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Malaysia Contemporary Art Tourism Festival July 1 – September 30, 2010 Fatamorgana #2 The State

Malaysia Contemporary Art Tourism Festival

July 1 – September 30, 2010

Art Tourism Festival July 1 – September 30, 2010 Fatamorgana #2 The State of Confusion >
Art Tourism Festival July 1 – September 30, 2010 Fatamorgana #2 The State of Confusion >
Art Tourism Festival July 1 – September 30, 2010 Fatamorgana #2 The State of Confusion >

Fatamorgana #2 The State of Confusion > 2006, oil on canvas, 244 x 150cm

"Contemporary art is a passion that unites discerning travellers and tourists alike from all corners "

of the world

Dato' Sri Dr. Ng Yen Yen Minister of Tourism, Malaysia

Malaysia’s contemporary art scene is a reection of the country itself. It is varied, multicultural and resists stringent denition.

Just like Malaysia, a nation whose historic sites, towers of modernity and glimpses of nature promise surprises and memories on every visit.

For the rst time ever, Malaysia’s Ministry of Tourism hosts the 1Malaysia Contemporary Art Tourism Festival.

The festival encompasses exhibitions, seminars, competitions and other fringe events at various locations around the country.

Come see how Malaysia’s renowned contemporary artists have expertly woven her history, national identity, landscapes and people into paintings, sculptures, photographs, installations and more.

Whether it is abstract works that channel artistic soul, mixed media art that shows oartistic ingenuity or gurative works that display artist prowess, Malaysia has it all.

The 1Malaysia Contemporary Art Tourism Festival is not to be missed. Visit Malaysia and take part in history.

Events in Kuala Lumpur, Melaka, Johor and Penang | JUL 1 – SEPT 30, 2010 |

MCAT Exhibition 2010

Art Seminar

Galeria Sri Perdana 3 July – 30 September 2010 www.arkib.gov.my

Malaysia Tourism Centre (MaTic) 15 July – 30 September 2010 www.mtc.gov.my

Balai Seni Lukis Negara (National Art Gallery) July – September 2010 www.artgallery.gov.my

 

Starhill Gallery July – September 2010 www.starhillgallery.com

The Inuence of Mahathirism on Contemporary Art MaTic, Jalan Ampang

The Aliya & Farouk Khan Collection Art Seminar Galeri Seni Rakyat, Melaka

 

20

– 24 September 2010

 

1 – 3 August 2010

 

Galeri Seni Rakyat (Folk Art Gallery) 1 August – 30 September 2010 www.perzim.gov.my

IMCAS 2010 –The Aliya & Farouk Khan Collection Art Seminar

Malaysia Contemporary Art Tourism Seminar Penang

 

Danga City Mall, Johor

 

i-City Contemporary Art Exhibition 11 August – 9 September 2010

September – 1 October 2010

27

18 – 19 August 2010

 

MALAYSIA’S FIRST EVER ART AUCTION

 

IMCAS 2010 Danga City Mall July – September 2010 www.dangacitymall.com

 

A Curatorial Discourse on the Making of an Artwork

 

12 Gallery, Kuala Lumpur

Wisma Bentley Music PJU 7/2, Mutiara Damansara Petaling Jaya 1-8 August 2010

Galeri Petronas (Petronas Gallery) July – September 2010 www.galeripetronas.com.my

8 – 10 July 2010

MINISTRY OF TOURISM MALAYSIA

Menara Dato' Onn, Putra World Trade Centre, 45 Jalan Tun Ismail, 50480 Kuala Lumpur

Tel: 603-2693 7111

www.motour.gov.my

www.tourismmalaysia.gov.my

45 Jalan Tun Ismail, 50480 Kuala Lumpur Tel: 603-2693 7111 www.motour.gov.my www.tourismmalaysia.gov.my AUGUST 2010 / 5
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CONTENTS

Williamcho@Flickr
Williamcho@Flickr

22

28

COMING UP

ART AUCTION MALAYSIA - The 1st Henry Butcher Auction of Malaysian Modern and Contemporary Art Collection

Classes at DreamSpace Art Studio

Walasse Ting: A Commemoration

Yayoi Kusama

Kumari Nahappan: A solo exhibition

Singapore Art Wave in Art Expo Malaysia 2010

SPOTLIGHT

Gallery in Focus – Pop and Contemporary Fine Art

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31

38

COVER STORY

Strawalde

FEATURES

The Man Behind the Merlion

Top 30 Public Artworks

From Cheo Chai-Hiang’s Concepts

to Singapore’s Contemporary Art?

A Walk Down Memory Lane

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AUGUST 2010 / 15
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AUGUST 2010 / 15

CONTENTS

22.
22.
28.
28.
22. 28.
31.
31.
38.
38.
44.
44.
47.
47.

57

59

61

66

GLOSSARY

POSTSCRIPT

Post-It Notes

SINGAPORE

ART MAP

DIRECTORIES

Singapore Art Guide For Tourists Malaysia Art Guide

16 / CONFABULATION

AUGUST 2010 / 17
AUGUST 2010 / 17
Issue #9 (August 2010) ISSN 1793-9739 / MICA (P) 183/02/2010 www.confabmag.com Cover Anna Chron I

Issue #9 (August 2010) ISSN 1793-9739 / MICA (P) 183/02/2010

www.confabmag.com

ISSN 1793-9739 / MICA (P) 183/02/2010 www.confabmag.com Cover Anna Chron I (Fontainbleau möglicherweise) 1/1/2002

Cover Anna Chron I (Fontainbleau möglicherweise) 1/1/2002 / Anna Chron 1 (Fontainbleau possibly) January 2002, Oil on Canvas 162 x 130 cm

Editor-in-chief // Sabrina Sit / s@confabmag.com

Art Director // Amalina MN / a@confabmag.com

Photography Director // Michael Tan (Ambious Studio)

Account Executive // Kayla Hoo / k@confabmag.com

General enquiries and feedback // _@confabmag.com Submission of press releases // pr@confabmag.com

CONFABULATION MAGAZINE 14 Robinson Road, #13-00, Singapore 048545

For advertising enquiries, please email ad@confabmag.com. All editorial, design requests, advertising bookings and materials for September issue of CONFABULATION should be received by 18 August.

Printed in Singapore by International Press Softcom Limited.

Copyright of all editorial content in Singapore and abroad is held by the publishers, CONFABULATION MAGAZINE. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission from the publishers. CONFABULATION cannot be held responsible for any loss or damage to unsolicited material. CONFABULATION, ISSN 1793-9739, is published 12 times a year by CONFABULATION MAGAZINE.

Every effort has been made to contact the copyrights holder. If we have been unsuccessful in some instances, please contact us and we will credit accordingly. Even greater effort has been taken to ensure that all information provided in CONFABULATION is correct. However, we strongly advise to confirm or verify information with the relevant galleries/venues. CONFABULATION cannot be held responsible or liable for any inaccuracies, omissions, alterations or errors that may occur as a result of any last minute changes or production technical glitches.

The views expressed in CONFABULATION are not necessarily those of the publisher. The advertisements in this publication should also not be interpreted as endorsed by or recommendations by CONFABULATION The products and services offered in the advertisements are provided under the terms and conditions as determined by the Advertisers. CONFABULATION also cannot be held accountable or liable for any of the claims made or information presented in the advertisements.

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Published monthly, complimentary copies of CONFABULATION are available at several places around Singapore including the

Published monthly, complimentary copies of CONFABULATION are available at several places around Singapore including the National Library, Singapore Tourism Board’s Singapore Visitors Centre at Orchard (junction of Cairnhill Road and Orchard Road), MICA Building on Hill Street, leading art galleries (Opera Gallery at ION Orchard, Galerie Joaquin at The Regent and Sunjin Galleries in Holland Village), art groups and venues (The Luxe Museum on Handy Road and Sculpture Square on Middle Road), museums and lifestyle shops (STYLE: NORDIC on Ann Siang Road and Lai Chan at Raffles Hotel).

To accompany your daily dose of caffeine, browsing copies are also made available at all good coffee chains in town.

For the environmentally-conscious, the PDF format of CONFABULATION can be downloaded from www.confabmag. com every month or simply flip through the magazine on the website using the online reader.

Subscription price is SGD98 within Singapore and USD98 internationally. For subscriptions, renewals and address changes, please email subscribe@confabmag.com.

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COMING UP

COMING UP 1. Datuk Ibrahim Hussein The Dream, 1969 Acrylic on canvas 121 x 121 cm
COMING UP 1. Datuk Ibrahim Hussein The Dream, 1969 Acrylic on canvas 121 x 121 cm
COMING UP 1. Datuk Ibrahim Hussein The Dream, 1969 Acrylic on canvas 121 x 121 cm
COMING UP 1. Datuk Ibrahim Hussein The Dream, 1969 Acrylic on canvas 121 x 121 cm

1. Datuk Ibrahim Hussein The Dream, 1969 Acrylic on canvas 121 x 121 cm

2. Chia Yu Chian Paris Street Scene, 1960 Oil on board 58 x 44 cm

3. Khoo Sui Hoe Lovers’ Dance, 1988 Oil on canvas 90 x 90 cm

4. Dato’ Chuah Thean Teng Mother With Children, 1986 Batik 85.5 x 85.5 cm

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ART AUCTION MALAYSIA - The 1st Henry Butcher Auction of Malaysian Modern and Contemporary Art

ART AUCTION MALAYSIA - The 1st Henry Butcher Auction of Malaysian Modern and Contemporary Art Collection

Preview: 01-07.08.10 Auction: 08.08.10 / Wisma Bentley Music (3, Jalan PJU 7/2 Mutiara Damansara Petaling Jaya, Malaysia) www.henrybutcher.com.my

Singapore: The 1st Henry Butcher Auction of Malaysian Modern and Contemporary Art Collection presents an interesting dynamics of the socio-cultural nexus between Malaysia and Singapore.

Essentially, the people who happened to be sequestered

territorially, then as one entity until the 1965 split, were one and the same people with the same ethnic mix and cultural practices and life. Whereas, politically, the two countries had

a more strained past what with sibling economic rivalry, the

situation on the ground, especially related to arts and culture,

is

very much different and opposite.

In

the arts, the ties are inextricably linked and it is common to

find artists from both sides of the causeway having exhibitions together at home and abroad.

One reason could be due to the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (Nafa), where many of the early artist aspirants from Malaya, mostly of Chinese ethnicity, had had their academic training. The academy was mooted, after all, by Yong Mun Sen (1896-1962), dubbed arguably the Father of Modern Malaysian Painting, before his friend Lim Hak Tai set up the venerated institution.

Auction artists such as Khoo Sui Hoe, Cheah Yew Saik, Tew Nai Tong, Lim Kim Hai, Tan Choon Ghee and Lee Long Looi were trained by the best masters in what is regarded the institution’s Golden Years.

For instance, when Cheah Yew Saik and Khoo Sui Hoe studied at Nanyang from 1959-1961, it had some of the best teachers such as Cheong Soo Pieng, Georgette Chen, Lai Foong Mooi and Tan Tie Chie.

