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6500 Packet-Optical Platform

OAM&P (Photonic Layer)

Student Guide

Part Number: 556-T154-160.09.01

Issue: 9.1

Information in this courseware is provided


for training. This courseware may not be
reproduced without written permission.

Copyright 2012 Ciena, All Rights Reserved

Publication date: April 2012

1
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THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS CONFIDENTIAL AND TRADE SECRET INFORMATION OF CIENA


CORPORATION AND ITS RECEIPT OR POSSESSION DOES NOT CONVEY ANY RIGHTS TO REPRODUCE
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EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO ENSURE THAT THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS
COMPLETE AND ACCURATE AT THE TIME OF PRINTING; HOWEVER, THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN
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Copyright 2011 Ciena Corporation

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Contacting Ciena

Corporate Headquarters 410-694-5700 or 800-921-1144 www.ciena.com


Customer Technical Support/Warranty: www.ciena.com/support/support-contacts/
In North America Toll Free: 1-800-CIENA24, Phone: 1-410-865-4961
In Europe Toll Free: 00-800-CIENA-24-7 (800-2436-2247), Phone: +44-207-012-5508
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Sales and General Information 410-694-5700 E-mail:sales@ciena.com

Training on web www.ciena.com/support/product-training/


Training 410-981-7232 E-mail:techtng@ciena.com
Documentation on web https://portal.ciena.com/portal/server.pt
For additional office locations and phone numbers, please visit the Ciena web site at www.ciena.com.

Ciena Confidential and Proprietary 2


Publication History
April 2012
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 9.1
December 2011
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 9.0. Removal of
common lessons from this guide.
June 2011
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 8.0.
January 2011
Minor update to courseware, changes made to Documentation lesson
December 2010
Updated courseware to reflect release 7.0 content from 6500 Packet-
Optical Platform (Courseware re-branding day 2 transition)
September 2010
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 7.0.
September 2009
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 6.0.
March 2009
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 5.3.
February 2009
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 5.12.
May 2008
Courseware updated and aligns to software release 5.0.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical
Multiservice Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this
document.

Ciena Confidential and Proprietary 3


Introduction

Description
6500 Packet-Optical Platform Photonic Layer Operation and Maintenance course
provides lecture and hands-on exercises on the operation and maintenance of the
6500 Photonic Layer equipment.

Intended audience
This course is designed for anyone responsible for operating, administering,
provisioning and maintaining a 6500 Photonic Layer system.

Prerequisites
Working knowledge of fiber optics and digital communications technology.
Recommended: Cienas Optical Communications Associate (OC-A) Certification.

Objectives
After completing this course, you will be able to
Identify the 6500 Photonic Layer Hardware
List the 6500 Photonic Layer configurations
Visualize the 6500 Photonic Layer Signal flow through the different site
types
Perform Equipment and Facility Provisioning
Perform Photonic Layer level Provisioning (OTS and adjacencies)
Add and Delete a wavelength from a system
Describe the 6500 Photonic Layer Performance Monitoring (PM) features
Retrieve PM data from a node
Clear alarms using Fault Management procedure

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY


4
References

The following documents provide additional information:

6500 Packet-Optical Platform Planning


NTRN10CA
Guide
Provisioning and Operation Procedures Part
323-1851-310
1 and 2

323-1851-520 Performance Monitoring

323-1851-543 Fault Management Alarm Clearing Part 1


and 2

323-1851-545 Fault Management - Module Replacement

Ciena Confidential and Proprietary 5


Table of Contents

Hardware Overview 7

Configurations 67

Signal flow 99

Equipment and Facility Provisioning 115

Activity 146

Optical Transport Section (OTS) Management/Adjacencies 155

Activity 177

DOC/Photonic Connections 185

Activity 206

Performance Monitoring 223

Activity 247

Fault Management 259

Activity 281

Glossary 295

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

6
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to provide an overview of the 6500 Packet-Optical


Platform Photonic Layer hardware.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical Multiservice
Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

7
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

Configuration - Bandwidth 323-1851-320 part 1


and Data Services

8
OSC w/WSC 2 port SFP 2 Port 10BT (2xOSC) Circuit Pack

The dual OSC circuit pack provides the communications infrastructure for the photonic
layer of the 6500.
The OSC is the primary communication channel in the photonic layer. It supports
OAM&P services which use this channel from the Domain Optical Control (DOC) all the
way to the dedicated customer wayside.
The OSC consists of a 155 Mbps Ethernet-over-SONET (EOS) communications
infrastructure available for use by both the customer and the applications software of the
dual OSC itself.

The 2xOSC circuit pack (NTK554BAE5) provides the following functionality:


Is a single slot four-port interface that can be equipped in any slot of the following 6500
shelves:
For a 32 slot shelf the 2xOSC circuit pack can be equipped in slots 1-8, 11-18, 21-
28, and 31-38. Note: However, you must contact Ciena regarding the supported
status for applications using this circuit pack.
For a 14 slot shelf the 2xOSC circuit pack can be equipped in slots 1 to 14. The
supported shelves are: Optical Converged/40G optical (NTK503ADE5) Optical/front
electrical Converged/40Goptical/front electrical (NTK503BDE5) Optical/rear electrical
Converged/40G optical/rear electrical (NTK503CDE5). The 2xOSC circuit packs
(NTK554BAE5) are not supported in a Metro front electrical shelf (NTK503GA). Note:
You must use one of the three converged/40Gshelf assemblies to route CAT-5
Ethernet cables (connected to a 2xOSC wayside channel) in the shelf embedded
Fiber Management tray.
9
The 2xOSC circuit pack (NTK554BAE5) provides the following functionality
contd :
For a 7 slot shelf the 2xOSC circuit pack can be equipped in slots 1 to 7. Note:
However, you must contact Ciena regarding the supported status for applications
using this circuit pack.
Cannot be equipped in the 2-slot shelf.
Up to two 2xOSC circuit packs can be equipped in a 6500 shelf at the same time
(one per facing direction).
Up to two OSC facilities can operate out of band in the 1511 nm CWDM window
provided by two OC3/STM1 SFP ports.
For an in-line amplifier application, two SFPs are required and they can both be
equipped on the same or on different 2xOSC circuit packs. Using different 2xOSC
circuit packs provides data comms protection if one of the 2xOSC circuit pack
fails.
Optical generation and termination of each OSC facility.
Ethernet over SONET (EOS) mapping of each OSC facility.
Wayside access for customer use (IP over 10Base-T Ethernet data
communications for unspecified use by the customer) provided by two 10Base-T
ports (RJ-45 MDI-X connectors). The wayside access ports are called WSC.

The OSC circuit pack supports the following:


OC3/STM1 CWDM 1551 nm SFP modules NTK592NPE6 for a 0-25 dB span.
OC3/STM1 CWDM 1551 nm SFP modules NTK592NBE6 for a 10-30 dB span.
OC3/STM1 CWDM 1551 nm SFP modules NTK592NHE6 for a 20-34 dB span.
OC-3/STM-1 CWDM 1511 nm SFP module NTK592NGE5 for a 34 dB span.
OC-3/STM-1 CWDM 1511 nm SFP module NTK592NVE5 for 12-42 dB spans

Important notes: Although 2xOSC circuit packs can be equipped in slots 1 to 14 of a


14-slot shelf, it is recommended to use slot 1 and/or 14. Channels for electrical cable
management within the fibre management tray associated with slots 1 and 14 allow for
routing of two RJ-45 Category 5 Ethernet cables to each of those slots.
These channels are separated from the fibre routing area and can be used to connect
to the two Wayside Ethernet ports found on the 2xOSC circuit pack.

10
OSC Ports

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the OSC circuit pack.
OSC 1 In/Out are Out-of-band (1511 nm) OSC input / output from the Amplifier,
direction 1.
OSC 2 In / Out are Out-of-band (1511 nm) OSC input / output to the Amplifier,
direction 2.
The wayside access ports 3 and 4, called WSC (WaySide Channel), are 10Base-
T ports (RJ-45 MDI-X connectors).

11
Line Interface Module Circuit Packs

Line Interface Modules (LIMs) are used for edge and core applications. Five variants
exist.

This circuit pack is equipped at a 6500 site and the interface selection is per link
engineering rules. The amplification when needed is done through an Erbium-Doped
Fiber Amplifier (EDFA).

Line Interface Module provides the following functionality:


It's a single slot eight-port interface that can be equipped in:
slots 1-8, 11-18, 21-28, and 31-38 of the 32-slot 6500 optical shelf. However,
you must contact Ciena regarding the supported status for applications using
this circuit pack.
any slot of any 6500 14 slot 40G solution shelves as well as the optical/rear
electrical shelf, except in the Metro Front electrical shelf (NTK503GA).
slots 1 to 7 of the 7-slot 6500 optical shelf.
cannot be equipped in the 2-slot shelf.

12
Line Interface Module (LIM) circuit pack (contd)

The LIM circuit pack provides the following functionality:


Wavelength range: C-band 1530.139 to 1565.29 nm.
50 GHz and 100GHz grid compliant.
Integrated OSC add/drop filters.
OSC add/drop ports.
External monitor at outputs of each amplifier line (Line A Mon and Line B Mon).
Automatic Line Shut Off (ALSO) functionality (in amplified LIM type).
Automatic Power Reduction (APR) functionality (in amplified LIM type).
Optical connectorized taps on amplifier input/output ports.

13
Amplifier / Line Interface Modules Variants

The 6500 architecture includes four different amplifier modules and one line interface
module:
The Line Interface Module (LIM) is used for point-to-point and unamplified edge
applications.
The Single Line Amplifier (SLA) is a single (pre-amplifier) erbium-doped fiber
amplifier (EDFA), is primarily used for edge applications.
The Mid-stage Line Amplifier (MLA/MLA2) is a dual (pre-amplifier/booster) EDFA,
is used for both edge and core applications. The MLA2 provides a higher pre-
amplifier output than the MLA.
The Mid-stage Line Amplifier 3 (MLA3), which is a dual (pre-amplifier/booster)
EDFA, is used for both edge and core applications. The MLA3 provides support
for a 96-channel 50 GHz grid (88 supported by software) and supports higher
total output power than the MLA2 (maximizes reach for 88 x 100G links).

Note: Contact Ciena for MLA3 availability.

14
LIM Variants Power Specifications

This table summarizes the optical specifications of the different line interfaces
modules.

15
LIM Ports

Shown here are (MLA/MLA2/MLA3) ports. The same port numbering and labels are
used and are common to all types of LIMs.

16
Midstage Line Amplifier 2 (MLA2 C-Band) w/Variable Optical Attenuator (VOA)
Circuit Pack (MLA2 w/VOA)

Similar functionality to existing NTK552FAE5 MLA2 circuit pack with the following
differences:
The MLA2v includes a Variable Optical Attenuator at the output of each amplifier
required for applications where attenuation is needed to meet link budget
constraints and pads are not desired.
Typical power consumption: 30W for MLA2 and 33W for MLA2v.
VOA attenuation level is provisioned independently from the amplifier gain.

Equipment reconfiguration is supported for the following cases by first putting the
equipment OOS, editing the Provisioned PEC and returning the equipment to the IS
state:
MLA/MLA2/MLA3 to MLA2v.
MLA2v to MLA/MLA2/MLA3.

Upon the reconfiguration, LOS threshold values are automatically updated to the
new default values.

17
MLA2 w/VOA Circuit Pack Block Diagram

Shown here is the block diagram for the MLA2 w/VOA circuit pack.

18
MLA2 w/VOA - Automatic VOA Target Loss Calculations

The OSC Span loss is used for the loss of the fiber span. If there are LIMs between
the MLA2v and the downstream amplifier their loss is included. The loss of any
DSCMs on the line is automatically included in the OSC span loss measurement .
When the OSC span loss is unavailable, DOC does not adjust the MLA2v VOA.
By default the VOA target loss is automatically calculated and set by DOC. However
this functionality can be disabled and instead the VOA target loss can be manually
user-provisioned.
The choice of automatic VOA target loss calculation/setting or manual VOA target
loss setting depends on the VOA facility VOA Reset Required parameter. When the
parameter is set to True, the VOA target loss calculation/setting is automatic.
The automatic VOA target loss calculation and setting is performed once based on
the setting of the VOA facility VOA Reset Required parameter.
When the VOA facility is created, the VOA facility VOA Reset Required parameter
inherits the value from the VOA Reset Required parameter in the Node Information
application (default value is True). If it is set to True, this drives an automatic VOA
target loss calculation/setting after a DOC auto monitor cycle or after a dark channel
add (i.e., first channel add in a photonic domain).
Once the calculation/setting is complete and DOC has successfully set the VOA
target loss, DOC sets the VOA facility VOA Reset Required parameter to False.
The VOA range is from 1 to 20 dBs.

19
Fixed Gain Amplifier (FGA)

The PEC code is NTK552AB and it operates in the C-Band. This amplifier is used in
passive optics configuration.
It is a one slot wide circuit pack. It is a Hazard Level 1 unit for all operating conditions
and over its entire life.
The FGA supports one amplifier facility operating at a fixed gain of 23 dB
There is no gain and no gain tilt provisioning. Input LOS, Output LOS and Shutoff
thresholds are user-provisionable.
A FGA may be inserted between any two filters in the passive optic configuration. An
amplifier placement between filters is referred to as a utility amplifier.
FGA may be used for either inbound (pre-amp), cascaded, outbound (post amp) or
utility applications.
There are two monitor ports that can be connected to an OPM or an external OSA.

20
Fixed Gain Amplifier (FGA)

Shown here is the port numbering scheme and labels for the FGA.

The FGA supports the following power mesurements:


Input power.
Ouptut power.
Optical Return Loss (ORL).

21
Wavelength Selective Switch with OPM (WSS/OPM) Circuit Pack
The WSS w/OPM circuit pack is used for flexible per-wavelength
add/drop/passthrough and per-wavelength switching. The combination of WSS
w/OPM circuit pack and CMD modules (ROADM sites) are required to perform
add/drop operations.
The WSS w/OPM circuit pack (NTK553EAE5) provides the following
functionality:
A per wavelength attenuation profile .
In-service dynamic per channel add/drop/branching/broadcast.
Per channel power monitoring for both directions.
Per channel power control on add and pass-through traffic.
Provides 100% add/drop capability at each site.
Supports 2.5G, 10G , 40G and 100G channels.
Per-wavelength switching.
The following modules are available at 100 Ghz spacing (44 channels):
5x1 (2 slots unit).
2x1 (2 slots unit).
The following modules are available at 50Ghz spacing (88 channels):
9x1 (3 slots unit).
2x1 (1 slot and 3 slots units)
22
WSS 100GHz-5x1-OPM Ports

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the 100GHz 5x1 circuit pack.
The ports 1 and 2 are monitor ports for the OPM.
The ports 3 through 18 are used for optical input or output from other WSS or
CMD44.
The ports 17 and 18 are DWDM optical input or output to or from the line
amplifier circuit packs.
The LC connector type is used for all ports.

23
WSS 100GHz-2x1-OPM Ports

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the 100GHz 2x1 circuit pack.
The ports 1 and 2 are monitor ports for the OPM.
The ports 3 through 6 are used for optical input or output from other WSS or
CMD44.
The ports 17 and 18 (7 and 8 on the 1 slot unit) are DWDM optical input or
output to or from the line amplifier circuit packs.
The LC connector type is used for all ports.
Notes for the 1 slot unit.
This unit has a power tap/monitor on Common Out. However, software support
(alarms/PMs) for this port is to be added in a future release.
The faceplate LC connectors on the 1 slot unit protrude by an extra 10 mm
compared to faceplate LC connectors on the NTK553JA. As a result, in order to
avoid unacceptable interference with the shelf front cover, NTTC50++ patch cords
(NTTC50++ patch cords are Corning standard LC strain relief boots) or approved
equivalent must be used. Also, attenuator pads cannot be mounted on the
faceplate of the NTK553JA WSS when the shelf front cover is installed.

24
WSS 100GHz-4x1-OPM Ports - (Single Slot-Wide Variant)

This unit is supported in similar configurations as the existing NTK553EA WSS. It


can be used in a ROADM OTS or a DIA OTS and is supported with all variants of the
100GHz CMD44. Future releases will add support for 4200 filter cascades.
Any switch port can be connected to the CMD44 for add/drop traffic and any switch
port can be used for pass-through traffic.
A five way node can be configured if no add/drop is required and a four way node is
the maximum if add/drop is required.
The Drop LIM and Cascaded LIM configurations are supported

Note that the faceplate LC connectors on this unit protrude by an extra 10 mm


compared to faceplate LC connectors on the NTK553EA. As a result, in order to
avoid unacceptable interference with the shelf front cover, NTTC50++ patch cords
(NTTC50++ patch cords are Corning standard LC strain relief boots) or approved
equivalent must be used. Also, attenuator pads cannot be mounted on the faceplate
of the NTK553HA WSS when the shelf front cover is installed.

25
WSS 50GHz-9x1-OPM Ports - (Triple Slot-Wide)

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the 50GHz 9x1 circuit pack.
Ports 1 and 2 are monitor ports for the OPM.
Ports 3 through 16 are used for optical input or output from other WSS.
Ports 17 through 20 are used for optical input or output from other CMD44 or
BMD2.
Ports 21 and 22 are DWDM optical input or output to or from the line amplifier
circuit packs.
The LC connector type is used for all ports.

The 2-slots wide unit adds a power tap/monitor on Common Out port. However,
software support (alarms/PMs) for this port to be added in a future release.
Optical technical specification are the same for both units.
Provisioned PEC edit is supported from NTK553FA (3-slots) to NTK553FC.(2-
slots) . This simplifies a reconfiguration from NTK553FA to NTK553FC. This also
means you can spare the NTK553FA with a NTK553FC.

26
WSS 50GHz-9x1-OPM Ports - (Double Slot-Wide)

The 2-slots wide unit adds a power tap/monitor on Common Out port. However,
software support (alarms/PMs) for this port to be added in a future release.
Optical technical specification are the same for both units.
Provisioned PEC edit is supported from NTK553FA (3-slots) to NTK553FC.(2-
slots) . This simplifies a reconfiguration from NTK553FA to NTK553FC. This also
means you can spare the NTK553FA with a NTK553FC.

27
WSS 50GHz-9x1-OPM Ports - (Double Slot-Wide Gridless Variant)

NTH553LA adds support for gridless ROADM architecture to be introduced in a


future release. Optical technical specification are similar to other 9 ports WSS. This
WSS is supported in same applications/configurations as the other 9 ports WSS
circuit packs.
Provisioned PEC edit is supported from NTK553FA/FC (3 slots and 2 slots WSS) to
NTK553LA. This simplifies a reconfiguration from NTK553FA/FC to NTK553LA. This
also means you can spare the NTK553FA/FC with a NTK553LA

28
WSS 50GHz-2x1-OPM Ports

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the 50GHz 2x1 circuit pack.
Ports 1 and 2 are monitor ports for the OPM.
Ports 3 through 6 are used for optical input or output from other WSS or CMD44
or BMD2.
Ports 7 and 8 are DWDM optical input or output to or from the line amplifier circuit
packs.
The LC connector type is used for all ports.

29
Channel Mux/Demux Modules

CMD44 100 GHz


The CMD44 100 GHz module is deployed at a WSS-based ROADMs or WSS-based
terminals . The enhanced module (eCMD44) includes an isolator in the Common In
port.

CMD44 50 GHz
The CMD44 50 GHz modules are deployed at a WSS-based ROADMs or WSS-
based terminals . Each module (red and blue) has a 44 wavelengths capacity for a
total of 88 add and drop wavelengths.
The enhanced version (eCMD44) provides an additional monitoring port.

SCMD4 and OMD4 100 GHz


These modules are used in thin-OADM (TOADM) sites. Each module type has 4
add/drop channel capacity. Both units have 9 different groups for a total system
capacity of 36 wavelengths at 100Ghz spacing.
The SCMD4 unit is an active circuit pack and is inserted in a 6500 shelf slot.
The OADM4 is a passive unit that is externally connected to the 6500 through the
access panel.

30
44 Channel Mux Demux (CMD44)

All these CMD44 modules are two rack units (2RU) high and are passive filters.

31
CMD44 100 GHz module functionality contd

The CMD44 module provides the following:

The CMD44 module is a passive device, auto provisioning and inventory support
are available if using the:
NTK555ABE5 or NTK555CAE5 shelf processor and NTK505MBE5 access
panel in a 14-slot 6500 shelf type, or
NTK555FAE5 shelf processor and NTK605MAE5 access panel in a 32-slot
6500 shelf type, or
NTK555ABE5 shelf processor and NTK505PAE5 access panel in a 7-slot 6500
shelf type.
The CMD44 module must be located in the same bay as the access panel that the
CMD44 module connects to and its assigned OTS resides in.
The channels on the CMD44 module have 100% add/drop capability at each side,
allowing one to 44 channels to be added or dropped.
The CMD44 has no variable optical attenuators (VOA), optimization is carried out
through the wavelength selective switch (WSS).

32
CMD44 Ports (100GHz / 50GHz Red and Blue)

The CMD44 100GHz and 50GHz red and blue have the same port numbering.

