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FINAL INTERNSHIP

HANDBOOK
FOR CANDIDATES,
MENTOR TEACHERS, and
UNIVERSITY SUPERVISORS

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA SARASOTA-MANATEE

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, OFFICE OF CLINICAL EDUCATION

8350 NORTH TAMIAMI TRAIL, B322

SARASOTA, FL 34243-2025

(941) 359-4531

2017-2018
WELCOME!

This handbook is the result of the accumulated knowledge of and input from a variety of people
who are part of the teacher preparation team. Therefore, we encourage candidates, mentor
teachers and university supervisors to take the time to read through the Handbook. It will clarify
what is expected to happen during the internship. It also explains the responsibilities of each
person who plays a role in internship. If there are parts that are unclear, call the USFSM SOE Office
of Clinical Experiences.

The primary responsibility of the School of Education is to facilitate the final internship process. As
such, we are always looking for input from teacher education teams to improve both this
handbook and the various teacher education programs in the School. We love to hear from you
when things are going well, but more importantly, do not hesitate to call on us if you run into a
problem that you cannot solve through normal channels. The more time we have to work out
solutions, the better the experience for the candidate, the students in the classroom, and the
mentor teacher. Experienced help is available to you through the School. Toughing out a
situation beyond a reasonable time can result in unsatisfactory interning experiences. Teaching is
one of the hardest, but most rewarding jobs in the world. It is our job to see that the teacher
education team functions successfully. We cannot do that unless we are kept informed.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION DIRECTORY

School of Education .... 941-359-4531

Dr. Marie Byrd, Director


School of Education
Internship Office..941-359-4288

Dr. Heather B. Duncan, Coordinator of Clinical Education

Undergraduate Advising....... 941-359-4330

Katherine Ceaser

Office of Clinical Education ii 2016-2017


TABLE OF CONTENTS

WELCOME. ... ii
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION DIRECTORY.....ii

I. THE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM ... .....1


The School of Education Conceptual Framework
Clinical Experience Process and the Final Internship
The Clinical Experience Process
The Final Internship Experience

II. ROLES OF MAJOR PARTICIPANTS .......10


Office of Clinical Education
Designated Representative of the School System
University Supervisor
School Principal
Mentor Teacher
Candidate

III. CANDIDATE RESPONSIBILITIES AND GUIDELINES .....13


Absences
Code of Dress
Conduct
Academic Expectations
School Procedures
Legal Responsibilities of the Candidates
The Code of Ethics of the Education Profession in Florida

IV. FLORIDA PROFESSIONAL TEACHING CERTIFICATE.15

V. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MENTOR TEACHER ........16


Orientation
Guided Observation
Participation
Teaching

VI. FORMAL EVALUATION ....19


Specific Guidelines Pertaining to Formative and Summative Evaluation of Candidates
Recommendations

VII. CANDIDATE AND MENTOR RESOURCES21

VIII. MANDATORY INTERNSHIP FORMS AND SCHEDULE 47

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I. THE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION: CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

In 2011, the faculty and staff of the School of Education, additional key personnel from USFSM,
and representatives from our partners in the Manatee and Sarasota County School Districts met
to develop key elements that evolved into our Core Commitments, Mission, Vision, Philosophy
and Institutional Standards aligned with state and national standards. The School of Education
at USFSM outlined a conceptual framework centered on the process theme of Learn. Lead.
Inspire. Transform.

Key Elements of the Conceptual Framework


The vision of the School of Education is to lead in transforming the educational endeavors of
our region and to be recognized nationally for excellence in our work. Our programs include
faculty members, scholars who conduct research to contribute to the knowledge bases of the
disciplines of education, working alongside associated school administrators and faculty who are
experienced practitioners working in P-12 schools. We admit applicants who are highly
qualified, desiring to develop in their abilities to ensure that all students learn, committed to
continuous improvement of their own practice, and prepared to assume leadership roles in the
educational settings in which they will work.

The School of Educations mission is to prepare effective educators who will learn, lead,
inspire, and transform their schools and communities. We see the process of learn, lead,
inspire and transform as recursive and not linear. We learn in order to lead, and by leading
inspire transformation. We learn from transforming and thus create a cycle of continuous
learning and improvement. Our mission guides the USFSM COE to prepare educators poised to
positively impact the lives of pupils and their communities, locally, nationally, and globally. We
meet our mission through programs grounded in researched practices and critical perspectives
and professional clinical education designed and led by university and associated school faculty
through partnerships with a network of local schools. Our partnerships form a solid basis for
program assessment built on outcomes, revision of the curriculum based on impact data, and
the identification of specific knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are crucial for educator
success.

Our philosophy is grounded in the belief that knowledge as represented in educational


endeavors is multi-faceted. Therefore, educators must adopt critical perspectives on what is
known and seek to grow in their own content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and
pedagogical content knowledge through ongoing study and reflection. This growth should be
evident in their practice and informed by both theory and data.

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In support of our mission and informed by our philosophy, we see our purposes as learn, lead,
inspire, and transform. As stated above, we developed, adopted, revised, and implemented a
conceptual framework with input from unit faculty, professional partners, and other
stakeholders based on essential knowledge, professional standards, research, and professional
practice. Our purposes are expressed in our recognized goals:

1. Content Knowledge
2. Reflective and Ethical Practice
3. Evaluation and Decision-making
4. Educational Design
5. Learner as an Individual in Community

The relationship among our purposes and our goals can be seen in the diagram below:

1. Content
Knowledge
Learn 2. Reflective &
Ethical Practice

3. Evaluation
Lead & Decision-
making

4. Educational
Inspire Design

5. The Learner
as an
Transform Individual in
Community

Our goals led to the development of our seven School-wide candidate proficiencies, which we
use as benchmarks for evaluating our success. Specific program proficiencies for candidates
who are seeking state certification are delineated in standards prescribed by the State of
Florida. These state standards differ among programs and are related to areas of specialization;
however, we have identified seven overarching candidate proficiencies expected of each
program completer in the School of Education:

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1. Candidates demonstrate depth and breadth of content knowledge for their respective
roles.

2. Candidates engage in reflective and ethical practice as educators.

3. Candidates make professional educational decisions drawing on analysis of data and


research from a variety of sources.

4a. Candidates design educational experiences that result in successful learning.

4b. Candidates demonstrate proficiency in educational technology aligned to the NETS-T


standards.

5a. Candidates construct learning environments that reflect the diversity of experiences,
perspectives, and cultures of their students and the larger world.

5b. Candidates communicate in ways that demonstrate fairness, respect, and sensitivity to
diversity, setting high academic expectations for all students.

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Clinical Education, Practicum, and Internship Policy

USFSM SOE

School of Education Clinical Experience Policies for Educator Preparation Programs

Definitions:
A clinical experience is defined as a course in which the candidate in a teacher or administrator
preparation program continues to develop and is evaluated on his or her application of learning
in the field of education. Such courses typically include the word(s) clinical experience,
practicum, or internship in the course title. A non-passing grade in a clinical experience is defined
as grades of D, F, U, or in some cases W.

Grade of Incomplete
Ordinarily, a grade of Incomplete (I) may be given by the instructor of record for the clinical
experience for two reasons:

(1) If the candidate has completed a minimum of 2/3 of the field experience time
required, but cannot complete the clinical experience for medical reasons or extreme
extenuating circumstances. The Coordinator of Clinical Education or the faculty
supervisor for Practica in Advanced Programs1 , in consultation with the Dean of the
School, will determine what constitutes extreme extenuating circumstances;

(2) A candidate for the Bachelor degree in Elementary Education program or the Master
of Arts in Teaching Elementary Education (MAT) program completed the teaching
portion of the internship, but has not passed the Professional Education (PEd) and/or
Subject Area Examination (SAE) portions of the Florida Teachers Competency
Examination (FTCE).

Grade of Unsatisfactory (U) and Failure (F)


A grade of Unsatisfactory (U) or Failure (F) will ordinarily be given if the candidate cannot
complete the clinical experience due to the candidates lack of appropriate proficiency in (a)
planning, delivering, and/or evaluating instruction in educator preparation programs (Initial
Teacher Preparation or Advanced) or (b) planning or completing administrative project(s) in the
Educational Leadership program.