Kuo Juping (198-1966) was there for a year (1941) before the war broke out, Datuk Ibrahim Hussein had a short stint there before moving on to work at an advertising company where he developed his signature style and eventually ended up in the Byam Shaw School of Drawing and Painting in London

(1959-64).

Chia Yu Chian (1936-1991), who was privately taught by Chen Wenxi and Cheong Soo Pieng, was given an “honorary” Nafa certificate so that he could study at the Ecole Nationale Beaux Arts in Paris, and Fung Yow Chork met Nafa’s Zhong

COMING UP

could study at the Ecole Nationale Beaux Arts in Paris, and Fung Yow Chork met Nafa’s
could study at the Ecole Nationale Beaux Arts in Paris, and Fung Yow Chork met Nafa’s
could study at the Ecole Nationale Beaux Arts in Paris, and Fung Yow Chork met Nafa’s
could study at the Ecole Nationale Beaux Arts in Paris, and Fung Yow Chork met Nafa’s
could study at the Ecole Nationale Beaux Arts in Paris, and Fung Yow Chork met Nafa’s

COMING UP

Baimu, who persuaded him to switch to a career- changing practice in oil painting.

Khoo Sui Hoe even opened a gallery there called Alpha Singapore which operated for several years after 1972, and later had had several solos there, including one at Outram Park in 1990. It was at Alpha Gallery that Dato’ Sharifah Fatimah Zubir held a solo in 1972 and later in other group exhibitions such as with the Utara group of artists.

Of all the Nafa alumni, the one who most represents the so-called Nanyang Style until today is perhaps Tew Nai Tong, who studied there in 1957-58 before continuing his studies at the Ecole in Paris.

Yong Mun Sen spent two years in Singapore, working in a bookshop while painting, before being posted to Penang, where he remained permanently until his death. But he had then decided to set up photo studios which doubled as his gallery cum painting studio. Yong Mun Sen was also given a rare Memorial exhibition in 1966 besides a solo exhibition at the Victoria Memorial Hall in 1948.

In this auction, Yong Mun Sen had painted a de rigeur work on the Singapore River in 1953.

Another pioneer, Dato Hoessein Enas (1924- 1995), fleeing political persecution, had a stopover Singapore where he eked a living as an artist and beca rider, before moving to Penang, and then Kuala Lumpur.

Even the Sunday painter, A.B. Ibrahim (1925-77), was an early member of the Singapore Malay Artists Society, joining its second exhibition in 1951 (the society was formed in 1949).

Artist-playwright John Lee Joo For had a solo there in 1972, at the Mandarin Hotel, and also gave a demonstration in Chinese calligraphy in 1989. Chang Fee Ming had a major “graduation” exhibition after an experimental workshop at Singapore’s Tyler Print Institute in November

2009.

24 / CONFABULATION

Batik Painting founder Dato Chuah Thean Thean and Khalil Ibrahim had given batik art demonstrations in Singapore.

Academician-artist Dr Jolly Koh was born in Singapore in 1941, before moving back to Malacca where he grew up in, and then to Australia, and now back to Malaysia. He had recently gone back to Singapore in his latest two-man show with Choy Weng Yang at Sunjin Galleries (Singapore) from 8 - 29 July 2010.

Latiff Mohidin, too, has long and rich ties with Singapore. Born in Malaysia but grew up in Singapore, he stayed with his parents at No. 15 Java Road and studied at the Kota Raya Malay School and the English School Mercantile Institution in the early 1950s.

Also featured in the auction is an unusual and large 1989 work of Latiff Mohidin, who launched the book, Latiff Mohidin: Journey to Wetlands and Beyond at the Singapore Art Museum last year. In its press release then, the Singapore Art Museum acknowledged that Latiff has long and rich ties with Singapore. Born in Malaysia in 1941, Latiff spent his early years in Singapore, living with his parents at Java Road, where he attended the Kota Raja Malay School and the English School Mercantile Institution in the early 1950s. The artist also held his first exhibition at the former in 1951, wherein he was hailed as a ’wonder boy’ by the local press then. It was also at the same school that his drawing first drew the attention of his schoolmaster who then advised his parents to nurture his manifest artistic talents.

Malaysia’s National Art Laureate Datuk Syed Ahmad Jamal also had an exhibition at Takeshimaya Singapore while most of the artists featured in the auction, including Zulkifli Yusoff have their works in the collection of the Singapore Art Museum.

(Ooi Kok Chuen)

Classes at DreamSpace Art Studio Ongoing / DreamSpace Art Studio / +65 9168 7785 (Leo)

Classes at DreamSpace Art Studio

Ongoing / DreamSpace Art Studio / +65 9168 7785 (Leo) www.hill-ad.com.sg

Art Studio / +65 9168 7785 (Leo) www.hill-ad.com.sg Walasse Ting: A Commemoration 19.07.10 - 30.10.10 /
Art Studio / +65 9168 7785 (Leo) www.hill-ad.com.sg Walasse Ting: A Commemoration 19.07.10 - 30.10.10 /

Walasse Ting:

A Commemoration

19.07.10 - 30.10.10 / The Private Museum /

www.theprivatemuseum.org

- 30.10.10 / The Private Museum / www.theprivatemuseum.org Yayoi Kusama 07.08.10 – 28.08.10 / Pop and
- 30.10.10 / The Private Museum / www.theprivatemuseum.org Yayoi Kusama 07.08.10 – 28.08.10 / Pop and

Yayoi Kusama

07.08.10 – 28.08.10 / Pop and Contemporary

Fine Art / www.popandcontemporaryart.com

COMING UP

Founded in 2006, DreamSpace Art Studio is located just units away from Sotheby’s Institute of Art. Housed in a restored shophouse, the studio offers a quiet respite from Singapore’s buzzing city life. Aside from the art classes on offer, the studio serves as an exhibition space from time to time.

Visit www.hill-ad.com.sg or call +65 9168 7785 for class and exhibition schedules.

创立于2006年,主要是以艺术创作,销售艺术品和绘画教育为

主,现在开始引进中国的年轻画家,并为他们提供策划和举办画 展。 同时,还为绘画爱好者和学生,开设了创作和绘画培训中心,发 掘和培养年青的艺术人才, 欢迎艺术爱好者来参观我们的Art Studio

For its second exhibition, The Private Museum offers a rare opportunity to see private collections of late Chinese-American artist Walasse Ting works.

Walasse Ting, born in Shanghai, is a self-taught painter, sculptor, graphic artist and poet. Leaving China in 1949 to travel, he reached Paris in 1953 and became acquainted with artists Karel Appel, Asger Jorn and Pierre Alechinsky, members of the avant-garde group known as COBRA. Known for his paintings of female nudes, animals and scenery, Ting rose into prominence in the 1960s in New York.

Pop and Contemporary Fine Art proudly presents one of Japan’s most famous and influential female artists, Yayoi Kusama. Kusama’s work reflects the hallucinations she has endured since childhood which compel her to cover surfaces with polka dots and lines which she calls infinity nets. She has often been quoted saying “If it were not for art, I would have killed myself a long time ago”. In 1973 Kusama voluntarily committed herself to a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo where she continues to live, whilst commuting to her studio, a short distance away.

Among her numerous awards and distinctions is the Praemium Imperiale, one of Japan’s most prestigious awards for internationally recognized artists, which she received in 2006, becoming the first Japanese woman to receive such a distinction. On the 12th Nov ember 2008 Christies New York sold one of her works for USD 5.1 million, a record for a living female artist at the time.

COMING UP

COMING UP Kumari Nahappan: A solo exhibition 20.08.10 – 10.10.10 / Chan Hampe Galleries / www.chanhampegalleries.com

Kumari Nahappan: A solo exhibition

20.08.10 – 10.10.10 / Chan Hampe Galleries /

www.chanhampegalleries.com

10.10.10 / Chan Hampe Galleries / www.chanhampegalleries.com Chan Hampe Galleries has been established to advocate

Chan Hampe Galleries has been established to advocate Singaporean contemporary art nationally and internationally.

To begin our inaugural program, an exhibition of seminal works from one of Singapore’s most celebrated contemporary artists – Kumari Nahappan – will be presented, high-lighting 20 years of artistic practice.

Kumari Nahappan is recognised for her iconic public artworks including Nutmeg at ION Orchard and Pedas, Pedas at the National Museum of Singapore.

and Pedas, Pedas at the National Museum of Singapore. Singapore Art Wave in Art Expo Malaysia

Singapore Art Wave in Art Expo Malaysia 2010

28.10.10 – 01.11.10 /

Singapore galleries will be making a big wave in this year’s Art Expo Malaysia slated for October 28 - November 1 at the Matrade Exhibition and Convention Centre in Kuala Lumpur.

They will not only be representing Singapore masters and exciting contemporary artists but in reflecting its cosmopolitan and globalized outreach, also artists from various countries and all spectrums.

The galleries lined up are Art Facet; Cape of Good Hope Art Gallery, which will also manage the Singapore Artists Pavilion; MAD Museum of Art & Design managed by Jasmine Fine Art; Collectors Contemporary; S.Bin Art Plus; Sunjin Galleries; The Gallery of Gnani Arts, Y2Arts and Yisulang Art Gallery. Art Trove of Germany has also set up base in

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COMING UP

Singapore while Summit Arts Collection, once based in Singapore with its stable of Myanmar artists, has relocated to Yangon. Valentine Willie Fine Art which started in Malaysia has expanded to Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines.

What is most interesting about the Singapore galleries is that they have such a diverse buffet of artists not only from Singapore, but also China, Tibet, the United States, India, Indonesia, England, Australia and Germany.

Collectors Contemporary, with its base at Pedro Centre, will be using the Art Expo Malaysia 2010, to test the regional market for prints of American Pop Art pioneers Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. S.Bin Art Plus, a contemporary offshoot of SooBin Art Gallery, will plumb for Malaysian hotshot artist Ahmad Zakii Anwar and Indonesian/Singaporean Lee Man Fong with a host of thirty-something Indonesian artists such as Putu Sutawidjaja (40-years-old), Jumaldi Alfi, Farhan Siki, M. Irfan and Wayan Kun Adnyana.

Sunjin Galleries, celebrating its 10th anniversary, will be showcasing China’s Wu Qiong and the island republic’s own, blind sculptor of wire Victor Tan Wee Tar.

Art Facet, from International Plaza, will parade India’s Raju Mehta, the New York-based surrealist artist Shay Kun and Berlin-based Cornelia Renz, while the Gallery of Gnani Arts will have several Indian artists headed by mechanical engineer-turned-artist P. Gnana, who is based in the island republic.

Y2Arts will parade several China artists such as Liu Gang and Bai Yao while Yisulang Art Gallery has Singapore sculptor Han Sai Por and Tibetans Benba and Jimei Chilei.

