Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 29

990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin...

Page 1 of 29

Shutdown SIS

Previous Screen

Product:WHEELLOADER
Model:990IIWHEELLOADER4FR
Configuration:990SeriesIIWheelLoader4FR00001-UP(MACHINE)POWEREDBY3412Engine

Systems Operation
990 & 990 II WHEEL LOADER & 844 WHEEL TRACTOR STEERING SYSTE
Media Number -SENR6649-01 Publication Date -31/03/1995 Date Updated -15/04/2011


SENR66490001

Systems Operation
SMCS - 7566

Introduction
Reference: For specifications with illustrations, make reference to SENR6648, 990 Wheel Loader
Steering System Specifications. If the specifications in SENR6648 are not the same as in the
Systems Operation, Testing And Adjusting module, look at the printing date on the cover of each
book. Use the specifications in the book with the latest date.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 2 of 29

Steering System Hydraulic Schematic


(1) Steering control valve. (2) Left steering cylinder. (3) Right steering cylinder. (4) Dual check valve group. (5)
Pressure reducing valve. (6) Fan motor group. (7) Right turn neutralizer valve. (8) Left turn neutralizer valve. (9) Oil
cooler. (10) Fan control valve group. (11) Pilot Control Valve. (12) Pressure control and selector valve. (13) Steering
pump group. (14) Hydraulic tank and filter group. (15) Fan pump group.

The steering hydraulic system is made up of three basic circuits: the fan, pilot, and the high
pressure circuit. When the machine is equipped with optional supplemental steering, the steering
system also includes this circuit.

The main components of the pilot system are hydraulic tank (14), pressure reducing valve (5),
pressure control and selector valve (12), pilot control valve (11), neutralizer valves (7) and (8),
dual check valve group (4) and various lines.

The main components of the high pressure system are hydraulic tank (14), pump group (13),
steering control valve (1), steering cylinders (2) and (3) and various lines.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 3 of 29

The main components of the fan drive system are hydraulic tank (14), fan pump (15), fan motor
(6), oil cooler (9), control valve (10) and various lines.

Cylinders, Valves, Hydraulic Tank And Filters Location


(1) Steering control valve. (2) Left steering cylinder. (5) Pressure reducing valve. (11) Pilot Control Valve. (12)
Pressure control and selector valve. (14) Hydraulic tank and filter group.

Hydraulic tank and filter group (14) is located on the left side of the machine next to the operator's
station. Access is gained by opening an access door. Additional oil is placed into the tank through
a fill cap attached to the top of the tank.

Steering control valve (1), pressure reducing valve (5) and pressure control and selector valve (12)
are located on the left side of the machine under the operator's station. Left steering cylinder (2) is
located under the steering control valve.

Pilot control valve (11) is located in the operator's station.

Steering And Fan Pumps Location


(13) Steering pump group. (15) Fan pump group.

Steering pump (13) and fan pump (15) are located behind the operator's station. The pumps are
mounted to a pump drive. Access is gained by opening an access door.

Fan control group (10) is located in the pump compartment. The control group is mounted on the
firewall above and to the right of the steering pump.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 4 of 29

Neutralizer Valve And Dual Check Valve Location


(4) Location of dual check valves. (8) Right neutralizer valve.

Fan Motor And Oil Cooler Location


(6) Fan motor group. (9) Oil cooler.

Fan motor group (6) is located in the engine compartment next to the radiator. Oil cooler (9) is
attached to the radiator. Access is gained through the engine access doors.

Alert System

Steering Alert Indicators


(1) Action light. (2) Steering oil pressure alert indicator. (3) Steering oil temperature alert indicator.

The alert system is activated when the disconnect switch key and the engine start switch key are in
the ON positions. All references to the action alarm are good only if the engine is running.

Loss of steering oil pressure will cause both steering oil pressure alert indicator (2) and action
light (1) to flash. The action alarm will also sound if the engine is running.

If steering oil temperature rises above approximately 100C (212F), steering oil temperature alert
indicator (3) will flash.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 5 of 29

Pilot Circuit

Steering System Hydraulic Schematic


(1) Steering control valve. (2) Left steering cylinder. (3) Right steering cylinder. (4) Dual check valve group. (5)
Pressure reducing valve. (6) Fan motor group. (7) Right turn neutralizer valve. (8) Left turn neutralizer valve. (9) Oil
cooler. (10) Fan control valve group. (11) Pilot Control Valve. (12) Pressure control and selector valve. (13) Steering
pump group. (14) Hydraulic tank and filter group. (15) Fan pump group.

The pilot circuit controls the movement of the valve spool in steering control valve (1). With the
engine running pressure oil from fan pump group (15) flows to pressure control and selector valve
(12).

With the engine running, oil flows from hydraulic tank (14) to fan drive pump (15). The fan drive
pump is an axial piston type pump.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 6 of 29

Part of the oil flows from the pump to the fan drive motor and oil cooler. The fan drive motor is a
fixed displacement, bent axis motor. The rest of the oil flows through an oil line, past a check
valve and into pressure control and selector valve (12).

The pressure control and selector valve reduces the fan pump pressure to a pilot pressure of 3300
400 kPa (480 60 psi). From the pressure control and selector valve, the pilot oil flows to the
inlet of pilot valve (11).

In the event the fan drive pump fails, pilot oil pressure is supplied by oil flowing from steering
pump (13) into steering control valve (1). The oil flows from the steering control valve, into and
through pressure reducing selector valve (5).

From pressure reducing valve (5) the reduced pressure oil flows through the pressure control and
selector valve into the inlet of pilot control valve (11).