Repeating a Clinical Experience


A candidate who receives a non-passing grade or withdraws when performing unsatisfactorily in
any clinical experience may re-enroll in that course one additional time for a total of two
attempts, as follows:

1. In the event that a candidate must repeat any clinical experience, the candidate
must meet with designated School of Education personnel to develop an action
plan for the experience that may include enrollment in a course(s).
2. The candidate must request permission to repeat the internship by completing a
written appeal addressed to the Dean of the School, including the action plan.
3. There is no guarantee that the request will be approved for the semester for which

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the request/appeal is made.

If a candidate receives an unsatisfactory grade or withdraws when performing unsatisfactorily in


any clinical experience two times at the same level (e.g., Level I, Level II or Level III) or in a
Practicum of an Advanced Program the student will be removed from the School of Education. If
a candidate re-applies for admission to the School of Education, he/she must indicate he/she
was once in the School and dismissed. If the candidate is admitted and it is determined that
he/she did not disclose the dismissal, the candidates enrollment will be terminated
immediately.

When repeating a clinical experience, a goal-oriented action plan will be developed to help
guide the level, and type, of support provided during the course of the internship. The action
plan will be shared with the university supervisor and mentor teacher for the purposes of
promoting success in the repeat internship experience.

Withdrawal from a Clinical Experience


Before a candidate withdraws or discontinues attending a clinical experience, he/she must
communicate his/her intent to drop the course with (a) the professor/university supervisor and
(b) the mentor teacher or supervising administrator. The candidate should not stop attending
the experience without first discussing it with appropriate personnel. If a candidate does not
follow the appropriate procedure, the candidate will not be allowed to re-enroll in a clinical
experience until he/she makes a written request for a future placement. The request must
include an explanation as to why the candidate stopped attending without first discussing it with
appropriate personnel. Upon receiving the request, the Dean will make a determination as to
whether or not the candidate may enroll for the clinical experience.

Administratively Dismissed from a Clinical Experience


If a hosting school/agency or the School of Education requests that a candidate be removed
from, or not continue at, a clinical experience site, the candidate will be required to meet with
the appropriate School of Education personnel and develop an action plan.

Upon successful completion of the action plan, the candidate may apply for placement in the
next semester. However, the School of Education cannot guarantee placement, since the
school district or agency must approve all placements. If the School is unable to secure a
placement for a candidate who has been administratively dismissed, s/he should discuss
program options with an advisor.

Final Internship Policy-FTCE


Passing scores on all sections of the FTCE exam (Professional Education and all Subject Areas)
must be submitted prior to July 1st for Fall semester, and November 15th for Spring semester. If a
candidate does not successfully complete all FTCE requirements prior to the aforementioned
dates, they will need to defer the final internship to a future semester.

Ensuring Candidates Experiences in Diverse Settings


Purpose
The School of Education is committed to preparing educators to be effectivei in the roles for
which they are preparing. One attribute of an effective educator is the capacity to apply the
knowledge, skills, and dispositionsii that lead to learning and development of a diverseiii student
population. Clinical education provides candidates the experience they need to develop and
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hone the ability to positively affect the learning and development of students with a range of
individual, cultural and linguistic differences.
Policy
Candidates in School of Education programs preparing for roles in the K-12 learning environment
will develop the type of knowledge, skills and dispositions that lead to learning and development
of all K-12 students through well-designed field-based experiences. These clinical experiences
will be designed in partnership with K-12 educators; will vary in setting and be of sufficient
depth, breadth, diversityiv, coherence and durationv for candidates to practice application of
knowledge and skills that have positive effect on the learning and development of diverse
students.

Candidate development will be monitored through performance-based assessment. The extent


of candidate experience with diverse students will be monitored through demographic data
collected on each placement through a Diversity-Tracking form. Data from both sources will be
used in determining subsequent placements.

A Clinical Experience Demographic Tracking form will be completed by candidates for each
clinical experience in order to gather classroom-level (for initial teacher preparation) or school-
level (for Advanced Education Programs) diversity data. The Diversity Tracking form contains
verifiable data regarding:
Students on a free/reduced lunch program
English Language Learners
Students with an IEP (Individualized Education Program)
Students with an EP
Students with a 504 Plan
Students with Individual Behavior Contract or Functional Behavior Assessment
Students on Tier 3 RtI (Response to Intervention)
Students in review process (referred for special education evaluation)
Students retained last year
Student race/ethnicity (Hispanic/Latino, Black/African American, Asian, Native Hawaiian or
Other Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaskan Native, 2 or more Races, White)

Initial Teacher Preparation


Candidates in Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) programs are required to complete at least one
internship a Title I school or a setting inclusive of the following criteria:
1. Percentage of Free/Reduced Price Lunch eligible students is at least 40%vi
2. The schools percentage of English language learners is either at least 25% and/or ranks
in the top 25% of the district;
3. The schools percentage of non-white students is either at least 25% and/or ranks in the
top 25% of the district;
The school setting must meet these criteria, but also, the classroom experience must provide
candidates experience working with a diverse student population, therefore data from the
classroom will be collected. During each placement, candidates complete a Clinical Experience
Demographic Tracking Form. For each candidate, the Clinical Education Coordinator reviews data
from the forms of prior semesters to determine the next placement in order to ensure candidates
are experienced teaching students with a range of individual, cultural and linguistic differences.
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Educational Leadership
The M.Ed. in Educational Leadership has field experiences woven throughout the coursework, as
well as the practicum through the following field experiences required for each candidate:
Observation of teachers with specific feedback in EDS6050 Supervision
Principal interview w/diverse settings in EDA 6192 Educational Leadership
Principal Field Experiences in EDA 6503 Principalship
Practicum in EDA 6945 Practicum
Purposeful interactions require the candidate to interact with school administrators or teachers in
a diverse setting. The experiences enable them to explore, engage, and reflect upon their
interactions within the diverse settings. To document and monitor experience, candidates
complete a Building-level Demographic Tracking Form for each of the field experiences and
Practicum. The demographic data along with performance-based assessment data are used by
faculty to determine future field experiences to ensure candidate experience in diverse settings.

1
NCATE/CAEP defines Advanced Programs as including programs for licensed teachers continuing their
education as well as programs for other school professionals. These are graduate level programs for
teachers seeking a graduate degree in the field in which they teach; programs not tied to licensure (e.g.,
programs in Curriculum and Instruction); programs for teachers for a second license in a field different
from the field in which they have their first license, such as for Other School Professionals in educational
administration, school counseling or reading specialization.

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The Clinical Experience Process

The candidate is assigned to a school, under the competent guidance of a mentor teacher, for one
full semester at or near the completion of the teacher preparation program. The final internship
experience allows the candidate to begin to take responsibility for an entire classroom of
students. Mentor teachers should model and reflect best practices and generally help the
candidate become proficient in the tasks of teaching. Communication is essential, and the
candidate benefits from specific feedback on a routine basis, especially at the beginning of the
internship. Candidates also participate in a weekly discussion seminar with their university
supervisor, and there are three workshops during the semester at which candidate participation is
required.

Strong communication between the mentor teacher, the university supervisor, and the
candidate is essential in helping the candidate reach proficiency in each of the Florida Educator
Accomplished Practices (FEAPs, see page 19), which is the requirement for a satisfactory
summative evaluation. Throughout the experience, the mentor teacher should routinely observe
and evaluate the candidates behaviors and skills and conference with the candidate.

I. OBJECTIVES

o The main objectives of the program are to provide the candidate with opportunities for
the following:
o To continue to refine your teaching practices and strategies based on a solid research
and pedagogical understanding of current best practices.

o To establish a collegial relationship with members of the school staff, parents, and all
others interested in the education of the students.
o To continue to refine your techniques in each of the FEAPs by:
Applying concepts from learning theories to plan long- and short-term instruction,
Creating and managing a student-centered learning environment,
Using deep and comprehensive content knowledge to deliver engaging and
challenging lessons,
Using data and scholarship to assess and align instruction, and
Practicing ethical conduct and continuous professional improvement.
o To continue to refine your ability to reflect on your teaching, diagnose problem areas,
and to seek improvement.
o To experience a positive, collaborative, and professionally satisfying relationship with fellow
candidates, your mentor teacher, and your university supervisor.