Channel Multiplex ports are 1, 3, 5, 7, ..., 87 . They correspond to channels 1 to 44


IN.

Channel Demultiplex ports are 2, 4, 6, 8, ..., 88


They correspond to channels 1 to 44 OUT.

The Demux Common In port is port 89 .


The Demux Common Out port is port 90.

33
eCMD44 Ports (100GHz)

The eCMD44 100GHz has all the same features and implementation rules as a
CMD44 100Ghz except for an embedded isolator feature which is needed for the DIA
configuration.
The isolator is used to prevent the MLA in the DIA configuration to go into APR if the
Tx/Rx are connected in reverse. Therefore traffic of all other channels will not be
affected.
The insertion loss of the isolator is 0.4dB therefore we are keeping the same values
of the regular CMD44 100GHz.
The insertion loss of the mux/demux component is 4 to 6.4 dbs

34
eCMD44 100 GHz Isolator use

In a DIA site, the CMD44 is connected to an amplifier as opposed to a WSS in a


ROADM site.
The use of the isolator is to prevent the amplifier to go in APR mode (Automatic
Power Reduction) if Tx fibers are wrongly connected to a Rx port. APR goes into
action when the amplifier sees power reflected back to itself. This would happen in
the following scenario.
Lets pretend that we already have four existing channels dropped as indicated by
the blue arrows. Lets also pretend that we want to add four new channels but we
improperly connect the transmit fibers to the receive ports of the CMD44.
Without the isolator, the amplifier would suddenly see power propagating in the
opposite direction of its line out port as indicated by the red arrow. The amplifier may
measure this as reflected power and if it is over the threshold, it will go in APR. APR
would reduce the power and could impact the existing channels in blue. The use of
an isolator prevents the preceding scenario from happening.

35
eCMD44 Ports (50Ghz Red and Blue) with Test Access Point (TAP)

Two modules:
eCMD44 50GHz C-Band Blue with TAP NTT862BCE5
eCMD44 50GHz C-Band Red with TAP NTT862BDE5
They have similar functionality as the existing CMD44 50GHz modules .

New to the Enhanced CMD44 modules:


A passive 5% tap added on the Common Out port
Two additional LC connectors added on the faceplate for a total of 92 LC
connectors. The Monitor Out is port #92 and port #91 is unconnected and not
labeled.
The monitor port has a 0.5 dB higher insertion loss.
Can be monitored using an external Optical Spectrum Analyzer (OSA) or the
OPM 2-Port 50GHz circuit pack.

36
Connected to an OSA:
If the service circuit pack Tx wavelength and Tx power is properly provisioned and
the service circuit pack is properly fibered to the CMD44, the wavelength will be visible
on the OSA. Note that the OSA power will be ~13-15 dB lower than actual power.

Connected to the 50GHz OPM 2-Port circuit pack:


When service circuit packs are connected to the CMD44 Channel In/Out ports, power
levels of existing and new service circuit packs can be read via the CHMON /
OPTMON performance monitoring.
The software will automatically account for the CMD44 tap loss, providing a more
accurate power reading than an external OSA
No need to provision the channel in DOC or create Tx adjacency to get the channel
power info (but CMD44 has to be provisioned in OTS)

37
BMD-2 Module

The Broadband Mux/Demux 1x2 (BMD-2) module is used together with a WSS 50
GHz w/OPM9x1 or WSS 50 GHz w/OPM 2x1 circuit pack to allow for full 88 channel
support and freeing up a switch port for passthrough traffic.

The BMD-2 module is comprised of two wide-band optical couplers that perform
the function of coupler on the MUX side and power splitter on the DEMUX side.
The BMD-2 tray is a 1U height and intended to be mounted in a bay.

The BMD-2 module 9NTT862DAE5) provides the following functionality:


Can be used with 14-slot 6500 optical, converged/40G optical, optical/front
electrical, converged/40G optical/front electrical, optical/rear electrical, or
converged/40G optical/rear electrical shelves.
Can be used with 32-slot 6500 optical shelf, however, you must contact Ciena
regarding the supported status for applications using this module.
Can be used with 7-slot 6500 optical shelf, however, you must contact Ciena
regarding the supported status for applications using this module.
Notes: BMD-2 modules (NTT862AAE5) are not supported in Metro front electrical
shelf (NTK503GA).

38
BMD-2 Module Block Diagram-Functionality

Here is the port numbering and labeling on the BMD-2 module.

39
50GHz OPM 2-Port Circuit Pack

Provides the ability to monitor and report the per-wavelength optical powers on the
50 GHz ITU grid across the entire C-band using the interconnection of up to two
Enhanced CMD44 50GHz modules .
Provides a check point for service circuit pack Tx powers connected to CMD44.
Installers can validate connections between service circuit packs and CMD44 without
provisioning CMD44 Tx/Rx adjacency and adding the channel in the Domain Optical
Controller (DOC).

40
50GHz OPM 2-Port Circuit Pack Ports and Rules

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the 50GHz OPM 2-Port Circuit
Pack .
Ports 1 and 2 are monitor ports for the OPM. They connect to one or two
eCMD44 50 GHz modules.
Maximum number of 50GHz OPM 2-port circuit packs per shelf: 4
Maximum number of 50GHz OPM 2-port circuit packs per OTS: 1
The 50GHz OPM 2-port circuit pack and the Enhanced CMD44 50GHz modules
fibered to the 50GHz OPM 2-port circuit pack must be provisioned in the same
shelf
An OPM can only be fibered to 2 CMD44 modules belonging in the same OTS.
This implies an OPM circuit pack cannot be shared between 2 shelves or
between 2 CMD44 modules that are in different OTSs.
Enhanced CMD44 50GHz has to be provisioned in an OTS in order to have PM
support
Not supported in CMD44 thin terminal configurations due to lack of topology
support
In this release, the 50GHz OPM 2-Port circuit pack connects to an eCMD44
module only, not to a line facing LIM circuit pack.

41
50GHz OPM 2-Port Circuit Pack Interconnections

Shown here is an example of a 50GHz OPM 2-Port Circuit Pack interconnection.

Ports 1 and 2 are monitor ports for the OPM. They connect to one or two eCMD44
modules in the same shelf. There are no hard rules about the interconnection. Port 1
of the OPM can connect to a blue or red eCMD44.
The manual adjacency provisioning confirms the interconnection. Provision CMD44
monitor port (port 92) to OPM port (port 1 or 2) adjacency using Site Manager. The
corresponding adjacency at the OPM port will be auto-derived.

The line facing LIM monitor ports connect to the WSS/OPM module.

42
4 Serial Channel Mux/Demux (SCMD4) Circuit Pack

The Serial Channel Mux/Demux 4 (SCMD4) is a single slot circuit pack which has 8 ports
that support channels 1 to 4 (In and Out) + 2 ports for Common (In and Out) and 2 Express
ports (Upgrade ports In and Out).

The SCMD4 circuit pack can be deployed at Thin Terminal or Thin OADM sites. The circuit
pack provides 4 channels into 1 group of muxed signals (9 groups available).

The SCMD4 circuit pack provides the following functionality:


It's a single slot twelve-port interface that can be equipped in:
slots 1-8, 11-18, 21-28, and 31-38 of the 32-slot 6500 optical shelf.
any slot of any 6500 14 slot 40G solution shelves as well as the optical/rear
electrical shelf, except in the Metro Front electrical shelf (NTK503GA).
slots 1 to 7 of the 7-slot 6500 optical shelf.
cannot be equipped in the 2-slot shelf.

Mux inputs have channel-level taps, and ingress Electrical Variable Optical Attenuator
(eVOA) with 15 dB range to allow for levelling launch power.
Demux has group-level VOA with 15 dB range used to set the average drop power to the
average receiver power, based on Tx/Rx profiles known by DOC.

43
4 Channel Optical Mux/Demux (SCMD4) circuit pack contd

The SCMD4 circuit pack provides the following functionality:

Internal optical tap on demux input.


Demux path includes an isolator to ensure the pre-amp APR doesnt get triggered
with a Tx to Ch Out misconnection.

Engineering rules

SCMD4s must be in the same OTS as the LIM and all equipment part of the OTS
must reside in the same shelf. The line-facing OTSs at a Thin OADM can be in
different shelves.
The LIM can be an MLA2, MLA, SLA or LIM circuit pack if supported by link
engineering. Cascaded LIMs are not supported.
Software supports up to 9 cascaded SCMD4s but the number may be limited by link
engineering.
SCMD4 cascade order must be user-provisioned. Cascade can be in any group
order. Fibering must match the provisioned cascade order. No CMD44 is allowed in
the cascade.
Capacity upgrade with addition of new groups/SCMD4s at a Thin Terminal can be
done In-Service using the upgrade ports.
Capacity upgrade with addition of new groups/SCMD4s at a Thin OADM impacts
express traffic as upgrade ports need to be rerouted.
A Thin OADM with no equipped/provisioned SCMD4s is supported. This is like a
line-amp site without amps, but provisioned as a Channel Access site; ready for an
OOS upgrade to OADM site in the future. Also, Thin OADMs with one OTS
equipped with SCMD4(s) and the other OTS equipped with no SCMD4(s) are
supported. This results in SCMD4 upgrade ports being connected to the opposite
sides LIM/AMP.

Note: Every Optical Section in a Photonic Domain must have at least one active circuit
pack (SLA/MLA/MLA2/WSS/SCMD4), and hence you cannot deploy a TOADM Optical
Section with LIMs and no SCMD4s on either end.

44
SCMD4 Ports

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the SCMD4 circuit pack.

45
4-Channel Optical Mux/Demux (OMD4) Module

The OMD4 module has 9 groups which are 100GHz compliant. With the use of an
upgrade port, OMD4 modules can be cascaded as capacity requirements increase.

This is a passive unit which has no eVOAs. OMD4 is a 1 RU module equipped with
LC connectors. It can be installed in all shelf types (2/7/14/32 slots) except for the 14-
slot metro front electrical shelf (NTK503GA). This module includes an RJ45 port for
automated Inventory discovery support .

The common in port has a demux path isolator to prevent the amplifier to go in an
automatic power reduction (APR) mode if the transmit and receive interface fibers are
misconnected.

46
OMD4 Ports

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the OMD4 circuit pack.

47
Colorless Application Modules

Colorless OADM based Network Element (NE)

The 50 GHz SMD C-Band 8x1 circuit pack (also referred to as SMD 50 GHz 8x1) is
used together with the CCMD12 circuit pack (NTK508FAE5) to provide colorless
add/drop per-wavelength switching.

48
50GHz Selective Mux/Demux (SMD) - C-Band 8x1 Circuit Pack

The SMD is a mandatory component in a colorless application node.


It supports eighty-eight 50GHz spaced channels. The SMD provides two
independently controlled wavelength selective switches (WSS) to select each of the
88 channels in the band plan from any of its eight ports.
Blocking of channels on unselected ports and per channel attenuation is performed
on either the mux or demux path.
There is an internal loopback connection between the two WSSs. The loopback path
has a fixed filter to only allow wavelength 1529.94. The optical loopback verifies the
connectivity and insertion loss in the CCMD12 and SMD for any interfaces tuned to
that wavelength.. It can be used during TU&T and even with an up and running
system testing a new wavelength addition (before the actual channel add). There is
an automated loopback procedure and a manual one.
Monitoring (total power) is available on all mux and demux ingress ports
There are eight monitor ports that are combined before feeding into 1 port of the
OPM. This allows power measurement and power setting of drop channels as these
monitor ports are connected to the CCMD12 circuit packs.
The SMD uses LC-UPC connectors and is a 2-slot wide unit.

49
50GHz SMD C-Band 8x1 Circuit Pack (SMD)

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the SMD circuit pack.

The switch in/out ports connect to a CCMD12 circuit pack as well as the monitor
ports. Up to eight CCMD12 can be connected to the SMD.

The common in/out will be connected to an amplifier

50
Colorless 12-Channel Mux Demux (CCMD12) C-Band Circuit Pack

The CCMD12 provides twelve mux/demux ports without filtering. The optical client
interfaces connecting to the CCMD12 need to be wavelength selective.
The CCMD12 provides the following:
Power monitoring (total power) on all mux ingress ports.
Provides an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) at the common ports of both
mux/demux paths.
Total power monitoring at both the input and output of both EDFAs.
External monitor port at the output of the demux EDFA (this connects to the SMD
monitor ports).
Optical isolation in the EDFAs to eliminate return loss and extraneous connection
reverse-propagating power.

The CCMD12 is equipped with LC-UPC connectors and is a 1-slot wide unit.

51
CCMD12 Ports

Shown here is a description of the ports located on the CCMD12 circuit pack.

Ports 1 to 24 are dedicated to connect optical interfaces. These ports are not
filtering. The client interfaces used need to have a wavelength selectable receiver.

Ports 25 to 27 connect to the SMD circuit pack.

52
Passive Optics Application

Modules
Passive Optics application may use some of the following modules:
Six-slot Passive Photonic Chassis.
4-Channel Mux/Demux (High and Low modules for each band).
8-Channel Mux/Demux.
1-Group Band Splitter Modules BS1 (A-B-C-D-E).
2-Group Band Splitter Modules BS2 (AB-CD).
3-Group Band Splitter Module BS3 (A-B-E).
5-Group Band Splitter Module BS5 (A-B-C-D-E).
1-Channel Mux/Demux Module for OSC.
DSCM shelf and modules.

53
Passive Optics Application

2150 Passive Optical Multiplexer Chassis

The Six-slot Passive Photonic Chassis is a rack mounted (2U) passive shelf.
It can house up to six half-width passive filters or two full-width passive filters plus
two half-width passive filters.
It can be created in the 6500 shelf external slots or in virtual slots (recommended).
When adding equipment, select PPC6 equipment type.
After manual creation of the Six-slot Passive Photonic Chassis, up to six filters can
be added in its sub slots.

54
Passive Optics Application

174-0040-900 6-Slot Passive Photonics Chassis

This shelf has similar functionality to the existing 2150 Passive Optical Multiplexer
Chassis with the following difference, it includes CCT (i.e., inventory date in
EEPROM) and an RJ-45 interface to allow connection to 6500 shelf Access Panel for
auto-provisioning and inventory support. Note that auto-provisioning and inventory
support requires the NTK505MB Access Panel when using the 14-slot shelf.
Moreover, note that the NTK555AA Shelf Processor does not support passive
module auto-provisioning/inventory.
The chassis can be automatically provisioned in external slots (recommended unless
all the external slots are used up) or manually provisioned in any virtual slot. If a
chassis is provisioned in a virtual slot, no equipment alarms for the chassis or
equipment in its sub-slots.
When the 6-Slot Passive Photonics Chassis is used in an external slot, module
presence detection and readback of inventory EEPROM content from modules
inserted into sub-slots is supported. When 6-Slot Passive Photonics Chassis is used
in an external slot, the sub-slots in the chassis inherit the Auto Equip setting from the
chassis. That is, if Auto Equip is enabled for the external slot, the chassis as well as
modules in its sub-slots are auto-provisioned upon detection of hardware presence.

55
Passive Optics application (4-Channel Mux/Demux)

The 4-Channel Mux/Demux is a passive module. There is a module for each band
divided in high and low wavelength assignement. For example: a module exists for
band C Low (C4L) and a separate module exists for band C High (C4H).
This module is half width and occupies a single slot in Six-slot passive photonic
chassis.
Each module supports four 100-GHz spaced channels.
There is support for a pass-through path for the other bands (EXPR) and monitor
ports.
The 4-Channel Mux/Demux module equipment type is OMDF4.

56
Passive Optics Application (OMDF4)

This shows the OMDF4 high-level schematics. The NETWK port sums all the add
and drop channels for this module and the other bands express channels.

The table shows all wavelengths available for each bands High and Low modules.

57
Passive Optics Application (8-Channel Mux/Demux)

The 8-Channel Mux/Demux is a passive module. There is a module per each band.
This module is full width and occupies two slots in the Six-slot passive photonic
chassis. It can be inserted in slot one or slot four.
Each module supports eight 100-GHz spaced channels.
These modules are equipped with monitor ports.
The 8-Channel Mux/Demux module equipment type is OMDF8.

58
Passive Optics Application - Band Splitter Modules

Four different Band Splitter Module types can be equipped in a Passive Optics
configuration.
They are:
1-Group Band Splitter Modules BS1 (5 types: A-B-C-D-E).
2-Group Band Splitter Modules BS2 (2 types: AB-CD).
3-Group Band Splitter Module BS3 (ABE).
5-Group Band Splitter Module BS5 (ABCDE).

All modules are half width units and occupy one slot in the Six-slot passive photonic
chassis.
BS1 and BS2 extract and insert group(s) and let the others pass through/come
through.
All Band Splitter modules except for BS3 provide monitor ports to see incoming and
outgoing spectrum. The BS-3 has no pass through ports and is intended to be used
as an add-on with the BS-2 CD to extend the site capability from 2 to 5 bands.

59
Passive Optics Application (1-Channel Mux/Demux Module for OSC)

The 1-Channel Mux/Demux Module for OSC is a Half width module and occupies
one slot in the Six-slot passive photonic chassis.
It extracts and inserts the 1510 nm OSC wavelength going to/coming from an OSC
facility of a 6500 2xOSC circuit pack (all other wavelengths are passing through)
using a 1511 nm single-channel ITU CWDM filter module.
The 1-Channel Mux/Demux Module for OSC equipment type is OSCF.

60
Passive Optics Application (DSCM Shelf and Modules)

The DSCM shelf is rack mounted and occupies 1U of rack space.


It can house one full-width DSCM module or two half-width modules (as shown in the
picture).

Two types of DSCM are available. One that matches the NDSF CD slope and one
that matches ELEAF.
Depending on the length, the DSCM modules are half width (2 per DSCM shelf) or
full width (1 per DSCM shelf).

61
Shelf Configurations

Shown here are examples of shelf configurations (1-way and 2-way) supported by
the 6500.

62
Shelf Configurations

Shown here are examples of shelf configurations (3-way and 4-way) supported by
the 6500.

63
Check Your Learning

1. Which of the following shelves does not support 6500 Photonic Layer circuit
packs?
a) Optical shelf
b) Optical/Front Electrical shelf
c) Optical/Rear Electrical shelf
d) Metro Front/Electrical shelf
2. Although the CMD44 and the DSCM are passive devices they can be
automatically provisioned in a 6500 shelf?
a) True
b) False
3. The dual OSC is:
a) A 44.7 Mbps Ethernet-over-SONET (EOS) communications infrastructure
b) A 155 Mbps Ethernet-over-SONET (EOS) communications infrastructure
c) A 622 Mbps Ethernet-over-SONET (EOS) communications infrastructure
d) None of the above

64
Check Your Learning

4. Which photonic equipment does the re-routing of a pass-through wavelength to


an add/drop wavelength?
a) MLA circuit pack
b) SLA circuit pack
c) WSS w/OPM circuit pack
d) CMD44 module

5. Which equipment is required in order to perform add/drop operation in a 6500


Photonic network?
a) SLA and/or MLA circuit packs
b) CMD44 module and WSS w/OPM circuit pack
c) SLA and/or MLA and WSS w/OPM circuit packs
d) SLA and/or MLA and CMD44 module

6. Which module is used together with a WSS 50 GHz w/OPM 9x1 or WSS 50 GHz
w/OPM 2x1circuit pack to allow for full 88 channel support. (Choose all that
apply)
a) Dispersion Sloped Compensation Module (DSCM).
b) Wavelength Selective Switch (WSS)
c) 44 Channel Mux/Demux (CMD44)
d) Broadband Mux/Demux 1x2 (BMD-2) module

7. Which circuit is used for Thin Terminal and Thin OADM configurations?

a) SLA
b) MLA/MLA2
c) SCMD4
d) CMD44
e) None of the above

8. The Line Interface Module (LIM) provides a greater gain versus all other
amplifiers that are supported in the 6500.
a) True
b) False

65
66
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to identify the site types, wavelength grid and fiber
types supported in 6500 Packet-Optical Platform Photonic Layer.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical Multiservice
Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

67
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

68
Supported site types

Shown here are the 6500 Photonic Layer site types.

69
Terminal or Edge sites

At the Terminal site all channels that form the photonic layer are added or dropped at
the service layer.

The following 6500 Photonic Layer equipment is required at a terminal or edge site
type:
44 Channel Mux/Demux (CMD44).
Wavelength Selective Switch (WSS)-Optical power Monitor (OPM).
Line Interface Module (LIM), Single Line Amplifier (SLA) or Midstage Line
Amplifier (MLA/MLA2/MLA3).
2 x OSC circuit pack
Dispersion and Slope Compensation Modules (DSCM) can be used if required to
compensate for chromatic dispersion in the network.

Note: A Terminal site can also be named Edge or Channel Access site.

70
Line Amplifier site

Line Amplifier sites are used to amplify the wavelengths in the network. Dispersion
and Slope Compensation Modules (DSCM) can be used if required to compensate
for chromatic dispersion in the network.
One or two 2 x OSC circuit packs can be used in this site type.

The following 6500 Photonic Layer equipment is required at a Line Amplifier site
type:
Single Line Amplifier (SLA) or Midstage Line Amplifier (MLA/MLA2/MLA3).
2 x OSC circuit pack.