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 7 of 29

Pilot Control Valve

Pilot Control Valve


(1) Handle. (2) Link. (3) Link. (4) Plunger. (5) Plunger. (6) Spring. (7) Spring. (8) Cap. (9) Cap. (10) Spring seat. (11)
Spring seat. (12) Spring. (13) Spring. (14) Port to tank. (15) Spring. (16) Spring. (17) Passage. (18) Passage. (19)
Spool. (20) Spool. (21) Port to right turn neutralizer valve. (22) Inlet from pressure control and selector valve. (23)
Port to left turn neutralizer valve.

With the engine running, pilot oil flows from the pressure control and selector valve to the pilot
control valve. Oil enters the valve at inlet port (22).

The STIC control lever is attached to handle (1). When the STIC control lever is in the straight
ahead position, centering springs (6), (7), (12), (13), (15) and (16) keep the pivot plate in its
centered position, as shown. Pilot oil flows through inlet (22) to metering spools (19) and (20). In

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 8 of 29

this position the spools block the flow of oil to the steering control valve and causes it to flow
back to the hydraulic tank.

When the STIC control lever is moved to the left turn position, the pivot plate causes link (2) to
move plunger (4) down. As the plunger moves down it overcomes spring (6) and moves it down
also. As the plunger moves down through cap (8), it also causes spring seat (10), spring (12),
spring (15) and spool (19) to move down.

At the same time, the pivot plate causes link (3) to move plunger (5) up. As the plunger moves up,
spring (7) moves up also. As the plunger moves up through cap (9), it also causes spring (13) and
spring seat (11) to move up. Spring (16) moves spool (20) up.

When spool (19) moves down it opens passage (17). Oil can now flow from inlet port (22) into
passage (17). Then the oil flows through passage (17), past spool (19) out port (21).

The oil flows from port (21) to the right turn neutralizer valve and on to the steering control valve.

Oil flowing from the steering control valve flows through the left turn neutralizer valve. From the
neutralizer valve the oil flows into port (23).

Because spool (20) is up, the oil can flow past the spool into the return oil passage. The oil flows
through the passage and out port (14) back to the hydraulic tank.

When the STIC control lever is moved to the right turn position, the pivot plate causes link (3) to
move plunger (5) down. As the plunger moves down it overcomes spring (7) and moves it down
also. As the plunger moves down through cap (9), it also causes spring seat (11), spring (13),
spring (16) and spool (20) to move down.

At the same time, the pivot plate causes link (2) to move plunger (4) up. As the plunger moves up,
spring (6) moves up also. As the plunger moves up through cap (8), it also causes spring (12) and
spring seat (10) to move up. Spring (15) moves spool (19) up.

When spool (20) moves down it opens passage (18). Oil can now flow from inlet port (22) into
passage (18). Then the oil flows through passage (18), past spool (20) out port (23).

The oil flows from port (23) to the left turn neutralizer valve and on to the steering control valve.

Oil flowing from the steering control valve flows through the right turn neutralizer valve. The oil
flows from the neutralizer valve into port (21).

Because spool (19) is up, the oil can flow past the spool into the return oil passage. The oil flows
through the passage and out port (14) back to the hydraulic tank.

Hydraulic Pumps

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Engin... Page 9 of 29

Steering Pump And Compensator Valve Group

Variable Displacement Piston Pump And Compensator Valve Group


(1) Drive shaft. (2) Pump. (3) Swashplate. (4) Retaining plate. (5) Pistons (nine). (6) Cylinder barrel. (7) Spring. (8)
Upstroke piston. (9) Compensator valve group. (10) Inlet from tank. (11) Pump discharge pressure passages. (12)
Flow compensator spool. (13) Return to tank orifice. (14) Signal pressure port. (15) Springs. (16) Flow compensator
valve. (17) Destroke piston. (18) Spring. (19) Pump discharge pressure outlet. (20) Return to tank passage. (21)
Pressure cutoff spool. (22) Passage to large actuator piston. (23) Pressure compensator piston. (24) Spring. (25)
Pressure compensator valve.

The steering pump is an axial piston pump. Pump (2) output is controlled by compensator valve
group (9). The compensator group senses both pressure and flow requirements for the system. The
pump provides both the high pressure oil for the steering system and back up source for pilot oil.
The pump mounted to the pump drive.

With the engine running, drive shaft (1) turns. The drive shaft causes cylinder barrel (6) to also
turn. Nine pistons (5) are held against swashplate (3) by retaining plate (4). The swashplate does
not rotate.

At maximum swashplate angle (shown above), some of pistons (5) are pulled out of cylinder
barrel (6). At the same time some of them are pushed into the cylinder barrel. The rotation of the
cylinder barrel causes the pistons to move in and out of the cylinder barrel.

As a piston moves out of its barrel it draws oil into the pump. As a piston moves back into its
barrel it forces the oil back out of the pump.

The angle of swashplate (3) determines how much oil is drawn into and forced out of each piston
barrel per drive shaft revolution. As steering system load changes the swashplate angle fluctuates
between neutral (zero degrees or straight up and down) and the maximum angle. The more the
swashplate moves towards its maximum angle, the greater the amount of oil drawn into and
discharged from the pump.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 10 of 29

When the swashplate angle is zero, the pistons do not move in and out of the rotating cylinder
barrel. Therefore, no oil is drawn into and discharged from the pump. In this condition the pump is
at zero displacement.

Since the pump is not discharging any oil, the pump is producing neither flow nor pressure. The
only time the pump is in this neutral condition is when system pressure suddenly drops to zero and
causes the swashplate to move to the zero angle position.