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The Final Internship Experience

The final internship experience allows the candidate to take responsibility for an entire
classroom of students under the guidance of an experienced teacher. For this final experience,
the candidate is required to be at school during the regular teachers duty day (M-F, ~ 8:15-
3:30). Candidates participate in a weekly seminar discussion with their university supervisor,
who also makes observations during the semester. During this apprenticeship, the candidate
benefits from very precise, detailed comments and advice.

Performance feedback is provided to candidates in a number of ways: weekly discussions with


mentor teachers, formal visits and observations from university supervisors, and two formative
and one summative evaluation at particular points in the internship semester. Candidates are
encouraged to ask questions and apply the specific recommendations during their planning and
teaching time, and when candidates struggle in a particular area, an action plan is developed to
help the candidate better focus to support improvement. In particularly challenging
circumstances, the Coordinator of Clinical Education formally observes the candidate to provide
feedback. Candidates are either successful or are encouraged to withdraw from the internship
and repeat the experience at a later time.

The candidate fully participates in the management and instruction of the classroom, including
all areas of the teachers responsibility. By the midpoint of the semester, the candidate will be
fully involved in the duties and responsibilities of the classroom. The goal is to help the
candidate become fully competent as a beginning teacher.

The final grade for internships is S/U (satisfactory/ unsatisfactory), and based on documentation
of your work in the classroom, participation in the seminar, and documentation of the Florida
Educator Accomplished Practices. However, early removal from your final internship could
occur for reasons that are outlined in the syllabus.

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II. ROLES OF MAJOR PARTICIPANTS

The School of Education is keenly aware of the significant contribution made by the school
systems in the internship program. Sharing this joint responsibility in teacher preparation is
deeply appreciated.

The major participants in the internship program are: the Office of Clinical Education of the
School of Education, the designated representative of the school system, the university
supervisor, the school principal, the mentor teacher, and the candidate.

OFFICE OF CLINICAL EDUCATION

The Office of Clinical Education works directly with the designated representative of the
superintendent of schools in each county or school system in interpreting the program and in
assigning the candidate according to the policy of the individual school system. The office
personnel coordinate all phases of the program and serve as a liaison between the individual
school systems and the School of Education. The Coordinator of Clinical Education assists
university supervisors on specific problems involving candidates. The Coordinator is also a
contact for candidates in the event that the university supervisor is not available.

Placements are not normally changed once the semester has begun. If there is a situation
indicating a need for a change, it must be handled through the School of Education and the
appropriate school district representative before any decision is made. Each district has its own
system for working with USFSM to handle these situations and we have committed to follow
their specific procedures.

DESIGNATED REPRESENTATIVE OF SCHOOL SYSTEM

The representative works directly with the School of Education in all activities on the school
system level and serves as the major liaison with the School of Education. The representative
consults with local supervisors and principals in making candidate assignments within the
individual schools.

UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR

The university supervisor works closely with the principal and mentor teacher in interpreting the
program, observing the candidate teaching lessons, and visiting as often as possible to share in
the assistance and advice in problem situations. Depending upon the situation, the candidate
may be notified in advance of the visit. Some visits, however, may occur without prior notice.
The supervisor is ultimately responsible for the grade assigned for the internship.

A. In most cases, the university supervisor will observe and critique the candidate
teaching in the classroom a minimum of three times throughout the semester for a
conclusive observation. In addition to these formal observations, introductory and
final visits are usually made by the supervisor for a minimum of five total visits.

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B. The university supervisor should be willing to discuss matters relating to the candidate
with the mentor teacher.
C. The supervisor will evaluate the candidates teaching with the candidate and the
mentor teacher and assign the final grade based upon collaboration with the mentor
teacher. In between scheduled or unscheduled visits, the candidate may contact the
university supervisor at any time to discuss concerns and problems and request extra
visits as deemed helpful.
D. The supervisor will work very closely with the candidate so that the internship is a
satisfying and rewarding experience, personally and professionally. If the candidate is
unable to reach the university supervisor, the Office of Clinical Education should be
contacted at (941) 359-4288.

SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

The principal works closely with the designated representative of the school system in placing
candidates with teachers under conditions most suitable and beneficial for the candidate. The
principal encourages outstanding classroom teachers to become mentor teachers, but principals
are urged to place candidates only with teachers, or teams of teachers, who request such an
experience. The principal treats candidates as beginning faculty members, interpreting school
policies accordingly.

MENTOR TEACHER

The mentor teacher must meet certification standards of the State of Florida in the area of the
candidates major. Teachers should have at least three years of service in the Florida state
school system and be highly competent, demonstrating expertise in the classroom, skilled in
interpersonal relationships, and interested in guiding candidates. Each mentor teacher is
required to have successfully completed a state endorsed Clinical Educator training. The mentor
teacher plays a critical role in the teacher education process. By agreeing to accept an
candidate, the mentor teacher affirms a commitment to the profession to aid in the
development of highly qualified beginning teachers.

The mentor teacher is expected to:

A. Create an atmosphere of acceptance for the candidate that invites collaboration and
mentoring;
B. Provide opportunities for the candidate to observe and participate in the classroom and
in extracurricular activities;
C. Allow and encourage the candidate to plan and carry out lessons that may deviate from
the assigned text book but still meet appropriate course objectives and curriculum
guides (such lessons will be subjected to review and approval by the Mentor Teacher);
D. Provide feedback on the candidates performance in both informal and formal ways,
and to provide support necessary for the candidate to develop and refine his/her
professional practice skills. The Mentor Teacher will facilitate the use of audio and/or
video tapes for recording the candidates teaching performance; and
E. Provide for continuous evaluation of the performance of the candidate through daily
contact, weekly conferences in which the candidate will receive written anecdotal
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feedback, self-evaluation sessions, completion of the interim evaluation forms and
through final evaluation procedures

CANDIDATE

The candidate is a degree-seeking university student in good standing who has completed two-
thirds or more of the teaching specialization, has attained at least a 2.5 overall grade point
average and met all other School of Education eligibility requirements.

A candidate is not a teachers aide and is not training to become a teachers aide.
Candidates are inexperienced teachers who are honing their pedagogical skills under the
guidance of an experienced teacher. Candidates may not assume substitute positions during
the internship.

Most candidates do not hold a Florida Teaching Certificate of any rank and usually apply for
certification after completing the internship and graduating from the University.

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III. CANDIDATE RESPONSIBILITIES AND GUIDELINES

ABSENCES

Candidates are allowed no absences during their internship. If illness or an emergency should
require the candidate to be absent from school for any period of time, it is the responsibility of
the candidate to let the mentor teacher, university supervisor, and the school secretary know
immediately. In cases of prolonged or repeated absences, the university supervisor will, after
consulting with the mentor teacher and principal, determine whether the candidates
experience will be extended or repeated in a subsequent semester. Such decisions should be
communicated to the School of Education. Employment interviews are to be scheduled after
internship hours.

CODE OF DRESS

The candidate will be dressed appropriately for the role of a professional person, conforming to
the dress code and culture of the assigned school. Jeans and flip-flops (shower shoes) are not
usually considered professional.

CONDUCT

The candidate should be considered a professional member on the school staff. Conduct
expectations should be appropriate to the position, conforming to the morals and customs of
the school.

The Florida Department of Education has articulated the specific rules and guidelines that guide
the Principles of Professional Conduct for the Education Profession in Florida. These can be
found at: http://www.fldoe.org/edstandards/code_of_ethics.asp As a professional member of
the staff at an elementary school, the candidate has obligations to the students, the public, and
to the profession. These obligations are reviewed during the Ethics Training session at
Orientation.

Please be advised that under the code of professional and ethical behavior, it is inappropriate to
discuss any issues related to your students with anyone other than your mentor teacher or your
university supervisor.
If a problem arises between you and your mentor teacher, discuss it first with your
university supervisor. Your supervisor will then suggest a course of action.
If a problem arises between you and your university supervisor, discuss it only with the
Coordinator of Clinical Education.

As a future teacher, you are expected to treat pupils, parents, and colleagues in a fair and just
manner that communicates respect for all persons regardless of their abilities and
socioeconomic backgrounds.