Cape of Good Hope Art Gallery, which will also be helming the Singapore Artists Pavilion, has also a stable of China artists besides Malaysia’s Nanyang stalwart Tew Nai Tong. Its Singaporean representatives will include Lim Yew Kuan, the son of Nanyang Academy of Fine Art founder Lim Hak Tai and who headed the institution from 1963-79, Choy Wen Yang, the owner Terence Teo, collagist Goh Beng Kwan and politician-artist Dr. Ho Kah Leong.

Jasmine Tay’s MAD Museum of Art & Design will offer a double-barreled Pop Art fare in China’s Song Wei and Singapore’s Taipei-based Jahan Loh.

Art Trove will present German artists Ewald Platte (1894-1985) and artist- film director Strawalde (Jurgen Botcher).

Singapore galleries entry into the Art Expo Malaysia 2010 promises to bring greater excitement and prestige to the art expo, now in its fourth year.

(Ooi Kok Chuen)

Image credit: Zhang Tongshuai Stand with You, 2009 Woodblock monoprint 150 x 200 cm at Sunjin Galleries

Image credit: Zhang Tongshuai Stand with You, 2009 Woodblock monoprint 150 x 200 cm at Sunjin

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm
SPOTLIGHT Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm

Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean, 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm (Edition of 250)

28 / CONFABULATION

Andy Warhol Campbell’s Soup I - Black Bean , 1968 Screenprint 88.9 x 58.4 cm (Edition

GALLERY IN FOCUS

Pop and Contemporary Fine Art

GALLERY IN FOCUS Pop and Contemporary Fine Art W hen Saskia Joosse was looking for a

W hen Saskia Joosse was looking for a suitable gallery space a year ago, she

could not have found a better spot. Nestled

in the heart of the city centre, the bedrock of

commerce, high fashion and popular culture, Pop and Contemporary Fine Art has found its new home in Palais Rennaissance early this year.

“We only sell art that we ourselves collect and we own all our pieces,” Saskia explains. Although the gallery owner is reluctant to divulge the exact size of the collection she and her husband have amassed over the years during their sojourns across continents, a quick survey of her gallery

reveal an unwavering dedication to art collecting. Their collection, which reads like

a Who’s Who of the avant-garde, follows

two simple principles – first, to collect only pieces they enjoy looking at and second, to buy only pieces that are in the best possible

condition.

Andy Warhol, also hailed the grandfather of American Pop Art, features prominently in their collection which includes some of his most famed pieces – Campbell’s Soup I – Black Bean (Screenprint) (1968) and Marilyn Monroe (Screenprint) (1967). Warhol’s controversial appropriation of a publicity shot of Monroe had inadvertently turned her into a modern day icon; the Pop Art movement for which Warhol had undoubtedly played a central role influenced the development of modern art and its reception in profound ways both within America and across the world. Like

dots waiting to be connected, generations of Pop Art could be observed from the gallery’s tidy collection alone.

Keith Haring and Burton Morris – also from Pennsylvania like Warhol – have been strongly influenced by local conditions and art developments; their art works perpetuated themes of pop culture and are difficult to miss in the gallery. Displayed on one side of the wall is the familiar screen print, Growing I, by the late graffiti artist, Haring. It depicts the ubiquitous android figures devoid of sexuality and is a fine example of how a cultural icon had become first popularized and subsequently reconstituted into a trademark that bespoke of his artistic expression. Hung generously across several walls opposite Haring are the colourful paintings of Burton Morris whom the gallery is the sole representative of. His representations of the Chanel No. 5 bottle and Tiffany & Co. gift box are among the many original and stylized renditions of objects and themes related to the world of pop and glamour relevant to his generation.

Apart from these “signature” works, Saskia adds that they also collect “sleepers” – which are works that they have discerned as being undervalued. From among the collection lay lessen known pieces – for example lithographs and etchings by Henry Moore, Damien Hirst and Salvador Dali that would surely interest any serious art collector or buyer keen to learn more about the artists’ oeuvre. In particular, the gallery’s collection

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT Burton Morris Chanel triptych , 2008 Acrylic on canvas 76.2 x 76.2 cm also extends
SPOTLIGHT Burton Morris Chanel triptych , 2008 Acrylic on canvas 76.2 x 76.2 cm also extends

Burton Morris Chanel triptych, 2008 Acrylic on canvas 76.2 x 76.2 cm

Chanel triptych , 2008 Acrylic on canvas 76.2 x 76.2 cm also extends to include two

also extends to include two influential Japanese artists – Yayoi Kusama and Takashi Murakami. Both of whom had also been strongly influenced by the Pop Art movement of America and whose interpretations of ‘Pop Art’ have gained immense popularity first in New York and in their homeland before gaining international recognition for their art.

Indeed, Saskia has every reason to be proud of her collection, now made available to the public for the first time. She reminds us, “Fashionable artists may come and go but the true greats have withstood the tests of time and continue to be relevant today.” //

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COVER STORY

Strawalde

STRAWALDE

STRAWALDE Ab und Zu (selbst) / Sometimes (self), Oil on canvas 195 x 175cm 32 /

Ab und Zu (selbst) / Sometimes (self), Oil on canvas 195 x 175cm

32 / CONFABULATION

J urgen Böttcher, or Strawalde, is a painter, sculptor and film-maker. His

artistic talents are not constrained by the conventional boundaries that delineate these art forms, and he is well-regarded for the inter-disciplinary character of his works. He adopted the pseudonym Strawalde for his graphic and sculptural art, but uses his birth name for his films. His paintings, sculptures and films are known to influence each other, and he has received a number of prestigious national and international awards for works in all these media. Strawalde’s artistic versatility, together with his impressive oratorical skills, makes him an intriguing figure for art connoisseurs, historians and students.

Böttcher was born on July 8, 1931 in Frankenberg, in the state of Saxonia in Germany. He spent his youth in Strahwalde, a small village in the German state of Upper Lusatia. Fond memories of his childhood, family and the people of the village led Böttcher to adopt the name of ‘Strawalde’ for his non-filmic art. “Strawalde” also has echoes of master artists Stradivari and Vivaldi, both of whom Böttcher greatly admires.

Strawalde is part of the generation of Germans whose lives were shaped by the tumultuous events of the mid-20th century. After the Second World War, Strawalde moved to Dresden, which had just become a part of the newly-constituted East Germany. There, he attended and graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts. Between 1953 and 1955, he taught art at high schools in the city, while doing freelance art work at the same time.

Strawalde recognized that his creative impulses for paintings and sculptures could not take flight in this highly regulated environment. He moved into film studies,

COVER STORY

having been inspired by films made by Vittorio De Sica, Alexander Dowshenko and Roberto Rossellini. He applied to study at the German University for Cinematography at Potsdam. He was one of a handful of candidates accepted from over 800 applicants, a rare accomplishment in those days, seeing that he had already graduated in another field. He impressed his interviewers with his creativity and clear exposition of his views. He graduated in 1960 and began a second career working for the German Film Academy, DEFA, in East Berlin.

In 1961, Strawalde was expelled from the German Academy of Arts, after being accused of “aestheticism”. This prevented his paintings and sculptures from being shown in any more exhibitions. Many East Germans in a similar position fled to the West for better working environment, living conditions and economic prospects. But Strawalde did not want to abandon his family, friends and students.

A few of his students left East Germany. The

best known of these is Ralf Winkler, better

known as A.R. Penck. He attained great fame after leaving East Germany in 1980,

having faced the same bureaucratic obstacles

in getting recognition for his work.

Penck cited Strawalde as his most important teacher. He argues that “Jürgen is not simply a painter, he is a full-blooded painter! … he has really bewitched us all”. He respectfully refers to Strawalde as “Master Böttcher” (Genie-Böttcher) for his guidance and inspiration. He sees Strawalde as a fatherly figure and, as such, occasional tensions can be felt between the two artists - as one would expect in any mentor-student relationship. Penck could not understand Strawalde’s selfless devotion to his family and students. He criticises Strawalde for remaining in East Germany instead of going

STRAWALDE

STRAWALDE 1. Feld / Field, 2007 Oil on canvas 137 x 140cm 2. Regen / Rain,
STRAWALDE 1. Feld / Field, 2007 Oil on canvas 137 x 140cm 2. Regen / Rain,
STRAWALDE 1. Feld / Field, 2007 Oil on canvas 137 x 140cm 2. Regen / Rain,

1. Feld / Field, 2007 Oil on canvas 137 x 140cm

2. Regen / Rain, 1996 Oil on canvas 195 x 175 cm

3. Spätwerk / Rolling Stones, 2002 Oil on canvas 180 x 150 cm

34 / CONFABULATION

COVER STORY

to the West to develop his artistic career: “I am not a philanthropist who helps everyone like Jürgen has … he likes people and wants

a living by sifting through the rubble of bombed out cities in Germany, earned him international fame. In 1982, the

them to succeed in life interested in business to become rich”.

(he) is not that he does not want

National Gallery of Berlin acquired one of his paintings, thus giving him the national recognition that was long due.

Within the confines of East Germany, Strawalde continued to keep a positive outlook and remained optimistic that his contributions would one day make a

For the rest of the time the East German state

Strawalde´s renown began ascending with the reunification of the two Germanys. Here are some of his achievements in chronological order:

difference. He was not deterred by being unable to exhibit his works. In a studio at

1989

home, he continued tirelessly to paint and

Elected a member of the Arts Academy of

sculpt, experimenting with different media,

Berlin.

materials and ideas.

Invited to lecture at the Art Academy of Hamburg.

remained, Strawalde focused on producing films. His films, totally more than 40, were

1990

highly successful, and a number of them are still being sold in DVD format. Beginning 1962, he began producing documentary films. That same year, he was awarded the “Silver Grape” at the International Documentary Festival in Liepzig. Once

Strawalde’s works featured in exhibitions in Toulouse, as well as in the prominent East German Arts festival in Paris. Among other things, he held art workshops at which he composed large paintings as the public looks on.

again, despite the national and sometimes international success of his films, he found

1991

himself the target of political persecution. Four films were banned – “Drei von vielen”,

Becomes guest professor at the Summer Academy Salzburg, a post still held.

“Jahrgang 45”, “Der Sekretaer”, and “Barfuss und ohne Gut”. In 1965, Strawalde directed his first, and what turned out to be his last, feature film. The film was halted while in production for being cynical and nihilistic.

His film “The Wall” (1991) is awarded the European Film Academy in the category for “best documentary film” at the European Film Awards (Felix)

It was not until 1990, within re-unified Germany, that the draft version of this film

1992

had its first screening - at the Berlinale.

Receives the Art Award of Darmstadt and the “Filmband in Gold” for lifetime

With a slight relaxation of the political

achievement.

environment, the first comprehensive exhibition of Strawalde took place in

1994

Berlin, Dresden and Karl-Marx City (now Chemnitz). At the same time, Strawalde’s film, “Martha”, featuring a lady who makes

Awarded “Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et de Lettres” for his artistic work by the French President François Mitterand.

STRAWALDE

1997

Receives the Art Award of Dresden.

1998

Wins the Art Award “From the occasion in the Sprengel Museum, Hanover.

1999

Strawalde´s paintings are bought for the collection of the German Parliament.