71
ROADM site

The remotely Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer (ROADM) site provides


the ability to remotely and automatically reconfigure optical channels as either
add/drop or passthrough.
Dispersion and Slope Compensation Modules (DSCM) can be used if required to
compensate for chromatic dispersion in the network.
One or two 2 x OSC circuit packs can be used in this site type.

The following 6500 Photonic Layer equipment is required at a ROADM site type:
Wavelength Selective Switch (WSS)-Optical power Monitor (OPM).
Channel Mux/Demux 44 (CMD44) module.
Single Line Amplifier (SLA) or Midstage Line Amplifier (MLA/MLA2/MLA3).
2 x OSC circuit pack.

72
Drop LIM in ROADM or terminal

In order to improve the Receiver power level, it may be necessary to include an extra
amplifier in the WSS drop path in some network deployments.
Only supported with the following WSS variants:
NTK553EAE5 WSS 100GHz w/OPM 5x1 (shown here)
NTK553JAE5 WSS 100GHz w/OPM 2x1
NTK553KCE5 WSS 50GHz w/OPM 2x1
This variant use a BMD2 for a full add and drop capacity

The DROP LIM must be an SLA (NTK552AAE5), other LIM types cannot be used ,
they are blocked by software.

Although both the CMD44 100GHz and eCMD44 100GHz can be used in this
application, it is recommended that the eCMD44 100GHz be used since it includes an
embedded isolator after the Common In port (port 89). The embedded isolator
prevents the SLA from entering the APR (Automatic Power Reduction) state if a user
were to accidently misconnect the Tx and Rx signals from the service equipment to the
CMD44 Ch In and Ch Out ports.

73
Cascaded LIM

The combination of a large interior DSCM and/or long spans can trigger the need for
an interior SLA (also called Cascaded LIM).

The Line B of interior SLA is bypassed to minimize loss. The Line B facility should be
put OOS.

The OPM is always connected to the exterior amplifiers.

74
Dynamic Gain Flattening Filter (DGFF)

The dynamic gain flattening filter (DGFF) is a variant of a ROADM site with all
channels glassed through. Link budget analysis dictates the placement of back-to-
back WSSs for the purpose of a DGFF function used to optimize system
performance.

The DGFF provides a per-wavelength attenuation profile for control purposes to


overcome the accumulation of gain tilt and ripple in an optical link.

75
Photonic Branching

Photonic branching provides the following benefits:


Savings by the elimination of regenerators at branching locations.
Wavelengths can be routed along the primary route or to local POPs for
add/drop.
You can route any wavelength in any direction.
You can perform rapid provisioning and remote reconfiguration.
Allows for future network expansion when you want to connect to other regional
networks also deploying 6500 Photonic Layer.
Photonic Branching supports up to eight way node (with local 100% add/drop
capability on each direction) and the branching can be done on a per channel basis.

76
Photonic Branching - Optical Branch Site Configuration

Shown here are examples of 6500 PL supported branch site configurations.

2 Way Branching Site


End of 1 Domain connects into the start of another Domain.

3 Way Branching Site


End of 1 Domain connects into an OADM site of another Domain.
End of 2 Domains connect into start of another Domain.

4 Way Branching Site


End of 2 Domains connect into start of 2 other Domains.
End of 2 Domains connect into start of another Domain.
End of 3 Domains connect into start of another Domain.

77
Photonic Branching - 5 Way Branching

Shown here are examples of 6500 PL supported branch site configurations.

A 5-way branching site configuration involves three, four, or five different


domains where:
The end of four domains connect into the start of another domain, or
The end of three domains connect into the start of another domain.
The end of two domains connect into the start of another domain.

78
Photonic Branching - 8 Way Branching

An 8-way branching site configuration involves six, seven, or eight different


domains where:
The end of seven domains connect into the start of another domain, or
The end of six domains connect into the start of another domain.
The end of two domains connect into the start of another domain.

79
Direction Independent Access (DIA) Site Configuration

Previous ROADM configurations are directionally dependant. A TX/RX pair


connected to a CMD can only be sent out of the site in the direction of the line ports
of the WSS it is connected to. A DIA increases the amount of remote reconfiguration
available.

The DIA allows the user to determine the optical direction of a channel out of a site
via software and not a physical connection. This simplifies the planning of ROADM
sites / network. It allows wavelengths to be remotely re-directed to other direction as
the bandwidth requirements change.

DIA supports directional control of 44 (100GHz eCMD44) or 88 (50GHz CMD44s)


wavelengths. Each optical direction has capacity up to 88 wavelength via
combination of passthrough, DIA add/drop and local add/drop.

The DIA OTS has no OSID provisioned nor has a DOC facility created. The DIA OTS
is controlled by the other domains DOC. All outgoing lines are in different domains.
The amplifier in the DIA node has its shutoff mode disabled and is provisioned in a
set and forget mode.

80
Module Interconnections

In the DIA shelf, the main difference is that the LIM is not facing the backbone fibers,
thus not facing a far end LIM. For this, the OSC channel is not connected and not in
use. Another parameter that is affected by this is Automatic Laser Shut Off: ALSO is
disabled.
Shown here is the LIM connected to a BMD2. The BMD2 is required for 50Ghz
deployments. When we use 100Ghz deployment, the LIM is fibered to an eCMD44.

81
Dual DIA with 4 way branch

This configuration allows no local add/drop on line facing WSS modules.

The Dual-DIA in this type of configuration allows the user to:


Increase the route diversity and the high available links
Increase the channel count (can use the same wavelength as active in 2
directions)
Redundancy on the functionality of the DIA equipment

Number of domains that a DIA OTS can connect to


2 for 50/100GHz 1x2 WSSOPM
5 for 100GHz 1x5/9 WSSOPM (reduced by 1 if local add/drop, reduced by 1 if
Dual DIA, reduced by 2 if Dual DIA and local add/drop)
8 for 50GHz 1x9 WSSOPM (reduced by 2 if local add/drop)

82
Colorless OADM (COADM) configuration

Colorless OADM configuration is made up of 2 OTSs: the DIA OADM OTS and the
Colorless OADM (COADM) OTS.
The LIM used in the DIA OADM OTS must be the MLA (NTK552BA).
The WSS used in the DIA OADM OTS must be the 1x9 50GHz WSS (NTK553FA).
Service circuit packs that can connect to CCMD12 need to be wavelength
selective.
The MLA amplifier is provisioned to a set and forget mode as per an Optical
Modeler report. It is not DOC controled.

The EDFA amplifiers within the CCMD12 circuit pack are not DOC controled.
Although they can be user provisionable, it is preferred to leave them to the 20 dBs
default value. These amplifiers do not support Automatic Power Reduction (APR).

83
Colorless 4-Way ROADM Site with Dual COADMs

This example shows two COADMs connected to a 4-Way ROADM site. A single
COADM node is also supported.

The same configuration type can be deployed in an 8-Way ROADM site. Single and
dual COADM s are also supported in this configuration type.

Specific WSS port assignement rules have to be followed.

84
Colorless 4-Way ROADM Site with Dual CADMs - WSS Switch port assignments

In every colorless deployment types, specific WSS ports are dedicated to specific
interconnections.

For the DIA WSS, although seven ports are available to connect to the backbone
WSS, only the first four should be used.

For the backbone WSS, use the following:


The first 7 switch ports are available to interconnect to the other backbone
WSSs (passthrough traffic only). Note that in a 4-Way ROADM site, only 3
ports are needed.
The last two switch ports (switch 8 and 9) interconnectes to the DIA WSS.

For the Colorless 8-Way ROADM Site with Dual Colorless OADMs configuration,
the DIA WSS has a different port assignement. Please consult Cienas
Technical Publications.

85
Colorless OADM - Engineering rules

The Colorless OADM (consisting of the DIA OADM OTS and the Colorless OADM
OTS) can connect to any backbone WSS switch port.
Maximum number of supported Colorless OADMs at a site: 2
Maximum number of supported Colorless OADMs in a 6500 14-slot shelf: 1
Maximum number of supported Colorless OADMs in a 6500 32-slot shelf: 2
Colorless circuit packs cannot be remote. Remote CCMD12 is not supported.
The circuit packs that make up the Colorless OADM must be equipped in the same
6500 shelf .
The 6500 shelf which houses the Colorless OADM circuit packs must be equipped
with an SP2 Shelf Processor (NTK555CA or NTK555FA).

86
SCMD4 Thin Terminal Configuration

Example shown here is a Thin Terminal configuration with three Serial Channel
Mux/Demux (SCMD4s) although more than three are supported.

Example uses an MLA, but other LIM types can be used.

87
SCMD4 Thin OADM Configuration

Example shown here is a Thin OADM configuration with two SCMD4s per line-facing
direction, although more than two are supported.

Example uses an MLA, but other LIM types can be used

88
4 Channel Optical Mux/Demux (OMD4) terminal site

6500 release 8 introduces the OMD4 circuit pack. These are used only in strict point-
to-point systems with no line amplifier sites. The amplifiers when present are based
on set-and-forget 20 dB gain .
There is no DOC support to optimize the system. Channel additions/deletions in
multiple channel links are performed by direct connection and disconnection to the
OMD4. No OTS provisioning is necessary and adjacency provisioning is necessary
only for alarm correlation.

Since no OTS is provisioned, the only amplifier type supported is the SLA. MLA type
of amplifier requires OTS provisioning in order to properly execute amplifier shutoff
mode.

Future release will enable thin OADM configuration.

In a non-amplified system, there are no SLA and OSC modules.

89
90
High Level Description
For applications not requiring automatic equalization, automatic channel add/delete,
automatic branching capability, etc., the new passive photonic network configurations
supported by 6500 allow to build a photonic layer that is as inexpensive as possible.
Target networks are mostly point-to-point or small rings of max 12 spans/300 km.
Span losses are mostly below 17 dB with a few longer spans.
Line amps need to be avoided as much as possible (cost + cost of maintaining a site).
The majority of the networks do not have line amps. When amplification cannot be
avoided, a fixed gain amplifier is used.
DSCMs will be required in some cases.
Equalization is done manually using pads at various locations in the network.
OSC is not mandatory but can still be implemented to provide data communications
wherever needed.
The Photonic Passive Networks are based on a new OTS subtype, named "Passive",
used with either the Amplifier or Channel Access OTS types.
The AMP Passive or CHA Passive OTS is built using the following building blocks:
OSC add and drop filter
Fixed Gain Amplifier
Mux/Demux Filters
Band Splitter, DSCMs and attenuators

91
Supported Configurations

Supported configurations are 1 way (Terminal) or 2-way branch


In a 2-way branch, all connections from one line facing direction to another line facing
direction are done at the group level. Add/Drop is available for the 2-way branch.

92
Internal components and connections.

Multiple components may be present in a passive optics node.


Channel Mux/Demux is based on groups. We can use group based 4 channels or 8
channels modules.
Different Band Splitters are also available. They can cary 1 group, 2 groups, 3 groups
or 5 groups.
A Fixed Gain Amplifier (FGA) may be inserted between any two filters. Amplifier
placement between filters is referred to as a utility amplifier.
FGA will usually be placed at the front (i.e., closer to the OTS network port) of a filter
cascade, but not always. FGA may be used for either inbound (pre-amp), cascaded,
outbound (post amp) or utility applications
A DSCM or pad may be inserted between any two filters line connections, group
connections or add/drop connections. DSCM will usually be placed at the front (i.e.,
closer to the OTS network port) of a filter cascade, but not always
Pads are used for equalization. They can be found in mutliple locations in the node.
The use of an OSC is optional depending on the configuration. If a 6500 OSC signal is
needed, a OSC Filter module is inserted as the first module facing the network side.

93
CPL/6500 interworking

The 6500 Photonic Layer (PL) platform provides similar features and functionality as
the Common Photonic Layer (CPL) platform.
The CPL modules are interconnected using Ethernet cables, not using a shelf or
backplane. Common Photonic Layer network elements are supported in a network
comprising 6500 equipment.
For all types of CPL nodes including GMD based network elements to be supported
in interworking with 6500, CPL nodes must be at Release 5.0 and 6500 nodes must
be at Release 9.1.
Interworking CPL line amplifier nodes with 6500 network elements was supported
with CPL Release 4.0 and 6500 nodes Release 6.

Refer to planning guide for a complete list of operational considerations.

94
Consolidated TID (TIDc)
TID consolidation is required for Branching functionality. TID consolidation allows
multiple CPL or 6500 shelves at a site to be managed under the same TID. All
shelves in a TIDc nodes are interconnected using the ILAN ports.
This reduces the number of TIDs and nodes requiring management in the network.
Each shelf shares the same TID, but has a unique shelf number.
A single shelf, referred to as primary shelf, represents the group of consolidated
NEs. The primary shelf is responsible for acting as the recipient of all TL1 messages
in and out of the consolidated group of network elements.

Up to 36 shelves (mix of 6500 and CPL shelves) can be consolidated.


Only Transponder and Photonic services are supported within a mixed TIDc.
Cross-connect circuit packs not supported within a mixed TIDc.

Starting at CPL release 5 and 6500 release 9.1, mixed TIDc is supported as long as
the primary shelf is a 6500 and is equipped with a SP2 shelf processor.

Refer to planning guide for a complete list of operational considerations.

95
Check your Learning

1. Which of the following 6500 Photonic Layer circuit packs is not required at a Line
Amplifier site?
a) 2 x OSC circuit pack
b) Single Line Amplifier (SLA)
c) Midstage Line Amplifier (MLA)
d) Wavelength Selective Switch (WSS) - Optical power Monitor (OPM)

2. 6500 Photonic Layer supports 4 wavelength groups.


a) True
b) False

3. 6500 Photonic Layer supports 44 wavelength in C and L-Band.


a) True
b) False

96
97
Intentionally left blank

98
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to visualize how the optical signal flows through the
photonic circuit packs in different 6500 Packet-Optical Platform Photonic Layer site
types.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical Multiservice
Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

99
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

100
Signal flow legend

This section contains diagrams of the signal flow within a typical 6500 Photonic
Layer site types.

The following site types will be covered:


Edge (Terminal).
Amplifier.
Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer (ROADM).

Shown on the right are the commonly used pictograms and what they represent.

101
Terminal Transmit Direction

A: From subtending equipment to CMD44, in A: The signal is received by the


CMD44 from the subtending network element.
B: CMD44 multiplexing, in B: The signal is combined with other signals received from
different subtending equipments to form an aggregate signal that will be transmitted
through the Common Out port (90) of the CMD44. Up to 44different 100 GHz
wavelengths can be multiplexed by the CMD44.
C: CMD44 to WSS-OPM, in C: The CMD44 is connected to the WSS-OPM circuit
pack so the aggregate signal is sent to one of the "Switch In" ports.
D: Multiplexing at WSS-OPM level, in D: The aggregate signal is combined with
other wavelengths that are received on other "Switch In" ports. At this point the
power of each wavelength is evaluated and controlled for equalization purposes.
E: WSS-OPM to MLA, in E: Once the power of each wavelength has been set to the
appropriate level, the aggregate signal is sent to the booster amplifier of the MLA
circuit pack. The OSC 1 Out port of the 2 X OSC circuit pack is connected to the
OSC B In port of the MLA. The Line B monitor port of the MLA extracts two percent
of the signal and sends it to the WSS-OPM port 1 for power monitoring purposes.
F: Aggregate signal and OSC transmitted, in F: The amplified aggregate signal and
the OSC are combined to be transmitted on the backbone fibers.

102
Terminal Receive Direction

A: From backbone fibers to MLA, in A: The signal coming from the backbone is
received at the Line A In port (8) of the MLA circuit pack.
B: OSC extracted, in B: The OSC is then extracted from the aggregate signal and
sent to the OSC 1 In port of the 2 X OSC circuit pack.
C: MLA to WSS-OPM, in C: The signal is amplified and two percent of it is taken
from the Line A Mon port of the MLA circuit pack and sent to the WSS-OPM Monitor
2 port.
D: WSS-OPM Common, in D: The Line A Out port (7) of the MLA is connected to the
Common In port (17) of the WSS-OPM circuit pack in order to demultiplex the
aggregate signal.
E: WSS-OPM Demux, in E: Wavelengths are re-routed in the Demux section of the
WSS-OPM and the signal containing the combined wavelengths is going through the
appropriate Switch Out port.
F: WSS-OPM to CMD44, in F: The Switch 2 Out port (4) of the WSS-OPM is
connected to the CMD44 Common In port (89) and the signal is demultiplexed into
individual wavelengths.
G: CMD44 to subtending NE, in G: Each wavelength is then sent to a receiver port of
a subtending network element.

103
Line Amplifier

A: OTS 1 MLA Line A, in A: The optical signal is received from the backbone fiber at
the Line A In port of the OTS 1 MLA.
B: Amplification of the signal received, in B: The pre-amplifier A performs the
amplification of the optical signal received from the upstream Network Element.
C: OSC dropped, in C: The OSC signal is extracted from the optical signal and
returned to the OSC circuit pack.
D: OTS 2 MLA Line B, in D: The OTS 1 MLA Line A Out port is connected to the OTS
2 MLA Line B In port.
E: OSC re-insertion, in E: The OSC signal is re-inserted to the OSC B In port of the
OTS 2 MLA.
F: Amplification of the signal to be transmitted, in F: The optical signal is amplified by
the OTS 2 MLA's booster B and combined to the OSC.
G: Optical signal transmitted, in G: The combined signal is transmitted from the Line
B Out port of the OTS 2 MLA to the next site.

104
ROADM OTS 1

A: Backbone to OTS 1 MLA, in A: The optical signal coming from the upstream 6500
Photonic Layer Network Element enters the Line A In port of the OTS 1 MLA circuit
pack.
B: OTS 1 MLA to OTS 1 WSS-OPM, in B: The signal is amplified and then sent to
the Common In port of the WSS-OPM circuit pack.
C: OTS 1 MLA to OSC, C: The OSC is extracted and returned to the 2 X OSC circuit
pack.
D: OTS 1 MLA to OPM, in D: After being amplified two percent of the signal is taken
from the Monitor port and sent to the OTS 1WSS-OPM for power monitoring
purposes.
E: WSS-OPM channel demux, in E: After being amplified the aggregate signal is
routed to the appropriate port.
F: Passthrough signal to OTS 2 WSS-OPM, in F: The part of the signal that is
passing through is sent to the OTS 2 WSS-OPM.
G: Dropped signal, in G: The dropped local traffic is sent to the Common In port of
the OTS 1 CMD44.
H: Dropped wavelength, in H: The dropped signal is demultiplexed and each
wavelength is sent to a subtending Network Element.

105
ROADM OTS 2

I: Passthrough signal enters channel mux, in I: The passthrough signal enters the OTS 2
WSS-OPM channel mux at the Switch1 In port as per Ciena recommendations.
J: Local traffic to CMD44, in J: The local added traffic goes from the subtending Network
Element to a Channel in port of the OTS2 CMD44.
K: CMD44 to channel mux, in K: The OTS 2 CMD44 multiplexes all the wavelengths that
are part of the local added traffic and the common signal to the Switch 4 In port of the
OTS 2 WSS-OPM as per Ciena recommendations.
L: channel mux to OTS 2 MLA, in L: The passthrough and the local added traffic are
combined by the WSS-OPM circuit pack and sent to the MLA's booster.
M: OTS 2 aggregate signal amplified, in M: The aggregate signal is amplified.
N: OTS 2 MLA to OPM, in N: After being amplified two percent of the signal is taken from
the Monitor port and sent to the OTS 2 WSS-OPM for power monitoring purposes.
O: OSC insertion, in O: The OSC signal is re-inserted and combined to the aggregate
signal.
P: Aggregate signal and OSC transmitted, in P: The transmission signal is connected to
the backbone fibers and sent to the downstream Network Element.

106
Thin Terminal Site OTS 1

A: Backbone to OTS 1 MLA, in A: The optical signal coming from the upstream 6500 Photonic
Layer Network Element enters the Line A In port of the OTS 1 MLA circuit pack.
B: OTS 1 MLA to OSC, B: The OSC is extracted and returned to the 2 X OSC circuit pack.
C: OTS 1 MLA to SCMD4 in slot 3, in C: After being amplified the signal is sent from the Line
A out of the MLA into the Common In of the SCMD4 of slot 3. Here the wavelengths that
belong to this SCMD4 group are dropped and other wavelengths pass through at the Upgrade
port Out, other wavelengths are Muxed and can be added by the SCMD4.
D: OTS 1 SCMD4 to SCMD4 in slot 4, in D: Carry signals from the SCMD4 from slot 3 and the
same process takes places, signals that belong to this SCMD4 group are dropped as the
other wavelength groups pass through to the next SCMD4.
E: OTS 1 SCMD4 to SCMD4 in slot 5, in E: Carry signals from the SCMD4 from slot 4 and the
same process takes places, signals that belong to this SCMD4 group are dropped as the
other wavelength groups pass through to the next SCMD4.
F: Dropped wavelength, in F: The dropped signals are demultiplexed and each wavelength is
sent to a subtending Network Element.
Note: For a the Thin OADM site same process takes place. The difference is signals travel from
one OTS group to another OTS group and the OSCs terminate at the other Thin OADM site

107
SCMD4 Thin OADM Configuration

Example shown here is a Thin OADM configuration with two SCMD4s per line-facing
direction, although more than two are supported.