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ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS

The candidate takes on the responsibilities of the classroom teacher. As such, the candidate is
expected to collaborate with the mentor teacher and university supervisor to write detailed
lesson plans and have them approved by the mentor teacher in advance of implementation;
develop short and long range plans, and work towards assuming total responsibility for the
students in the classroom for a minimum of 1-2 weeks (fly solo).

In the event of any absence, the candidate is to see that the mentor teacher has the lesson
plan/s with accompanying instructional materials. Candidates are expected to complete the
course requirements as outlined in the syllabus. Candidates participate in the seminar
concurrently with the final internship.

SCHOOL PROCEDURES

A candidate is expected to:

A. Be at the school during the hours of the teaching staff and be punctual;
B. Follow the calendar of the school system;
C. Abide by the regulations and rules of the school system;
D. Attend all faculty meetings unless directed otherwise by the school principal; and
E. Practice sound professional ethics and hold all information in confidence concerning
children or others as directed.

LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY OF THE CANDIDATE

The state of Florida defines the legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers and candidates for teaching
credentials. These can be found on the Florida Department of Education website: https://www.fldoe.org.

The rules regarding candidates and internships can be found at: https://www.flrules.org/default.asp. The
specific ones to pay special attention to are:

231.14 SUBSTITUTION - A candidate may not be used as a regular substitute teacher even
though he/she may hold a Florida Substitute Teaching Certificate.

228.041 DEFINITION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL - The candidate has the same legal
responsibility and is accorded the same protection of the laws as the certified teacher.

PROFESSIONAL TEACHING PRACTICES ACT


http://www.fldoe.org/edstandards/

231.28 EDUCATION PRACTICES COMMISSION; AUTHORITY TO DISCIPLINE This applies to the


right of the state to revoke the teaching certificate of any person given particular circumstance
outlined in the regulation.

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THE CODE OF ETHICS OF THE EDUCATION PROFESSION IN FLORIDA

The Code of Ethics of the Education Profession in the state of Florida is an essential piece of the
formal presentation by the Dean of the School during Orientation. Candidates must familiarize
themselves with the Code of Ethics of the Education Profession (6B-1.001) in Florida. It can be found
at: http://www.fldoe.org/edstandards/code_of_ethics.asp.

FLORIDA STATUTES AUTHORITY OF TEACHER

232.27 Authority of Teacher - Subject to law and to the rules of the district school board, each
teacher or other member of the staff of any school shall have such authority for the control and
discipline of students as may be assigned to him by the principal or his designated representative
and shall keep good order in the classroom and in other places in which he is assigned to be in
charge of students.

LETTER OF COMPLETION

A letter of completion is issued by the Dean of School of Education approximately one week
after graduation. These are emailed to your USF Sarasota-Manatee email account if all
graduation requirements have been met. Some school districts will accept letters as
temporary proof of program completion when applying for a teaching position. It is up to
the candidate to verify the districts position.

IV. FLORIDA PROFESSIONAL TEACHING CERTIFICATE

Because you are graduating from a university that requires you to pass all state certification
exams as part of your teacher preparation program, when you graduate you will be eligible
for a 5-year professional Florida teaching certificate rather than the standard 3 year
temporary certificate. However, it is not awarded by USF; it is something you must apply for
by submitting the Application for Florida Educators Certificate directly to Tallahassee. The
Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) requests that all applications be completed online
via their online process. District Human Resources personnel are usually happy to assist if
you have questions.

http://www.fldoe.org/edcert is the website to go to for your certification application.

ESOL: Be sure to apply and pay extra for the ESOL endorsement as well as your certification
area in your application (1016/E). Do not let your certificate expire!!

Office of Clinical Education 15 2017-2018


V. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MENTOR TEACHER

ORIENTATION

The principal and mentor teacher are key figures in making a candidate feel welcome to their
school and staff. The following activities can help the candidate feel comfortable and confident
in the school environment:

The mentor teacher should:


Introduce the candidate to the faculty and school staff;
Provide a tour of the entire school facilities;
Explain the general philosophy and policies of the school, the rules and regulations
and all emergency procedures to be followed;
Treat the candidate as a coworker and professional person;
Notify parents of the presence of the candidate and identify him/her to them;
Introduce the candidate to the students as another teacher who will be interning in
the classroom;
Acquaint the candidate with the overall program, the daily schedule and routines,
lesson plans, location of all teaching materials, the standard of conduct established,
policies on disciplinary action, emergency procedures, and pertinent information
regarding each student (e.g., cumulative records, conferences with parents, test
scores, health records, etc.);
Provide a desk/table, storage space, handbooks, teachers guides, textbooks, etc., for
the candidate; and
Make the school handbook available to the candidate.

GUIDED OBSERVATION

Planning for periods of observation early in the internship is suggested. This will enable the
candidate to become familiar with content and procedures so that he/she will be more
knowledgeable when teaching responsibilities are assumed.

The observation stage is a continuous process. While it is helpful for candidates to spend some
time observing the mentor teachers procedures during the first week, it is difficult for anyone
to just sit and watch for several hours a day. Systematic observation periods should be
integrated with other experiences such as tutoring one or two individual students. It is
important that the candidate has an opportunity to observe, at some time, all the activities that
teaching involves. We suggest that the initial observations focus on the following:

1. The procedural aspect of the classroom -- how the teacher takes roll, organizes the
class, and initiates the lesson.
2. The learning environment aspects of teaching. Most candidates and beginning
teachers find that this is difficult. While they learn about class management in the
School classroom, they cannot begin to acquire competency in it until they are in a
real class.

Office of Clinical Education 16 2017-2018


These initial observations should be the focus during the first few days and should be
accompanied by discussions. Observation periods may continue intermittently during the first
few weeks with the emphasis shifting to observing instructional techniques and procedures.

These include:

1. How is the class organized for learning? How is movement from large to small groups
accomplished? How are students grouped for optimal learning experiences? (Who is not
allowed to sit with whom?)
2. How does the mentor teacher plan for teaching? Candidates will be expected to write
fairly lengthy lesson plans at this stage of development. The lesson plans during the final
internship serve two purposes. First, they help candidates organize their thinking about
the content and processes they plan to use. Second, they serve as a communication
instrument which helps the mentor teacher and the university supervisor understand
how the candidate thinks about the crucial matter of planning for instruction.
3. How is the instruction delivered? How much time is spent talking? How are discussions
initiated and maintained? What audio-visual aids are available, and what procedures
should be followed? How can technology be employed to deliver instruction?

Candidates should also have an opportunity to learn how the everyday paperwork is handled.
Candidates are usually unprepared for the amount of paperwork that is part of the teachers
daily load, as well as the importance of doing it accurately. This is one of those competencies
that is not learned outside the classroom.

Throughout the semester, candidates may need to observe some specific aspects of the
instructional process. Sometimes this need may be expressed by the candidate; sometimes the
mentor teacher will perceive the need based on observing the candidate teaching.

PARTICIPATION

In addition to guided observation, participation in the classroom should be planned sequentially,


making the transition to full-time teaching a successful and rewarding experience.

Each mentor teacher should plan for the candidate to participate in the following areas:

A. Develop plans for instruction;


B. Secure instructional and resource materials;
C. Write daily lesson plans with the mentor teacher;
D. Tutor individual students;
E. Accompany and direct students to areas of the school;
F. Assume responsibility for one small instructional group or subject area;
G. Assume responsibility for a total class or subject area for short periods of time;
H. Gradually assume responsibility for additional groups and subject areas;
I. Assume responsibility for the total class or scheduled classes for the entire school day; and
J. Keep records and evaluate progress of students.

Office of Clinical Education 17 2017-2018


TEACHING

The length of the final internship is one full semester. The actual amount of full-time teaching
the candidate will do depends upon individual needs, past experiences, abilities, interest,
enthusiasm for teaching and commitment to the profession. There is no one plan for all
candidates. A period of six to eight weeks full-time teaching is desired. Some candidates have
assumed full-time responsibility for longer periods, others shorter. Nevertheless, a block of
weeks will enable the candidate to view the process of teaching in a more sequential,
comprehensive pattern. The block also helps candidates develop competence and confidence
in their teaching ability. The candidate will develop skill in planning for instruction over a period
of time as opposed to fragmented vision. Periodic visits by the university supervisor to observe
will also aid in determining the progress of the candidate.