Compensator valve group (9) keeps pump pressure and flow at a level needed to fulfill the load
and flow needs of the steering system. The compensator group contains two control pistons which
work together to continually adjust the angle of the pump swashplate.

Upstroke piston (8) causes swashplate (3) to upstroke the pump. Spring (7) combines with pump
discharge pressure and moves the swashplate to its maximum angle. This increases pump output.

Destroke piston (17) causes the swashplate to destroke the pump. Flow compensator spool (12),
and/or pressure cutoff spool (21), changes pump displacement by regulating the amount of pump
discharge pressure acting on the destroke piston.

When pump discharge oil acts against the larger area of piston (17) it causes piston (17) to
overcome the combined force of smaller upstroke piston (8) and spring (7). Piston (17) can now
move left. When the piston moves left it causes the swashplate to rotate clockwise. This destrokes
the pump.

Pressure cutoff spool (21) prevents pump and system overloads. When pump output pressure
exceeds 31 000 kPa (4500 psi), pressure cutoff spool (21) will override flow compensator spool
(12), and lower pump output until system pressure is maintained at 31 000 kPa (4500 psi).

Pump outlet pressure is maintained at 2100 105 kPa (305 15 psi) above the signal oil pressure
by flow compensator (margin) spool (12).

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 11 of 29

Upstroking

Steering Pump And Compensator Valve Operation (Upstroking)


(2) Pump. (3) Swashplate. (7) Spring. (8) Upstroke piston. (9) Compensator valve group. (12) Flow compensator
spool. (15) Springs. (17) Destroke piston. (18) Spring. (19) Pump discharge pressure outlet. (21) Pressure cutoff
spool. (24) Spring. (26) Steering and brake systems hydraulic tank. (27) Return oil line. (28) Drain line to tank. (29)
Destroke piston chamber. (30) Passage to destroke piston. (31) Passage connecting pressure and flow valves. (32)
Steering control valve signal oil line. (33) Pump supply oil line. (34) Upstroke piston spring chamber. (35) Passage to
flow compensator valve. (36) Passage to flow compensator spool. (37) Case drain line. (38) Passage. (39) Passage to
pressure cutoff spool. (40) Passage to pressure cutoff valve. (41) Passage to upstroke piston. (42) Line to steering
control valve. (A) Pressure oil. (B) Signal oil. (C) Return oil. (D) Supply oil.

Upstroking is when the pump increases displacement (output) due to an increased load. When the
system requires more flow, signal oil from the steering control valve flows through line (32). This
oil fills springs (15) chamber.

The signal oil pressure combines with the force of springs (15) and causes flow compensator spool
(12) to move down. When the flow compensator spool moves down it blocks the flow of pump oil
through passage (35).

With the flow compensator spool moved down, oil in destroke piston chamber (29) can flow into
passage (30). The oil then flows past spring (24) cavity, past flow compensator spool (12) and
through line (27) back to hydraulic tank (26).

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 12 of 29

Oil from the steering pump flows through line (41) into chamber (34). Since oil in destroke piston
chamber (29) is now vented, the combined force of spring (7) and pump oil in chamber (34)
causes piston (8) to move swashplate (3) toward maximum angle.

As the swashplate moves towards maximum angle pump output increases. As pump output
increases, the pressure in passages (38) and (36) also increases. Oil in passage (36) flows through
an orifice and acts against spool (12).

When pressure across the orifice in passage (36) becomes greater than the combined force of
springs (15) and the signal oil in spring (15) chamber, the oil in passage (36) moves the flow
compensator spool up.

When the spool moves all the way up, pump oil in passage (35) can now flow past the spool,
through passage (31) and on to destroke piston chamber (29).

Destroke piston (17) is larger than upstroke piston (8). Because of this difference in size, the oil
pressure acting against the destroke piston exerts a greater amount of force than the combined oil
and spring force acting against the upstroke piston.

The oil pressure acting against the destroke piston overcomes the force of spring (18) and the
combined force of the oil and spring in chamber (34). This causes piston (17) to move down.

As piston (17) moves down, swashplate (3) moves toward minimum angle destroking the pump.
As the angle of the swashplate move toward minimum angle pump output and pressure decreases.

When pump pressure decreases enough, the signal pressure oil in line (32) combines with the
force of springs (15) and moves flow compensator spool (12) down. This allows pump oil pressure
in the destroke chamber to vent to tank and the pump upstrokes again.

The continuous up and down movement of the flow compensator spool, or metering, maintains
pump pressure in passage (36) at 2100 105 kPa (305 15 psi) greater than the signal pressure in
springs (15) chamber. This is because the force of springs (15) is equal to 2100 105 kPa (305
15 psi). This difference is called margin pressure.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 13 of 29

Destroking

Steering Pump And Compensator Valve Operation (Destroking)


(2) Pump. (3) Swashplate. (7) Spring. (8) Upstroke piston. (9) Compensator valve group. (12) Flow compensator
spool. (15) Springs. (17) Destroke piston. (18) Spring. (19) Pump discharge pressure outlet. (21) Pressure cutoff
spool. (24) Spring. (26) Steering and brake systems hydraulic tank. (27) Return oil line. (28) Drain line to tank. (29)
Destroke piston chamber. (30) Passage to destroke piston. (31) Passage connecting pressure and flow valves. (32)
Steering control valve signal oil line. (33) Pump supply oil line. (34) Upstroke piston spring chamber. (35) Passage to
flow compensator valve. (36) Passage to flow compensator spool. (37) Case drain line. (38) Passage. (39) Passage to
pressure cutoff spool. (40) Passage to pressure cutoff valve. (41) Passage to upstroke piston. (42) Line to steering
control valve. (A) Pressure oil. (B) Signal oil. (C) Return oil. (D) Supply oil.