Late 1990s Extensive exhibition activity. Strawalde`s works are seen in Belgium, France, Switzerland and the USA, among others.

Many film retrospectives are dedicated to him in France, Scotland and Spain.

2000

Receives the “Golden Dove” award at the International Leipzig Documentary and

Short Film week.

2001

Strawalde is awarded the First Class Service Cross of Germany.

Böttcher introduced in 2001 his then last film “Concert in the Open”.

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2006

Honored at the Berlinale Camera for lifetime

achievement.

On the occasion of his 75th birthday, a retrospective is dedicated to him.

Since 2006, there have been many exhibitions in Germany and in other countries. Retrospectives of his films have been screened in several countries, including France, Japan, Korea, the U.K. and the USA

His paintings are included in the following public collections: collection of the German Parliament, National Gallery Berlin, Albertan in Dresden, The Dresden Residential Palace, Albertan in Vienna, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Museum Ludwig and the Boston Public Library. //

CONFABULATION wishes Singapore a very Happy Birthday and dedicates this issue to the lesser-known artists behind some of the nation’s icons such as the Merlion and takes A Walk Down Memory Lane to revisit some of the best public sculptures that have unfortunately been removed and kept in storage. We explore contemporary art in Singapore and follow the traces of Post-it notes left behind all over town by a litterbug.

To a country that have only three small parts – Cuisine, Media and Sport & Recreation – to make up the Culture section on its Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Singapore) but have an entire article exploring gay art in the country (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Singapore_gay_art)

Cheers!

THE MAN BEHIND THE MERLION

The Man behind the Merlion

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FEATURES

THE MAN BEHIND THE MERLION

THE MAN BEHIND THE MERLION 40 / CONFABULATION T here are many iconic sights in Singapore

40 / CONFABULATION

T here are many iconic sights in Singapore but little is known about the artists who created

them. We are acquainted with local artists such as Georgette Chen, Liu Kang, Cheong Soo Pieng and Ho Ho Ying but the talents behind National symbols such as the Merlion is often overlooked.

There is Thomas Woolner who sculpted the iconic Sir Stamford Raffles in front of Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall as well as Cavalieri Rodolfo Nolli, an Italian sculptor who came to Asia in 1913 with a group of Italian artists on the service of the King of Thailand to construct artwork for the throne room. He finally settled in Singapore in 1921. He was responsible for the Allegory of Justice which forms the pediment of the façade of the former Supreme Court Building

(1939).

The 13-ton tympanum (inner cavity) sculpture that rests within the archway of the building was carved from faux stoneware and makes for an imposing decoration for a building that has been designed in a classical Greco-roman style. The artwork depicts Adam on the far left with the serpent, a fallen man, his back turned from the Goddess of Justice in the centre.

His imprint is also left behind on various other pre-World War II and colonial buildings of importance that include the Fullerton Building, the Tanjong Pagar Railway Station and the former City Hall.

But, we need to move on to something even bigger: The Merlion, a trademark of Singapore and a must-see for all first time visitors to the country. Just who is the man responsible for crafting the massive animal, a sculpture made from cement and so large that it had to be built on site? CONFABULATION examines the work of art:

FEATURES

Merlion

FEATURES Merlion Artwork Patron Location Emblem design Conceptu- alisation of the Statue Lim Nang

Artwork

Patron

Location

Emblem

design

Conceptu- alisation of

the Statue

Lim Nang Seng (Singapore) The Merlion, 1972 Cement 8.6-metre tall

Singapore Tourism Board

There are five Merlions in Singapore which are recognized by STB.

1. The original statue at Merlion Park

2. The 2-metre tall cub statue standing behind the original statue

3. The 37-metre tall gigantic replica — with Mouth Gallery Viewing Deck on the ninth storey, another viewing gallery on its head and The Merlion Shop — at Sentosa Island

4. The three-metre tall glazed polymarble statue at Tourism Court (near Grange Road) completed in 1995

5. The three-metre tall polymarble statue placed on Mount Faber’s Faber

Point

In addition a recognized Merlion statue is found at the Merlion Restaurant in Cupertino in California, USA.

Fraser Brunner

Fraser Brunner was a member of the Souvenir Committee and the curator of Van Kleef Aquarium. The Merlion logo became the emblem of STB on 26 March 1964 and its registration as a trademark was finalised two years later on 20 July 1966.

By 1997, although STB has acquired a new corporate logo, the Merlion was still protected under the STB Act and use of the symbol required their permission.

On 1985, the Merlion Week was initiated by STB which included a week of celebrations, including dance and carnival events. Unfortunately, in recent times, the Merlion do not get to have a whole week that revolves only around him anymore.

Kwan Sai Kheong, Vice-chancellor of the University of Singapore and Ambassador to the Philippines.

Details such as the water-fountain and piped-music which flows out of the Merlion were added.

THE MAN BEHIND THE MERLION

Construction Lim Nang Seng, Local craftsman

In November 1971, Lim Nang Seng began sculpting the Merlion statues, one larger than the other. The actual Merlion to be built was so large that it had to be built on location and required the enlistment of all eight of Lim’s children, in particular Pee Nee and Pee Boon.

The Merlion and its cub were finally completed in August 1972.

Description

The Merlion was officially installed at 8:45 pm on 15 September, 1972, by the then Prime Minister Lee Kwan Yew, on his birthday.

Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew was again the guest of honor for the official launch of the new site which took place on 15 September, 2002, exactly 30 years since it was built.

The Merlion is an imaginary creature with the head of a lion and the body of a fish. This half-lion, half-fish sculpture rests on undulating waves.

The lion head alludes to the legend of Singapore’s founding by Sang Nila Utama, a Palembang Prince who, on his arrival on the island, saw what he thought to be a lion and thereafter renamed Temasek, Singapura or “Lion City”.

The fish-tail represents Singapore’s links to the ancient sea-bound island which was Temasek and its long and successful association with the sea, reflecting how our forefathers traversed the oceans to come to Singapore and our subsequent dependence upon it as a port.

It sits facing the East, aligned in the most auspicious feng-shui position as advised. An inscription reads “The Merlion has been erected as a symbol to welcome all visitors to Singapore”.

Edwin Thumboo cemented the iconic status of the Merlion as a personification of Singapore with his poem Ulysses by the Merlion in 1979. Due to Thumboo’s status as Singapore’s unofficial poet laureate and the nationalistic mythmaking qualities of his poetry, future generations of Singaporean poets have struggled with the symbol of the Merlion, frequently taking an ironical, critical, or even hostile stand - and pointing out its artificiality and the refusal of ordinary Singaporeans to accept a tourist attraction as their national icon.

The poem “attracted considerable attention among subsequent poets, who have all felt obliged to write their own Merlion (or anti-Merlion) poems, illustrating their anxiety of influence, as well as the continuing local fascination with the dialectic between a public and a private role for poets,

42 / CONFABULATION

FEATURES

which Thumboo (as Yeats before him, in the Irish context) has wanted to sustain as a fruitful rather than a tense relation between the personal and the public.” Among the poems of this nature are “Merlign” by Alvin Pang and “Love Song for a Merlion” by Vernon Chan.

The Merlion was featured– or, depending on point of view, not featured– during the 51st Venice Biennale (2005) in the controversial work “Mike” by artist Lim Tzay Chuen. He had proposed taking the sculpture in the Merlion Park to the Singapore Pavilion at the exhibition, but was refused by the authorities.

Said art critic Lee Weng Choy: “Tzay Chuen’s work is important precisely because he addresses this very Singaporean problem of ‘can’ versus ‘cannot’.

A personal comment by Eugene Tan, the curator of Lim’s exhibition:

“After the failure to move the Merlion to Venice for the Biennale, I was apprehensive that Tzay Chuen’s intended installation might perhaps be too subtle for the context of Venice and overlooked. However, I was proved

wrong, judging by the positive reception to Tzay Chuen’s work. The strength

of the work lies in the way it engages with different audiences through

various levels. Some viewers became aware and fascinated by the artist’s intention to move the Merlion, while others were simply pleased to have found clean and functional washrooms at their disposal. In the latter, this led to long queues to use the washrooms, which attests to the success of the Tzay Chuen’s intention to challenge and break down the boundaries between the experience of art and life in a particularly pertinent and poignant way.” //

30 PUBLIC ARTWORKS

Top 30

A selection of the

best of Singapore’s iconic public artworks worthy

of an art trail on

a good-weather

day (listed in no particular order).

6. Momentum by David Gerstein Image credit: williamcho@Flickr

44 / CONFABULATION

1. Sir Stamford Raffles

Artist

Year

Patron

Location In front of Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall

Thomas Woolner

1887

The Government of the Straits Settlements

2. First Generation

Artist

Year 2000

Patron

Chong Fah Cheong

Far East Organization / Sino Group / Singapore Tourism Board

Location Along the Singapore River (next to the Fullerton Hotel)

3. Fishing by the River

Artist

Year

Patron

Chern Lian Shan

2005

The Riverwalk / National Heritage Board / Singapore Tourism Board

Location Along the Singapore River (in front of The Riverwalk)

4. Six Brushstrokes

Artist

Year

Patron

Location Roy Lichtenstein Sculpture Plaza at Millenia Singapore

Roy Lichtenstein

1997

Collection of Pontiac Land Group

5. Abundance III

Artist

Year

Patron

Location Suntec Singapore International Convention

Sun Yu-Li

1993

Suntec City

FEATURES

9. Negative Mass, Harmony of the Generations

Artist

Year

Patron

Communications and the Arts (MICA) Location MICA Building (intersection of Hill Street and River Valley Road)

Oh Sang Wook

1995

Collection of Ministry of Information,

10. Big Bang

Artist

Year 2000

Patron

Location MICA Building (small courtyard)

Brother Joseph McNally

Collection of the Singapore Art Museum

11. ASEAN Sculpture Garden

Artist

Napoleon Veloso Abueva / Vichai Sithiratn / Ng Eng Teng / But Muchtar / Anthony Lau / Osman Bin Mohammad

Year 1982

Patron

Location Fort Canning Hill

National Parks Board

12. Space – Time Link

Artist

Year

Patron

Location UE Square (Shell House entrance)

Anthony Poon

1997

UE Square

13. Web Light

Artist

Year

Patron

Location Orchard Central (side facing Orchard Road

Matthew Ngui

2009

Orchard Central

 

and Killiney Road)

& Exhibition Centre (intersection of Raffles Boulevard and Temasek Boulevard)

14.