The following is an example of a typical time schedule for observing and teaching:

Weeks 1-2 Observation and modeling of mentor teacher. Initial meeting between
university supervisor, candidate, and mentor teacher. Conduct routine activities
where possible.

Weeks 3- 5 Gradual undertaking of full teaching responsibilities collaboratively determined


by mentor teacher and candidate.

Weeks 3 -13 A minimum of three observations by university supervisor. This will include at
unannounced visits as well as formal observations.

Weeks 6-13 Teaching full time and have assumed classroom responsibilities.

Weeks 14-15 Gradual relinquishing of teaching responsibilities back to the mentor teacher.
Planned observations in other class settings as appropriate. Final observation
and evaluation of candidate.

Office of Clinical Education 18 2017-2018


VI. FORMAL EVALUATION

SPECIFIC GUIDELINES PERTAINING


TO FORMATIVE AND SUMMATIVE EVALUATION OF CANDIDATES

Its natural to want to know how others think we are performing. As a member of the
profession who has assumed responsibility for a candidate, a mentor teacher has an obligation
to provide the guidance necessary for developing the candidates teaching abilities. Day-to-day
informal discussions are necessary for reviewing plans and materials and evaluating together
the candidates teaching.

In many school systems, facilities and resources are available for videotaping candidates
teaching activities. Arrangements should be made through the mentor teacher, the school
principal, and the university supervisor. Videotapes have been an effective evaluation tool for
the candidate and mentor.

It is advisable for the mentor teacher and candidate to set aside some time each week to
evaluate the week in total and plan together for the week ahead; to discuss teaching techniques
and materials; to look at specific problems which have occurred; and assess areas of teaching.

Some guidelines for evaluating candidates and providing feedback are:

Evaluate the candidate as a beginning teacher, not as an experienced professional


Show cumulative progress: do not attempt to rate all skills early on in the internship
Be honest: be careful not to overrate the candidate in early evaluations; do not give
benefit of the doubt if you have no evidence
Use cooperative evaluation: ask open ended questions that encourage reflection
Provide specific feedback and assistance: give suggestions for doing things differently
Review competence: use the FEAPs as a guideline for the desired behaviors and skills
Provide written comments: these can be reviewed more easily (rather than
remembered) in the future by candidates and others

All teacher preparation programs approved in the State of Florida are required to document that
students completing their programs have demonstrated all 6 Florida Educator Accomplished
Practices (FEAPs) at the level of a beginning teacher. Therefore the formal evaluation of
candidates is critical not only for the students but for the Schools reporting responsibility to
the State Department.

The School of Educations evaluation forms are intended to be used as documents that
summarize judgments made by the Mentor Teacher and University Supervisor from both
observations as well as reviews of documents such as lesson plans, record keeping systems,
student achievement data, or parent communication developed during the internship. Our
current rating system reserves the rating of 5 (Exceptional: Expert/experienced professional
level demonstration of knowledge and skill.) for those situations in which a candidate truly
excels. We believe that a rating of 3 (meets standards) is a proficient rating that would result in
passing the internship, and a rating of 4 indicates that the candidate is advanced in a particular
area. Please use the USF SM School of Education Performance Level Indicators (Appendix B) as
your guide.
Office of Clinical Education 19 2017-2018
We suggest that a thoughtful use of the ratings will demonstrate to principals that those who
have worked with the student have recognized variable talent within an candidates repertoire
as well as across candidates. (Some principals have indicated that they place more faith in an
evaluation that is not automatically rated at the highest level for every indicator. They also read
and appreciate handwritten comments.) NOTE: Some individual indicators may not be directly
observed by a university supervisor and may need to be rated in conjunction with the mentor
teacher.

In terms of written evaluation, the mentor teacher has two obligations:

1. Complete and review the Formative I and II Final Internship Evaluation Forms with the
candidate. The formative evaluation forms are used to provide written and specific
feedback to the candidate based on several weeks performance. These are not single
lesson observation forms. The form provides a mechanism for assessing the candidates
progress on each indicator linked to the Florida Accomplished Practices and it is a
parallel document to the Summative Final Internship Evaluation Form. The first time the
form is used, it is expected that some indicators may not have been observed yet.

It is expected that when the Second Formative Evaluation Form (II) is completed, a Plan
of Action will be developed with the candidate and university supervisor to address any
area needing improvement. This form helps the candidate set goals for improvement
and direction. A Plan of Action can be completed each time an informal or formal
evaluation is completed, but it is required when any indicator is rated with a 2 or lower
on the Formative II Final Internship Evaluation Form. When used in this situation, the
Plan of Action should outline specific steps expected of the candidate that will lead to
improvement as well as support that will be provided by the mentor teacher and/or
university supervisor to help the candidate make progress. Failure to improve has
serious consequences for the candidate.

The signature of the candidate simply indicates that the form was reviewed by the
evaluator as well as the candidate and does not necessarily convey agreement.

The Formative I Evaluation Form should be completed at the end of the 4 th week; the
Formative II Final Internship Evaluation Form at the end of the 10th week and the
Summative Final Internship Evaluation Form at the end of the internship.

2. Complete the Summative Final Internship Evaluation Form at the end of the semester.
Each mentor teacher is to complete, sign, and review the Summative Evaluation Form
with the candidate at the conclusion of the internship. This form serves as the formal
assessment documenting the candidates performance and demonstration of the Florida
Educator Accomplished Practices. The University Supervisor is responsible for returning
the green copy to the Internship Office and for distributing copies to the student, the
mentor teacher, and a copy for him/herself. The candidate signs the form; however, the
signature means that a review has occurred; it does not mean there is agreement
concerning the evaluation.

Office of Clinical Education 20 2017-2018


RECOMMENDATIONS

After an internship is successfully completed, a Mentor teacher may be asked by a principal or


school district to complete a recommendation form on the candidate. It is expected that a
recommendation given by the Mentor teacher would closely mirror the ratings given on the
Summative Internship Form.

Office of Clinical Education 20 2016-2017


CANDIDATE AND MENTOR RESOURCES

The final internship experience allows the candidate to begin to take responsibility for an entire
classroom of students. Mentor teachers should model and reflect best practices and generally help the
candidate become proficient in the tasks of teaching. Communication is essential, and the candidate
benefits from specific feedback on a routine basis, especially at the beginning of the internship.
Candidates also participate in a weekly discussion seminar with their university supervisor, and there are
three workshops during the semester at which candidate participation is required.

Strong communication between the mentor teacher, the university supervisor, and the candidate is
essential in helping the candidate reach proficiency in each of the Florida Educator Accomplished
Practices, which is the requirement for a satisfactory summative evaluation. Throughout the experience,
the mentor teacher should routinely observe and evaluate the candidates behaviors and skills and
conference with the candidate.

These are the major assignments for the final internship:

1. Professional behavior at all times. Candidates are expected to act in a professional manner,
keeping the teachers duty hours at the school and participating in all teacher activities.

2. Demographic study: focus on the classroom. Candidates complete background information about
each child in the classroom and then develop an instructional action plan based on the data.

3. Impact on Pupil Performance Profile (IP3) Candidates are required to create and implement a
plan that has been designed to utilize previous learning data, to be observed implementing the
lessons, and to provide evidence of pupil impact from that lesson.

4. Videotaped lesson: candidates will have one lesson videotaped for peer and university
instructor review.

5. Formal observations: university supervisors will do dropin visits as well as a minimum of 3


formal observations. All lesson plans should be reviewed by the mentor teacher.

6. Parent/student conference: candidates are asked to observe and/or participate in at least one
parent conference during the semester.

7. The following pages have information for both the mentor teacher and the candidate.

Office of Clinical Education 21 2016-2017


Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010 Revision)
Rule 6A5.065

Revised 12/2010, the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (known as the FEAPs), identify
the state standards for effective instructional practice; these are used to define and identify
effective teaching.

Purpose and Foundational Principles.

(a) Purpose. The Educator Accomplished Practices are set forth in rule as Floridas core
standards for effective educators. The Accomplished Practices form the foundation for the
states teacher preparation programs, educator certification requirements and school
district instructional personnel appraisal systems.

(b) Foundational Principles. The Accomplished Practices are based upon and further
describe three (3) essential principles:

1. The effective educator creates a culture of high expectations for all students by
promoting the importance of education and each students capacity for academic
achievement.