Example uses an MLA, but other LIM types can be used

108
Optical Drop and Continue (OD and C) feature

The Optical Drop and Continue operation feature consists of ramping up a channel
on the Photonic Layer and of ramping down the channel from the Photonic Layer at
multiple sites while the channel is also allowed to pursue its optical path to reach
multiple sites.

One of the main objectives of OD and C functionality in 6500 is to carry digital video
via GigE within SONET/SDH over an Optical Transport Network (OTN) infrastructure
and dropping to multiple points around the network.

In this application, video traffic is carried within a single wavelength via redundant
traffic paths in both directions through DWDM ring.

109
Photonic Broadcast - Optical Broadcast feature

In optical broadcast, a channel is allowed to be dropped at the same site and


branched in multiple directions. Broadcast is intended to be a natural extension of
optical branching and optical drop and continue (OD&C).

While OD&C is a 2-way split, where one of the split signals is terminated at a local
receiver, the other replicated signal extends beyond the node, optical broadcast is an
N-way split at a flex point, where all N channels can extend beyond the node.
Broadcast and OD&C are not mutually exclusive.

110
Photonic Broadcast - Distribution Ring

The 6500 supports the following characteristics for Photonic broadcast:


Primary channels support optical drop and continue (OD&C).
Broadcast channels support optical drop and continue (OD&C).
Channels can be broadcast in more than one direction.
There can be no broadcast channels in a Primary domain.
Broadcast cross-connections must traverse between domains.
The broadcast domain needs to be in Auto Re-optimize As Necessary. Auto
add/delete channels must be disabled in broadcast domains.
The Enhanced Automation mode, which has an embedded re-optimization
process, cannot be supported when Optical Broadcast is used.
Auto-Delete on channel LOS must be disabled in all domains.

For more characteristics refer to the Planning Guide.

111
Check Your Learning

1. Which port of the CMD 44 is connected to a Switch In port of the WSS-OPM?


a) Common In
b) Common Out
c) Any port 1 through 44 In
d) Any port 1 through 44 Out

2. On which Photonic circuit pack the 1510 nm OSC signal is inserted?


a) The Line facing MLA/SLA
b) The WSS-OPM
c) The CMD44
d) None of the above

3. The CMD44 and the WSS-OPM are not used at a Line Amplifier site.
a) True
b) False

112
Check Your Learning

4. A fiber patch cord is connected between two Monitor ports. What are the two
circuit packs involved?
a) OSC and MLA/SLA
b) WSS-OPM and OSC
c) WSS-OPM and MLA/SLA
d) OSC and WSS-OPM

113
114
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to provide an overview of the 6500 Packet-Optical


Platform provisioning and connection procedure, with specific activities to be
performed by the students.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical Multiservice
Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

115
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

Provisioning and Operating 323-1851-310


Procedures
Bandwidth and Data Services 323-1851-320
Procedures

116
Equipment and Facility States - Equipment Management

There are two types of equipment entities that exist in the 6500 platform:
Provisionable equipment represents equipment that can be provisioned and
managed by user commands.

These entities reside in:


Existing 6500 circuit packs may be installed in the 32-Slot Shelf.
Service slots:
1 to 8, 11 to 18, 21 to 28 and 31 to 38. (See the Technical Publication
Planning Guide NTRN10CA for Engineering rules and exceptions
that apply to the 32-slot shelf.
Interface circuit packs in the 14-slot shelf (slots 1 to 14 for most circuit packs)
Exception is when deploying the WSS circuit packs, 50 GHz circuit packs
can be deployed in slots 1 to 12 and 100GHz circuit packs can be
deployed in slots 1 to13).

117
Equipment and facility states - Equipment Management contd

Interface circuit packs in the 7-slot shelf (slots 1 to 7 for the following circuit
packs):
NTK531VAE5 - L2 MOTR.
NTK535EAE5 and NTK535EBE5 SuperMux.
NTK528AAE5 - 10GOTSC.
NTK530PAE5 - 2X10G OTR.
Pluggable optical modules (SFPs, XFPs...).
Non-provisionable equipment are not managed by user commands but are required
to operate an 6500 network element.
Cooling units, Access Panel, Power interface circuit packs, SP, Maintenance
Interface circuit pack, Main shelf backplane, Filler cards.

Note:
This equipment is inventoried and alarmed appropriately based on the respective
conditions.
Pluggable circuit packs applies to the 2 x OSC circuit pack that utilizes 2 Small
Form-factor Pluggable optics (SFP).

118
Equipment and Facility States

The screen capture shown here is of the Equipment and Facility Provisioning
information window (found under Configuration menu in Site Manager).

Equipment and facilities on a network element have primary and secondary states.
Equipment and facility primary states are user provisionable.

The valid values are:


IS (in service).
OOS (out of service).

119
Equipment Mode Parameters

The table shown here indicates the read-only information for the Equipment Mode
parameters found in the Equipment and Facility Provisioning window.

120
Equipment and Facility Primary States

Listed here is a description of the equipment and facility states for the 6500.

121
Equipment Secondary State

Listed here is a description of the equipment secondary states for the 6500.

Secondary state Description


Active Equipment has connections established to the
facilities it supports and the connected facilities
are in service
Fault detected Equipment failure detected
Idle No connections established to facilities
supported on this equipment, or all connected
facilities are out-of-service
Mismatched (EQ) Mismatched or unknown equipment detected in
attributes a provisioned slot
No OAM DSM does not have a OAM link with host shelf
processor
No site DSM does not have a site address provisioned

Protection Sw. Protection switching has been inhibited for the


Inhibited equipment
122
Equipment Secondary State contd

Listed here is a description of the equipment secondary states for the 6500.

Secondary state Description


Hot StandBy Equipment is inactive in a 1+1 equipment
protection configuration (stand By cross-
connect circuit pack)
Supporting entity Supporting equipment has a failure (applicable
outage to pluggable equipment when associated circuit
pack has failed or is mismatched)

Unequipped Equipment is missing


Unknown Equipment cannot be identified
Working Equipment is protection unit or required
equipment to maintain traffic on the protection
unit
Working Cross-connect circuit pack is working, circuit
synchronization pack providing synchronization function
Working traffic Cross-connect circuit pack is working, circuit
pack carrying traffic
1:N standBy Circuit pack in a 1:N configuration with no active
traffic

123
Facility Secondary State

Listed here is a description of the facility secondary states for the 6500

Facility state Description


Null Active, working state for UPSR/SNCP facility.

Working Rx / Tx Active OC-n/STM-n/ STM1J/STM4J in the


specified direction.
Protected Optical line in a BLSR/MS-Spring protection
scheme is protected.
Hot StandBy Inactive facility in both directions (Hot standBy).

Protection Switch Protection switch inhibited. Lockout command


Inhibited issued on a line OC-n / STM-n / STM1J/STM4J.
Not supported for OC-3 associated with a DS1
service module (DSM) or for an OC-3 facility on
a DSM.

Disconnected Facility has no connections established

124
Facility Secondary State contd
Listed here is a description of the facility secondary states for the 6500.

Facility state Description


Disabled Applies to L2SS circuit packs (ETH, WAN or LAG facilities). The L2SS
facility's secondary state is set to Disabled when it has no associated
tunnel segment endpoint or virtual circuit endpoint created.

Fault detected Facility failure detected.


Support entity outage Supporting equipment (SFP or circuit pack):
has a failure, or
is missing, or
is mismatched, or
has an associated cross-connection which is failed.
In case of an L2SS circuit pack, the L2SS LAG facility's secondary state
is also set to Supporting entity outage when one or more of the LAG's
member ports are out of service.

DCC link is down/failed DCC link is down or has failed

Signal degrade on sync Signal degrade detected on a synchronization reference.


source / reference

Loopback active Loopback (facility, terminal, or EFM remote) active on facility.


Unprovisioned site A provisioned DSM 84xDS1 TM is provisioned without its site address
address parameter.
OAM not available A provisioned DSM 84xDS1 TM does not have an OAM link.
Host-DSM fiber Host-DSM fiber misconnected. There is a discrepancy between the
misconnected provisioning data and the actual fiber connection. Only applicable to host
OC-3 facility (not applicable to OC-3 facility on a 84xDS1 TM).

Supported entity Applies to L2SS LAG facilities when the LAG facilities have no members.
absent
UAS Applies to RPR backplane WAN facility's secondary state when the WAN
facility is not associated to an RPR ring.
SGEO Applied to Channel Control (CHC) Photonic facilities. "Supporting Entity
Outage" (SGEO)
No Change Applied to AMP and OPTMON Photonic facilities.
FAF: Auto In Service Applied to CHC and OPTMON Photonic facilities." Facility Failed" (FAF).

Auto in Service Applied to AMP and OPTMON Photonic facilities.


deactivated
MON Applied to OPTMON Photonic facilities." Monitor" (MON).
125
Facility Maintenance Secondary State

Maintenance State is a Secondary State valid when the Facility Primary State is Out
of Service . When putting a facility Out of Service, a user can specify whether the
Secondary State is to be Maintenance.

The Maintenance Secondary State is not valid when the facility Primary State is In
Service.

A user can provision a facility with any of the following state combinations:
In Service.
Out of Service.
Out of Service with the Maintenance Secondary State.

126
Out-of-service Facility Secondary State behaviours

Here is a list of behaviours for different facility provisioning states.

Highlighted are the main differences between the regular out-of-service and out-of-
service maintenance state.

127
Equipment and Facility State Combined

The combinations of equipment and facilities states are shown. If the equipment is
Out Of Service (OOS) then all its facilities will be OOS;

When the equipment is In service (IS), then its facilities can be IS or OOS.
For a facility to be IS, the equipment must be IS.

128
Auto-Equipping or Auto-Provisioning - Provisioning steps
Automatic equipping refers to the automatic creation and enabling of a circuit pack
functionality when the automatic equipping mode is enabled.
Automatic equipping occurs when the user inserts:
A circuit pack into an unequipped valid slot.
A pluggable module (SFP/XFP or DPO) into an unequipped valid circuit pack.
Note: Automatic equipping is enabled for a slot which has a circuit pack physically
inserted and no equipment already provisioned.
Auto-equipping is enabled by default when in SONET and SDH-J mode and disabled
when in the SDH mode.
To enable this feature the end user can:
Go to the Tools menu in Site Manager, and select Visualization, then select Site
Equipment view (as shown here), right click on the node and select Auto Equip.
Another option is to go to the Configuration tab in Site Manager, select Shelf Level
View, then select Site Equipment view, right click on the node and select Auto Equip.
If auto equipping is enabled, a SFP is automatically provisioned and a facility is
created when the SFP is inserted into the circuit pack subslot.
The facility is not created if the SFP supports more than one facility type. The user
must then manually equip the type and rate for each port.

129
Manually Add Equipment - Adding equipment window

Provisioning steps can also be performed manually. The user can:


Provision an empty slot or subslot.
Provision an empty slot or subslot for a circuit pack or SFP that will be inserted in
the slot or subslot at a later time.
Provision a circuit pack or SFP that has been de provisioned (but not removed)
from the shelf.
Note: You must provision the circuit pack before you have the option of provisioning
SFPs for that circuit pack.

The end user has the option when adding new equipment to either: Select from the
Configuration menu (as shown here), Equipment and Facility Provisioning menu,
then select Add, or When in the Visualization mode, the end user can right click the
mouse button and select Add Equipment.

Note: The user must be in the Physical Shelf mode to have the Add Equipment option
available.

130
Equipment State Editing

Equipment state - this can be changed from IS to OOS or reversed depending on


requirements.
You can change the primary state of photonic circuit packs regardless of the primary state
of their non-user provisioned adjacency facilities (there are exceptions).
The primary state of Adjacency facilities that are "ADJ and or ADJ-Line" types are not
editable.
You can change the primary state of non-derived "ADJ-TX or ADJ-RX" facilities to
OOS by changing the Transmitter/Receiver type to UNKNOWN.
An UNKNOWN adjacency facility type "ADJ-TX or ADJ-RX" can be put IS by editing its
Transmitter/Receiver type to a supported type other than UNKNOWN.
To change the primary state of a Line Interface Module (LIM), 2xOSC, WSSOPM, or
CMD44 circuit pack to out-of-service requires all the non-adjacency provisioned AMP,
OPTMON, OSC, or CHC facilities to be put OOS first.
Note:
The 2xOSC equipment/P155M pluggable also supports Wayside Service Channel
(WSC) facilities. These facilities are not displayed or managed in the Equipment &
Facilities Provisioning applications. Instead, they are handled by Comms Setting
Management application through LAN option under Interfaces tab.
For the circuit pack, module or SFP to be deleted it must be in OOS state prior to
deletion.

131
Photonic Layer (PL) Facility Parameters

The 6500 PL supports many Facility parameters as shown above.

The next several pages are examples of some of the Facility parameters you may
encounter.

For a complete list of Facility parameters and each of there details, consult the
Technical Publication 323-1851-310 book 1 " Configuration - Provisioning and
Operating".

132
2 x OSC Facility Parameters

Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.

OSC facility parameters:


Name - option is "OSC-shelf-slot-port", this parameter displays the facility, shelf
number, slot number and port number.
Primary State - this option sets the primary state of the facility to either IS or
OOS. (read only) and IS is set to default.
Rx Path Loss (db) - the end user can edit this field to represent the loss at the
OSC. The values can vary from 0.00 to 5.00 dB. (Default value is set to 0.70dB).
Signal Degrade Threshold - the end user can edit this field to set the signal
degrade threshold value at which alarm reporting occurs. Values vary from (10)-4
to (10)-10.

133
LIM Facility parameters AMP

Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.


Name - option is "AMP-shelf-slot-port", this parameter displays the facility, shelf
number, slot number and port number.
Primary State - this option sets the primary state of the facility to either IS or
OOS. (read only) and IS is set to default.
Secondary state - this field displays the facility operating state (read only). End
user could see one of the following:
No change.
Auto in service.
Auto in service deactivated.
SGEO. (Applied to CHC and AMP Photonic facilities when there is a
equipment failure.)
Auto in-service time (hh-mm) - use this option to set the AINS, the default time
is 5 minutes. Note if the AINS is edited, the new AINS time is available only after
the current AINS timer has expired and the new AINS condition or timer has been
entered.
Mode - Peak Power Control State - this option is used to set the peak clamp, by
default this option is enabled.

134
LIM Facility parameters AMP contd

Target Gain (dB) - this field is used to set the target Gain in dB, with the following
options:
Single Line Amp (SLA) Line A and Mid Line Amp (MLA) Line A (port 8) can be set to
0.00to 30.00 dB (default is 7.00 dB).
SLA Line B and MLA Line B (port 6) can be set to 0.00 to 30.00 dB (default is 6.00
dB).
MLA2 can be set to 0.00 to 30.00 dB (ports 6 and 8) the default is set to 11.0 dB.
Target Gain Tilt (dB) - this field is used to set the target Gain Tilt in dB, with the following
options:
SLA Line A and MLA/MLA2 Line A (port 8) can be set to -5.00 to 5.00 dB (default is
0.00dB).
SLA Line B and MLA/MLA2 Line B (port 6) can be set to -5.00 to 5.00 dB (default is
0.00dB).
Target Power (dBm) - this option is used to set the target power in dBm, with the
following option:
SLA/MLA Line A (port 8) can be set to -15.00 to 24.00 (default is 18.00).
MLA/MLA2 Line B (port 6) can be set to -15.00 to 24.00 (default is 20.00).
MLA2 Line A (port 8) can be set to -15.00 to 24.00 (default is 20.50).
Target Peak Power (dBm) - this field is used to set the Target Peak Power, with the
following options:
SLA Line A and MLA/MLA2 Line A (port 8) can be set to -15.00 to 24.00 (default is
0.00).
MLA/MLA2 Line B (port 6) can be set to -10.00 to 24.00 (default is 0.00).
Input Loss / Output Power (dB) - this option is used to set the connector loss in dB
(default is:0.25).
Input LOS threshold (dBm) - this field is used to display the input loss of signal
threshold in dBm, with the following options:
SLA Line A and MLA Line A (port 8) can be set to -40.00 to 10.00 (default is -32.00).
MLA Line B (port 6) can be set to -30.00 to 13.00 (default is -22.00).
MLA2 Line A (port 8) and B (port 6) can be set to -40.00 to 10.00 (default is -36.00).
Output LOS threshold (dBm) - this field is used to display the output loss of signal
threshold in dBm, with the following options:
SLA Line A and MLA Line A (port 8) can be set to -15.00 to 15.00 (default is -13.00).
MLA Line B (port 6) can be set to -11.00 to 24.00 (default is -10.00).
MLA2 Line A (port 8) and B (port 6) can be set to -15.00 to 15.00 (default is -12.00).

135
LIM Facility parameters OPTMON

Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.

Name - option is "OPTMON-shelf-slot-port", this parameter displays the facility,


shelf number, slot number and port number.
Primary State - this option sets the primary state of the facility to either IS or
OOS. (read only) and IS is set to default.
Secondary state - this field displays the facility operating state (read only). End
user could see one of the following:
No change.
Auto in service.
Auto in service deactivated.
Auto in-service time (hh-mm) - use this option to set the AINS, the default time
is 5 minutes. Note if the AINS is edited, the new AINS time is available only after
the current AINS timer has expired and the new AINS condition or timer has been
entered.

136
LIM Facility parameters OPTMON contd

LOS threshold (dBm) - this field is used to display the output loss of signal
threshold in dBm at which alarm reporting occurs, with the following options:
WSSOPM (ports 1 to 2) can be set to -40.00 to 07.00 (default is -32.00).
WSSOPM Demux Common In can be set to -35.00 to 18.00 (default is -
12.00).
WSSOPM Mux Switch In can be set to -35.00 to 15.00 (default is -21.00)
SLA/MLA/MLA2 can be set to -40.00 to 0.00 (default is -38.00).
SLA Line B (port 6) can be set to -28.00 to 20.00 (default is -20.00).
LIM Line A (port 8) can be set to -36.00 to 20.00 (default is -36.00).
LIM Line B (port 6) can be set to -20.00 to 20.00 (default is -20.00).

137
SCMD4 - VOA

Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.

VOA facility parameters:


Primary State - this option sets the primary state of the facility to either IS or
OOS. (read only) and IS is set to default.
Secondary state - this field displays the facility operating state (read only). End
user could see one of the following:
No change.
Auto in service.
Auto in service deactivated.
Auto in-service time (hh-mm) - use this option to set the AINS, the default time
is 5 minutes. Note if the AINS is edited, the new AINS time is available only after
the current AINS timer has expired and the new AINS condition or timer has been
entered.
VOA Mode - this option sets the VOA mode to either a Loss Mode (default) or
(TOP) sets the VOA to a power mode.

138
SCMD4 VOA contd

Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.

VOA facility parameters:

Target Loss this option is used to set the Target loss in a dB value. (value could
be set to 0 20).
Target Power this option is used to set the Target power in dBm.
Average Target Power - this option is used to set the average wavelength target
power in dBm.
LOS Threshold - this option is used to set the loss of signal threshold in dBm at
which alarm reporting occurs.

139
WSSOPM Facility parameters CHC

Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.


Channel Control (CHC) facility parameters:
Primary State - this option sets the primary state of the facility to either IS or
OOS. (read only) and IS is set to default.
Opaque - this field the end user can select if the channel is opaque. (option Yes
or No).
Switch Selector - this option indicates the Wavelength Selector Switch (WSS)
ingress port on which the CMD44 is connected to.
3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16 (WSSOPM 100GHz 5x1).
3, 5 (WSSOPM 2x1).
3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19 (WSSOPM 50GHz 9x1).
Target Loss (dB) - this field allows the end user to calculate and enter the WSS
loss.
0.00 to 23.00 (default: 15.00) for WSS 50GHz w/OPM 2x1.
0.00 to 28.00 (default: 18.00) for all other.

140
WSSOPM Facility parameters OPTMON

Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.

WSSOPM - OPTMON facility parameters:


Primary State - this option sets the primary state of the facility to either IS or
OOS. (read only) and IS is set to default.
Secondary state - this field displays the facility operating state. End user could
see one of the following:
No change.
Auto in service.
Auto in service deactivated.
Auto in-service time (hh-mm) - use this option to set the AINS, the default time
is 5 minutes. Note if the AINS is edited, the new AINS time is available only after
the current AINS timer has expired and the new AINS condition or timer has been
entered. Note not applicable to CMD44 module.

141
WSSOPM Facility parameters OPTMON contd

LOS threshold (dBm) - this field is used to set the loss of signal threshold in
dBm at which alarm reporting occurs, the following options are available:

WSSOPM OPM (ports 1 and 2):-40.00 to 7.00 (default:-32.00).


WSSOPM Common In:-35.00 to 18.00 (default:-12.00).
WSSOPM Switch In:-35.00 to 15.00 (default:-21.00).
SLA, MLA, MLA2 port 4:-40.00 to 0.00 (default:-38.00).
SLA port 6:-28.00 to 20.00 (default:-20.00).
LIM port 8:-36.00 to 20.00 (default: -36.00).
LIM port 6:-20.00 to 20.00 (default: -20.00).