Sculptural Reliefs

6. Momentum

Artist

Gerard d’Alton Henderson

Artist

David Gerstein

Year

1970

Year 2007

Patron

Hilton Singapore

Patron

ocation

Hilton Singapore (side facing Orchard Road)

One Raffles Quay (Keppel Land / Cheung Kong Holdings / Hongkong Land)

Location Finlayson Green (opposite One Raffles Quay)

15. Mother and Child

Artist

Ng Eng Teng

7. Living World

Year 1980

Patron

Far East Organization

Artist

Ju Ming

Location Orchard Parade Hotel

Year

1986

(side facing Orchard Road)

Patron

Collection of the Singapore Art Museum (SAM)

16. Urban People / Nutmeg / Cloud

Location In front of SAM

Artist

Kurt Laurenz Metzler / Kumari Nahappan / Troika

8. A Visit to the Museum:

Year

2009

Taking the Past Forward

Patron

Location ION Orchard

ION Orchard

Artist

Chern Lian Shan

Year 2000

 

Patron

National Heritage Board

Location In front of the Peranakan Museum

30 PUBLIC ARTWORKS

17. Progress & Advancement

Artist

Year 1988

Patron

Location In front of OUB Centre

Yu Yu Yang

Lien Ying Chow

25. Mama’s Precious One

Artist

Year 1989 Patron HDB Location HDB Hub (in front of Block 184)

Chong Fah Cheong

18. Harmony

 

Artist

Yu Yu Yang

26. Flower Tree

Year

2001

Artist

Choi Jeong-Hwa

Patron

Collection of City Developments Limited

Year

2006

(CDL)

Patron

VivoCity

Location In front of Republic Plaza

19. Homage to Newton

Artist

Year 1985

Patron

Location UOB Plaza 1 (ground floor)

Salvador Dali

Collection of United Overseas Bank (UOB)

20. Bird

Artist

Year

Patron

Location Along the Singapore River (next to UOB Plaza II)

Fernando Botero

1990

Collection of UOB

21. Reclining Figure

Artist

Year

Patron

Location OCBC Centre (along Canal Road)

Henry Moore

1982

OCBC Bank

22. Samsui Women

Artist

Year 1999 Patron URA Centre Location URA Centre (side entrance facing Maxwell Hawker Centre)

Professor Liu Jilin

23. Struggle for Survival

Artist

Year 1987 Patron SMRT Location Outside Raffles Place Station (in front of OUB Centre)

Aw Tee Hong

24. The Climb

Artist

Year 1987

Patron

Location HDB Hub (in front of Block 190)

Ng Eng Teng

Housing and Development Board (HDB)

46 / CONFABULATION

Location VivoCity (entrance facing HabourFront Centre)

27. Snowman

Artist

Year 2006 Patron VivoCity Location VivoCity (The Promenade)

Ignes Idee

28. I Was Here

Artist

Year 2005 Location In front of the University Cultural Centre

Francis Ng

29. Superstring

Artist

Year 2009 Patron Land Transport Authority (LTA) Location Marymount Station on Circle Line

Joshua Yang

30. The Coin Mat

Artist

Year 2009 Patron LTA Location Bartley Station on Circle Line

Jane Lee

FEATURES

From Cheo Chai-Hiang’s Concepts to Singapore’s Contemporary Art?

Text: Yvonne Low

Cheo Chai Hiang, And Miles to go before I sleep, 1976, Wash board, hinges, stenciled letter, latch

CONTEMPORARY ART

H ow did Contemporary Art come about in Singapore? Still considered a fairly

recent discourse here, Contemporary Art appears to have followed a global trend - as the internationally ‘new’ art. The practice of Contemporary Art predicates a much wider field of international production discourse generally described as ‘visual culture’, and is characterized by the use of commodity images and visual technologies, often exchanged across and between countries in the form of international art shows. Practitioners of the Contemporary Art may choose to conceptualise an artistic concept through the use of one or more of the following media – painting, sculpture, installation, video, performance or other more complex types typically generalized as multi-disciplinary. Although it is difficult to pin down the precise impact of globalization on art making and reception, it is important to recognize its role as significant; it has revolutionalised the manner at which art was created, received and interpreted – and particularly in the manner at which local art practitioners of Contemporary Art now define their ‘art’ themselves. Much as such art practices may appear to be widely practiced now, they were once viewed as alien in the local context.

During the 60s and 70s, art practitioners hoping to pursue further education in art often went to Paris and London. Cheo Chai- Hiang and Tang Da Wu went to London and were exposed to new ways of conceptualizing art – ‘possibilities’ which were then perceived as alien in Singapore. For example, Cheo’s infamous submission – 5’ x 5’ (Singapore River) (1972) – which consisted of a set of instructions to the organizers (the Modern Art Society) was rejected. Art as ‘concept’ was unimaginable. In this particular instance, Cheo’s work predicates the fundamental concept spearheaded by Marcel Duchamp back in 1917 Paris – that the idea comes before the visual example. This example further

48 / CONFABULATION

showed how a concept perceived as alien can accentuate the role and possible function of dominant gatekeepers. Subsequently, from the late 1970s through to 1980s, there was an increase in prevalence of conceptual- based and performance-based artworks, indicating perhaps that the gatekeeping role held by certain art societies was either losing precedence or showing less resistance to alien art forms.

In

1976, Cheo once again submitted his work

to

a local exhibition, this time to a National

Sculptural exhibition. Entitled And Miles to Go, it was a 3-dimensional object consisting

of a wooden washing board with hinges

that are attached to a roughly hewn log of wood. Although it was initially rejected, the jury accepted the entry in the end. The audience were allowed to flip open and

close the board like a book. His ‘sculpture’ had experimented with ready-made objects and was conceptualized to provoke critical responses from the audience; such departures questioned the conventions of sculpture and

art making as an aesthetic practice.

Three decades later, Donna Ong presented

a series of four site-specific sculptural

installations titled secret, interiors: chrysalis

(19) (20) (21) (22) at the inaugural 2006 Singapore Biennale. Secret, interiors: chrysalis (21) used ready-made objects such as stationery and everyday items to construct the interior of a plane. She too urged the audience to ‘enter the work’. In terms of medium and approach, there were stark similarities between Cheo’s 1976 work and Ong’s 2006 work – both had re-worked ready-made objects into meaningful objects (art) and both required their audience to understand their work by engaging with it physically. Of course, to what extent was Ong’s work then considered new (modern) and contemporaneous remains to be examined in context; what is significant is

FEATURES

FEATURES Donna Ong, Secret, interiors: chrysalis (21) , 2006, Mixed media installation that State agencies had

Donna Ong, Secret, interiors: chrysalis (21), 2006, Mixed media installation

that State agencies had commissioned her to make such art. Conceptualism, as shown, is possibly a precondition to the generic and canonizing category of Contemporary Art.

On this note, it is important to remember that terms such as ‘Conceptualism’ or ‘Performance’ are names given to art practices and they need to be re-defined and examined from a local perspective; in brief, Conceptualism in Singapore is in all likelihoodquitedifferentfromConceptualism in Japan or China (for example) in terms of how it has developed and how it has been interpreted and received. The difficulty of recognizing such issues lay implicitly in how such practices have been represented in the

English language, a ‘common’ language that has following Singapore’s independence gradually become the people’s default lingua franca. A close examination of Cheo’s work

shows that he is often less interested in providing a name for his aesthetic practice – whether in his Mother-Tongue or in English

– than in pushing all boundaries (including

his own) circumventing his practice. The local language issue – being uniquely Singapore’s

– has pressed it upon us to remember that

much as Conceptual Art is determined by an artist’s own terms, unique and specific to his national-cultural identity, so too is Singapore’s Contemporary Art a unique phenomenon developed in accordance to local conditions and local responses. //

WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE

A Walk Down Memory Lane

- Revisiting the forgotten

50 / CONFABULATION

Public art is art that is specifically commissioned for a particular site and its community in mind. The works can be intended to be permanent or temporary and its form can range from mosaics, paintings, sculptures, lighting, landscape designs, textiles, glassworks, video installations, ceramics and performance art.

Introducing the artwork into the local environment creates a significant impact in terms of encouraging regeneration and enhancement of the space and creates opportunity for social and educational interaction and can even promote tourism.

Before, Singapore was earnest about public art and endeavored to build monuments and artworks that reflected national aspirations and struggles. However, by 1970-80, the task proved taxing and this gave way to private and corporate commissioning of artworks.

FEATURES

In the recent years, LTA has been actively encouraging the incorporation of art into their train stations (in what came to known as Art in Transit), a practice common in Europe and North America.

In 2007, a National Heritage Board survey estimated that there were over 300 public artworks on display. The earliest surviving work of public art in Singapore is a statue of an elephant, a gift from King Rama V of Thailand in 1871 that is currently located at The Arts House (side entrance facing the Padang). Sadly, over the years, not all sculptures stood the test of time and many have come and gone from our public spaces.

A Walk Down Memory Lane takes us through a handful of these works of art; some which have been removed and placed in storage, and others permanently destroyed in the pursuit of the newer and better.

WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE

WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE 52 / CONFABULATION Athletes in Action Artwork Brother Joseph McNally (Singapore) Athletes
WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE 52 / CONFABULATION Athletes in Action Artwork Brother Joseph McNally (Singapore) Athletes
WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE 52 / CONFABULATION Athletes in Action Artwork Brother Joseph McNally (Singapore) Athletes
WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE 52 / CONFABULATION Athletes in Action Artwork Brother Joseph McNally (Singapore) Athletes

52 / CONFABULATION

Athletes in Action

Artwork

Brother Joseph McNally (Singapore) Athletes in Action, 1979

Patron

Housing and Development Board

Location

Previously at the Town Centre

Description

The Town Centre was originally built in 1973 and the sculpture was added in 1979. It survived a few different redesigns of the Town Centre, but not the rebuilding in 2004 and is currently not accessible by the public.

Breakthrough

Artwork

Chern Lian Shan (Singapore) Breakthrough, 1990

Patron

NTUC Income

Location

Previously at the NTUC Income building

Description

Breakthrough is a golden sculpture of a horse leaping out of an egg, commissioned to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of NTUC Income. The Golden Egg depicts the essence of life as all forms of life begin with an egg while the Golden Horse is a symbol of hardwork, dedication and reliability.

Dancer

Artwork

Sun Yu Li (Singapore) Dancer, 1993

Patron

Wing Tai Land

Location

Previously outside Park Mall

Description

The work is a liberation of the body and soul. The sculpture evolves itself into ever-changing symbols following the rhythm of nature. The curves twist gently, achieving greater balance and rhythm through the asymmetrical design. The swaying posture looks as if it is inviting you to dance to the music of life.

Joyous Rivers

Artwork

Elsie Yu (Singapore) Joyous Rivers, 1987

Patron

Singapore Airlines

Location

Previously located at the Marina Bay. It was moved during

Description

the redevelopment of the Esplanade waterfront. A sculpture to commemorate the successful completion of the cleanup of the Singapore River/Kallang Basic Catchment. It epitomizes the eternal flow of live-giving water. Meandering and in- terlocking patterns of rivers and catchments are captured on its base, whilst joyous, dancing waves, frozen in motion, portray the abstract form of mass celebration of a happy event. The waves surge forward in one direction, at a 60 degree angle in one direction, symbolizing Singaporeans striving with one common purpose towards a better tomorrow. Lights at night enliven the liquid forms with an animated, shimmering glow. At the time, it was the most expensive work com- missioned to a local artist.