Destroking is when the pump is decreasing displacement (output). This occurs when the signal oil
pressure through line (32) decreases from lower loads or goes to 0 kPa (0 psi) when the steering
control valve is in the neutral position.

When pump oil pressure in passage (36) is greater than the combined force of signal oil pressure
and springs (15), it causes flow compensator spool (12) to move up. With spool (12) in the up
position, pump oil pressure in passage (35) can flow past the spool and through passages (30) and
(31). Then the oil flows into destroke piston chamber (29).

Destroke piston (17) is larger than upstroke piston (8). Because of this difference in size, the oil
pressure acting against the destroke piston exerts a greater amount of force than the combined oil
and spring force acting against the upstroke piston.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 14 of 29

The oil pressure acting against the destroke piston overcomes the force of spring (18) and the
combined force of the oil and spring in chamber (34). This causes piston (17) to move down.

As piston (17) moves down, swashplate (3) moves toward minimum angle destroking the pump.
As the angle of the swashplate move toward minimum angle pump output and pressure decreases.

Low Pressure Standby

Steering Pump And Compensator Valve Operation (Low Pressure Standby)


(2) Pump. (3) Swashplate. (7) Spring. (8) Upstroke piston. (9) Compensator valve group. (12) Flow compensator
spool. (15) Springs. (17) Destroke piston. (18) Spring. (19) Pump discharge pressure outlet. (21) Pressure cutoff
spool. (24) Spring. (26) Steering and brake systems hydraulic tank. (27) Return oil line. (28) Drain line to tank. (29)
Destroke piston chamber. (30) Passage to destroke piston. (31) Passage connecting pressure and flow valves. (32)
Steering control valve signal oil line. (33) Pump supply oil line. (34) Upstroke piston spring chamber. (35) Passage to
flow compensator valve. (36) Passage to flow compensator spool. (37) Case drain line. (38) Passage. (39) Passage to
pressure cutoff spool. (40) Passage to pressure cutoff valve. (41) Passage to upstroke piston. (42) Line to steering
control valve. (A) Pressure oil. (B) Signal oil. (C) Return oil. (D) Supply oil.

With the engine running and the steering control valve in the neutral position, there is no signal oil
pressure in line (32). Because there is no signal oil pressure in springs (15) chamber, pump oil
pressure in passage (36) overcomes the force of springs (15) and moves flow compensator spool
(12) up.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 15 of 29

Oil flows through passage (35) past spool (12) through passages (31) and (30) into destroke piston
chamber (29). The oil acts against the destroke piston, overcomes spring (18) and causes the
piston to move down.

When the destroke piston moves down, it moves swashplate (3) toward its minimum angle. The
piston moves the swashplate towards minimum angle until pump output can maintain 3755 1240
kPa (545 180 psi) in the system.

NOTE: Low pressure standby is not the same as margin pressure. Margin pressure equals 2100
105 kPa (305 15 psi). This is the signal pressure required to compress springs (15). This is not
enough pressure to overcome the force of spring (7) and cause upstroke piston (8) to move. Pump
output increases until signal oil pressure increases and causes the destroke piston to move the
swashplate. The swashplate moves until low pressure standby pressure of 3755 1240 kPa (545
180 psi), is reached. Margin pressure can only be measured in a non-stall load sensing condition.
Some variation in low pressure standby can occur from minimum to maximum engine rpm. See
the Testing And Adjusting section for the correct procedure.

High Pressure Stall

Steering Pump And Compensator Valve Operation (High Pressure Stall)


(2) Pump. (3) Swashplate. (7) Spring. (8) Upstroke piston. (9) Compensator valve group. (12) Flow compensator
spool. (15) Springs. (17) Destroke piston. (18) Spring. (19) Pump discharge pressure outlet. (21) Pressure cutoff
spool. (24) Spring. (26) Steering and brake systems hydraulic tank. (27) Return oil line. (28) Drain line to tank. (29)
Destroke piston chamber. (30) Passage to destroke piston. (31) Passage connecting pressure and flow valves. (32)

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 16 of 29

Steering control valve signal oil line. (33) Pump supply oil line. (34) Upstroke piston spring chamber. (35) Passage to
flow compensator valve. (36) Passage to flow compensator spool. (37) Case drain line. (38) Passage. (39) Passage to
pressure cutoff spool. (40) Passage to pressure cutoff valve. (41) Passage to upstroke piston. (42) Line to steering
control valve. (A) Pressure oil. (B) Signal oil. (C) Return oil. (D) Supply oil.

When the hydraulic system stalls out under a load in the steering circuit, the oil pressure increases.
A stall occurs when pump oil pressure reaches 31 000 kPa (4500 psi). The signal oil pressure in
line (32) and springs (15) chamber becomes equal to the pump output pressure.

Springs (15) and signal oil in the spring chamber keep flow compensator spool (12) moved down.
Pressure oil in passage (38) flows through the orifice in passage (39) and acts against pressure
cutoff spool (21).

As pump oil pressure in passage (39) reaches 31 000 kPa (4500 psi), it overcomes the force of
spring (24) and causes pressure cutoff spool (21) to move up.

When the spool moves up it allows pump oil to flow through passage (40), past the spool, through
passage (30) into destroke piston chamber (29). The oil in chamber (29) overcomes the force of
spring (18) and causes piston (17) to move down.