2. The effective educator demonstrates deep and comprehensive knowledge of the


subject taught.

3. The effective educator exemplifies the standards of the profession.

The Educator Accomplished Practices. Each effective educator applies the foundational
principles through six (6) Educator Accomplished Practices. Each of the practices is clearly
defined to promote a common language and statewide understanding of the expectations for
the quality of instruction and professional responsibility.

Quality of Instruction

1. Instructional Design and Lesson Planning

Applying concepts from human development and learning theories, the effective educator
consistently:
a. Aligns instruction with stateadopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor;
b. Sequences lessons and concepts to ensure coherence and required prior knowledge
c. Designs instruction for students to achieve mastery;
d. Selects appropriate formative assessments to monitor learning;
e. Uses diagnostic student data to plan lessons; and
f. Develops learning experiences that require students to demonstrate a variety of
applicable skills and competencies.

Office of Clinical Education 22 2016-2017


2. Learning Environment

To maintain a studentcentered learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible,


inclusive, and collaborative, the effective educator consistently:
a. Organizes, allocates, and manages the resources of time, space, and attention;
b. Manages individual and class behaviors through a wellplanned management system;
c. Conveys high expectations to all students;
d. Respects students cultural, linguistic, and family background;
e. Models clear, acceptable oral and written communication skills;
f. Maintains a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness and support;
g. Integrates current information and communication technologies;
h. Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of
students; and
i. Utilizes current and emerging assistive technologies that enable students to participate
in highquality communication interactions and achieve their educational goals.

3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation

The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject
taught to:
a. Deliver engaging and challenging lessons;
b. Deepen and enrich students understanding through content area literacy strategies,
verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter;
c. Identify gaps in students subject matter knowledge;
d. Modify instruction to respond to preconceptions or misconceptions;
e. Relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences;
f. Employ higherorder questioning techniques;
g. Apply varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate technology, to
provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for student understanding;
h. Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and
recognition of individual differences in students;
i. Support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students to
promote student achievement; and
j. Utilize student feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction.

4. Assessment

The effective educator consistently:


a. Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose
students learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the
learning process;
b. Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives
and lead to mastery;
c. Uses a variety of assessment tools to monitor student progress, achievement and
learning gains;

Office of Clinical Education 23 2016-2017


d. Modifies assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and
varying levels of knowledge;
e. Shares the importance and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and
the students parent/caregiver(s); and
f. Applies technology to organize and integrate assessment information.

Continuous Improvement, Responsibility, and Ethics

1. Continuous Professional Improvement

The effective educator consistently:


a. Designs purposeful professional goals to strengthen the effectiveness of instruction
based on students needs;
b. Examines and uses datainformed research to improve instruction and student
achievement;
c. Uses a variety of data, independently, and in collaboration with colleagues, to evaluate
learning outcomes, adjust planning and continuously improve the effectiveness of the
lessons;
d. Collaborates with the home, school and larger communities to foster communication
and to support student learning and continuous improvement;
e. Engages in targeted professional growth opportunities and reflective practices; and
f. Implements knowledge and skills learned in professional development in the teaching
and learning process.

2. Professional Responsibility and Ethical Conduct

Understanding that educators are held to a high moral standard in the community, the effective
educator adheres to the Code of Ethics and the Principles of Professional Conduct of the
Education Profession of Florida, pursuant to State Board of Education Rules 6B1.001 and 6B
1.006, F.A.C., and fulfills the expected obligations to students, the public and the education
profession.

Rulemaking Authority 1004.04, 1004.85, 1012.225, 1012.34, 1012.56 FS. Law Implemented 1004.04,
1004.85, 1012.225, 1012.34, 1012.56 FS. HistoryNew 7298, Amended 21311.

https://www.flrules.org/gateway/ruleNo.asp?id=6A-5.065

Office of Clinical Education 24 2016-2017


School of Education Performance Level Indicators
level 1: level 2: Level 3: level 4: level 5:
Unacceptable Margina Meets Standard Advanced Exceptional
l (target 1) (target 2) (note, attainment should be rare)
1. Incomplete or 1. Underdeveloped 1. Meets standards for 1. Meets all and exceeds 1. Exceeds expectations
insufficient 2. Marginal knowledge and skills with some criteria for 2. Outstanding
2. Did not performance, some support, coaching, proficient 3. Exemplary
adequately 3. Work is scaffolding 2. Skilled, independent 4. Fully independent
demonstrate approaching, but 2. Consistent demonstration of demonstration of 5. Meets level expected of an experienced
knowledge or not yet consistent knowledge/skill competencies educator
skill in performance, 3. Proficient with respect to 3. Advanced understanding 6. Expert demonstration of knowledge
3. Demonstrated indicating partial stated criteria demonstrated and skill
knowledge or understanding 4. Satisfactory performance 4. Goes beyond what was 7. Superior with indepth understanding
skill inaccurately 4. Required a great indicating understanding and explicitly taught or and exemplary display of skills
4. Fails to perform deal of support adequate display of the skills expected 8. Comprehensive; an unusually thorough
with support 5. Incomplete 5. Focused, coherent, detailed 5. Evidence of novel demonstration of knowledge and skills
5. Shows minimal account, or enough so that essential thinking or application of 9. Use knowledge and skill and adjust
or little unsubstantiated elements are communicated knowledge and skills understanding well in diverse and
understanding generalizations, 6. Able to demonstrate 6. Rare and minor errors difficult contexts masterful ability to
6. Is incoherent, 6. Products show knowledge and skill transfer.
unfocused, limited 7. Minimal errors
7. Perfunctory responsiveness to
generalization; feedback (i.e.,
unexamined unable to
hunch; understand well
borrowed ideas enough to
8. Filled with errors incorporate
feedback)
7. Many errors
These performance indicators are to guide the development of content specific rubrics to be used to assess Critical Tasks, Transition Point Projects, and
Portfolios that are used to assess our programs for effectiveness in providing experiences that build candidate knowledge, skill and dispositions as delineated
in the Unit Standards of our COE Conceptual Framework, standards set by Florida Department of Education for each program that leads to certification in
education, and those of accrediting bodies such as the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. It is the intent of the Assessment Committee
that there is continuity and consistency in assessment such that a rated level of performance on one task refers to similar qualities or expectations on another
task rated at the same level.

25
WEEKLY SEQUENCE OF LEVEL III INTERNSHIP
This is a suggested plan for involving the candidate in activities during the period of internship. As such, this
should serve as an arbitrary guide based upon recommendations of the mentor teacher, the candidate, and the
University supervisor.

Observation Participation Planning Teaching Evaluation

Week 1 in The majority of the Assist teacher in Review & discuss Assess individual Discuss curriculum
the time spent in the gathering lesson plans learning styles & and particular
Classroom classroom. This first instructional developed by the needs of students. events during each
week will be in materials. Work w/ mentor teacher. day.
focused observation students on a one Contribute Begin conducting
and instructional toone basis. resources as routine daily
assistance. needed. activities with the
class.

Weeks Continue observation Continue & increase Develop & discuss Assume Discuss instructional
and classroom participation in plans for one responsibility for program, specific
23 assistance w/daily managing the content area with teaching one class assigned teaching
routines. classroom. mentor teacher. or subject area responsibilities, &
following joint particular events of
lesson plans. the week.

Weeks Continue Plan for instruction Assume Continue daily


participation in all with approval of responsibility for informal
47 areas of teacher mentor teacher. additional conferences, and
responsibility. curriculum areas. schedule first formal
observation.

Weeks Assume responsibility, with supervision and guidance from the mentor teacher, for as much of the classroom
activities as possible.
8 13

Weeks Teaching responsibility is gradually turned over to the mentor teacher and is concluded by the end of week 15.
Week 16 (University finals week) has been designated as a time when candidates are able to observe other
14 15 classrooms within the school as well as in other schools or outside of the country; however, all planning and
arranging must be cleared and discussed with the mentor teacher and the mentor professor.

Office of Clinical Education 26 2016-2017


COMPLETION OF COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The first three weeks Every new candidate should become very familiar with their school culture and
classroom context within the first few weeks of the internship. The Demographic Study task is designed
to help you in that effort. The act of completing this task will help you become situated in your school
and develop a personal relationship with each of your students. This is a critical task for this course.