LOVE FEATURES Artwork Robert Indiana (American) LOVE , 1987 Patron Wing Tai Holdings Location Previously
LOVE FEATURES Artwork Robert Indiana (American) LOVE , 1987 Patron Wing Tai Holdings Location Previously
LOVE FEATURES Artwork Robert Indiana (American) LOVE , 1987 Patron Wing Tai Holdings Location Previously

LOVE

FEATURES

Artwork

Robert Indiana (American) LOVE, 1987

Patron

Wing Tai Holdings

Location

Previously located at the Marina Bay. It was moved during

Description

the redevelopment of the Esplanade waterfront. The LOVE design has been reproduced in a variety of formats. Likewise, the sculpture has been recreated in multiple versions and a variety of colors, and is now on display around the world. The piece in Singapore is one of the thirteen LOVE sculptures located outside of USA.

Metamorphosis I

Artwork

Obie B. Simonis (USA) Metamorphosis I, 1986

Patron

Marina Centre Holdings

Location

Previously along Marina Bay

Description

John Portman and Associates was developing a large architectural project in Singapore and commissioned Simonis to create the work for the project.

Musical Fountain

Artwork

Tan Teng Kee (Malaysia) Musical Fountain, 1974

Patron

DBS for Plaza Singapura

Location

Previously placed at Plaza Singapura and later moved to

Description

the Marina City Park (and then removed) Tan mentioned in a catalogue for his retrospective show held at Sculpture Square in October 2001 that, “the commission was sponsored by the Development Bank of Singapore (DBS). It was to be displayed in front of a shopping centre called Plaza Singapura. I studied the environment, measured the size of the proposed pool and used metal to build an abstract form, using straight lines to build a model. My concept was to join two clusters of forms: one in front of the other. From a distance, the two forms appear like natural forms, like a mountain, summits high and low. It can appear as a landscape, as a scene that seems to be changing. I wanted to convey a sense of change and development. I sent it in for the competition and the judges selected my work.”

From an exchange with art historian TK Sabapathy in 1991 –

TK Sabapathy: Are you still very interested in art in public places? Do you still think that it is relevant or important?

Tan Teng Kee: I think it is important for the public environment. First we must look for a suitable environment to display sculpture; that is important. That is challenging work for me, a big project. I

WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE

just want to mention about the first project which I did in 1974. At that time it was a closed competition and I was lucky to win the first one organized by the Development Bank. The judges selected my submission, but the managers of Plaza Singapura could not believe that my entry could be the winner; but they had to accept it as the judges had decided on it. So, the manager decided to test the entries on his own staff. Everyone including the clerks and the janitors were asked to view the first three winners and to select one from their own judgments. They were asked to cast their votes. Guess what! They still chose mine to be the overall winner. Is that not amazing?

TK Sabapathy: That is interesting and I am glad you disclosed that.

That is interesting and I am glad you disclosed that. Peace and Prosperity Artwork Yu Yu

Peace and Prosperity

Artwork

Yu Yu Yang (Taiwan) Peace and Prosperity, 1971

Patron

Mandarin Hotel / Lien Ying Chow

Location

Previously in front of Mandarin Hotel

Description

Yu Yu Yang has had a strong influence as a teacher, counting Ju Ming as one of his students. In 1983, he drew up plans for a Space & Technology Art Centre in Singapore, and in 1991 the Singapore National Museum featured his work in an exhibition titled “Stainless Steel Sculptures Exhibition”.

This work stood for 20 years in front of the Mandarin Hotel but little remained after a remodelling of the hotel in the late 1990s. Remnants included two white stucco structures pictured.

Remnants included two white stucco structures pictured. 54 / CONFABULATION Rainbow Artwork Chern Lian Shan
Remnants included two white stucco structures pictured. 54 / CONFABULATION Rainbow Artwork Chern Lian Shan

54 / CONFABULATION

Rainbow

Artwork

Chern Lian Shan (Singapore) Rainbow, 1994

Patron

Pidemco Land

Location

Previously outside Pidemco Center (later developed into

Description

One George Street) The sculpture was intended to reflect the business goals of the now defunct Pidemco Land.

Singapore at the Crossroads

Artwork

Sim Lian Huat (Singapore) Singapore at the Crossroads, 1986

Patron

Port of Singapore Authority

Location

Singapore Port

Description

The sculpture is fabricated from brass plates. It is crossed at the centre to symbolise Singapore’s strategic position at the crossroads of world shipping. Its shape is inspired by ancient Chinese junks which plied in this region and reflects Singapore’s long maritime history and the port’s contribution to Singapore’s development.

Singapore’s Multicultural Life FEATURES Artwork Chieu Shuey Fook (Singapore) Singapore’s Multicultural Life ,
Singapore’s Multicultural Life FEATURES Artwork Chieu Shuey Fook (Singapore) Singapore’s Multicultural Life ,
Singapore’s Multicultural Life FEATURES Artwork Chieu Shuey Fook (Singapore) Singapore’s Multicultural Life ,
Singapore’s Multicultural Life FEATURES Artwork Chieu Shuey Fook (Singapore) Singapore’s Multicultural Life ,

Singapore’s Multicultural Life

FEATURES

Artwork

Chieu Shuey Fook (Singapore) Singapore’s Multicultural Life,

1987

Patron

Singapore MRTC (currently known as SMRT)

Location

Previously Orchard MRT, destroyed during the building

Description

of ION Orchard Chieu states that the artwork was the largest copper enamel artwork in the world. This low relief copper enamel mural measured some 2.5 x 30 metres, and cost around S$200,000 at the time of its commission.

Soaring Visions

Artwork

Elsie Yu (Singapore) Soaring Visions, 1992

Patron

Donated by Mr Albert Hong

Location

Previously at the Marina City Park

Description

A symbol of our society’s aspirations and progress. Its components symbolise the spiralling development of a people working together for a common cause. Each layer of the brass units represents bursts of energy of individual effort. The units are moulded together in a fluid movement emphasising the co-operation between individuals. The brass units are attached to the shaft by stainless steel pipes which signify the unifying and stabilising strength of the people. The volcanic base emerging from the earth portrays both the dynamism of the Nation and the solid roots which form the basis for advancement.

Surprising Singapore

Artwork

Leo Hee Tong (Singapore) Surprising Singapore, 1987

Patron

Singapore MRT

Location

Previously leading to the entrance of Orchard MRT station

Description

Measuring 2.2 x 37 metres, it was a painting that was translated into a mosaic mural featuring the tourist icons of Singapore. It was destroyed in the construction of ION Orchard.

Taichi

Artwork

Ju Ming (Taiwan) Taichi, 1984

Patron

Donated to the National Museum by the Trade Mission of

Location

Taiwan Previously in front of the Singapore History Museum

Description

(now known as the National Museum) The twin of this sculpture is located at the HDB Headquarters office.

WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE

WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE 56 / CONFABULATION Typical Prosperous and Honest Merchant Artwork William G. Stirling
WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE 56 / CONFABULATION Typical Prosperous and Honest Merchant Artwork William G. Stirling

56 / CONFABULATION

Typical Prosperous and Honest Merchant

Artwork

William G. Stirling Typical Prosperous and Honest Merchant,

1937

Patron

Gift from the artist

Location Previously in front of the Raffles Museum, it was moved to make way for the time capsule and again during the renovations of the National Museum of Singapore in 2004-2006

Description

The artwork was the artist’s conception of a typical prosperous and honest Chinese merchant during the colonial days.

Wings of Victory

Artwork

Ramon Orlina (Philippines) Wings of Victory, 1986

Patron

Wisma Atria

Location

Previously displayed in the Wisma Atria atrium

Description

A S$300,000 work made up of 67 suspended steel birds weighing 35kg each. It is presumably destroyed during a change of the mall’s ownership and management.

GLOSSARY

Glossary

This glossary contains terms that commonly arise in the discussion of art, especially in 3D art. (Ed’s note: Commit selected vocabulary to memory to suitably impress people the next time you find yourself engaged in an arty-farty conversation.)

A

Abstract

Art that either distorts or transforms its subject matter so that it is no longer clearly recognizable, or is art that resists representation of anything concrete or realistic

Applied Arts

Refers to crafts (pottery, weaving, stitchery, jewelry-making, etc.), industrial design, fashion design, advertising design, and architecture. The applied arts are functional and their products are intended to fulfill some practical purpose.

B

Biomorphic Shapes

Shapes which are irregular and resemble the freshly formed shapes of Nature, e.g. a leaf, your body, clouds

Bronze

Any mixture of alloys of copper and tin in various proportions, often with traces of other metals

Bronze Disease

When mineral salts in the surface of the bronze react with air to form acids that erode the bronze and produce a green powdery residue

C

Cast

To give shape and form, often used to describe the process of forming material (liquid metal, for example) into a particular shape by pouring into a mould

Content

The subject matter, narrative or thematic concerns of an artwork

Cubism

A

developed in Paris in the early 20th century, characterized by the reduction and fragmentation

of

natural forms into abstract,

often geometric structures usually rendered as a set of discrete planes

F

school of painting and sculpture

Fauvism

style of painting introduced in

Paris in the early 20th century, characterized by areas of bright, contrasting colour and simplified shapes. The name les fauves is French for “the wild beasts”

A

Figuration / Figurative

Representations of the world based

on

with real forms, but these references are not based on realism, figurative art can be heightened, exaggerated and stylized

resemblance and association

Fine Arts

Refers to drawing, painting, sculpture, music and dance

Focal point

An object, artwork or design element that is the main point of focus in a given space

Form/Formal concern

The characteristics of an artwork’s visual elements, not subject matter

or

content

Free-standing art

Art that has been placed in the space, but which is independent of

that space, such as a sculpture on

its own plinth

G

Geometric Shapes

Shapes which are defined in terms

of

science and mathematics

I

Icon

famous or instantly recognizable

A

image that embodies certain positive values or characteristics

Integrated Art

Art that takes the place of materials that would have been used on location, such as wall finishings, seating and other functional objects

Impressionist /

Impressionism

A

in

of

outdoors using divided brush

strokes to capture light and mood

of

transitory effects of natural light and color

a particular moment and the

style of painting that originated France about 1870. Paintings casual subjects were executed

M

Matte A non-glossy or shiny surface coating

Mixed-media

Artwork created with more than one type of art material

Modernity

Pertaining to the set of political, social, economic and aesthetic ideas that charaterize the modern world in the 20th Century

AUGUST 2010 / 57

GLOSSARY

N

Negative Space

Areas of an artwork which are unoccupied by shape or color (see Positive Space)

P

Positive Space

The space in a composition that is filled with form

Process

The methods or techniques through which an artwork is created

Public Art

The practice of involving artists in the conception, development and transformation of a public space

R

Relief

Artwork that projects out or above the surface plane where it is presented or made

Representation

A tangible or recognizable image or

likeness of something or someone

S

Sand Mould Casting

When a model is encased in a sand mould which is then split, the model removed and molten metal poured into the reassembled mould