142
Colorless application Optical Loopbacks

An optical loopback can be created automatically or manually.


The loopback verifies the continuity through the CCMD12 and SMD circuit packs.
Only TX ADJs on a CCMD12 with a wavelength of 93 are eligible to be verified.

143
Colorless application Automated Optical Loopbacks

Navigate to Site Manager Configuration->Photonic services->Optical Loopback Test


application to see this menu.
This application has the ability to perform automated testing on all eligible Tx ADJs
associated with a single SMD, up to a maximum of 88 Tx ADJs.
Only TX ADJs on a CCMD12 with a wavelength of 93 are eligible to be verified. The
Far End Address (FEA) needs to be manually provisioned between CCMD12 ADJ
port to OCLD ADJ port.
The ADJ-TX available for test is shown in the list only when it has a wavelength of
93. Multiple entities may be visible as multiple interfaces with a wavelength of 93 can
exist on different CCMD12 circuit packs.
As each loopback is completed, the status is updated and the detailed results are
accessible through a button. The next queued loopback starts automatically upon
completion of the previous loopback.

144
Colorless application Optical Loopbacks
Channel 96 (1529.94 nm) is used for connection validation. The Loopback Active
alarm is raised when a loopback is operated. A loopback is automatically cleared
after 24 hours.
1. Initially CCMD12 TX ADJ should be at channel 93 (1528.77 nm) and OOS. Tune
the Tx from channel 93 (1528.77 nm) to channel 96 (1529.94 nm).
2. Once Tx tuned, the desired OPTMON LOS at CCMD12 port should go off. Power
value from OPTMON facility can be read at this point. This can be checked against
the provisioned OCLD TX Power. If this is the 1st channel on that CCMD12, with the
tuning of Tx the designated OPTMON LOS on SMD should go off too.
3. Pixel needs to be turned from default COMMON-OUT port to LOOPBACK-OUT
port. This can be done using the ED-ADJ-TX command.
This single command should turn the CHC to LB on both sides, and set the pixel
target loss to 0.0.
4. The corresponding Rx power at the receiver should be confirmed at this point.
Once Rx Power is confirmed, a trace match should be checked. The following 2
fields at OTMn facility should match:
OCHTXTRACE == OCHTXASSOCFARENDRX == <TID>-<sh>-<slot>-<port>
A match on the above mentioned TRACE indicates a proper validated loopback
connection.
5. Once the validation completed, the corresponding Tx has to be set back to its
initial state channel=93 and state IS.
Loopback can now be released. 145
Provisioning Activities
Group activity

In this activity you will learn how to retrieve, edit and provision photonic parameters
from the screens mentioned above.

Your instructor will provide you with the NE numbers/names, IP addresses and login
information for this activity.

Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6

NE #/name

IP address

User ID
Password

146
Equipment and Facility exercises
1. Log into your assigned NE.
2. Go to the Configuration/Equipment and Facility Provisioning menu.
3. Enter the results of the next questions in the following table.
Which Photonic Layer circuit packs are present in the NE that you have
logged into?

Unit Provisioned PEC

4. In the equipment field, locate the OSC circuit pack. Click on its pluggable SFP
(example: P155M-0-0-1-1). In the facility window displayed at the bottom,
there is a Facility Type menu list. From this list, what are the possible facility
types for the OSC?

5. Select the OSC facility type. From the information, what is the OSC span loss?

6. Click on Edit. What parameters can be changed for this facility type?

7. From the information in the equipment window, what type of LIM is used in this
NE (LIM/SLA/MLA/MLA2)?

8. Click on the LIM equipment and select the AMP facility type. What is the
current Amp Mode?

9. What is the Shut Off Threshold?

Note: That no AMP facility are available if the unit is a LIM instead of a
SLA/MLA/MLA2.

147
Equipment and Facility exercises contd

10. Click on Edit and answer the two following questions:


Which AMP mode can the LIM be provisioned in?

Do you see an option to edit the Shut Off Threshold?


Shut Off threshold can only be edited using a TL1 command.
Click on cancel.

11. What is the amplifiers Target Gain?


Target gain can be provisioned by the user for testing and initial provisioning
but is controlled by the Domain Optical Controller under normal operation.

12. Select the WSSOPM in the equipment field and note the possible facility types.

13. How many optical channels are added, dropped or passthrough in this NE? To
answer this question, select CHC Facility Type and look for channels that
have an Opaque indication of No. You can group all channels by finding and
clicking the first channel with an opaque of no, then click on the Opaque
column header. This should group all the opaques that equal No on the top of
the list.
Amount of managed wavelengths?

14. For the first channel listed, Note:


Input Power:
Input Power Source:

15. Select the OPTMON facility type and note the Input LOS Threshold for port 2.

148
Equipment and Facility exercises contd

Select the CMD44 in the equipment window.


16. What are the possible Facility types for the CMD44?

17. Select the OPTMON facility type.

18. Find facilities that are IS. Enter the information in the table for the first one.

Unit

A primary state of IS indicates that traffic is added/dropped on that port. The


Tx/Rx adjacency concept is explained in a separate lesson.

-End-

149
150
Check Your Learning

1. Photonic circuit packs can be installed in which slots of a 14-slot 6500 shelf?
a) 1 to 6 and 9 to 14
b) 1 to 14
c) 1 to 4 and 9 to 12
d) even numbered slots only

151
Check your learning (contd..)

2. Can the end user manually add equipment?


a) Yes
b) No

3. Does the 6500 support Auto-In-Service for all photonic equipment. (circuit packs,
modules)
a) Yes
b) No

4. Facility parameters can be found on which circuit packs? (choose the correct answer)
a) CMD, LIM (SLA/MLA/MLA2) WSS, OSC
b) CMD, LIM (SLA/MLA/MLA2)
c) WSS, OSC
d) None of the above

152
153
Intentionally left blank

154
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to explain the different aspects of the 6500 Packet-
Optical Platform Photonic Layer Optical Transmission Signal (OTS) management
and Adjacency concept and provisioning.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical
Multiservice Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

155
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

156
OTS Definition

The Optical Transport Section (OTS) Management application is a Photonic


application that manages Optical Transport Sections at the photonic equipment level.
An OTS is defined as a group of equipments all serving the same fiber pair.

Typically, an OTS is made up of:


One Wavelength Selective Switch (WSS) with Optical power Monitor (OPM)
circuit pack. (not applicable to Thin Terminal or Thin OADM sites).
One LIM (a LIM, SLA, MLA or MLA2 circuit pack).
One CMD44 (a 50GHz OTS can contain 2 CMD44 modules. It can also contain a
BMD-2).
One OSC SFP.
DSCM (if any).
The 2 x OSC circuit pack is not assigned to an OTS but one of its SFP port is. Its
OSC and WaySide Channel (WSC) facilities are assigned independently to the OTS
they serve.
A single OTS is represented by a set of equipment and facility shelf-slot assignments
and photonic-related default parameters. a 6500 14 slots shelf can support up to four
line facing OTSs in this release.
The user performs OTS management from the Photonic Services, OTS Management
application in the Configuration menu of Site Manager.

157
OTS Provisioning an Amplifier Site

Use this procedure to provision a new OTS on the shelf. An OTS can be provisioned
before or after a circuit pack is provisioned. As shown above the end user can
provision two types of configurations, Amplifier and Channel Access.
A maximum of four OTS instances can be provisioned on a given shelf. This number
can be limited to three if you have a triple width WSSOPM circuit pack in the shelf.

Note: If maximum number of OTS instances have been provisioned, the end user can
still attempt to add another OTS instance, but the operation will fail.

For information on OTS provisioning reference the Technical Publication 323-1851-


310.

158
OTS Provisioning a ROADM

OTS Provisioning: For WSS based terminal and ROADM configurations, the
Configuration parameter must be set to Channel access and the Subtype parameter
must be set to ROADM.

159
OTS Provisioning a Passive OTS

In order to provision a passive OTS, we need to manually add the Passive Photonic
Chassis in the equipment and facility provisioning menu. Once the chassis has been
added, other components (OMDF4, OMDF8 etc) can be added in subslots of the
Passive Photonic Chassis.

When all the necessary equipment has been added, the OTS can be created.
The OSC port and OSCF module are defined if used.
Here is an indication of the maximum amount of components that can be provisioned
in a channel access passive OTS:
Up to 8 Fixed Gain Amplifiers (FGA)
Up to 10 filters (OMDF4, OMDF8, CMD44)
Up to 8 DSCMs
Up to 5 Band Splitters (BS)

160
Passive OTS Defining the topology

Different connections and module placement can exist in a Passive Optics


configuration. Fixed gain amplifier can be placed facing the network or in between
filters. Band splitters can cascade to other type band splitter. A topology definition
needs to be provisioned.
This tool is used to define how the different modules within the passive OTS are
connected.
Once the slot sequencing is defined, all intra-OTS adjacencies are derived
automatically.

161
OTS Parameters

Optical System IDentifier (OSID)


All OTSs belonging to an Optical System share the same user-defined Optical
System IDentifier (OSID). The OSID is defined by a maximum of eight characters.
At a ROADM site, the OTSs belonging to the same OSID are normally equipped in
the same shelf but do not necessarily have to be. They can be equipped in different
shelves provided that the shelves are TID-consolidated.

DOC=True (False)
In an optical system, there must be two OTSs designated as DOC instances
(DOC=True), one for each Photonic domain direction.

Domain Optical Controller (DOC) is detailed in a separate lesson.

Tx Path Identifier
The direction in an Optical System is defined by the Tx Path IDentifier (Tx Path ID)
parameter. The Tx Path ID is an integer number, and it must be consistently odd or
even for a particular direction in an Optical System.
Each OTS has a Tx Path ID. The Rx Path ID is automatically provisioned based on
the Tx Path ID. For example:
if Tx Path ID is 1, Rx Path ID is 2
if Tx Path ID is 2, Rx Path ID is 1
if Tx Path ID is 4, Rx Path ID is 3

162
Photonic Layer Adjacency Introduction

The 6500 defines the concept of adjacency as a logical representation of the


physical link between two given elements of the optical network. Knowledge of such
adjacencies is crucial for the various Topology applications that automatically
discover and build the nodes and channels, for automatic optimization.
Different types of adjacencies exist, some being derived by the system and others
needing manual provisioning by the user.
Whenever possible, the system attempts to derive as many adjacencies as possible.
This is the case when a specific Photonic circuit pack port can only connect to one
and only one other possible Photonic circuit pack port (e.g., ports 1 and 2 of a
WSS/OPM always connect to an amplifier). However in some cases, circuit packs
can connect to other circuit packs using different port numbers (e.g., a given
WSS/OPM switch port could be connected to another WSS/OPM or a CMD44).
In these cases, the system cannot determine how the user has optically
interconnected the circuit packs and therefore this adjacency must be user-
provisioned.
In the Site Manager Equipment & Facility Provisioning application, adjacencies
derived by the system have a Status of "Derived", while user-provisioned
adjacencies show as (Unverified), as illustrated in the slide above.

163
Adjacency Types

As mentioned on the previous page the 6500 Photonic layer defines the concept of
adjacency as being two elements of the optical network that are physically linked.
Knowledge of such adjacencies is crucial for the automatic discovery of wavelengths
and nodes, and for automatic optimization.

The following adjacencies must be provisioned in 6500 Photonic Layer Network


Elements:
Inter Optical Transmission adjacency.
Intra Optical Transmission adjacency.
Transmitter/Receiver adjacency.

164
Inter Optical Transmission Adjacencies
6500 Photonic layer supports the following inter-OTS adjacencies:
Line Interface Module (LIM) Line adjacency
6500 Photonic layer OTS LIM is physically linked to the neighbouring 6500 Photonic Layer
OTS LIM. This manually provisioned adjacency defines which line facing LIM module ports
are used to interconnect the LIM circuit packs between two sites.
The following LIM Line adjacency parameters are used to define the connection between the
two LIMs (fiber pair):
Expected Far End Address (TID, Shelf, Slot, Port).
Fiber Type.
Note: For the ''manually provisioned adjacency''.... the line adjacency is auto discovered from
the OSC's information, it is then acknowledged by the user who manually confirms the received
data.
WSS-WSS adjacency
This manually provisioned adjacency defines which WSS switch ports are used to interconnect
WSS circuit packs between two OTSs. The following WSS-WSS adjacency parameters are
used to define the connection between the two WSSs (fiber pair):
Adjacency Type (WSS).
Adjacency facilities (WSS and WSS).
Expected Far End Address (TID, Shelf, Slot, Port).

165
Intra Optical Transmission Adjacencies

Shown above are the 6500 Photonic Layer Intra OTS adjacencies that are
supported between the various components used for Photonic services.

166
Intra Optical Transmission Adjacencies WSS-LIM

WSS and LIM (derived) adjacency defines interconnection ports between the WSS
circuit pack and the LIM circuit pack in an OTS.

These are automatically provisioned (derived) by the network element upon OTS
creation.

167
WSS-LIM Adjacency Example
Each type of facility has a number of parameters associated with it.
ADJ facility parameters:
Adjacency Type - this option can be found on the CMD, LIM, OPM WSS and
OSC, and is used to set the type of adjacency that the end user will interconnect
with.
Expected far end address format - this field can be used to select the expected
far end line receive and client receive addresses reported by the adjacency. The
field has a down arrow feature which opens up the different options available,
such as: NULL, TID-SH-SL-PRT. (Either log in to a shelf with Site Manger to view
the options or locate the appropriate information in the Technical Publication 323-
1851-310)
Expected far end address - here we find the TID-shelf-slot-port, this parameter
sets the expected far end line receive and client receive addresses. In this
example, WSSOPM slot 3 port 1 points to a LIM in slot 2 port 1.
Use actual far end address and format - Check off this box if you want to keep
the same value appeared on "Expected far end address format" and "Expected
far end address". Note: Not applicable to 2xOSC equipment.
Customer Defined Facility Identifier - this option allows the end user to set the
customer's provisionable label for the facility. (the string format allows up to 64
characters).

168
Intra Optical Transmission Adjacencies WSS-CMD

WSS and CMD adjacency when using 100GHz WSS: defines interconnection ports
between the WSS circuit pack and the CMD44 module in an OTS.

These need to be manually provisioned when using 50GHz WSS since the CMD44
module can connect to any WSS switch port.

169
Intra Optical Transmission Adjacencies WSS-BMD-CMD44

WSS/BMD/CMD44 adjacency when using 50GHz WSS: defines interconnection


ports between the WSS circuit pack, the BMD-2 module, and the CMD44 module in
an OTS.

The following WSS/BMD/CMD44 default adjacencies are system-derived at the


creation of the equipment or provisioning of the OTS parameters:
WSS 50GHz w/OPM 9x1 without a BMD-2.
CMD1 defaults to SW8 (ports 17 and 18).
CMD2 defaults to SW9 (ports 19 and 20).
WSS 50GHz w/OPM 2x1 without a BMD-2.
CMD1 defaults to SW2 (ports 5 and 6).
CMD2 is not auto-provisioned.
WSS 50GHz w/OPM 2x1 with BMD-2 (which defaults to SW2 ports 5 and 6) or
WSS50GHz w/OPM 9x1 with BMD-2 (which defaults to SW9 ports 19 and 20).
CMD1 defaults to BMD-2 pair port #1 (ports 3 and 4).
CMD2 defaults to BMD-2 pair port #2 (ports 5 and 6).

170
Intra Optical Transmission Adjacencies LIM-OPM

LIM and OPM (derived) adjacency defines interconnection ports between the WSS
circuit pack OPM ports and the LIM circuit pack in an OTS.

These are automatically provisioned (derived) by the network element upon OTS
creation.

171
Intra Optical Transmission Adjacencies LIM-OSC

LIM and OSC (derived) adjacency defines interconnection ports between the LIM
circuit pack and the OSC circuit pack SFP pluggable in an OTS.

These are automatically provisioned (derived) by the network element upon OTS
creation.

172
Transmit/Receive (TX/RX) Adjacency

This CMD44 adjacency is manually provisioned or system provisioned when using


Service Photonic Layer Interoperability (SPLI) and defines the Transmitter and
Receiver type connected to the 6500 Photonic layer.
With this information, the 6500 Photonic layer Network Channel Topology application
creates the channel path through the 6500 Photonic layer. This step is a pre-requisite
before channels can be added using DOC.

The data used to create the Tx/Rx adjacency includes:


Tx/Rx attribute profile.
Transmitter: Tx type, circuit identifier, OSNR bias, line rate, forward error
correction (FEC) gain, minimum launch power, maximum launch power,
maximum typical launch power, Tx wavelength.
Receiver: Rx type, sensitivity level, overload level, nominal level.

173
Service and Photonic Layer Interoperability (SPLI)

SPLI (Service and Photonic Layer interoperability) is a discovery/transport framework


between service and photonic circuit packs.

In previous releases, discovery is done by ADJ Tx Expected Far End Address and
wavelength. Once the match occurs, the service circuit pack data is used to auto-
populate CMD ADJ Tx/Rx type (if the CMD ADJ Tx/Rx Auto Discovered parameter
is Auto). Also, alarm correlation software is enabled between the matched service
and photonic ports provided that the Alarm Correlation field is set to On in Site
Manager Configuration->Node Information System tab.

In Rel. 7.0, discovery is done by ADJ Tx Expected Far End Address only. Once the
match occurs, the same events as in previous releases occur. Also, the CMD ADJ Tx
wavelength and Tx Max./typical Launch Power values are propagated to the service
circuit pack and the OTMn facility Tx wavelength and Tx power parameters of the
service circuit pack involved in the match are automatically provisioned to the
propagated values (this only occurs on circuit packs that have transmitters that
support Tx wavelength and Tx power provisioning and if the CMD ADJ Tx/Rx Auto
Discovered parameter is Auto and the Sync Provisioned parameter is True).

174
SPLI rules

A new parameter is introduced in Rel. 7.0 for the CMD ADJ Tx/Rx facilities called
Sync Provisioned. This parameter along with the CMD ADJ Tx/Rx facility Auto
Discovered parameter controls whether OTMn facility Tx wavelength and Tx power
autoprovisioning occurs.
After an upgrade from a previous release to Rel. 7.0, the Sync Provisioned
parameter defaults to False. This ensures that the Tx power is not changed as a
result of an upgrade. After an upgrade from Rel. 7.0 to a higher release, the Sync
Provisioned attribute value is preserved.
Once a shelf is running Rel. 7.0, any new creation of ADJ Tx/Rx facilities (through
the provisioning of a new CMD) has the CMD ADJ Tx/Rx Sync Provisioned default
value of True
The CMD ADJ Tx/Rx Sync Provisioned parameter is TL1 and Site Manager editable.
Enabling and disabling OTMn facility Tx wavelength and Tx power autoprovisioning
can therefore be set for a particular CMD ADJ Tx/Rx facility.
The CMD ADJ Tx/Rx Sync Provisioned parameter is PAIRED. This means that if the
ADJ Tx Sync Provisioned parameter is edited, the ADJ Rx Sync Provisioned
parameter is updated if pairing is enabled (i.e., Paired Rx=Yes)

175
SPLI rules contd

If the CMD ADJ Tx Auto Discovered parameter is set to Auto and the Sync
Provisioned parameter is set to True:
When a SPLI match occurs, the Tx wavelength and Tx power is propagated
to the service circuit pack and is autoprovisioned on the OTMn facility
When SPLI match is lost or is duplicate, the OTMn Tx wavelength or Tx
power is not reset
SPLI does not propagate the Tx wavelength or Tx power if the ADJ Tx type
is Unknown
If the CMD ADJ Tx Auto Discovered parameter is set to Manual or the Sync
Provisioned parameter is set to False:
SPLI does not propagate the Tx wavelength and Tx power
If the CMD ADJ Tx Auto Discovered parameter changes to Auto:
SPLI propagates the Tx wavelength and Tx power.
If the CMD ADJ Tx Auto Discovered parameter transitions from Auto to Manual:
Any subsequent changes to the CMD ADJ Tx facility Max./typical Launch
Power are not propagated to the service circuit pack. If the CMD ADJ Tx
Auto Discovered parameter transitions from Manual to Auto, current
wavelength and power is propagated to the service circuit pack.
This feature is not supported for uni-directional channels.
.

176
Provisioning Activities
Group activity

In this activity you will learn how to retrieve, edit and provision photonic parameters
from the screens mentioned above.

Your instructor will provide you with the NE numbers/names, IP addresses and login
information for this activity.

Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6

NE #/name

IP address

User ID
Password

177
OTS and Adjacencies exercises
1. Log into your assigned NE.
Note: To answer questions about port numbers and their identification, you
can use the following menu: Configuration/Shelf Level View. Select the OTS
Schematic layer as displayed by the following screen capture. You can zoom
in or out by using the + or buttons.

2. Select the Configuration menu, Photonic Services and OTS Management.

3. How many OTS instances did you find in the shelf?

4. For the first OTS listed, click on it and fill in the applicable information:

OTS name
Optical System
Identifier
Tx Path Identifier
Rx Path Identifier
CMD1
LIM
OSC
WSS

178
OTS and Adjacencies exercises
5. Click the Add button.
6. If you had to add one more OTS to the NE, what would its value be?

Click on cancel.
7. For the first OTS listed, what is the configuration type?