As the piston moves down it moves swashplate (3). The swashplate moves towards the destroke
position to a point where pump output flow is enough to make up for system leakage and maintain
the 31 000 kPa (4500 psi) system pressure.

If the steering system remains in a stall condition, the pump output now is not enough to maintain
system pressure and make up leakage. When the load on the steering system causing the stall is
removed, the pressure decreases below 31 000 kPa (4500 psi) and the force of spring (24) moves
pressure cutoff spool (21) down.

When the pressure cutoff spool moves down it blocks the flow of oil to piston (17). As pump
pressure decreases further, the spool moves further down, opening piston chamber (29) to passage
(31) and flow compensator spool (12).

As system pressure reaches margin pressure or low pressure standby if there is no signal oil
pressure, the flow compensator spool moves to its metering position. This allows the swashplate
angle to increase to a point where pump flow is enough to make up for system leakage and
maintain the lower required pressure.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 17 of 29

Fan Drive Pump

Variable Displacement Piston Pump


(1) Drive shaft. (2) Body. (3) Swashplate. (4) Spring. (5) Upstroke piston. (6) Retaining plate. (7) Pistons (nine). (8)
Cylinder barrel. (9) Port. (10) Destroke piston. (11) Adjustment rod. (12) Guide. (13) Pressure compensator port. (14)
Swashplate adjustment locknut.

The fan drive pump is an axial piston pump. Pump output is controlled by a compensator valve
group. The compensator group senses both pressure and flow requirements for the system. The
pump provides both the high pressure oil for the fan drive system and is the primary source for
pilot oil. The pump mounted to the end of the steering pump.

With the engine running, drive shaft (1) turns. The drive shaft causes cylinder barrel (8) to also
turn. Nine pistons (7) are held against swashplate (3) by retaining plate (6). The swashplate does
not rotate.

At maximum swashplate angle (shown above), some of pistons (7) are pulled out of cylinder
barrel (8). At the same time some of them are pushed into the cylinder barrel. The rotation of the
cylinder barrel causes the pistons to move in and out of the cylinder barrel.

As a piston moves out of its barrel it draws oil into the pump. As a piston moves back into its
barrel it forces the oil back out of the pump.

The angle of swashplate (3) determines how much oil is drawn into and forced out of each piston
barrel per drive shaft revolution. As engine rpm changes the swashplate angle fluctuates between
neutral (zero degrees or straight up and down) and the maximum angle. The more the swashplate
moves towards its maximum angle, the greater the amount of oil drawn into and discharged from
the pump.

Adjustment rod (11) limits the maximum output of the pump. This is necessary to ensure the fan
rpm does not exceed specification.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 18 of 29

The compensator valve group keeps pump pressure and flow at a level needed to fulfill the load
and flow to maintain full fan rpm. The compensator group contains two control pistons which
work together to continually adjust the angle of the pump swashplate.

Upstroke piston (5) causes swashplate (3) to upstroke the pump. Spring (4) moves the swashplate
to its maximum angle. This increases pump output.

Destroke piston (10) causes the swashplate to destroke the pump. Oil from the pressure
compensator flows into port (13) and acts against piston (10). The oil moves the piston and
changes pump displacement by regulating the amount of swashplate angle.

Pump outlet pressure is maintained at 10 600 kPa (1540 psi) by the pressure compensator spool.

On machines with standard or optional high ambient cooling, the pump supplies the fan drive
motor with enough oil flow at 1900 engine rpm to drive the fan at full speed. At speeds above
1900 rpm, the pressure compensator valve on the pump, decreases the pump displacement to
maintain fan speed at 746 rpm.

On machines with optional high ambient cooling, when the CMS signals the control valve a need
for additional cooling, the pump swashplate moves towards maximum angle. Now the pump
supplies the fan drive motor with enough oil flow to increase full fan speed to 860 rpm at 1555
engine rpm. At speeds above 1555 rpm, the pressure compensator valve on the pump, decreases
the pump displacement to maintain fan speed at 860 rpm for as long as the control valve is sending
a signal to the pump.

Compensator Valve Group


(15) Flow compensator spool. (16) Spring. (17) Adjustment screw. (18) Pressure cutoff spool. (19) Pump discharge
passage. (20) Passage to destroke piston. (21) Drain to tank. (22) Spring. (23) Adjustment screw.

With the engine running and the pressure of the oil from the pump less than the pressure setting of
the pump pressure compensator, pump discharge oil in passage (19) is blocked by pressure cutoff
spool (15). If the engine speed goes beyond 1900 rpm, the pressure of the oil in pump outlet
passage (19) increases.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 19 of 29

The pressure of the oil increases until the force of the oil in passage (19) acting against spool (15)
is overcomes the force of spring (16) and moves the spool to the right. When the spool moves to
the right, it opens a passage so the oil in passage (19) can flow into passage (20).

NOTE: The pressure compensator setting for machines with standard cooling is 10 600 kPa (1540
psi). The setting for machines with optional high ambient cooling is 13 400 kPa (1945 psi).

The oil in passage (20) now flows into passage (13) in the hydraulic pump. The force of the oil
acts against destroke piston (10) and causes it to move to the left.

When the destroke piston moves left it also moves swashplate (3) towards its minimum angle
position. Pump output is now reduced and fan speed also is reduced.

If engine speed is reduced, fan drive pump output and pressure also decreases. With the decrease
in oil pressure in passage (19), the force of spring (16) is now greater than the oil pressure and
moves pressure cutoff spool (15) to the left. This blocks the flow of pump discharge oil at passage
(19).