Sculpture

The art or practice of shaping figures

or designs in three-dimensions

58 / CONFABULATION

Stylized

Made to conform to some style; represented according to some

convention, rather than in a realistic

or literal manner

Surrealism

A 20th-century literary and artistic

movement that attempts to express the workings of the subconscious and is characterized by fantastic imagery and incongruous juxtaposition of subject matter

Symbolic

An artwork is symbolic if it, or a part of it, stands for or represents something else

T

Tympanum

The surface enclosed by the arch and lintel of an arched doorway,

frequently carved with relief sculptures

POSTSCRIPT

Location: Peninsula Plaza
Location: Peninsula Plaza
POSTSCRIPT Location: Peninsula Plaza Location: Tanjong Pagar Location: Forum Location: Upper East Coast Road AUGUST 2010

Location: Tanjong Pagar

Location: Forum

Location: Upper East Coast Road
Location: Upper
East Coast Road
61 / CONFABULATION Mercedes-Benz Center

61 / CONFABULATION

Mercedes-Benz Center
Mercedes-Benz Center
61 / CONFABULATION Mercedes-Benz Center
Pop and Contemporary Fine Art Art Trove 51 Waterloo Street #02-01/2/3 Singapore 187969 T: +65
Pop and Contemporary
Fine Art
Art Trove
51 Waterloo Street #02-01/2/3
Singapore 187969
T: +65 6336 0915 F: +65 6336 9975
E: enquiry@art-trove.com
W: www.art-trove.com
Opening hours:
Wednesday - Sunday,
11am - 6:30pm.
Foundation Oil
Painting
Art Trove,
The Private Museum
The Private Museum
Lai Chan,
Chan Hampe Galleries
Art Trove
Sotheby’s Institute of Art, DreamSpace Art Studio
Sotheby’s Institute of Art,
DreamSpace Art Studio
Museum Lai Chan, Chan Hampe Galleries Art Trove Sotheby’s Institute of Art, DreamSpace Art Studio AUGUST

AUGUST 2010 / 64

DIRECTORIES

SINGAPORE ART GUIDE

#

33 Auction www.33auction.com 72-13/TheatreWorks 72-13 Mohamed Sultan Road 2902 Gallery 11 Mount Sophia Block B #B2-09

A

Alliance Française de Singapour 1 Sarkies Road

B #B2-09 A Alliance Française de Singapour 1 Sarkies Road Antiquaro 19 Tanglin Road #02-42 Tanglin

Antiquaro

19 Tanglin Road

#02-42 Tanglin Shopping Centre

Singapore 247909 +65 6737 4822 www.antiquaro.com

AndrewShire Gallery 5 Swiss Cottage Estate Asian Civilisations Museum www.acm.org.sg Aratong Galleries 26 Mount Pleasant Drive Art Forum 82 Cairnhill Road Art Galleries at NAFA 80 Bencoolen Street Art Glass Solutions 30 Kuo Chuan Avenue Art Retreat (Wu Guanzhong Gallery) 10 Ubi Crescent

#01-45/47

Art Seasons 7 Kaki Bukit Road 1 #02-12 Art Tree Gallery 333A Orchard Road #04-11 Art-2 Gallery 140 Hill Street #01-03 artcommune 133 New Bridge Road #02-77 Artesan 793 Bukit Timah Road #02-01 Artfolio 328 North Bridge Road #02-25 ArtGoGo 402 Orchard Road #02-08 ARTSingapore www.artsingapore.net

402 Orchard Road #02-08 ARTSingapore www.artsingapore.net Art Trove 51 Waterloo Street #02-01 to 03 Singapore 187969

Art Trove

51 Waterloo Street

#02-01 to 03 Singapore 187969 +65 6336 0915 www.art-trove.com

ArtSpace at Royal Plaza Hotel 25 Scotts Road Arty Art Gallery 686A Woodlands Drive 73 #15-52 Aryaseni 10A Bukit Pasoh

B

686A Woodlands Drive 73 #15-52 Aryaseni 10A Bukit Pasoh B Benaka Art Conservation Private Ltd 64

Benaka Art Conservation Private Ltd

64 Taman Warna

Singapore 276386 +65 9105 4377 / +65 6100 2707 www.benakaartconservation.com

Black Earth Auction 367 Joo Chiat Road Singapore 427559 +65 6346 3767 www.blackearth.com.sgBlack Earth Auction

66 / CONFABULATION

Barrosa Studio 4 Woking Road #01-02 Bhaskar’s Art Academy 19/21 Kerbau Road Borobudur www.borobudurauction.com

C

19/21 Kerbau Road Borobudur www.borobudurauction.com C Cape of Good Hope 140 Hill Street #01-06 MICA Building
19/21 Kerbau Road Borobudur www.borobudurauction.com C Cape of Good Hope 140 Hill Street #01-06 MICA Building
19/21 Kerbau Road Borobudur www.borobudurauction.com C Cape of Good Hope 140 Hill Street #01-06 MICA Building

Cape of Good Hope

140 Hill Street

#01-06 MICA Building Singapore 179369 +65 6733 3822 www.capeofgoodhopeartgallery.com

Chan Hampe Galleries

328 North Bridge Road

#01-04 Raffles Hotel Arcade Singapore 188719 +65 6338 1962 www.chanhampegalleries.com

Chieu Sheuy Fook Studio Studio 102

91 Lorong J

Telok Kurau Road Singapore 425985 +65 96690589 chieusf@gmail.com

Changi Museum 1000 Upper Changi Road North Collectors Contemporary 5 Jalan Kilang Barat #01-03 COMBINART 27 Woodlands Industrial Park E1 #01-08

D

d’Art 5 Westbourne Road #02-03

Park E1 #01-08 D d’Art 5 Westbourne Road #02-03 DaTang Fine Arts Singapore 177 River Valley

DaTang Fine Arts Singapore

177 River Valley Road,

Liang Court , #02-09A Singapore 179030 +65 9846 2098 / +65 9721 3718

www.9911art.com

D’Peak Art Space Kaki Bukit Road 1 #01-07

www.9911art.com D’Peak Art Space Kaki Bukit Road 1 #01-07 DreamSpace Art Studio 艺术创作,专业绘画教育。

DreamSpace Art Studio

艺术创作,专业绘画教育。

19 China Street

#03-04/05 Far East Square

Singapore 049561 +65 9168 7785 www.hill-ad.com.sg

Square Singapore 049561 +65 9168 7785 www.hill-ad.com.sg Dynasties Antique & Art Gallery 18 Boon Lay Way

Dynasties Antique & Art Gallery

18 Boon Lay Way

#01-136 TradeHub 21 Singapore 609966

+65 67383268

www.9911art.com

DLR Gallery 22 Marshall Road

E

Esplanade 1 Esplanade Drive Eagle’s Eye 39 Stamford Road #01-01 Echo Art Galerie 19 Tanglin Road #02-59 Emily Hill 11 Upper Wilkie Road

F

19 Tanglin Road #02-59 Emily Hill 11 Upper Wilkie Road F fill your walls 21 Tanjong

fill your walls 21 Tanjong Pagar Road

#04-02

Singapore 088444 +65 6222 1667 www.fill-your-walls.com

Fortune Cookie Projects www.fortunecookieprojects.com

Fortune Cookie Projects www.fortunecookieprojects.com Foundation Oil Painting (conducted by Mr Wee Shoo Leong) 155

Foundation Oil Painting

(conducted by Mr Wee Shoo Leong)

155 Waterloo Street

#01-04 Stam ford Arts Centre Singapore 187962 +65 9726 2028

www.foundationoilpaintingclass.com

FOST 65 Kim Yam Road

G

Gajah Gallery 140 Hill Street #01-08

65 Kim Yam Road G Gajah Gallery 140 Hill Street #01-08 Galerie Joaquin 1 Cuscaden Road

Galerie Joaquin

1 Cuscaden Road

#01-03 The Regent Hotel

Singapore 249715 +65 6725 3113 www.galeriejoaquin.com

Galerie Belvedere 168 Robinson Road #36-01

Galerie Belvedere 168 Robinson Road #36-01 The Gallery of Gnani Arts 1 Cuscaden Road #01-05 The
Galerie Belvedere 168 Robinson Road #36-01 The Gallery of Gnani Arts 1 Cuscaden Road #01-05 The

The Gallery of Gnani Arts

1 Cuscaden Road

#01-05 The Regent Singapore 249715 +65 6725 3112 www.gnaniarts.com

Gnani Arts Space

190 Middle Road

#02-30/31, Fortune Centre Singapore 188979. +65 6339 1230 www.gnaniarts.com

Galerie Waterton 39 Keppel Road #02-01 Geeleinan Art Gallery & Studio 1 Whitchurch Road #02-03 Give Art 65 Spottiswoode Park Road

H

HaKaren 19 Tanglin Road #02-43 Heng Artland 290 Orchard Road #04-08

DIRECTORIES

Impress Galleries 1 Kim Seng Promenade #02-07/08 Great World City Singapore 237994 +65 67362966 www.impressgalleries.comImpress Galleries

Impress Galleries 429 East Coast Road Singapore 429016 +65 64404533 www.impressgalleries.comImpress Galleries

I

Indigo Blue Art 33 Neil Road INSTINC 12 Eu Tong Sen Street

iPRECIATION 1 Fullerton Square #01-08

J

Jalan Bahar Clay Studios 97L Lorong Tawas JENDELA (Visual Arts Space) 1 Esplanade Drive Level 2 Jeremy Ramsey Fine Art 16 Bukit Pasoh Road

Drive Level 2 Jeremy Ramsey Fine Art 16 Bukit Pasoh Road Ketna Patel 35 Jalan Puteh
Drive Level 2 Jeremy Ramsey Fine Art 16 Bukit Pasoh Road Ketna Patel 35 Jalan Puteh

Ketna Patel

35 Jalan Puteh Jerneh

Chip Bee Gardens, Holland Village

Singapore 278057 +65 6479 3736 www.ketnapatel.com

Koeh Sia Yong 许锡勇

10 Kampong Eunos

Singapore 417774 +65 9671 2940 www.yessy.com/koehsiayong

www.koehsiayong.artfederations.com

K

Kelly Reedy - Studio Arts 27 Woking Road #01-01

Kwan Hua 19 Tanglin Road #02-09

L

27 Woking Road #01-01 Kwan Hua 19 Tanglin Road #02-09 L Li Fine Art 19 Tanglin

Li Fine Art

19 Tanglin Road

#03-32 Tanglin Shopping Centre Singapore 247909 +65 6235 3306

www.lifineart.com

DIRECTORIES

DIRECTORIES Lukisan Art Gallery 110 Faber Drive Singapore 129421 +65 6774 1609 www.lukisan-art.com The Luxe Art

Lukisan Art Gallery

110 Faber Drive

Singapore 129421 +65 6774 1609 www.lukisan-art.com

The Luxe Art Museum 6 Handy Road #02-01 The Luxe Singapore 229234 +65 6338 2234 www.thelam.sgThe Luxe Art Museum

La Libreria 50 Kent Ridge Crescent Level 3 Larasati www.larasati.com LASALLE 1 McNally Street Little Red Shop www.littleredshop.org Linda Gallery 15 Dempsey Road #01-08

