follow this method of dehy- drop uniformly until it reaches a temperature of 35F
dration consists of a wet bulb indicator or vacuum gauge, (1.6C) or a pressure of 5 mm Hg.
a chart showing the relation between dew point tempera- When the vacuum indicator registers this temperature
ture and pressure in inches of mercury (vacuum), (Refer or pressure, it is a positive sign that the system is evac-
to Table 2 on Page 28) and a vacuum pump capable of uated and dehydrated to the recommended limit. If this
pumping a suitable vacuum on the system. level cannot be reached, it is evident that there is a leak
somewhere in the system. Any leaks must be corrected
OPERATION
before the indicator can be pulled down to 35F or 5
Dehydration of a refrigerant system can be obtained mm Hg. in the primary evacuation.
by this method because the water present in the system
reacts much as a refrigerant would. By pulling down During the primary pulldown, keep a careful watch on
the pressure in the system to a point where its satu- the wet bulb indicator temperature, and do not let it fall
ration temperature is considerably below that of room below 35F (1.6C). If the temperature is allowed to
temperature, heat will flow from the room through the fall to 32F (0C), the water in the test tube will freeze,
walls of the system and vaporize the water, allowing and the result will be a faulty temperature reading.
a large percentage of it to be removed by the vacuum 6
pump. The length of time necessary for the dehydra-
tion of a system is dependent on the size or volume of
the system, the capacity and efficiency of the vacuum
pump, the room temperature and the quantity of water
present in the system. By the use of the vacuum indi-
cator as suggested, the test tube will be evacuated to
the same pressure as the system, and the distilled water
will be maintained at the same saturation temperature
as any free water in the system, and this temperature
can be observed on the thermometer.
If the system has been pressure tested and found to be
tight prior to evacuation, then the saturation tempera- LD00474
ture recordings should follow a curve similar to the typ-
ical saturation curve shown as Figure 15 on Page 29. Figure 15 - SATURATION CURVE

The temperature of the water in the test tube will drop


as the pressure decreases, until the boiling point is REFRIGERANT CHARGING
reached, at which point the temperature will level off To avoid the possibility of freezing liquid within the
and remain at this level until all of the water in the evaporator tubes when charging an evacuated system,
shell is vaporized. When this final vaporization has only refrigerant vapor from the top of the drum or cyl-

JOHNSON CONTROLS 29
SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

inder must be admitted to the system pressure until the The refrigerant charge level must be checked after the
system pressure is raised above the point correspond- pressure and temperature have equalized between the
ing to the freezing point of the evaporator liquid. For condenser and evaporator. This would be expected to be
water, the pressure corresponding to the freezing point 4 hours or more after the compressor and water pumps
is 8.54 PSIG (58.9 kPa) for R-134a (at sea level). are stopped. The level should visible in the sight glass.
While charging, every precaution must be taken to pre- Charge the refrigerant in accordance with the meth-
vent moisture laden air from entering the system. Make od shown under the REFRIGERANT CHARGING,
up a suitable charging connection from new copper tub- above. The refrigerant level should be observed and
ing to fit between the system charging valve and the fit- the level recorded after initial charging.
ting on the charging drum. This connection should be
HANDLING REFRIGERANT FOR DISMANTLING
as short as possible but long enough to permit sufficient
AND REPAIRS
flexibility for changing drums. The charging connection
should be purged each time a full container of refrigerant If it becomes necessary to open any part of the refriger-
is connected and changing containers should be done as ant system for repairs, it will be necessary to remove
quickly as possible to minimize the loss of refrigerant. the charge before opening any part of the unit. If the
chiller is equipped with optional valves, the refrigerant
Refrigerant may be furnished in cylinders containing can be isolated in either the condenser or evaporator /
either 30, 50, 125, 1,025 or 1750 lbs. (13.6, 22.6, 56.6, compressor while making any necessary repairs.
464 or 794 kg) of refrigerant.
MEGGINGTHEMOTOR
The nameplate on the chiller contains the
correct refrigerant charge information While the main disconnect switch and compressor mo-
for the chiller. tor starter are open, meg the motor as follows:
1. Using a megohm meter (megger), meg between
phases and each phase to ground (Refer to Figure 16
on Page 30); these readings are to be interpreted
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT CHARGE using the graph shown in Figure 17 on Page 31.
DURING UNIT SHUTDOWN 2. If readings fall below shaded area, remove exter-
The refrigerant charge is specified for each chiller model. nal leads from motor and repeat test.
Charge the correct amount of refrigerant and record the Motor is to be megged with the starter at
level in the evaporator sight glass. ambient temperature after 24 hours of
idle standby.
The refrigerant charge should always be checked and
trimmed when the system is shut down.