No oil flows from passage (20) to destroke piston (10) in the pump. With no pressure oil acting on
the destroke piston, spring (4) moves swashplate (3) to its maximum angle position and the pump
output returns to maximum.

The pressure setting of pressure cutoff spool (15) can be adjusted, if necessary. Turn adjusting
screw (17) in for higher pressure, and out for lower pressure.

was 63507 Fan Control Valve


(24) Solenoid valve. (25) Port to pressure compensator. (26) Port to tank. (27) Pressure reducing valve. (28) Pump
discharge port.

The explanation of the pressure compensator applies to machines with either standard or optional
high ambient cooling systems. The additional control valve in the high ambient cooling system
routes oil into spring (16) chamber.

Pump discharge oil is flows into port (28) in the control valve. Pressure reducing valve (27)
reduces pump pressure to 9000 200 kPa (1305 30 psi).

The force of the oil in the spring chamber combines with the force of spring (16) and moves spool
(15) left. This blocks the flow of oil to destroke piston (10). With oil blocked to piston (10), spring

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 20 of 29

(4) moves the swashplate towards maximum angle. The pump can now produce higher pressure
which causes the fan drive motor to increase.

The pressure compensator will now maintain pump output that ensures a fan drive motor speed of
860 rpm. The 860 rpm motor speed will be maintained whenever the engine is at 1555 rpm or
higher.

Steering Control Valve (Standard)


Neutral Position

Steering Control Valve In The Neutral Position


(1) Pressure regulating valve. (2) Inlet from pump. (3) Outlet to hydraulic tank. (4) Pilot port. (5) Spool. (6) Cylinder
crossover relief valve. (7) Shuttle valve. (8) Springs. (9) Retainer. (10) Pilot port. (11) Return passage. (12) Port for
right turn. (13) Supply oil passage. (14) Port for left turn. (15) Return passage. (16) Relief valve.

NOTE: Valve shown is for machines without supplemental steering. The valve for machines with
supplemental steering function the same as standard steering until a loss of primary pump flow.
The supplemental steer function will be covered later.

With the engine running, oil flows from the steering hydraulic tank to the steering pump. Then the
oil flows into the steering control valve through port (2).

When the STIC control lever is in the center position, or if one of the neutralizer valves is
activated, the flow of pilot oil to either end of spool (5) stops. When no pilot oil is acting on either
end of the spool, centering springs (8) return the spool to the neutral position. As the spool returns

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 21 of 29

to neutral, the pilot oil that had been acting on an end of the spool is forced across an orifice and
back to the tank.

When the spool is in the center position, oil flowing into port (2) is blocked at passage (13). The
oil in the steering cylinder lines is also blocked in ports (12) and (14). The shuttle valve in port (7)
senses the cylinder load and routes signal oil back to the steering pump. This causes the pump to
destroke and supply only enough oil to makeup leakage.

NOTE: If the machine is turning while moving, it will continue moving in the radius of the turn
when the STIC control lever is released. Releasing the STIC control lever will not return the
machine to the straight ahead travel position.

If the fan drive pump fails, pilot oil used in the steering pilot control system will flow from a port
near pressure reducing valve port (1), to the pilot control valve. The pressure reducing valve
maintains pilot pressure at 1650 100 kPa (240 15 psi).

Left Turn Position

Steering Control Valve In The Neutral Position


(1) Pressure regulating valve. (2) Inlet from pump. (3) Outlet to hydraulic tank. (4) Pilot port. (5) Spool. (6) Cylinder
crossover relief valve. (7) Shuttle valve. (8) Springs. (9) Retainer. (10) Pilot port. (11) Return passage. (12) Port for
right turn. (13) Supply oil passage. (14) Port for left turn. (15) Return passage. (16) Relief valve.

NOTE: Valve shown is for machines without supplemental steering. The valve for machines with
supplemental steering function the same as standard steering until a loss of primary pump flow.
The supplemental steer function will be covered later.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 22 of 29

When the operator moves the STIC control lever to make a left turn, pilot oil flows from the pilot
control valve, through the right neutralizer valve, through the dual check valves into port (10). The
pilot oil acts against retainer (9) and the force of the oil overcomes springs (8) and causes the
spool to move left.

With the spool moved to the left oil in passage (13) can now flow past the spool into port (14).
The oil in port (14) flows through lines to the head end of the right side steering cylinder and the
rod end of the left side cylinder.

Oil from the rod end of the right side steering cylinder and the head end of the left side cylinder
flows into port (12). The oil flows from port (12) back to the hydraulic tank.

The machine articulates left and begins making a left turn. When the STIC control lever is
released, pilot oil flow to port (10) stops. Oil acting against retainer (9) must be removed before
the spool can return to the neutral position. Because pilot oil flow is blocked, springs (8) cause the
spool to move right back to the center position. As the spool moves right, oil in springs (8)
chamber flows through port (10) and back to tank.

While in the neutral position the valve spool blocks the flow of steering oil to the cylinders. This
holds the machine in the turn position arc where the STIC control lever last placed it.

The pressure of the oil in blocked outlets (12) and (14) is felt through internal passages at a
cylinder cross over relief valve in port (6). If an outside force (for example, a tire strikes a large
rock or hole) tries to turn the machine while the valve spool is in the neutral position, the increase
in pressure will open the crossover relief valve. The relief valve will not allow pressure to rise
above the 34 500 700 kPa (5010 100 psi) setting.

Right Turn Position


For a right turn, the steering control valve operates similar to that for a left turn. Pilot oil enters
port (4). This moves spool (5) to the right. Pressure oil from inlet (2) flows through passage (13)
past the spool (5) to outlet for right turn (12).