M

Linda Gallery 15 Dempsey Road #01-08 M Mercedes-Benz Center 301 Alexandra Road Singapore 159968 +65

Mercedes-Benz Center

301 Alexandra Road

Singapore 159968 +65 6866 1888 www.mercedes-benz.com.sg

Mulan Gallery 19 Tanglin Road #02-33 Tanglin Shopping Centre Singapore 247909 +65 6738 0810 www.mulangallery.com.sgMulan Gallery

M Gallery 1 Kaki Bukit Road 1 #03-19 MAD Museum of Art & Design 333A Orchard Road #03-01 Marisa Keller 28 Woking Road #03-05 Masterpiece www.masterpiece-auction.com Metakaos 1 Kaki Bukit Road 1 #03-22 MINT Museum of Toys 26 Seah Street

N

Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts 38/80/151 Bencoolen Street National Museum of Singapore 93 Stamford Road Ngee Ann Cultural Centre 97 Tank Road Night & Day 139 A/C Selegie Road NTU (School of Art, Design & Media) 81 Nanyang Drive NUS Museum 50 Kent Ridge Crescent

O

68 / CONFABULATION

NUS Museum 50 Kent Ridge Crescent O 68 / CONFABULATION Peter’s Frames 19 Tanglin Road #02-02

Peter’s Frames

19 Tanglin Road #02-02

Tanglin Shopping Centre Singapore 247909 +65 6737 9110 petersframes@hotmail.com

Pop and Contemporary Fine Art 390 Orchard Road #03-12 Palais Renaissance Singapore 238871 +65 6735 0959 www.popandcontemporaryart.com 390 Orchard Road #03-12 Palais Renaissance Singapore 238871 +65 6735 0959 www.popandcontemporaryart.com

Ode to Art 252 North Bridge Road #01-36E/F

Ode to Art 252 North Bridge Road #01-36E/F The Private Museum 51 Waterloo Street #02-06 Singapore

The Private Museum

51 Waterloo Street

#02-06

Singapore 187969 +65 67382872 www.theprivatemuseum.org

Opera Gallery 2 Orchard Turn #03-05 Osage 11B Mount Sophia #01-12

P

Ray’s Transport & Services Artwork Installation & Delivery Services All other Art related services +65 91522511 artswithray@gmail.com Artwork Installation & Delivery Services All other Art related services +65 91522511 artswithray@gmail.com

Peranakan Museum 39 Armenian Street

related services +65 91522511 artswithray@gmail.com Peranakan Museum 39 Armenian Street Post Museum 107/109 Rowell Road

Post Museum 107/109 Rowell Road

Public Art Space (Pan Pacific) 7 Raffles Boulevard

Public Art Space (Pan Pacific) 7 Raffles Boulevard S.Bin Art Plus 140 Hill Street MICA Building

S.Bin Art Plus 140 Hill Street MICA Building

#01-10/11/12

Singapore 179369 +65 6883 2001 www.sbinartplus.com

R

ReDot 39 Keppel Road #02-06 Red Dot Design Museum 28 Maxwell Road Red Sea 9 Dempsey Road #01-10 RSAF Museum 400 Airport Road

S

School of the Arts 90 Goodman Road Sculpture Square 155 Middle Road Sealey Brandt Photography Studio 1 Westbourne Road

#01-02

Sinema 11B Mount Sophia #B1-12 Singapore Art Museum 71 Bras Basah Road SAM at 8Q 8 Queen Street Singapore Art Society 10 Kampong Eunos Singapore Coins and Notes Museum 2 Trengganu Street

Eunos Singapore Coins and Notes Museum 2 Trengganu Street Sunjin Galleries 43 Jalan Merah Saga #03-62

Sunjin Galleries 43 Jalan Merah Saga #03-62 Work Loft @ Chip Bee Singapore 278115 +65 6738 2317 www.sunjingalleries.com.sg

Level 3 Singapore Contemporary Young Artists www. contemporaryart.sg Singapore Navy Museum 32 Admiralty Road West Singapore Philatelic Museum 23B Coleman Street Soobin Art International 10 Ubi Crescent #04-90/92/93/95 Sotheby’s Institute of Art 82 Telok Ayer Street Sun Craft 19 Tanglin Road #02-08

T

TAKSU 43 Jalan Merah Saga #01-72 Telok Kurau Studios 91 Telok Kurau Lorong J Tembusu 140 Hill Street #01-05 The Art Gallery 1 Nanyang Walk The Arts House 1 Old Parliament Lane The Gallery (SMU) 90 Stamford Road The Gallery of Gnani Arts One Cuscaden Road #01-05 The Luxe Art Museum 6 Handy Road #02-01 The Peach Tree 129 Tanglin Road The Picturehouse 2 Handy Road The Republic Cultural Centre 9 Woodlands Avenue 9 The Substation 45 Armenian Street Third Floor – Hermès 541 Orchard Road

U

DIRECTORIES

Utterly Art 229A South Bridge Road 2nd Level

Xuanhua Art Gallery 70 Bussorah Street Singapore 199483 +65 6392 2556 www.xuanhuaart.comXuanhua Art Gallery

V

Street Singapore 199483 +65 6392 2556 www.xuanhuaart.com V Y2ARTS 140 Hill Street #01-02 MICA Building Singapore

Y2ARTS

140 Hill Street #01-02 MICA Building Singapore 179369 +65 6336 8683

www.y2arts.com

Valentine Willie Fine Art 39 Keppel Road #02-04

Valentine Willie Fine Art 39 Keppel Road #02-04 Yisulang Art Gallery 6 Handy Road #01-01 The

Yisulang Art Gallery 6 Handy Road #01-01 The Luxe Singapore 229234 +65 63376810 www.yisulang.com

Victoria Theatre & Concert Hall 11 Empress Place VITRIA 17 Chee Hoon Avenue

X

Y

Yang Gallery 19 Tanglin Road #02-41 Your MOTHER gallery 91A Hindoo Road

LIFESTYLE

Lai Chan 1 Beach Road #02-10 STYLE: NORDIC 39 Ann Siang Road Papa Palheta 140 Bukit Timah Road

FOR TOURISTS

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DIRECTORIES

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+65 6872 2780 Hospitals

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Johore Battery Cosford Road +65 6546 9897 Jurong Bird Park 2 Jurong Hill +65 6265 0022 Kranji War Memorial 9 Woodlands Road Lim Bo Seng Memorial Esplanade Park Malay Heritage Centre 85 Sultan Gate +65 6391 0450 Malay Village 39 Geylang Serai +65 6748 4700 Mandai Orchid Garden 200 Mandai Lake Road +65 6269 1036 Marina Barrage 8 Marina Gardens Drive +65 6514 5959 Marina Bay Sands 10 Bayfront Avenue +65 6688 8868 Masjid Sultan Kampong Glam Merlion Park Fullerton Mount Faber +65 6270 8855 National Archives of Singapore 1 Canning Rise +65 6332 7909 National Library Singapore 100 Victoria Street +65 6332 3255 National Parks Board 1800 471 7300 Night Safari 80 Mandai Lake Road +65 6269 3411 Parliament House 1 Parliament Place +65 6336 8811 Raffles’ Landing Site North bank of the Singapore River Reflections at Bukit Chandra 31K Pepys Road +65 6375 2510 Resorts World Sentosa 39 Artillery Avenue +65 6577 8888 St. Andrew’s Cathedral 11 Saint Andrew’s Road Science Centre Singapore / Omni Theatre 15 Science Centre Road +65 6425 2500 Sentosa 1800 736 8672 SIA Hop-on +65 9457 2896 Singapore Botanic Gardens 1 Cluny Road +65 6471 7361 Singapore Cable Car +65 6270 8855 Singapore City Gallery 45 Maxwell Road +65 6321 8321 Singapore Discovery Centre 510 Upper Jurong Road +65 6792 6188 Singapore Expo 1 Expo Drive +65 6403 2160 Singapore Flyer 30 Raffles Avenue +65 6734 8829 Singapore Turf Club 1 Turf Club Avenue +65 6879 1000 Singapore Zoo 80 Mandai Lake Road +65 6269 3411 SKI360° 1206A East Coast Parkway +65 6442 7318 Snow City 21 Jurong Town Hall Road +65 6560 2306 Sri Mariamman Temple 244 South Bridge Road

70 / CONFABULATION

Sun Yat Sen Nanyang Memorial Hall 12 Tai Gin Road +65 6256

7377

Supreme Court 1 Supreme Court Lane +65 6336 0644 Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve 301 Neo Tiew Crescent +65 6794 1401 Taxis

- Comfort/YellowTop +65 6552 1111

- CityCab +65 6552 2222

- Premier +65 732 2516

- Smart +65 6485 7777

- Tibs +65 6555 8888

- Transcab +65 6555 3333

Thian Hock Keng Temple 158 Telok Ayer Street Touristline 1800 736 2000 Underwater World 80 Siloso Road +65 6275 0030 Universal Studios 8 Sentosa Gateway +65 6577 8888 War Memorial Park Bras Basah Road & Beach Road intersection

MALAYSIA ART GUIDE

+Wondermilk Art Gallery www.theclickproject.com 12 (Art Space Gallery) www.12as12.com A2 Gallery www.a2artgallery.com Annexe Gallery www.annexegallery.com Art Case Galleries www.artcase.com.my Art Expo Malaysia www.artexpomalaysia.com Art House Gallery www.arthousegallery.biz Art Loft www.artloftgallery.net Art Salon @ Seni www.theartgallerypg.com Artseni Gallery www.artseni.com CHAI (Instant Cafe House of Arts and Idea) www. instantcafetheatre.com City Art Gallery Edi.A Art Gallery www.ediarts.blogspot.com Galeri Chandan www.galerichandan.com GALERI PETRONAS www.galeripetronas.com.my Galeri Shah Alam www.galerisa.com galleriiizu @ Shangri-La Hotel www.galleriiizu.com House of Matahati (HOM) www.matahati.com.my Islamic Arts Museum www.iamm.org.my Lookiss www.lookissgallery.com Lost Generation Space www.lostgenerationspace.blogspot. com Malaysia National Art Gallery www.artgallery.gov.my MERAH: Mansion for Experimentation, Research, Arts and Horticulture www.facebook.com/pages/MERAH/148050170487 Metro Fine Art www.metro3gallery.com NN Gallery www.nngallery.com.my Pace Gallery www.pacegallery.net Pelita Hati www.pelitahati.com.my Pinkguy Gallery www.pinkguymalaysia.com Richard Koh Fine Art www.rkfineart.com Rimbun Dahan www.rimbundahan.org RougeArt www.rogueart.asia Shalini Ganendra Fine Art www.shaliniganendra.com The Gallery @ Star Hill www.starhillgallery.com Valentine Willie Fine Art www.vwfa.net Wei-Ling Gallery www.weiling-gallery.com Y 2 S Art Space www.y2sart.com.my ZINC www.zinc.com.my

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