8. Close the OTS Management tab.


9. Go to the Configuration/Equipment and Facility Provisioning menu.
In the equipment field, locate the OSC circuit pack. Click on its pluggable SFP
(example: P155M-1-1-1-1). In the facility window displayed at the bottom,
there is a Facility Type menu list. From this list, select ADJ.
10. Record the Expected Far End Address:
11. The last two numbers correspond to the slot-port information of the unit
connected to it. From the information that you retrieved, circle the correct
module and port number definition that it corresponds to:
Module:
WSS
LIM
CMD44
Port:
Note: You can use the information provided by the Configuration/Shelf Level View
menu, OTS schematic layer to find a port number or name.
OSC IN
OSC OUT
LINE A IN
COMMON OUT
12. Click on the LIM and associated facilities appear at the bottom of the screen.
In the Facility Type scroll down menu, select ADJ-LINE.
13. What is the name (Unit) of this adjacency (ADJ-sh-slot-port)?

14. What port does port 5 correspond to (LINE A or B, IN, OUT)?

16. What is the Actual Far End Address?


This address is system discovered and generated using the OSC.

179
OTS and Adjacencies exercises
17. What is the Expected Far End Address?
This address is provisioned by the user. If both expected and actual match, the
status becomes RELIABLE.
18. For the LIM equipment again, select Facility Type ADJ and fill in the required
information in the following table

Unit Adjacency Status


Type

Status of Derived and Adjacency Type comes from the OTS provisioning.
19. On the equipment field, click on the WSSOPM and select ADJ in the Facility
Type field.
20. Fill the required information in the following table. The amount of port shown in
the table may change depending on the WSS type that you have present in
your system (two, five or nine ports WSS).

Unit Adjacency Status


Type
ADJ-x-x-x-1

ADJ-x-x-x-2

ADJ-x-x-x-4

ADJ-x-x-x-6

ADJ-x-x-x-8

ADJ-x-x-x-10

ADJ-x-x-x-12

ADJ-x-x-x-18

Adjacency types of UNKNOWN means that nothing was provisioned to connect


on that particular port. Future capacity upgrades may change this setting to
CMD or WSS to reflect the new equipment what will connect to that port.

180
OTS and Adjacencies exercises

21. Go to 'Configuration/Equipment and Facility Provisioning'. Click on the CMD


and associated facilities appear at the bottom of the screen. In the Facility
Type scroll down menu, select ADJ-TX.

Do you see any Tx/Rx adjacency that is IS?


If so, record the following information:

Unit
Wavelength (nm)

22. What is displayed under Actual Far End Address?

These Tx/Rx adjacencies create a logical link between a SCMD/CMD port and
the subtending network element. This information is neither discovered nor
verified by the PL system. When the Tx and Rx adjacency is IS, it implies that
this channel is locally added and dropped.

23. Select a ADJ-TX adjacency. From the information in the facility screen, what is
displayed in the Paired Rx column?
If the Paired Rx field is set to yes, it implies that it is a bidirectional client
signal
24. What is the Transmitter Type of the selected adjacency?

This type is selected by the user during adjacency creation. It represents the
type of transmitters supplying the wavelength to the PL network. This also
brings all of the parameters values listed.

181
OTS and Adjacencies exercises

25. Without changing the original selection, click on the Edit button. Click on
the Transmitter Type scrollbar.
Do you see any option where an HDX(_C)4x10G DWDM TR could be the
subtending transmitter type?
Do you see any option listed as Foreign?
Do you see any option listed as UNKNOWN?

Foreign would be used if the client equipment is not any of the listed Ciena
transmitter types. Should the Tx/Rx adjacency need to be deleted, this field
would need to be set to UNKNOWN.

Note: All adjacencies need to be present to allow the DOC to optimize the
network. If an adjacency is deleted, it needs to be created again and put to an
OOS state.

This adjacency window only displays information about the node you are
currently logged into. When two ends of a connection have matching Tx/Rx
adjacencies created, the end-to-end information can be retrieved by the user
as it is automatically added to the DOC screen.

Click on cancel.

End of activity

182
Check Your Learning

1. For OTS in the same optical domain, which parameter needs to be exactly the
same value?
a) Tx Path ID
b) Rx Path ID
c) Optical System Identifier (OSID)
d) OTS name

2. WSS to LIM adjacencies are automatically populated upon OTS creation


a) True
b) False

3. Line adjacency must be manually provisioned by the user in order to be


RELIABLE.
a) True
b) False

183
184
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to explain the 6500 Packet-Optical Platform Photonic
Layer Domain Optical Controller (DOC) and the provisioning of photonic connections.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical Multiservice
Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

185
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

186
Advanced Optical Control

The 6500 Photonic layers optical control algorithm, which is used to optimize the
transport performance through a photonic domain, is founded on the following three
principles:
Minimize non-linearities.
Control gain tilt of the transmission medium: minimize degradation of a
wavelengths optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR).
Equalize: distribute finite available power such that all wavelengths are treated
equitably.

In order to achieve system optimization, the 6500 Photonic layer incorporates a


multi-level optical control hierarchy as shown here.

187
Advanced Optical Controller

Local Optical Controller


Local optical control (LOC) is generally localized within a module and seeks to
maintain a set-point for a given hardware component. Examples of local optical
control would be Amplifier gain and Amplifier design flat gain (DFG) offset.

Sectional Optical Controller


Sectional optical control (SOC), an intermediate level of control, seeks to optimize
the link performance of sections within the optical control domain. It sets control
targets for MOCs and LOCs within their sections and implements the bulk of the
system optimization function. One sectional optical controller exists per optical
multiplexed section.

Middle Optical Controller


Middle optical control (MOC) is an internal control loop that controls the target loss
on the WSS for each instance of the channel control (CHC) facility. There are 44
instances of CHC (88 at 50Ghz spacing). MOC runs independently of the Domain
optical control (DOC) and Sectional optical control (SOC).

Note: The LOC, SOC and MOC are not user-visible.

188
Advanced Optical Controller contd

Domain Optical Controller


Domain optical control (DOC) is the highest form of control. DOC seeks to maximize
end-to-end performance across the entire optical control domain comprising all
network elements that are visible to the assigned DOC site. One domain optical
controller exists for each optical control domain. As the highest level of control, DOC
has full authority on its SOCs and LOCs to perform the following control tasks:
Peak power control - on each amplifier, the EDFA gain is set such that no
wavelength exceeds a prescribed peak power target, in order to limit non-linear
effects.
WSS control - on each WSSOPM circuit pack, a per-wavelength attenuation profile
is set (using data collected from amps upstream and downstream from it) such that
propagating channels are equally penalized by the system, according to the class
bias of the channel.
Generally, the domain optical controller determines which of the domain actions is to
be performed.
The DOC actions are:
System Optimization: in which the domain performance is optimized either in a
service-affecting or non-service-affecting manner. Generally, this optimization
tracks aging and very slow changes in operating conditions.
Service-affecting Channel Addition: When DOC detects that all channels in the
photonic domain are Inactive, it opts for a service-affecting optimization in the
interest of minimizing execution time. This action adds channels in a service-
affecting manner, normally done during an initial system install.
Non-service-affecting Channel Addition: also known as in-service wavelength
addition, this action adds channels to the domain in a non-service-affecting
manner while maintaining the remaining channels in an optimized state.
Non-service-affecting Channel Deletion: also known as in-service wavelength
delete, this action removes specified channels from the domain in a non-service-
affecting manner while maintaining the remaining channels in an optimized state.
Monitoring: assesses whether the current domain operating point is optimal.
Re-Optimization: in which the system performance is optimized in a non-service-
affecting manner. Generally, this optimization tracks aging and very slow changes
in operating conditions.
The DOC provides the foundation to deliver autonomous system optimization. The
DOC also provides the single point of contact for the element manager (OMEA) and
is therefore user visible.
The optical control hierarchy takes the characteristics of the topology into account as
the optical multiplexed section serves as a key physical de-limiter between sectional
and domain optical control. Essentially, each non-line amp site de-limits one section
from another.

189
DOC Site Selection Engineering Rules

Shown here are the DOC site engineering rules that should be followed:
A Domain Optical Controller (DOC) domain is limited to 22 Sectional Optical
Control (SOC).
A SOC can have up to 15 amp sites.

Following engineering rules facilitate the selection of the DOC site for 6500
deployment:
Linear systems and Hubbed rings (ring with full optical seam).
DOC site must exist at the beginning of the optical path.
Two DOC site NEs must exist (one for each optical direction).
Meshed rings (pass-through wavelengths at every site).
Two DOC site NEs must exist (one for each direction).

190
DOC Intelligence

The 6500 domain optical control (DOC) incorporates advanced optical control
features to optimize traffic and maximize system performance and reach.

DOC intelligence provides:


Peak power control
EDFA gain set such that no wavelength exceeds a prescribed target.
limits non-linearities.
Tilt control loop
tilt is set on each amp.
minimizes accumulation of gain tilt and ripple across the link.
ensures the gain spectrum through cascaded EDFAs, DSCMs and the fiber
plant is as flat as possible.
WSS control loop
maintains a per wavelength attenuation profile using data collected from
amps upstream and downstream from it.

191
Optical Power Monitoring (OPM)

Optical Power Monitoring (OPM) provides optimization algorithms with a more


accurate view of the channel power profiles in the network, and allows data to be
used efficiently, for data to be passed across sections, and for end of link OSNR to
be estimated.

From a system perspective, the 6500 peak power, tilt, and WSS control loops
combine to:
limit non-linearities (that is, minimize the penalty attributable to non-linearities that
result from self-phase modulation [SPM], cross-phase modulation [XPM], and
four-wave mixing [FWM]).
control the gain tilt of the system (that is, preserve a wavelengths optical signal-
to-noise ratio [OSNR] by ensuring it is not overly attenuated through its
propagation).
equalize (that is, distribute finite available power such that all wavelengths are
treated equitably [the equitability currency is either power or estimated OSNR]).

192
Domain Optical Controller (DOC) Login Window

As mentioned previously, the Domain Optical Controller (DOC) application is a


Photonic application that displays and manages the DOC sites associated with the
6500 NE.

The end user performs DOC management from the Photonic Services: Domain
Optical Controller (DOC) application in the Configuration menu of Site Manager (as
shown here).

193
DOC Window

From the Domain Optical Controller (DOC) window the end user can monitor or
execute various commands within the 6500 NE.

The end user can from the DOC window, monitor or perform the following:
In-Service (IS) or Out-Of-Service (OOS), keep in mind when DOC is in service,
DOC is then active and raises customer-visible alarms. When DOC is OOS, DOC
will only respond to a user command that would put DOC IS.
Note: The DOC primary state transition from IS to OOS state or vice-versa is not
service affecting.
Monitor current status, current command and progress.
DOC when configured can autonomously execute a command and provide
its progress (in a percentage format).
Monitors per-channel status - Channel Condition and End-to-End Condition.

194
DOC Window contd

Use the:

DOC LOG button to display logs against a provisioned DOC instance or facility
within the same domain.
Re-Optimize to Optimize the path against a provisioned DOC instance or facility.
Reset TCA Baseline to reset all physical baseline values for the entire DOC
domain (all photonic equipment in all network elements in the domain).
Stop DOC Action to Stop the DOC action.
Clear DOC Logs to clear "Domain Control Command Logs", which are a subset
of all the logs shown on the DOC Logs screen.
Clear DOC Alarms to clear certain DOC alarms. (In this release, the following
alarms are cleared with this application: DOC Action Failed: Delete.

195
DOC window contd

Use the:
Pre-Check, DOC Pre-Check quickly informs the end user whether or not a
channel is likely to be added successfully without having to physically start the
DOC channel add operation.
Note: a pre-check can take anywhere from 15 seconds up to 5 minutes depending on
the number of channels that are being pre-checked.

ADD is used to open the Add DOC dialog box which lets you create a new
Domain Optical Controller.
Delete is used to delete the selected channel (wavelength).
Force Delete is used to bring a channel out of service when a normal delete
cannot be performed.
Note: The Forced Delete command is accepted only if the DOC Automation mode is
set to No Auto Monitoring.

DOC Trail, opens a new window to display a single DOC Trail view for any or all
DOC instances or channel selections.
NE Trail, opens a new window to display a single NE Trail view for any or all
DOC instances or channel selections.

196
DOC Settings Window
The end user can from the DOC window, monitor or perform the following:
Continuous Automatic Fault Detection
DOC runs automatic fault detection (including Pre-Check) on all of the SOCs the
channels traverse. Automatic fault detection runs every minute regardless of the
DOC Automation mode setting. It helps to identify potential faults that could fail
subsequent DOC related actions like re-optimizations or channel adds or deletes.
Configuring DOC automation mode, the following DOC automation modes are
supported:
Auto Re-optimize As Necessary: Every 5 minutes, DOC monitors the photonic
domain to determine its state of optimization. In this mode, if it is detected that re-
optimization is necessary, DOC automatically re-optimizes the domain.
Auto Monitor Only: Every 5 minutes, DOC monitors the photonic domain to
determine its state of optimization. In this mode, if it is detected that re-
optimization is necessary, DOC raises a customer-visible alarm but does not take
any re-optimization action unless commanded by the user.
No Auto Monitoring: All DOC automated actions are disabled in which case DOC
performs only user-initiated actions.
Enhanced (Pre and post release 9): In this mode, the network and channel
configuration has been modeled using Optical Modeler to be insensitive to power
fluctuations caused by adding or deleting wavelengths. This allows DOC software
to ramp up or down a wavelength much quicker than in a sensitive network.
Enhanced Auto Monitor Only (Release 9 and higher): Same action as Auto
Monitor Only but used at release 9.0.
197
Passive Optics Equalization.

The passive optics configuration is not DOC controled. The equalization is done
manually using pads at various locations in the network.
Pads are placed at the transmitter output of each channel in order to optimize the
system optical performance.
Pads are placed at the amplifier input when required to bring it to its flat gain operating
point and minimize tilt built up as the channels are travelling across the network.
Pads are placed at the input of DSCM and fiber span when required.

198
Passive Optics Equalization.

Optical Modeler validates links based upon a nominal operating range for channel
powers. If channel powers are outside of the design range, channels will not have the
designed margin.
The burden of implementing the channel power scheme falls upon the installation
team. It is their responsibility to ensure that channel powers at key interfaces are
within the design range validated by the Design Tool (Optical Modeler).
Optical Modeler suggests pad values corresponding to its worst-case analysis. During
installation, the pads almost always need to be increased to maintain target power
levels because losses at deployment are seldom worst-case. The process of
determining the correct pad for the deployment is called pad tuning
The Optical Modeler output provides:
Cost-optimized network solution with predicted optical QoS: includes wavelength
assignment and placement of filters, amplifiers & DSCMs
Itemized equipment list, organized by site
Node-level wiring diagrams
Pad locations and values (based upon typical loss analysis)
A channel power & OSNR audit form for recording deployed channel levels and
verifying that they are within range of OM recommendations
A completed audit form demonstrates that the channel equalization has been correctly
implemented at local & upstream nodes

199
Photonic Connections

Photonic traffic is carried by DWDM wavelengths that are switched through


connections at OADM sites. An optical domain consists of multiple OADM sites.
Multiple optical domains can be inter-connected together at branching sites.

Photonic connections specify the path of a wavelength between its ingress and
egress end points at a site, where the endpoints are ports on LIM (SLA, MLA, MLA2,
or LIM) circuit packs.

Photonic connections are automatically created by the system at channel access


sites that are composed of ROADM or TOADM OTSs that are in the same optical
domain.
Also, the photonic connections are automatically created for local add connections
from the CMD (CMD44, SCMD4) to the LIM within a ROADM or TOADM OTS when
the CMD Tx adjacency is provisioned; and for local drop connections from the LIM
to the CMD when the CMD Rx adjacency is provisioned.

Passthrough connections between two OADM sites that are within a single optical
domain. These connections are between LIM (SLA, MLA, MLA2, or LIM) ports of
circuit packs in two different OTS.

200
Photonic connections contd

Photonic connections at domain boundaries must be provisioned by the user. And


they are:
Passthrough non-broadcast connections between two OADM sites that are in
different optical domains.
Passthrough broadcast connections between two OADM sites that are in different
optical domains.
6500 Photonic connection types supported in this release are:
A unidirectional (1WAY) connection type is a unidirectional Photonic connection
between two LIM (SLA, MLA, MLA2, or LIM) interface ports or between a LIM
(SLA, MLA,MLA2, or LIM) interface port and a CMD (CMD44, SCMD4) interface
port.
1WAY Add.
1WAY Drop.
1WAY Passthrough.
A bidirectional (2WAY): connection type is a bidirectional Photonic connection
between two LIM (SLA, MLA, MLA2, or LIM) interface ports for pass-through
Photonic cross-connects.
2WAY Passthrough.

These connections are automatically added by DOC when a wavelength adds and
drops in the same domain.
Additional to these DOC installed connections, the user must provision an additional
connection at sites where the wavelength spans across domain boundaries.

201
1WAY Drop

1WAY Photonic local drop connection example


1 WAY photonic connection from OCH-1-4-8-153033 to OCH-1-91-2-153033.
To LIM in slot 4, input port 8, wavelength 1530.33.
To CMD44 in slot 91 (see the note below), output port 2, wavelength 1530.33.

Note: If a CMD44 or DSCM module is manually provisioned against slot 83 to 90 with


the shelf processor (NTK555AA) and/or Access Panel NTK505MA, the "Remote
Inventory Not Supported on SP" alarm is raised. To have an alarm-free network, the
associated facility and equipment must be deleted and re-provisioned in virtual slots 91
through 99.

202
1WAY Add

1WAY Photonic local add connection example


1 WAY photonic connection from OCH-1-91-1-153033 to OCH-1-4-5-153033.
To CMD44 in slot 91, input port 1, wavelength 1530.33.
To LIM in slot 4, output port 5, wavelength 1530.33.

203
1WAY Passthrough

1WAY Photonic passthrough connection example


1 WAY photonic connection from OCH-1-4-8-153033 to OCH-1-9-5-153033.
From LIM in slot 4, input port 8, wavelength 1530.33.
To LIM in slot 9, output port 5, wavelength 1530.33.

204
2WAY Passthrough

2WAY Photonic passthrough connection example


From OCH-1-4-8-153033/OCH-1-9-8-153033 to OCH-1-9-5-153033/OCH-1-4-5-
153033.
From LIM in slot 4, input port 8, wavelength 1530.33 nm To LIM in slot 9, output
port 5, wavelength 1530.33 nm.
From LIM in slot 9, input port 8, wavelength 1530.33 nm To LIM in slot 4, output
port 5, wavelength 1530.33 nm.

This connection type is an example of a DOC installed connection in a ROADM


within its domain. I is also an example of a user entered connection when a
wavelength spans across two domain boundaries.

205
Activity Introduction
Group activity

In this activity you will learn how to retrieve, edit and provision photonic parameters
from the screens mentioned above.

Your instructor will provide you with the NE numbers/names, IP addresses and login
information for this activity.

Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6

NE #/name

IP address

User ID
Password

206
DOC and ODU connections exercises

The Domain Optical Controller (DOC) is responsible for adding, deleting and
optimizing the wavelengths in a PL network.

1. To retrieve the DOC status, go to the following menu: Configuration/Photonic


Services/Domain Optical Controller (DOC).
Click on 'Start Monitoring'. Click on the DOC instance listed; managed
wavelengths (if any) will be listed at the bottom of the screen.
Record the following information:

Primary State

Overall Status

2. From this screen, do you see any wavelengths listed?


If so, record the following information for the first one listed:

AID
Source
Destination(s)
Wavelength (nm)
Channel Condition
End-to-End Condition

Channel condition reflects the state of the wavelength within this domain while
End-to-End Condition reflects the state of the wavelength in all domains (if
spanning more than one domain)

207
DOC and ODU connections exercises

The Domain Optical Controller (DOC) is responsible for adding, deleting and
optimizing the wavelengths in a CPL network.

3. Make sure that you select the Settings tab. Without changing the original
setting, click on the Edit button and from the options listed in the
Automation Mode scroll down menu, list the 4 possible automation modes:

Click on Cancel.

Here is a summary of the different DOC behaviors:


No Auto Monitoring (pre release 9): no automated operations
Auto Monitor Only (pre release 9): automated monitoring only (waits for
user intervention to optimize)
Auto Re-Optimize as Necessary (pre release 9): fully automated monitoring
and re-optimization
Enhanced (pre and post release 9): : Same as Auto Re-Optimize as
Necessary but it is a newer mode with faster add and delete times.
Enhanced Auto Monitor Only (release 9): Same as Auto Monitor Only but
used at release 9.

4. With the previously selected channel, click on NE Trail.


In the following table, list all the NEs that this wavelength travels through from
Ingress at the top of the table, to Egress at the bottom.

Network Elements

5. Close the Domain Optical Controller tab.

208
DOC and ODU connections exercises

Shelf Wavelength Topology exercises


The 6500 Photonic Layer topology feature enables multi-level topology
information to be displayed to the user via the Site Manager Craft interface.

6. Select the Configuration menu, Photonic Services and Shelf Wavelength


Topology.
7. Select "known" in the Routing field then click the "Retrieve" button.
8. Click on the first one listed and enter the port trail information in the following
table.