Weeks 3 to 6 By this point in the internship you will be gradually picking up the teaching responsibilities
in your classroom: working with small groups, teaching wholeclass content in at least one subject area,
and beginning to assess student learning. Key to this process is your ability to plan and evaluate your
teaching and childrens achievement. By the second month you should be developing a record of your
curricular plans, the multiple outcome evaluations and assessment activities you have used, and begin
analytically reflecting on this continuous teaching cycle. At this point, an organized electronic format for
tracking assessment results is helpful in analyzing student progress for planning future instruction.

Plan your first formal observation sometime during the fourth or fifth week of the semester. It is best to
plan a whole group lesson in the content area that you are most competent and comfortable with now
is not the time to pick the content area that is the most challenging for you or the time of the day that is
most challenging for your students. The two critical pieces of this observation are how you teach the
information (and monitor learning) and how you manage the behavior of the students in your classroom.

Begin thinking about the Impact on Pupil Performance Profile (IP3) assignment, and discuss possibilities
with your mentor teacher. You may need to consider a few different content areas as you plan for this
assignment: the point is to show the instructional impact on pupil learning. This is the other critical task
for this course.

Around week 7 you will need to videotape a lesson. You will respond to the selfassessment topics on
page 43 to reflect about the lesson as you view it, then determine an appropriate segment to show the
rest of our class. It can be something you view as a strength or an area that you are working to improve.
Your second formal observation should be scheduled around week 78. One of your formal observations
must incorporate differentiation into your instruction.

Week 9 1 3 At this point in the internship, you should be planning and directing most of the
classroom time and activities. Interacting with parents is a key feature of successful teaching. The
Parent/ Candidate/Student Conference assignment is designed to help you prepare for and conduct
parent conferences.

Week 14 15 Your final observation should be scheduled during the last month of the semester. At this
point, I expect to see the smooth, well thoughtout and nearly flawless performance of a beginning
teacher being observed. You should be able to anticipate students responses, reactions, and
performance. It can be any type of lesson, but keep in mind that you are responsible for the actions of
everyone in the classroom. I do not expect to see your mentor teacher in the back working with a group
of students for this observation youre flying solo.

Office of Clinical Education 27 2016-2017


DEMOGRAPHIC STUDY
Rationale:

Each school and each school year is unique. The school environment is not an isolated culture, but rather
an integral part of a larger community varying in demographics, social class, race, etc. As future
teachers, you need an understanding of the surrounding community in which you will be involved so as
to better satisfy the instructional needs of the children in your classroom.

Each classroom situation presents different opportunities and challenges for the teacher. The candidate
will compile descriptive group data about students in the school and in his/her classes, presenting the
class data in chart form. The candidate will analyze these data and, after consultation with their mentor
teacher (and others if necessary), will document the adaptations that he/she will need to make to meet
the individual needs of students. Be sure to consider the rubrics at the end of the syllabus as you put the
information together.

The focus of this demographic study is your classroom. This information will serve as a guide for your
planning and interactions with students. The product is the chart and the plan for adaptations.

The first part of the study should be a profile of the school and the environment. All other information
will be about the students in your classroom. Briefly describe the physical structure and history of the
school. Describe the students, including the percentage of students receiving free or reduced meals,
the number and type of special services offered students, and the cultural and ethnic makeup of the
school. Finally, what unique qualities make this school a special place for students and teachers?

The second part of the study is a roster/chart listing particular characteristics of each child in the
classroom (without giving names or using initials). Putting the information in table format allows
you to quickly find commonalities and differences among your students, making it a bit easier to
group and differentiate instruction for them. For the academic indicators (reading and math
levels), note where the information comes from for example, if youve used the previous years
FCAT scores, say so.
Child (number or first

Siblings/position

+, -., or on grade

Math level: +, -,

Special qualities
Family situation
Home language

single parent,

characteristics
(IEP, 504, etc.)
Specific needs

Reading level:
Age in years

parents, etc.
both, grand-
and months

or on grade
ethnicity

in family
Gender,
initial)

level

level

or

J F/W 11/04 Eng 1st of Both parents None On grade Above Likes to
4; 3F, level grade read,
1M level friendly

Office of Clinical Education 28 2016-2017


The last column in the table of characteristics is for something special about each child. One of the
hallmarks of good teachers is that they have a unique relationship with each child under their care. You
cannot be successful, either in the final internship, or in a career as a teacher unless you develop a strong
relationship with each individual student. This is true no matter the age of your students or
the curriculum.

In addition to compiling the information in this table, make sure you complete the Classroom Level
Demographic Tracking Form in Task Stream. This information documents your experiences working
with a diverse student population, and your mentor teacher should be able to share the information
with you.

The final part of this study should be a general plan that identifies the particular instructional,
management, assessment, and support strategies that you will need to use to meet the needs of the
students in your class. Discuss your students with special needs with the appropriate personnel in the
school, e.g., classroom teacher, ESE resource teacher, and/or an ESOL instructor.

Write a brief plan for what you will do to adapt your teaching to meet individual needs. Specifically,
you should identify ways in which you plan to differentiate both your academic and
social/emotional instruction based on the information you collected. Technology considerations
should also be discussed within your differentiation plan. This should be general rather than specific
to any student. Be sure to guard the confidentiality of your students. You should use pseudonyms
or use a numbering system for each child in the materials that you submit for evaluation.

Examples:

Most of your fifth grade students read below grade level. Assigning independent reading for
science or other content areas may not be a very effective strategy.
Many of the boys in your kindergarten students turned 5 in August. They may not be ready
(academic, behaviorally, or mature enough) for cooperative learning activities until the second
semester of the year.
Your remedial reading students (4 of them) work with the specialist during science three days of
the week. How will you help them learn science?
You have several students in your classroom who just missed the cutoff for inclusion in the
program for gifted students. How will you help them keep focused and interested?
Most classrooms today have a large range of student abilities. How will you differentiate your
instruction to meet all their needs?

This is an excellent activity for the first weeks of your internship, and a task that you should do every
year for the rest of your teaching career. It will accelerate the process of really getting to know the
children you will be working with and put you in a much better position to discuss their progress with
parents, other teachers, and administrators.

*Go over the rubric to make sure that you have covered every item.*

This is a critical assignment for the final internship and must be posted to Task Stream.

Office of Clinical Education 29 2016-2017


EDE 4940 Demographic Study Rubric

The Unacceptable Marginal Meets Standard Advanced Exceptional


demographic Standards
study shows FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010)
the candidate Area: Quality of Instruction
collects and Accomplished Practice: 1. Instructional Design and Lesson Planning. Applying concepts from
uses diagnostic human development and learning theories, the effective educator consistently:
student data Indicator:
and e. Uses diagnostic student data to plan lessons; and
information on Accomplished Practice: 2. The Learning Environment. To maintain a studentcentered
the school and learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible, inclusive, and collaborative,
the the effective educator consistently:
environment to Indicator:
design h. Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of
instruction. students; and
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
3. Candidates make professional educational decisions drawing on analysis of data and
research from a variety of sources (Evaluation and Decisionmaking).
The Unacceptable Marginal Meets Standard Advanced Exceptional
demographic Standards
study shows FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010)
understanding Area: Quality of Instruction
and respect of Accomplished Practice: 2. The Learning Environment. To maintain a studentcentered
students learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible, inclusive, and collaborative,
cultural, the effective educator consistently:
linguistic and Indicator:
family d. Respects students' cultural, linguistic and family background;
background FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
5a. Candidates construct learning environments that reflect the diversity of experiences,
perspectives, and cultures of their students and the larger world (The Learner as an
Individual in community).
Proficiency:
5b. Candidates communicate in ways that demonstrate fairness, respect, and sensitivity to
diversity, setting high academic expectations for all students (The Learner as an Individual in
community).
The Unacceptable Marginal Meets Standard Advanced Exceptional
demographic Standards
study shows FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010)
candidate plans Area: Quality of Instruction
ways to adapt Accomplished Practice: 2. The Learning Environment. To maintain a studentcentered
the learning learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible, inclusive, and collaborative,
environment to the effective educator consistently:
accommodate Indicator:
the differing h. Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of
needs and students; and
diversity of FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
students. Proficiency:
5a. Candidates construct learning environments that reflect the diversity of experiences,