LD00475

Figure 16 - DIAGRAM, MEGGING MOTOR WINDINGS

30 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE

Minimum Insulation Resistance vs. Temperature (per IEEE Std 43)


Open Motors

MEGOHMS
6

LD00476
TEMPERATURE F
Figure 17 - MOTOR STARTER TEMPERATURE AND INSULATION RESISTANCES

JOHNSON CONTROLS 31
SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

CondensersAndEvaporators General Tube Fouling


Maintenance of condenser and evaporator shells is im- Fouling of the tubes can be due to deposits of two types
portant to provide trouble free operation of the chiller. as follows:
The water side of the tubes in the shell must be kept
clean and free from scale. Proper maintenance such as 1. Rust or sludge which finds its way into the
tube cleaning, and testing for leaks, is covered on the tubes and accumulates there. This material usu-
following pages. ally does not build up on the inner tube surfaces
as scale, but does interfere with the heat transfer.
Chemical Water Treatment Rust or sludge can generally be removed from the
tubes by a thorough brushing process.
Since the mineral content of the water circulated
through evaporators and condensers varies with almost 2. Scale due to mineral deposits. These deposits,
every source of supply, it is possible that the water be- even though very thin and scarcely detectable
ing used may corrode the tubes or deposit heat resistant upon physical inspection, are highly resistant to
scale in them. Reliable water treatment companies are heat transfer. They can be removed most effec-
available in most larger cities to supply a water treat- tively by circulating an acid solution through the
ing process which will greatly reduce the corrosive and tubes.
scale forming properties of almost any type of water.
Tube Cleaning Procedures
As a preventive measure against scale and corrosion
and to prolong the life of evaporator and condenser Brush Cleaning of Tubes
tubes, a chemical analysis of the water should be made If the tube consists of dirt and sludge, it can usually be
preferably before the system is installed. A reliable wa- removed by means of the brushing process. Drain the
ter treatment company can be consulted to determine water sides of the circuit to be cleaned (cooling wa-
whether water treatment is necessary, and if so, to fur- ter or chilled water) remove the heads and thorough-
nish the proper treatment for the particular water con- ly clean each tube with a soft bristle bronze or nylon
dition. brush. DO NOT USE A STEEL BRISTLE BRUSH. A
steel brush may damage the tubes.
Cleaning Evaporator And Condenser Tubes
Improved results can be obtained by admitting water
Evaporator into the tube during the cleaning process. This can be
It is difficult to determine by any particular test wheth- done by mounting the brush on a suitable length of 1/8"
er possible lack of performance of the water evaporator pipe with a few small holes at the brush end and con-
is due to fouled tubes alone or due to a combination necting the other end by means of a hose to the water
of troubles. Trouble which may be due to fouled tubes supply.
is indicated when, over a period of time, the cooling
The tubes should always be brush cleaned before acid
capacity decreases and the split (temperature differ-
cleaning.
ence between water leaving the evaporator and the
refrigerant temperature in the evaporator) increases. A Acid Cleaning Of Tubes
gradual drop-off in cooling capacity can also be caused
by a gradual leak of refrigerant from the system or by a If the tubes are fouled with a hard scale deposit, they
combination of fouled tubes and shortage of refrigerant may require acid cleaning. It is important that before
charge. An excessive quantity of oil in the evaporator acid cleaning, the tubes be cleaned by the brushing
can also contribute to erratic performance. process described above. If the relatively loose foreign
material is removed before the acid cleaning, the acid
Condenser solution will have less material to dissolve and flush
from the tubes with the result that a more satisfactory
In a condenser, trouble due to fouled tubes is usually
cleaning job will be accomplished with a probable sav-
indicated by a steady rise in head pressure, over a pe-
ing of time.
riod of time, accompanied by a steady rise in condens-
ing temperature, and noisy operation. These symptoms
may also be due to foul gas buildup. Purging will re-
move the foul gas revealing the effect of fouling.