Port Trail (Slot-Port)

Looking at the different slot numbers listed, list all circuit packs involved in the
trail:

9. Select "Add" in the Routing field then click the "Retrieve" button.
10. Which Path(s) are available in the Path field above the Details table?

11. Close the Shelf Wavelength Topology tab.

209
DOC and ODU connections exercises

Photonic Connections exercise

To complete the following exercise, you will need to log in ROADM site to
see passthrough connections .

Photonic connections menu allow users to query, create, and delete bi-
directional (2WAY) or uni-directional (1WAY) channel level. This
provisioning is required when a channel travels across an OSID
boundary (different DOC domains).

Upon selecting the ingress port of a shelf, the interconnections between


shelves associated with the selected port is displayed, and a list of
optical cross-connects provisioned from that port is displayed in a table.

12. Go to Configuration/Cross Connections/Photonic Connections.

210
DOC and ODU connections exercises

Photonic Connections exercise

13. Do you have any connections listed in the table?

If you do, for the first connection enter the following information in this
table:

From To

Photonic Connections menu allows retrieval of provisioned cross-


connections based on specification of a "fromAID" and a "toAID"
From ("OCH-shelf-slot-port-wavelength")
identifies the local inbound edge port of the channel
is the LIM edge port for passhrough or dropped channels
is the CMD edge port for added channels
To ("OCH-shelf-slot-port-wavelength")
identifies the local outbound edge port of the channel
is the LIM edge port for passhrough or added channels
is the CMD edge port for dropped channels

14. In order to add an optical channel in between 2 WSS from


different OSID, you select Add.

What parameters need to be provisioned in the Add menu?

Click on Cancel/Exit

211
DOC and ODU connections exercises

Photonic Connections exercise

From the list of Photonic connections, look under the Derived column and
find two connections that have the following derived state in the table.

Derived From To
Yes
No

Derived indication of Yes indicates that this connection was added by


DOC.
Derived indication of No indicates a user entry. This connection is to
bridge a wavelength from one optical domain to a different optical domain.

What is port 8 on a LIM? Circle the right answer


LINE A IN
LINE A OUT
LINE B IN
LINE B OUT

What is port 5 on a LIM? Circle the right answer


LINE A IN
LINE A OUT
LINE B IN
LINE B OUT

When a connection spans across domain boundaries, the user creates a


connection from the LINE A IN port of the ingress LIM to the LINE B OUT
of the egress LIM.

End of activity

212
Channel Add/Delete Activity

STEPS FOR DELETING AND ADDING A WAVELENGTH


The detailed procedures for adding or deleting a channel are in the 323-
1851-221 Technical Publication section. What is following is a high level
summary of the procedures. Manual addition and deletion of a single
bidirectional channel is used in the following exercise.
Deleting optical channels

Note the following information provided by your instructor:

Wavelength
Transmitter Type
Source TID
Destination(s) TID
Direction 1 DOC site
Direction 2 DOC site

1 - Use a PC with visibility to the network elements where the channels to


be deleted are added or dropped, and to the DOC network elements for
the two directions.
2 - Identify the network element that is serving as the DOC for the
applicable direction.
Note: For bidirectional channels, you can perform steps 3 and 4 at the two
DOC network elements simultaneously, or perform these steps one
direction at a time.
3 - Select the channel to delete, and click on the Delete Channels button.

213
Channel Add/Delete Activity

STEPS FOR DELETING AND ADDING A WAVELENGTH

Note: If your class is divided in two teams, wait for the other teams
channel deletion completion before moving on to the next step.

4 - Repeat step 2 and 3 for the other direction, if assigned to your team.
5 - Once completed, identify the deleted channel on the DOC screen.
What is now indicated under the Condition column for that wavelength?

6 - Use the Craft interface session that is logged in one of the network
elements that adds/drops the selected channel in the Craft interface, select
the Tx adjacency that corresponds to the wavelength to be deleted.
7 - Click on the Edit button. Change the Transmitter Type to Unknown.
Note: If the Tx and Rx port adjacencies are paired (for a bidirectional
channel), this step also sets the Receiver Type to Unknown.
8 - Repeat steps 6 and 7 to edit the Tx and/or Rx adjacencies for the other
end of the optical channel entity if assigned to your team.

When at least one Tx/Rx adjacencies have been set to UNKNOWN, that
wavelength disappears from the DOC screen.
Is the wavelength still visible?
9 - Disconnect the transmitters and receivers associated with the deleted
channels, if this action has not already been done.

- END OF OPTICAL CHANNEL DELETION -

214
Channel Add/Delete Activity

Adding optical channels to an existing group


There are two impact types during channel addition:
Service Affecting add (SA): The DOC will perform a faster optimization
(such as during a SLAT process). This happens when all network
channels are under an inactive state.
Non Service Affecting add: The DOC will perform a slower optimization
iteration so that it does not affect the existing traffic carrying wavelengths.
This happens when at least one network channel is under a Optimized
state.
High level summary
The following steps assume that this is a manual addition of a single
bidirectional channel.

Note the following information provided by your instructor:

Wavelength
Transmitter Type
Source TID
Destination(s) TID
Direction 1 DOC site
Direction 2 DOC site

1 - Connect the transmitter and the receiver of the service layer equipment
to the correct CMD port at both ends of the selected channel.
For example, if you are adding a 6500 NGM wavelength, make sure that
the transmit laser is tuned to the right wavelength and that the power is set
to its maximum value (0 dBm).

215
Channel Add/Delete Activity

2 - Use a PC with visibility to the two network elements where the channel
is added or dropped, and to the two DOC network elements for the two
directions (or to the DOC sites direction assigned to your team).
3 Open the DOC screen and verify if existing channels appear in the list
of channels on the Domain Optical Controller (DOC) screen. If others
wavelengths exist, DOC will perform a non-service affecting add (nsa).
Note: Any new channel that is physically connected to a CMD or sCMD
that does not have a provisioned adjacency is not displayed in the DOC
channel list.
Do you have existing wavelengths that are Optimized?
Do you have existing wavelengths that are Inactive?
Do you see the presence of your wavelength in the list?
4 If not already provisioned, set the Auto Add and the Auto Delete
Channels parameters to Disabled.
5 - Repeat step 4 at the DOC network element controlling the other
direction of the channels you are adding if assigned to your team.
6 - Identify one of the network elements that adds/drops the channel and
select Facilities > Adjacency.
7 - Select the Tx adjacency from the list of available CMD or sCMD input
port AIDs that correspond to the selected wavelength listed in the
wavelength column. Click on the Edit button and select the Transmitter
Type that is indicated in the beginning of this exercise
Repeat this step to edit the Tx and Rx adjacencies at the other end of the
optical channel entity if assigned to your team.

216
Channel Add/Delete Activity

8 - Use the Craft session with the network element that is serving as the
DOC for the applicable direction and open the DOC screen
Note: Before continuing the following steps, wait for the other teams
completion of the adjacency provisioning.

9 - Verify that the new channel appears on the Domain Optical Control
screen in the list of channels in the Inactive state.
10 - Select the newly created channel and click on the Add Channels
button.

This action adds the new optical channel entities to the list of channels that
DOC is to optimize. DOC then controls the addition of the channels to the
system and begins optimization. Once optimization completes
successfully, the value displayed in the Overall Status field is Optimal, and
for each channel entity the value displayed in the Condition column is
Optimized.

Is the channel addition successful for both directions?

Note: If the expected results do not occur, refer to Trouble Clearing and
Module Replacement, 323-1851-543.

- END OF OPTICAL CHANNEL ADDITION -

217
Channel Add/Delete Activity

Provision a new channel in a Y-Branch or T-Branch network.


Wavelength
Transmitter Type
Ingress TID
Egress TID
Domain 1 Direction 1 DOC site

Domain 1 Direction 2 DOC site

Domain 2 Direction 1 DOC site

Domain 2 Direction 1 DOC site

Consolidated TID IP

1. Create a Photonic Connection (single command)


2. Provision Tx and Rx adjacencies
3. Domain 1 and Domain 2 are automatically optimized (provided that
Auto Add is Enabled and Ingress Active Flag is set to True in both
domains). Alternately, Domain 1 and then Domain 2 can be manually
optimized if Auto Add is Disabled.

218
Channel Add/Delete Activity

Re-routing a new channel in a Y-Branch network.

Wavelength
Transmitter Type
Destination(s) TID
Egress TID
Domain 1 Direction 1 DOC site

Domain 1 Direction 2 DOC site

Domain 2 Direction 1 DOC site

Domain 2 Direction 1 DOC site

Domain 3 Direction 1 DOC site

Domain 3 Direction 1 DOC site

Consolidated TID IP

In this example, a channel is re-routed from Domain 2 to Domain 3

Domain 1 Photonic Connection

ROADM1 ROADM2
Term Term

Domain 2
ROADM3
Domain 3

Term

219
Channel Add/Delete Activity

Re-routing a new channel in a Y-Branch network.

1. Provision Rx adjacency in Domain 3


2. Perform DOC Delete in Domain 2 and Domain 1
3. Delete Photonic Connection
4. Create a new Photonic Connection between Domain 1 and Domain 3
5. Domain 1 and Domain 3 are automatically optimized (provided that
Auto Add is Enabled and Ingress Active Flag is set to True in both
domains). Alternately, Domain 1 and then Domain 3 can be manually
optimized if Auto Add is Disabled.

220
Check Your Learning

1. An Optical Domain consists of how many DOC sites?


a) 1
b) 2
c) 3
d) 4

2. When a wavelength spans across two Optical Domains, what needs to be


provisioned?
a) Tx/Rx adjacency in domain A
b) Tx/Rx adjacency in domain B
c) A photonic connection at domain boundaries
d) All of the above

3. Photonic connections at the add and drop sites are automatically created by the
Domain Optical Controller (DOC)?
a) True
b) False
221
222
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to provide an overview of 6500 Photonic Layer


Performance Monitoring.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical Multiservice
Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

223
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

Provisioning and Operating 323-1851-310


Procedures
Fault Management - Performance 323-1851-520
Monitoring

224
SLA PM Collection Points

This graphic shows the performance monitoring collection points for the Single Line
Amplifier (SLA) circuit pack.

225
MLA/MLA2/MLA3 PM Collection Points

This graphic shows the performance monitoring collection points for the Midstage
Line Amplifier (MLA/MLA2/MLA3) circuit pack.

226
WSS-OPM PM Collection Points

This graphic shows the performance monitoring collection points for the Wavelength
Selective Switch with Optical Power Monitor (WSS-OPM) circuit pack. (Example
shown here is the WSS 100 GHz 5x1)

227
SMD PM Collection Points

This graphic shows the SCMD4 circuit pack optical monitoring points.

228
SMD PM Collection Points

This graphic shows the performance monitoring collection points for the SMD 50
GHz circuit pack.

229
SMD PM Collection Points

This graphic shows the performance monitoring collection points for the CCMD12
circuit pack.

230
Performance Monitoring Overview

Performance Monitoring provides a valuable set of tools that can be used for early
detection of problems. The 6500 monitors signals and produces performance error
statistics when problems are detected.

You can use performance monitoring to:


Provide and assure quality of service (QoS).
Prevent outages by monitoring degradation.
Sectionalize, isolate and troubleshoot faults on your system.

There are four categories of PM parameters:


Facility PM.
Physical PM.
Protection switching PM (MSPP and BB services).
Class of Service (COS) (MSPP services).

231
Photonic PM Facilities

6500 Photonic Layer supports the following performance monitoring facilities:


OPTMON on Midstage Line Amplifier (MLA/MLA2/MLA3), Single Line Amplifier
(SLA) and Wavelength Selective Switch with Optical power Monitor (WSS
w/OPM)
AMP on Midstage Line Amplifier (MLA/MLA2/MLA3) and Single Line Amplifier
(SLA)
CHMON on Midstage Line Amplifier (MLA/MLA2/MLA3) and Single Line Amplifier
(SLA)

232
Photonic PM Parameters

6500 Photonic Layer supports the performance monitoring parameters listed above.
AVG is the average valid value of the parameter during the bins duration. MIN is the
minimum valid value of the parameter during the bins duration. MAX is the maximum
valid value of the parameter during the bins duration.

The Invalid Data Flag (IDF) of the AVG, MAX and MIN values is set to invalid if the
parameter is invalid at any time during the interval. This varies from the current
behaviour of the 15-minute bins, which are only marked invalid if they are invalid at
the time of roll over.

Optical Power Received (OPR-OTS) is a gauge-type measurement of the optical


power level being received at the facility. The unit of measure for this parameter is
dBm.

233
Photonic PM Parameters contd

Optical Power Input (OPIN-OTS) is a gauge-type measurement of the optical


power into the Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA). The unit of measure for this
parameter is dBm.

Optical Power Output (OPOUT-OTS) is a gauge-type measurement of the optical


power:
After the signal has been attenuated.
Exiting the Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA).
The unit of measure for this parameter is dBm.

Optical Power Transmitted (OPT-OCH) is a gauge-type measurement of the optical


power level transmitted by the CHMON facility. The unit of measure for this
parameter is dBm.

Optical Return Loss (ORL-OTS) is a ratio of the output power over the reflected
power in the Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA). The unit of measure for this
parameter is dB.

234
Parameter Facility Location Direction

This table lists the Circuit pack, Facility type, location and direction that apply to each
performance monitoring parameter for the photonic circuit packs.

Note: AVG, MIN, and MAX measurements are available for the OPR-OTS, OPIN-
OTS, OPOUT-OTS, ORL-OTS, OPT-OCH, and DROPGAIN-OTS parameters.

235
PM Query.

The performance monitoring can be retrieved by using the Performance menu.


Another form of display is obtained by using the Visualization menu at the OTS
schematic level. A PM tab becomes available after clicking on a module s port.
This last option is not available at release 9.0, only in release 9.1
Clicking on a port provides a snapshot of PMs and is not auto-refreshed.

236
PM Count Binning

PM functions includes:
Count binning
Thresholding

Count binning
Each monitored entity has a set of bins for each specified parameter.
The counts for each parameter are based on raw hardware counts and defects
which are processed to derive the parameter value.
Every 15 minutes the values in the historical bins are shifted in time as the
current count is binned.
All counts can be retrieved by a user or reset at any time if the facility is in-
service.

237
PM Intervals

PM time intervals

The 6500 Site Manager PM application allows the user to retrieve current and recent
history PM values. For facility, physical, and protection switching parameters, the
following PM counts are stored and can be retrieved:
Current 15-minute interval.
Last 32 15-minute intervals (except CHMON for Photonic services).
Current day.
Previous day (except CHMON for Photonic services).
Untimed.
Baseline (current real-time reading).

238
PM Functions Thresholding - Thresholding (PM profiles)

Performance thresholds are the deviation above or below the baseline value that is
permitted without generating a threshold crossing alert. Each performance parameter
has three thresholds, one each for the current 15-minute, day or untimed counts.
Each physical parameter has one threshold on the current gauge value.

For Photonic services, TCAs are provided for gauge parameters on OPTMON, AMP,
and CHMON facilities. TCAs are not supported on the MIN, MAX, and AVG
measurements of the PM gauge parameters. PM threshold checking is disabled
during manual OOS and enabled once the facility placed back in-service. It is
recommended that the user clears all PMs for the affected bin period prior to
returning to service to prevent the raising of unwanted TCAs.

PM thresholds management is available in the PM Profiles application in Site


Manager. The PM Profiles application provides the user with the ability to create
default thresholds that can be applied across many facilities. A profile contains all the
facility and physical PM parameters that are supported on the selected entity.

For Photonic services, PM thresholds stored in PM Profiles define the maximum


deviation from the currently set baseline for a gauge power value. Resetting
baselines of gauge power values is normally done by DOC, but may also be
manually triggered by the user.

239
Invalid Data Flag (IDF)

Each PM value has an invalid data flag (IDF). The Craft interface displays an IDF in
the Performance Monitoring window to indicate that a set of values is invalid or
incomplete.

All values are shown in the following format:<value><IDF><units>

If the IDF is not applicable, the table displays the following:--? <units>

240
PM Physical Baseline

A baseline is a reference value associated with a physical PM parameter gauge


reading. Each physical PM parameter gauge reading has a baseline associated with
it.

Baseline values allow you to view trends of a gauge reading over time. You can reset
the baseline value to match the current gauge value at any time.

Optical layer components such as transmit lasers or EDFAs can slowly degrade over
time to a point where traffic is affected.

Baselines are used as reference values to flag such trends.

For example, the baseline value is reset after equalization is completed and all the
transmit output powers are stable. Over time, these laser output powers start to
decrease. The difference between the baseline value and the current gauge value is
an indicator of the extent of degradation.

241
Offset

The above information explains the Offset functionality.

242
Graphical PM
The 6500 supports graphical PMs in Photonic services using the PM Graphing application
available in the Performance menu of Site Manager.
PM Graphing is supported for CHMON facilities (CHMON facilities are those available
when an OPM is equipped at a site). Historical PM Graphing is supported for AMP,
OPTMON and CHMON facilities.
The PM Graphing application allows you to:
graphically view and retrieve PM data by any combination of facility type, shelf-slot-
port, parameter, and graph sub-type (Trend or Snapshot).
Snapshot: 32 15-min bin power values, where the graph displays the value at the end of
the15-min bin interval.
Trend: 32 15-min bin power values, where the graph displays the minimum, maximum and
average power values during the 15-min bin interval.
Historical PM Graphing of power values is also supported by all circuit packs that
support OPR-OCH, OPRN-OCH, OPT-OCH and OPTN-OCH performance
parameters.
Note: Only the Snapshot display type is supported for these circuit packs.
Channel powers per port PM Graphing is supported for the OPT-OCH performance
parameter of CHMON facilities. These graphs show the power against channel
wavelengths for a particular facility and performance parameters combination, and is
auto-refreshed every 60 seconds. CHMON facilities exist at all Optical Transport
Sections (OTS) equipped with a WSS w/OPM circuit pack.
243
Graphical PMs (Trend)

Shown here are screen captures for Graphical PM trends.

244
Check Your Learning

1. What type of Performance Monitoring is used by 6500 Photonic Layer circuit packs?
a) Facility PM parameters
b) Physical PM parameters
c) Protection switching PM parameters
d) COS parameters
e) RPR parameters

2. To which PM facility does the ORL Optical Return Loss (ORL) parameter apply?
a) Optical Monitoring (OPTMON)
b) Amplifier (AMP)
c) Channel Monitoring (CHMON)

245
Check your learning (cont.)

3. Which of the following PM parameters is monitored on the WSS-OPM circuit pack?


a) Optical Monitoring (OPTMON)
b) Amplifier (AMP)
c) Channel Monitoring (CHMON)

246
247
248
Lab drawing

You can refer to this lab drawing for a global view of the network on which you are
working.

249
Channel Access West PM Data

Refer to this lab drawing to retrieve the performance Monitoring data at the following
collection points:
SLA ports 1 to 8.
WSS-OPM port 1,2, 9, 10, 17, 18.

For each reading note the slot, circuit pack, port number, parameter, facility and
Untimed value.

Record your results in table 1.

250
251
ROADM PM Data

Refer to this lab drawing to retrieve the performance Monitoring data at the following
collection points:
OTS 1 MLA ports 1 to 8.
OTS 1 WSS-OPM ports 1 to 4, 9,10,17,18.

For each reading note the slot, circuit pack, port number, parameter, facility and the
Untimed value. Record your results in table 2.

252
253
Channel Access East PM Data

Refer to this lab drawing to retrieve the performance Monitoring data at the following
collection points:
SLA ports 1 to 8.
WSS-OPM port 1,2, 9, 10, 17, 18.

For each reading note the slot, circuit pack, port number, parameter, facility and
Untimed value.

Record your results in table 3.

254
255
Activities Review

Briefly verify the results of the activities.

Take this opportunity to ask any questions!

256
257
Intentionally left blank

258
Lesson Overview

The purpose of this lesson is to provide an overview of the 6500 Packet-Optical


Platform Photonic Layer Fault Management functionalities.

Disclaimer
The Ciena 6500 Packet-Optical Platform, formerly known as the Optical Multiservice
Edge (OME) 6500, will be referred to as 6500, in this document.

259
Documentation used in this lesson

This lesson references the following Ciena Documentation:

Title Number
Planning Guide NTRN10CA

Provisioning and Operating 323-1851-310


Procedures
Fault Management Alarm Clearing 323-1851-543

Fault Management Module 323-1851-545


replacement

260
261
Power Interfaces LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the power interface circuit packs.

262
Shelf Processor LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the Shelf Processor circuit pack.

263
Maintenance Interface Card LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the Maintenance Interface Card.

264
Optical Service Channel LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the Optical Service Channel circuit packs.

265
Midstage Line Amplifier LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the Midstage Line Amplifier circuit pack.

266
Single Line Amplifier LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the Single Line Amplifier LEDs circuit pack.

267
Serial Channel Mux/Demux 4 (SCMD4) LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the SCMD4 LEDs circuit pack.

268
Wavelength Selective Switch LEDs

Shown here are the LEDs for the Wavelength Selective Switch LEDs circuit pack.