The oil then flows to the rod end of the right steering cylinder, and the head end of the left steering
cylinder. This causes the machine to articulate and turn to the right.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 23 of 29

Neutralizer Valves

Neutralizer Valve In Closed Position


(1) Stem. (2) Inlet port. (3) Outlet port. (4) Tank port. (5) Spring.

The steering neutralizer valves block the flow of pilot oil to the steering control valve at the end of
a complete turn. This stops steering action before the machine turns against the frame stops.

A striker, for each valve, is mounted on the front frame. Both of the neutralizer valves are
mounted on the rear frame. The right and left neutralizer valves and strikers are identical.

Pilot oil flows from the STIC control lever to either the right or left neutralizer valve before
flowing to the steering control valve. Oil flows from the STIC control lever into the neutralizer
valve through inlet port (2).

Spring (5) holds stem (1) to the left. With the stem as shown, oil flows past stem (1) and out outlet
port (3). Then the oil flows into the steering control valve.

When the STIC control lever is moved to the right turn position, and the machine is turned as far
right as it can turn, the frame striker comes in contact with stem (1) of the right neutralizer valve.
The striker forces the stem to the right and compresses spring (5).

As the stem moves right it blocks the flow of oil through port (2). Since pilot oil can not flow from
port (2) to port (3), no pilot oil can flow to the control valve.

When the flow of pilot oil stops acting on the spool in the steering control valve, the control valve
spool will then return to neutral, and steering action of the machine stops.

When the STIC control lever is moved back to the left, return oil from the end of the steering
control valve spool flows through its line into port (3) of the right neutralizer valve. Then the oil
flows past the stem and returns to tank through port (4). This allows the steering control valve
spool to move back to its centered position, and the machine begins to turn to the left.

As the machine moves a small amount to the left, the frame striker will move away from stem (1).
The force of spring (5) acts against stem (1) and moves it left. As the stem moves left, it opens
port (2). Pilot oil can again flow past the stem and out port (3).

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 24 of 29

The left neutralizer valve operates in exactly the same manner as the right side valve.

Supplemental Steering System

Supplemental Steering System Schematic


(1) Left steering cylinder assembly. (2) Right steering cylinder assembly. (3) Steering control valve. (4) Check valve.
(5) Diverter valve. (6) Check valve. (7) Relief valve. (8) Dual check valves. (9) Pressure reducing valve. (10)
Supplemental steering pump. (11) Right neutralizer valve. (12) Left neutralizer valve. (13) Steering oil pressure
switch. (14) Pilot control valve. (15) Pressure control and selector valve. (16) Steering pump. (17) Hydraulic tank.

The optional supplemental steering provides steering oil supply if there is a failure of the primary
steering system, or if the engine stops when the machine is moving.

The main components for the supplemental steering system are: Diverter valve (5) [part of
supplemental steering control valve (3)], supplemental steering pump (10), pressure reducing
valve (9) and pressure switch (13).

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 25 of 29

Supplemental steering pump (10) is a ground driven pump that is attached to the output transfer
gears of the transmission. It will provide oil flow as long as the machine is moving forward or
backward.

During normal machine operation, supplemental steering pump (10) oil flow is not used in the
steering system. The supplemental steering pump draws oil from steering and fan hydraulic tank
(17) and sends it to steering control valve (3).

With the engine running, steering pump (16) draws oil from hydraulic tank (17) and sends it
through check valve (6), in steering control valve (3). The oil also acts against check valve (4) and
keeps it closed and causes the spool in diverter valve (5) to shift down. From the steering control
valve, the pressure oil flows through the system to steering cylinders (1) and (2).

As soon as the machine starts to move forward or backward, oil also flows from supplemental
steering pump (10). The oil flows into steering control valve (3) and into diverter valve (5). As
long as the primary steering pump maintains its pressure, its pressure is greater than that of the
supplemental steering pump. This keeps check valve (4) against its seat and the spool in diverter
valve (5) shifted down.

Supplemental steering pump oil flows through diverter valve (5). The diverter valve will send the
oil back to hydraulic tank (17).

With the machine moving, but the steering pump not able to maintain pressure, a spring on the
bottom of the diverter valve spool forces the spool up. Now the oil from the supplemental steering
pump flows through the diverter valve and through check valve (4).

Supplemental oil flows to check valve (6) and, because primary steering pump (16) has failed or
the engine has stopped, the supplemental oil forces check valve (6) to seat. This stops the flow of
supplemental oil from going to the primary pump.

If the primary pump has failed, supplemental oil flows to the steering control valve spool and on
to steering cylinders (1) and (2). The oil routing to the cylinders is controlled by pilot control
valve (14) the same as primary oil.

If the engine stops, supplemental steering oil also flows to pressure reducing valve (9). The
pressure reducing valve lowers the pressure of the supplemental oil changes to pilot pressure.

From pressure reducing valve (9), the oil flows to pressure control and selector valve (15). Then
the oil flows through the selector valve to pilot control valve (14). The oil flows from pilot valve
(14) through neutralizer valves (11) and (12), dual check valves (8) and on to steering control
valve (3).

Pressure switch (13) alerts the operator of low oil pressure in the primary steering system. It turns
on the low steering pressure alert indicator, the action light, and sounds an alarm. If this happens,
stop the machine immediately and investigate the cause.

Do not operate the machine until the cause has been corrected.