32 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211) SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE

Acid cleaning should only be performed 3. With nitrogen or dry air, blow out the tubes to
by an expert. Please consult your local clear them of traces of refrigerant laden moisture
water treatment representative for as- from the circulation water. As soon as the tubes
sistance in removing scale buildup and are clear, a cork should be driven into each end
preventative maintenance programs to of the tube. Pressurize the dry system with 50 to
eliminate future problems. COMMER- 100 PSIG (345 to 690 kPa) of nitrogen. Repeat
CIAL ACID CLEANING this with all of the other tubes in the suspected
section or, if necessary, with all the tubes in the
In many major cities, commercial organizations now evaporator or condenser. Allow the evaporator or
offer a specialized service of acid cleaning evaporators condenser to remain corked up to 12 to 24 hours
and condensers. If acid cleaning is required, YORK before proceeding. Depending upon the amount
recommends the use of this type of organization. The of leakage, the corks may blow from the end of a
Dow Industries Service Division of the Dow Chemical tube, indicating the location of the leakage. If not,
Company, Tulsa, Oklahoma, with branches in principal if will be necessary to make a very thorough test
cities is one of the most reliable of these companies. with the leak detector.
Testing For Evaporator And Condenser Tube 4. After the tubes have been corked for 12 to 24
Leaks hours, it is recommended that two men working
at both ends of the evaporator carefully test each
Evaporator and condenser tube leaks in R-134a sys-
tube one man removing corks at one end and
tems may result in refrigerant leaking into the water
the other at the opposite end to remove corks and
circuit, or water leaking into the shell depending on the
handle the leak detector. Start with the top row of
pressure levels. If refrigerant is leaking into the water,
tubes in the section being investigated. Remove
it can be detected at the liquid head vents after a period
the corks at the ends of one tube simultaneously
of shutdown. If water is leaking into the refrigerant,
and insert the exploring tube for 5 seconds this
system capacity and efficiency will drop off sharply. If
should be long enough to draw into the detec-
a tube is leaking and water has entered the system, the
tor any refrigerant gas that might have leaked
evaporator and condenser should be valved off from
through the tube walls. A fan placed at the end of
the rest of the water circuit and drained immediately to
the evaporator opposite the detector will assure
prevent severe rusting and corrosion. The refrigerant
that any leakage will travel through the tube to
system should then be drained and purged with dry ni-
the detector.
trogen to prevent severe rusting and corrosion. If a tube
leak is indicated, the exact location of the leak may be 5. Mark any leaking tubes for later identification. 6
determined as follows:
6. If any of the tube sheet joints are leaking, the leak
1. Remove the heads and listen at each section of should be indicated by the detector. If a tube sheet
tubes for a hissing sound that would indicate gas leak is suspected, its exact location may be found
leakage. This will assist in locating the section of by using a soap solution. A continuous buildup of
tubes to be further investigated. If the probable bubbles around a tube indicates a tube sheet leak.
location of the leaky tubes has been determined,
treat that section in the following manner (if the COMPRESSOR
location is not definite, all the tubes will require Maintenance for the compressor assembly consists
investigations). of checking the operation of the oil return system and
2. Wash off both tube heads and the ends of all tubes changing the dehydrator, checking and changing the oil,
with water. checking and changing the oil filters, checking the op-
eration of the oil heater, checking the operation of the oil
Do not use carbon tetrachloride for this pump, and observing the operation of the compressor.
purpose since its fumes give the same
flame discoloration that the refrigerant
does.

JOHNSON CONTROLS 33
SECTION 6 - MAINTENANCE FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

Internal wearing of compressor parts could be a seri- of operation. However, if aluminum particles continue
ous problem caused by improper lubrication, brought to accumulate and the same conditions continue to stop
about by restricted oil lines, passages, or dirty oil fil- the unit operation after a new filter is installed, notify
ters. If the unit is shutting down on (HOT) High Oil the nearest Johnson Controls office to request the pres-
Temperature or Low Oil Pressure (OP), change the oil ence of a Johnson Controls Service Technician.
filter element. Examine the oil filter element for the
presence of aluminum particles. Aluminum gas seal ELECTRICAL CONTROLS
rings can contact the impeller and account for some For information covering the OptiView Control Cen-
aluminum particles to accumulate in the oil filter, espe- ter operation, refer to the Optiview Control Center
cially during the initial start up and first several months Operation and Maintenance (Form 160.54-O1).