269
Shelf View

Besides the physical on site indications provided by the LED, the shelf level view
also provides an alarm summary by displaying shelf and specific card alarm levels.

Shown here is a screen capture of the Visualization (shelf view) graphic.

When the Shelf Level View is selected from the Configuration menu, the Physical
Shelf view of the Visualization tool is displayed.

270
Active Alarms Window

The Active Alarms window is used to view and filter the active alarms list.

Site Manager provides the end user with a visual summary of all active alarms for all
6500s logged in to through the alarm banner.

The end user views a list of active alarms on a 6500 shelf by selecting the Active
Alarms application in the Fault menu of Site Manager. A maximum of 4600 active
alarms are supported on the 6500 network element.

Note: To view the alarms for all the NEs that the end user is logged into, you must
select from the TOOLS menu "Consolidated Alarms
Select the alarm that needs to be addressed by viewing the alarm details, and then
gain access to the alarm clearing procedures by selecting the How to Clear... button.

271
Historical Fault Browser (Events Window)

Use the Historical Fault Browser window to:


View all the events for a single network element.
Filter events for a single network element.
Find alarms that have been raised and cleared.
Determine if a currently occurring alarm has occurred previously.
View event details.

272
Circuit Pack Replacement

Equipment replacement

Prior to replacing a faulty circuit pack, it is recommended to perform a warm restart,


if this does not clear the fault, then perform a cold restart and, if required, reseat a
faulty circuit pack before attempting to replace it.
For more information consult the Fault Management - Module Replacement
Technical Publication (323-1851-545). Site Manager's Fault menu allows you to
initiate a restart on a network element's circuit pack or on the shelf processor.
Warm restart operates a software restart of the circuit pack.
Cold restart operates a hardware restart of the circuit pack.

273
Automatic Line Shut Off (ALSO)

When a fiber is cut or disconnected at the downstream amplifier a feedback to the


upstream site occurs to facilitate shutdown of the upstream amplifier that is powering
into the detected fault. In 6500 Photonic Layer, the feedback to the upstream amplifier
site is accomplished through OSC signalling on the fiber that carries traffic in the
complementary direction. The OSC 155 Mbit/s overhead is used to turn down/off the
upstream amplifier that is emitting radiation into the fiber with the fault.
1. A fiber cut occurs on FP 1.
2. An OSC LOS will be raised against the OSC port connected to amplifier (OTS-1,
Site B).
3. The input of Amp A (OTS-1, Site B) will shut-off.
4. The input of Amp B (OTS-2, Site B) will then shut-off.
5. Optical Line Failure Alarm is raised against MLA Amp A Input (OTS-1, Site B).
6. MLA Amp B Output (OTS-1, Site B) is forced to shut-off.
7. MLA Amp A Output (OTS-2, Site B) is forced to shut-off.
8. MLA Amp A Input (OTS-2, Site A) is forced to shut-off.
9. MLA Amp B Input (OTS-1, Site A) is forced shut-off.1
10. Optical Line Failure Alarm is raised against MLA Amp B Input (OTS-2, Site A).
11. MLA Amp B Output (OTS-2, Site A) is forced to shut-off.
12. MLA Amp A Output (OTS-1, Site A) is forced to shut-off. 274
Automatic Power Reduction (APR)

Automatic power reduction (APR) on the 6500 Photonic layer is implemented on all
EDFA-based amplifiers at all points where there is a regulatory requirement for
exposure protection.

APR is a software controlled ramp-down and recovery mechanism used to limit


potential exposure. to instances of high optical power with a view to protecting
personnel and preventing equipment damage on detection of breaks or disconnects
in the optical line.
A regulatory deemed safe level of optical power is transmitted in the period of optical
discontinuity on the line to facilitate automatic detection of line restoration and
recovery to normal state.

275
Passive Optics configuration Alarm correlation
The FGA is the only building block that can be used in a Passive OTS that will provide
alarm points . The FGA generates the following alarms:
Excessive input power
Shutoff Threshold Crossed
Input Loss of Signal
Output Loss of Signal
Gauge TCA summary
All standard Equipment Alarms: CP Missing, CP Mismatch, CP Failed, etc
Site Level Alarm Correlation:
To avoid massive amount of alarms on the Service cards being raised at the same
time due to a single fiber cut.
FGA LOS and FGA Shutoff Threshold Crossed can be detected on the card. They
will mask related downstream alarms (provided SITE level alarm correlation is on).
LOS cannot be detected on any other passive OTS building blocks. To partially
overcome this limitation, a Logical LOS or Group LOS alarm may be raised on the
passive channel filters and band splitters when all service cards in a group are
detecting an LOS.
Logical LOS or Group LOS is only active when a service card is present on all
wavelengths supported by the channel filter or band splitter.
Logical LOS or Group LOS does not span across multiple sites.
276
Site Level Alarm Correlation examples.

Here are two examples of Logical LOS, Group LOS and LOS alarms being raised or
masked.

277
Site Level Alarm Correlation examples.

Here is an examples of Logical LOS, Group LOS and LOS alarms being raised or
masked.

278
Troubleshooting methodology - Alarm clearing strategy

This lesson outlines procedures for responding to alarms and clearing faults. Alarms
are triggered when either hardware or a function fails.
Procedures are divided into two levels, task-level procedures and detailed
procedures. The task level procedure identifies alarms by type and directs the reader
to detailed procedures for clearing the fault that has raised the alarm.

Ways in which alarms are reported:


LED indicators.
Autonomous and retrieved TL1 alarm messages.
(Optional) office alarms.

Assumptions for the alarm-clearing strategy:


That protection circuitry is used.
That no external factor, such as power fluctuation, causes the trouble.
That a primary fault generates primary and secondary alarms that can be cleared
by a single fault-clearing procedure.
That the network element is correctly provisioned and working properly until the
time of the alarm.
279
Troubleshooting Methodology

Troubleshooting is about solving problems (or troubles) on equipment. A deviation


from the norm is a problem. A system is designed to operate in a certain state (the
norm). When the system is suddenly not working according to this norm, you must
troubleshoot.

When you start to troubleshoot, the cause of the deviation is unknown. You need to
identify the cause in order to take appropriate corrective measures. Systematic
methods exist to help you perform this task in an efficient manner.

The activities described here are formal. It is good practice to consciously think about
each activity, even for small problems. This will help to apply the process when you
take on more difficult problems.

280
Locating and clearing alarms

Step 1: Retrieve all alarms

How do you know that a problem exists on your system?


In most cases, the 6500system is designed to automatically generate appropriate
information messages to report any malfunction.

Information messages such as:


Alarms.
Logs.
Error messages displayed in dialog boxes or directly on your user interface screens.
Notification from a Operating Support System (OSS).
Tools and indicators that help you identify the trouble state:
Audible and visible indicators for alarms.
Software tools for alarms and events.

Refer to the Technical Publications 323-1851-543 for procedures to retrieve alarms.

Step 2: Prioritize the alarms

At this point, you need to prioritize the problems. Too much data can overwhelm you
and the important information can get buried and be hard to find. Organize the data that
you collect so that you can more easily extract the pertinent information and interpret
the data. Usually, you can segregate data by time, location or severity.

Gather all pertinent data


Ask questions like the following:
What exactly is affected by the problem?
What was the state of the system when this happened?
Where did this happen?
When did it happen?
How severe is the problem?
Are alarms and logs related to the problem?

281
Locating and clearing alarms

Step 2: Prioritize the alarms contd

Alarm severities

The most urgent critical alarm is by definition a service-affecting alarm, followed by a


non-service-affecting failed card alarm.
Alarm severities:
Critical alarms (CR): Critical alarms are the most severe. Critical alarms always
indicate a service-affecting fault. For example, unprotected facility losses and
unprotected facility-carrying equipment failures raise critical alarms.
Major alarms (MJ): Major alarms are less severe than critical alarms. Major alarms
are raised when something has an effect on a low-speed facility. For example, a
major alarm is raised when tributary signals fail or unprotected provisioned circuit
packs are missing.
Minor alarms (MN): Minor alarms are non-service-affecting. For example, a minor
alarm is raised when a protected circuit fails.

Step 3: Isolate the problem

Problem isolation is carried out by identifying and eliminating details and facts that you
know are not related to the problem. If one morning, your car would not start, the fact
that your tires maybe a little low on air pressure is probably unrelated.
Once you have clearly defined what the problem is, from the two previous steps, one of
the best ways to troubleshoot that problem is to identify what it is not. Eliminate as
many unrelated pieces of information and unrelated conditions as possible.

Step 4: Determine the cause of the problem

Once you isolate the problem, it is important to determine the cause of the problem. To
determine the cause of the problem, you will need to use the Technical Publications.

List possible causes


Based on your knowledge of the system, your experience, the troubleshooting
resources at your disposition, and some common sense, you can formulate possible
causes for the problem.

282
Locating and clearing alarms

Step 4: Determine the cause of the problem contd


List possible causes
Points to consider when trying to determine the cause of a problem:
If the problem is with a process, where within that process can a problem occur?
Use the comparison method.
If the system where the problem exists is made up of several similar
components, why is the problem with this specific component and not the other
components? Identify the differences.
Identify any changes
Did the system change in some way?
Did the problem appear after this change?
Why is a similar component not affected by this change? Is it because of the
differences (that you identified above) between the components?
Evaluate the possible causes
Now that you have identified several possible causes, you need to find the most
probable one. Proceed by a process of elimination.
Systematically investigate each cause and eliminate causes that do not explain the
problem. Start with the causes that can best explain the symptoms and indications that
you analyzed previously. Doing this will save you time.
If you eliminate all the causes without solving the problem, you need to generate more
possible causes. At this point, it is possible that you will require assistance, from a more
expert person for example, to generate additional possible causes.

Step 5: Implement the solution


Once you isolate what you evaluate to be the most probable cause, you can take the
following actions:

Implementing the solution:


Identify the appropriate steps to resolve the problem. Use appropriate resources
such as the Technical Publications, Fault Management - Alarm Clearing (323 - 1851-
543).
Perform these steps to resolve the problem.
Verify that the problem has been cleared.
Return the equipment to service, if appropriate.
Depending on your company's policy, document the problem symptoms, causes,
and solution to assist in the diagnosis of similar problems in the future.

283
Use the Technical Publications and appropriate tools and procedures to clear
alarms

Fault number 1

Student notes

Alarm table 1

Alarms
Unit
Probable cause
Impact
Solution

284
Use the Technical Publications and appropriate tools and procedures to clear
alarms

Fault number 2

Student notes

Alarm table 2

Alarms
Unit
Probable cause
Impact
Solution

285
Use the Technical Publications and appropriate tools and procedures to clear
alarms

Fault number 3

Student notes

Alarm table 3

Alarms
Unit
Probable cause
Impact
Solution

286
Use the Technical Publications and appropriate tools and procedures to clear
alarms

Fault number 4

Student notes

Alarm table 4

Alarms
Unit
Probable cause
Impact
Solution

287
Use the Technical Publications and appropriate tools and procedures to clear
alarms

Fault number 5

Student notes

Alarm table 5

Alarms
Unit
Probable cause
Impact
Solution

288
Check Your Learning

1. What steps should be taken prior to replacing a circuit pack? (choose the best two
answers)
a) Restart
b) Replace
c) Reseat
d) Nothing

2. Which window displays all of the Threshold Crossing Alerts (TCA)?


a) The alarm window
b) The event window
c) The performance monitoring window
d) The equipment and facility window

289
Check your learning (contd)

3. In the case of a fiber cut, which circuit pack is used to turn down the upstream amplifier
that is emitting radiation into the fiber with the fault?
a) OSC
b) SLA
c) MLA
d) WSS-OPM

4. Automatic Power Reduction is a safety mechanism that prevent personnel and


equipment damage against optical return loss (optical reflections) and is implemented
on:
a) All optical amplifiers equipped with Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA)
b) All DWDM transmitters
c) All 6500 Photonic Layer circuit packs
d) All of the above

290
291
292
293
Intentionally left blank

294
295
Term Definition
ACO Alarm Cut-off
ADJ Adjacency
ADM Add/Drop Multiplexer
AID Access Identifier
AINS Automatic In-service
AIS Alarm Indication Signal
ALS Automatic Laser Shutdown
ALSO Automatic Line Shut Off
AM Analog Maintenance
AMP Amplifier
ANSI American National Standards Institute
AP Access Panel
APD Avalanche Photo Diode
APR Automatic Power Reduction
APS Automatic Protection Switch
ATM Asynchronous Transfer Mode
AW Allwave
AWG Athernal Arrayed Waveguide Grating Athernal
BBS Broad Band Services
BIP Breaker Interface Panel
BLSR Bidirectional Line Switched Ring
BS1/2/3/5 1/2/3/5-Group Band Splitter Modules
BT Base T (Ten)
CAP Change Application Procedure
C-band Conventional Band (1530 Nm To 1565 Nm)
CCAT Contiguous Concatenation
CD Compact Disk

296
Term Definition
CHC Channel Control
CLE Customer Line Equipment
CCMD12 Colorless 12-Channel Mux Demux
CMD44 44 Channel Mux/Demux
COM Common Return
CPL Common Photonic Layer
CWDM Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing
dB Decibel
dBm Decibels Above One Mill Watt
dc Direct Current
DCC Data Communication Channel
DCE Data Circuit-terminating Equipment
DCN Data Communication Network
DISP Dispersion
DOC Domain Optical Controller
DOSC Dual Optical Service Channel Module
DPO Dwdm Pluggable Optics
DS1 Digital Signal Level 1 (1.544 Mbit/S)
DS3 Digital Signal Level 3 (44.736 Mbit/S)
DSF Dispersion-shifted Fiber
DSM DS1 Service Module
DSCM Dispersion Slope Compensation Module
DSF Dispersion Shifted Single Mode Fiber
DTE Data Terminal Equipment
DWDM Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing
E1 European Level 1
EC-1 Electrical Carrier Level 1 (51.84 Mbit/S)
EDFA Erbium-doped Fiber Amplifier
ELEAF Enhanced Effective Area Fiber
ETH Ethernet
EMC Electro-magnetic Compatibility
297
Term Definition
EoL End Of Life
ESI External Synchronization Input
ESD Electro-static Discharge
ESM Ethernet Service Module
ESI External Synchronization Output
ETSI European Telecommunications Standards Institute
eVOA Electronically-controlled Variable Optical Attenuator
FC Fibre Channel / Failure Count / Ferrule Connector
FICON Fibre Connection
FGA Fixed Gain Amplifier
F-GFP Framed-generic Framing Procedure
FL Freelight
FM Fiber Manager
FX Base Ten (Optic)
FTP File Transfer Protocol
Gbit/s Gigabits Per Second
GE (GbE) Gigabit Ethernet
GFP Generic Framing Procedure
GUI Graphical User Interface
HDLC High-level Data Link Control
HO High Order
ID Identifier
I/F Interface
ILAN Inter Shelf Local Area Network
iISIS Integrated Intermediate System To Intermediate System

IOF Inter Office Facility


IP Internet Protocol
IR Intermediate Reach
IS In-service
ITU-T International Telecommunication Union -
Telecommunication Standardization Bureau

298
Term Definition
J-SDH Japan Synchronous Digital Hierarchy
Km Kilometer
L2 Layer 2
LAN Local Area Network
LBO Line Buildout
LCAS Link Capacity Adjustment Scheme
LEAF Large Effective Area Fiber
LED Light-emitting Diode
LIM Line Interface Module
LR Long Reach
LO Low Order
LOC Local Optical Controller
LS Lambda Shifted Single Mode Fiber
MAA Manual Area Address
MAC Media Access Control
MIC Maintenance Interface Circuit Pack
Mbit/s Megabits Per Second
MHz Mega Hertz
MLA Midstage Line Amplifier
MOC Middle Optical Controller
MOTR Mux Optical Transponder
MPLS Multi Protocol Label Switching
MSP Multiplex Section Protection
MSPP Multi Service Provisioning Platform
MS Millisecond, Multiplex Section
MS-SPRing Multiplexer Section Shared Protection Ring

MTU Maximum Transfer Unit


NDSF Non-dispersion Shifted Fiber
NE Network Element
NEBS Network Equipment-building System
299
Term Definition
NNI Network To Network Interface
NNI Network To Network Interface
NSAP Network Service Access Point
OAM Operations, Administration, And Maintenance
OAM Operations, Administration, Maintenance, And Provisioning

OC-n Optical Carrier Level N


OC-3 Optical Carrier Level 3 (155.52 Mbit/S)
OC-12 Optical Carrier Level 12 (622.08 Mbit/S)
OC-48 Optical Carrier Level 48 (2488.32 Mbit/S)
OC-192 Optical Carrier Level 192 (9.6 Gbit/S)
ODU Optical Data Unit
OE Optical Ethernet
OE-AD Optical Ethernet Auto Discovery
OMD4 4-channel Optical Mux/Demux
OMDF4 4-Channel Mux/Demux (passive filter)
OMDF8 8-Channel Mux/Demux (passive filter)
OMEA Optical Manager Element Adaptor
OMX Optical Multiplexer
OOS Out-of-service
OPM Optical Power Monitor
OPR Optical Power Received Un-normalized
OPRN Optical Power Received Normalized
OPT Optical Power Transmitted
OPTMON Optical Monitor
OPTN Optical Power Transmitted Normalized
ORL Optical Return Loss
OSA Optical Spectrum Analyzer
OSC Optical Service Channel
OSCF 1-Channel Mux/Demux Module for OSC
OSI Open Systems Interconnection
OSID Optical System Identifier
300
Term Definition
OSNR Optical Signal-to-noise Ratio
OSPF Open Shortest Path First
OSS Operations Support System Or Operation Sub-system

OST Optical System Topology


OTM2 Optical Transport Module2 (10G signals)
OTM3 Optical Transport Module3 (40G signals)
OTN Optical Transport Network

OTS Optical Transmission Section/Optical Trail Section


OTSC Optical Transponder and Service Channel
OTU Optical Transport Unit
P2P Point-to-point
PC Personal Computer
PCN Product Code Number
PDH Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy
PEC Product Engineering Code
PG Planning Guide
PID Password - Identifier
PIN P-intrinsic-n
PM Performance Monitoring
POP Point Of Presence
PPP Point To Point Protocol
PSC Protection Switch Count
PSD Protection Switch Duration
PSTN Public Switched Telephone Network
PWR Power
QoS Quality Of Service

301
Term Definition
RAU Rack Alarm Unit
ROADM Reconfigurable Optical Add-drop Multiplexer
RPR Resilient Packet Ring
RS Regenerator Section
RS Reduced Slope
Rx Receive
SCMD4 4 Serial Channel Mux/Demux
SDH Synchronous Digital Hierarchy
SDTH Signal Degrade Threshold
SF Signal Failure
SFP Small-form Factor Pluggable
SLA Service Level Agreement
SLA Single Line Amplifier
SMD Selective Mux/Demux
SMF Single-mode Fiber
SNCP Subnetwork Connection Protection
SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol
SOC Section Optical Controller
SoL Start Of Life
SONET Synchronous Optical Network
SP Shelf Processor
SPE Synchronous Payload Envelope
SR Short Reach
SSM Synchronization Status Messaging
SSMF Standard Single Mode Fiber
STM-1 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 1
STM-4 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 4
STM-16 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 16
STM-64 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 64
STM-256 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 256
STS Synchronous Transport System
SWT Shelf Wavelength Topology 302
Term Definition
SDTH Signal Degrade Threshold
SF Signal Failure
SFP Small-form Factor Pluggable
SLA Service Level Agreement
SLA Single Line Amplifier
SMF Single-mode Fiber
SNCP Subnetwork Connection Protection
SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol
SOC Section Optical Controller
SoL Start Of Life
SONET Synchronous Optical Network
SP Shelf Processor
SPE Synchronous Payload Envelope
SR Short Reach
SSM Synchronization Status Messaging
SSMF Standard Single Mode Fiber
STM-1 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 1
STM-4 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 4
STM-16 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 16
STM-64 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 64
STM-256 Synchronous Transport Module, Level 256
STS Synchronous Transport System
SWT Shelf Wavelength Topology
TCP/IP Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol

TDM Time Division Multiplexing


T-GFP Transparent Generic Framing Procedure
TL-1 Transaction Language 1
TOD Time Of Day
TPE Transparent Payload Envelope
TSA Time Slot Assignment
303
Term Definition
TSI Time Slot Interchange
TTI Trail Trace Identifier
Tx Transmit
TWc Truewave Classic
TWP Truewave Plus
TWRS Truewave Reduced Slope
U Standard Unit Of Measurement = 1.75"
UID User - Identifier
UNI User To Network Interface
UPC User Privilege Code
UPSR Unidirectional Path Switched Ring
UX Unix
VOA Variable Optical Attenuator
VC Virtual Container
VCAT Virtual Concatenation
VDC Volts Direct Current
VLAN Virtual Local Area Network
VOA Variable Optical Attenuator
VPLS Virtual Private Line Service
VPN Virtual Private Network
VT Virtual Tributary
VTG Virtual Tributary Group
WAN Wide Area Network
WSC Wayside Channel
WSS Wavelength Selective Switch
XC Cross-connect
XFP Large-form Factor Pluggables
XPM Cross-phase Modulation

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