NOTE: The steering pilot valve will not provide manual steering capability when the engine is
stopped. Steering with the engine stopped can be done only when the supplemental steering
system is installed, and the machine is moving.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 26 of 29

Steering Control Valve

Steering Control Valve In The Neutral Position


(1) Pressure regulating valve port. (2) Inlet from primary pump. (3) Cylinder crossover relief valve port. (4) Inlet from
supplemental pump. (5) Outlet to hydraulic tank. (6) Supplemental pump relief valve. (7) Diverter valve port. (8) Pilot
port. (9) Spool. (10) Shuttle valve port. (11) Springs. (12) Retainer. (13) Pilot port. (14) Return passage. (15) Port for
right turn. (16) Supply oil passage. (17) Port for left turn. (18) Return passage. (19) Relief valve.

The steering control valve on machines with supplemental steering contains the same components
as the standard steering control valve plus the following additional components: Supplemental
steering pump inlet (4), supplemental steering pump relief valve in port (6) and diverter valve in
port (7). As long as the primary steering pump is functioning, the steering control valve with
supplemental steering option functions the same as the standard steering control valve.

In the event the primary steering pump fails, and the machine is moving either in forward or
reverse, diverter valve (7) shifts and routes oil from the ground speed driven supplemental steering
pump into passage (16).

When the operator moves the STIC control lever to make a left turn, pilot oil flows from the pilot
control valve, through the right neutralizer valve, through the dual check valves into port (13). The
pilot oil acts against retainer (12) and the force of the oil overcomes springs (11) and causes the
spool to move left.

With the spool moved to the left supplemental steering pump oil in passage (16) can now flow
past the spool into port (17). The oil in port (17) flows through lines to the head end of the right
side steering cylinder and the rod end of the left side cylinder, the same as with the standard
steering control valve.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 27 of 29

Oil flow and operation is the same as described with the standard steering control valve.

Steering oil pressure is maintained at 14 000 700 kPa (2030 100 psi) during operation with the
supplemental steering pump by a relief valve in port (6).

Steering Frame Lock Link

Steering Frame Lock Link Installed


(1) Steering frame lock link.

Steering frame lock link (1) is shown in the locked position. The steering frame lock link must be
released and moved to the stored position in order to steer the machine.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 28 of 29

Fan Drive Circuit

Hydraulic Fan Drive Schematic


(1) Fan drive motor. (2) Makeup valve. (3) Oil cooler. (4) Oil cooler by-pass valve. (5) Solenoid valve. (6) Pressure
reducing valve. (7) Fan drive pump. (8) Control valve group. (9) Hydraulic tank.

Fan drive pump (7) is a variable displacement, axial piston-type pump. The pump is attached to
the rear of the steering pump, and is driven by the steering pump drive. If the machine is equipped
with the optional high ambient cooling attachment, the pump functions the same, however, output
capacity is greater.

With the engine running, the pump draws oil from hydraulic tank (9) and supplies oil to fan drive
motor (1). The pump also provides pilot oil for the steering pilot oil system.

If the machine is equipped with the optional high ambient cooling attachment, control valve group
(8) is part of the circuit. The valve group is controlled by the CMS computer in the operator's
station. When CMS sensors indicate conditions exist that require additional engine cooling or the
air conditioner is turned on, the CMS signals the control valve group to increase fan speed.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.
990 Series II Wheel Loader 4FR00001-UP (MACHINE) POWERED BY 3412 Eng... Page 29 of 29

The fan is attached to motor (1) and installed between the engine and the radiator. The fan drive
motor is a fixed displacement, bent axis motor. The fan pushes air through the radiator and
discharges it out the rear of the machine.

On machines with standard or optional high ambient cooling, pump (7) supplies fan drive motor
(1) with enough oil flow at 1900 engine rpm to drive the fan at full speed. At speeds above 1900
rpm, the pressure compensator valve on the pump, decreases the pump displacement to maintain
fan speed at 746 rpm.

On machines with optional high ambient cooling, when the CMS signals control valve (8) a need
for additional cooling, pump (7) swashplate moves towards maximum angle. Now the pump
supplies fan drive motor (1) with enough oil flow to increase full fan speed to 860 rpm at 1555
engine rpm. At speeds above 1555 rpm, the pressure compensator valve on the pump, decreases
the pump displacement to maintain fan speed at 860 rpm for as long as the control valve is sending
a signal to the pump.

Fan speed can be adjusted. Turning the pressure compensator adjustment screw in will increase
fan speed, and turning it out will decrease fan speed.

Fan drive motor (1) return oil flows to hydraulic oil cooler (3). Then the oil flows back to
hydraulic tank (9). The hydraulic oil cooler is located between the radiator and the engine.

When the engine is first started, and if the hydraulic oil is cold, return oil from the fan drive motor
can not easily flow through the oil cooler. Because of the resistance of oil flow through the oil
cooler, the oil flows into oil cooler by-pass valve (4).

The oil pressure overcomes oil cooler by-pass valve (4) and forces it to open. When the by-pass
valve opens the oil can flow back to hydraulic tank (9). When oil temperature rises and pressure
lowers, the force of the oil cooler by-pass valve spring is greater than the force of the oil pressure
acting on it allowing the valve to close.

When the by-pass valve closes, the oil now flows through the hydraulic oil cooler. The cooled
hydraulic oil returns to the hydraulic tank.

Copyright1993-2016CaterpillarInc. ThuJun2323:35:16UTC+02002016
AllRightsReserved.
PrivateNetworkForSISLicensees.

https://127.0.0.1/sisweb/sisweb/techdoc/techdoc_print_page.jsp?returnurl=/sisweb/sis... 23.6.2016.

Оценить