34 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

SECTION 7 - PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

It is the responsibility of the owner to provide the nec- RAM Motor Lubrication
essary daily, monthly and yearly maintenance require- Frame 143T thru 256T are furnished with double
ments of the system. sealed ball bearings, pre-lubricated prior to installa-
IMPORTANT If a unit failure occurs tion. Grease fittings are not supplied and bearings are
due to improper maintenance during the designed for long life under standard conditions.
warranty period; Johnson Controls will
not be liable for costs incurred to return Frames 284T thru 587UZ are furnished with double
the system to satisfactory operation. shielded or open ball or roller bearings. It is necessary
to re-lubricate anti-friction bearings periodically. (Re-
fer to Table 3 on Page 35.)
In any operating system it is most important to pro-
vide a planned maintenance and inspection of its func- Table 3 - BEARING LUBRICATION
tioning parts to keep it operating at its peak efficiency. FRAME STANDARD CONTINUOUS GREASE
Therefore, the following maintenance should be per- SIZE 8HR/DAY 24HR DAY QUANTITY
formed when prescribed. OZ.
143T-256T *7 Years *3 Years *1
COMPRESSOR 284TS-286TS 210 Days 70 Days 1
1. Oil Filter When oil pump VSD frequency in- 324TS-587USS 150 Days 50 Days 2
creases to 55 hz to maintain target oil pressure.
* On frame sizes 143T - 256T, changing bearings at these
intervals is recommended. However, removing the seal, clean-
When the oil filter is changed, it should be inspect-
ing and refilling the bearing and the cavity with recommended
ed thoroughly for any aluminum particles which grease can re-lubricate these bearings.
would indicate possible bearing wear. If alumi-
num particles are found this should be brought Recommended greases for standard applications:
to the attention of the nearest Johnson Controls
office for their further investigation and recom- OPERATING AMBIENT TEMP. -30C to 50C
mendations. Chevron SRI (Chevron)
Exxon Unirex #2 (Exxon Corp.)
2. Oil Changing The oil in the compressor must
be changed annually or earlier if it becomes dark Exxon Polyrex (Exxon Corp.)
or cloudy. However, quarterly oil analysis can Shell Dolum R (Shell Oil Co.)
eliminate the need for an annual change provided
Westinghouse Motor Lubrication:
the analysis indicates there is no problem with the
oil. Re-greasing should occur at 1000 operating hour 7
intervals.
COMPRESSOR MOTOR
Westinghouse recommends using Westinghouse
1. Check motor mounting screws frequently to in-
Grease No. 53701.
sure tightness.
Motors with shaft diameters less than 2 3/8 inch
2. Meg motor windings annually to check for dete-
require 1 oz of grease per bearing while motors
rioration of windings.
with shaft diameters between 2 3/8 and 3 inches
GREASED BEARINGS require 1.5 oz.
Mixing different greases is not recom-
Motor Operation and Maintenance manuals are sup-
mended
plied with the chillers providing maintenance sched-
ules and instructions for the specific motors. The fol-
lowing are lubrication schedules for the most common
motors:

JOHNSON CONTROLS 35
SECTION 7 - PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

Additional information on motor lubrica- a new unit, it is a good indication that the con-
tion and other service issues can be found denser tubes require cleaning. Refer to SECTION
in the A-C Motors Instruction Manual. 6 - MAINTENANCE of this manual for condenser
tube cleaning instructions.
2. The evaporator tubes under normal circumstances
will not require cleaning. If the temperature dif-
LEAK TESTING ference between the refrigerant and the chilled
water increases slowly over the operating season,
The unit should be leak tested monthly. Any leaks
it is an indication that the evaporator tubes may be
found must be repaired immediately.
fouling or that there may be a water bypass in the
EVAPORATOR AND CONDENSER waterbox requiring gasket replacement or refrig-
erant may have leaked from the chiller.
The major portion of maintenance on the condenser
and evaporator will deal with the maintaining the wa- 3. Heat recovery condenser tubes should be evalu-
ter side of the condenser and evaporator in a clean ated similiar to evaporator tubes when the heating
condition. circuit is a treated, closed loop. Fouling could be
detected as ability to meet heat load requirements
The use of untreated water in cooling towers, closed decreases.
water systems, etc. frequently results in one or more of
the following: OIL RETURN SYSTEM

1. Scale Formation. 1. Change the dehydrator in the oil return system


semi-annually or earlier if the oil return system
2. Corrosion or Rusting. fails to operate.
3. Slime and Algae Formation. 2. When the dehydrator is changed, the nozzle of the
It is therefore to the benefit of the user to provide for eductor should be checked for any foreign par-
proper water treatment to provide for a longer and ticles that may be obstructing the jet.
more economical life of the equipment. The following
ELECTRICAL CONTROLS
recommendation should be followed in determining
the condition of the water side of the condenser and 1. All electrical controls should be inspected for ob-
evaporator tubes. vious malfunctions.

1. The condenser tubes should be cleaned annually 2. It is important that the factory settings of controls
or earlier if conditions warrant. If the temperature (operation and safety) not be changed. If the set-
difference between the water off the condenser tings are changed without Johnson Controls ap-
and the condenser liquid temperature is more than proval, the warranty will be jeopardized.
4F (2C) greater than the difference recorded on

36 JOHNSON CONTROLS
MA INT E NA NC E R E QUIR E ME NT S F OR Y OR K Y K C HIL L E R S
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

JOHNSON CONTROLS
P R OC E DUR E DA IL Y WE E K L Y MONT HL Y YE AR LY OT HE R

Record operating conditions (on applicable Log Form) X


Check oil levels X
Check refrigerant levels X
Check oil return system operation X
Check operation of motor starter X
Check sump heater and thermostat operation X
Check three-phase voltage and current balance X
Verify proper operation/setting/calibration of safety controls1 X
Verify condenser and evaporator water flows X
Leak check and repair leaks as needed1 X
Check and tighten all electrical connections X
Megohm motor windings X
Replace oil filter and oil return filter/driers X
Clean or backflush heat exchanger (VSD, SSS Applications) X
Replace starter coolant (VSD, SSS Applications) X
Replace or clean starter air filters if applicable X2
1
Perform oil analysis on compressor lube oil X
Perform refrigeration analysis1 X
Perform vibration analysis X
Clean tubes X2
Perform Eddy current testing and inspect tubes 2 - 5 Years
Lubricate motor Refer to motor manufacturers recommentations

For operating and maintenance requirements listed above, refer to appropriate service literature, or contact your local YORK Service Office.

1
This procedure must be performed at the specified time interval by an Industry Certified Technician who has been trained and qualified to work on this type of YORK
equipment. A record of this procedure being successfully carried out must be maintained on file by the equipment owner should proof of adequate maintenance be required
at a later date for warranty validation purposes.
2
More frequent service may be required depending on local operating conditions.
Form 160.54-MR1 (801)

37
LD13598
FORM 160.75-O1 (111)

NOTES

38 JOHNSON CONTROLS
FORM 160.75-O1 (211)

The following factors can be used to convert from


English to the most common SI Metric values.

Table 4 - SI METRIC CONVERSION

MEASUREMENT MULTIPLY ENGLISH UNIT BY FACTOR TO OBTAIN METRIC UNIT

Capacity Tons Refrigerant Effect (ton) 3.516 Kilowatts (kW)

Power Horsepower 0.7457 Kilowatts (kW)

Flow Rate Gallons / Minute (gpm) 0.0631 Liters / Second (l/s)

Feet (ft) 304.8 Meters (m)


Length
Inches (in) 25.4 Millimeters (mm)

Weight Pounds (lbs) 0.4538 Kilograms (kg)

Velocity Feet / Second (fps) 0.3048 Meters / Second (m/s)

Feet of Water (ft) 2.989 Kilopascals (kPa)


Pressure Drop
Pounds / Square Inch (psi) 6.895 Kilopascals (kPa)

TEMPERATURE
To convert degrees Fahrenheit (F) to degrees Celsius
(C), subtract 32 and multiply by 5/9 or 0.5556.
Example: (45.0F - 32) x 0.5556 = 27.2C
To convert a temperature range (i.e., a range of 10F)
from Fahrenheit to Celsius, multiply by 5/9 or 0.5556.
Example: 10.0F range x 0.5556 = 5.6 C range

JOHNSON CONTROLS 39
P.O. Box 1592, York, Pennsylvania USA 17405-1592 Tele. 800-861-1001 Subject to change without notice. Printed in USA
Copyright by Johnson Controls 2011 www.york.com ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Form 160.75-O1 (211)
Supersedes: 160.75-O1 (309)