Office of Clinical Education 30 2016-2017


perspectives, and cultures of their students and the larger world (The Learner as an
Individual in community).
The Unacceptable Marginal Meets Standard Advanced Exceptional
demographic Standards
study shows FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010)
candidate Area: Quality of Instruction
adapts the Accomplished Practice: 3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator
learning consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
environment to Indicator:
accommodate h. Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and
the differing recognition of individual differences in students;
needs and FL University of South Florida SarasotaManatee Unit Standards
diversity of Understands the learner holistically
students Demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to be an effective educator
Diversity
The Unacceptable Marginal Meets Standard Advanced Exceptional
demographic Standards
study shows FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010)
varied Area: Quality of Instruction
instructional Accomplished Practice: 3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator
strategies and consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
resources, Indicator:
including g. Apply varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate technology, to
appropriate provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for student understanding;
technology, to FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
provide Proficiency:
comprehensibl 4b. Candidates demonstrate proficiency in educational technology aligned to the NETST
e instruction standards (Educational Design).
and to teach for FL USFSM COE Tracking Codes (2013)
student Code: Integrated technology
understanding
The Unacceptable Marginal Meets Standard Advanced Exceptional
demographic Standards
study shows an FL University of South Florida SarasotaManatee Unit Standards
understanding Understands the learner holistically
of differences Uses data and scholarship to inform educational practice
among students Demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to be an effective educator
as well as a Diversity
synthesis of FL USFSM Board of Governors (BOG)
student data Standard:
and grade level Critical Thinking
strategies FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
3. Candidates make professional educational decisions drawing on analysis of data and
research from a variety of sources (Evaluation and Decisionmaking).

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CLASSROOM DEMOGRAPHIC TRACKING FORM

Use the information from your classroom to complete the table below, and then transfer the information
to Task Stream. The school registrar may have some of the information as well as the mentor teacher.
School name
District
Grade Level
Current internship Select from menu

Classroom description - complete the table for the numbers of students in your classroom.
Characteristic Number

1. Number of students in the classroom


2. Number of students on free/reduced lunch
3. Number of English Language learners (those
identified, not just currently receiving services)
4. Number of students with an IEP
5. Number of students with an EP
6. Number of students with a 504 plan
7. Number of students with Individual Behavior
Contract or Functional Behavior Assessment
8. Number of students on Tier 3 RtI
9. Number of students in review process (referred for
special education evaluation)
10. Number of students retained last year
11. Gender
Male
Female
12. Race/ethnicity (keep in mind that the total must
equal the number of students in your classroom)
Hispanic/Latino
Black or African American
Asian
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
American Indian or Alaskan Native
2 or more races
White

Candidate: ______________________________________________

Mentor teacher verification: ________________________________

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USFSM Full Lesson Plan Template
Candidate Name Date
Lesson Title Grade
Florida Standards Include both the label and the description.
Arts Standards Include if appropriate to this lesson
An essential question is a main concept in the form of an inquiry it helps
Essential Question focus and organize the learning, and helps communicate why the information
is important. How does this extend beyond the grade level or classroom?
Where does this lesson fit into the content (new knowledge, guided practice,
Type of lesson
skill/drill for fluency and mastery, conceptual understanding, review, etc.)?
Assessment
Summative What is the final outcome you expect and how will you measure it? This
(include a tool or lesson may be part of a series of lessons, and your summative evaluation
data youll gather) may not be part of this particular lesson. How do you know youre there?
Formative
(include specific How will you measure and track what your students are learning as the
ways to measure and lesson progresses? How will you document this?
document progress)
Learning Objectives
The objective should state what you expect students to know, understand, and do as a result
of the lesson. For each objective, develop 1 succinct sentence to include each component:
conditions (what information and tools students will use), topic or skill (content), behavior
(what students will do to demonstrate their knowledge/skill), and outcome (measures that
determine acceptable understanding). Where are you going?
Objective(s)
How will you determine what your students already know about the
Prior Knowledge
content?
How difficult/abstract are the concepts? How relevant is the content to
Complexity
your students experiences? Where does the skill fit into the DOK?
Specific to this content knowledge and to the background of children in
Vocabulary
the classroom. How does the language help learning?
What is the overall design structure (the big picture) of this lesson? Direct
Instructional Design
instruction (such as gradual release), cooperative learning, discovery
Framework
learning, etc. How will you get there?
How will you handle progressing, proficient, and exemplary knowledge
and skill levels? How will you implement appropriate and allowable
Differentiation
instructional accommodations as specified in the IEP or 504 plan when
differentiating instruction for students with disabilities?
If you used a lesson plan or got an idea from the web or a published
Materials and source, be sure to reference it here. Include the url for electronic
Resources materials youll use. Include copies of materials, manipulatives, etc. that
will be part of the lesson plan.
How will you integrate technology within your lesson plan? How will this
Technology technology integration enhance student learning experiences? How will
Integration technology be used to create multi-lingual materials for those students
designated as ESOL learners?
Estimate the time you think each part of the lesson will take (include these
Approximate Time
estimates in each part of the activity). Be conscious of how much time you
Frame
expect students to sit at their seats listening.
Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
Office of Clinical Education 33 2016-2017
Opening How will you draw students into the What will students be doing?
lesson (what is the hook to engage
(2-3 minutes) their brains)? How will you get their What are some possible barriers
brains engaged in this subject and to their understanding?
topic?

What will you say and do?


What will you say and do? What will students be doing?

Use this section to provide step by What are your ideal student
step details about how you will teach responses? How will you handle
and guide students interactions other responses?
with the content.
Development
What are some possible
Separate instruction and activities to obstacles or barriers to their
help sequence the learning. How understanding?
will you transition between the parts
of the lesson?

Closing the Lesson How will you help students What will students be doing?
summarize the lesson?
(3-5 minutes) What do you want students to
How will you help students remember?
remember the important pieces and
reinforce their learning? What will help prepare them for
the next lesson?

Reflection post lesson delivery


Lesson Reflection What worked, what didnt work, what surprised you, what would you
do differently?
What data did you collect (formative assessment) during and after the
Evidence lesson that tell you what students have learned and what they still
need more help/practice to understand?
What will you do to help those learners who did not meet your
Plans for Re-teaching
objective?
Professional Development What will you work on for the next lesson?
Goals

Office of Clinical Education 34 2016-2017


USFSM Abbreviated Lesson Plan Format

Candidate: Grade Date:


Level: Duration of Lesson:
Instructional Design (ID) Framework, Type of lesson, and Content area:
ID Framework(s): direct instruction OR exploratory/inquiry lesson, cooperative learning?
Type of lesson: Review, introduction to new knowledge/skill, practice for mastery
Content area: math, reading, science, social studies
Standard(s):

Objective(s): 1 succinct sentence for each objective to include the conditions, topic or skill, behavior,
and student outcome.
Formative Assessment :
Include strategies for how you will monitor and document students understanding during the
lesson
Essential Question (s):
Sequence of Activities
Opening :

Development:

Closing:
Materials:
Technology Integration (including ESOL supports):

Office of Clinical Education 35 2016-2017


PLANNING FOR LEARNING
Do not confuse what you see in your mentor teachers plan book with lesson plans. What you see are
notes and reminders; shorthand for what they do. Youll get to that point, but were not there yet, and
these tools are useful anytime you have to teach something for the first time.

What do you want you students to know, think, do, and feel after the instruction?

Points to consider during planning:

Age and maturity level of the students: younger students may not be able to work for as long a
time period or as independently as older students.

The point of teaching is to connect the students to the content. How will they learn the content
what are the benefits for them to figure it out compared to having you tell them? Is it
something better learned by first examining the parts or by considering the whole?

Think about the complexity of the specific material. That will help determine how much teacher
modeling you need and how much practice the students need. Generally speaking, the more
complex the task, the easier the examples should be, especially when they are first learning it.
Move on to the harder examples after they start to understand and build some confidence
about their ability to master what youre teaching.

Can you use both examples and nonexamples? Sometimes nonexamples simply confuse the
students. Be VERY careful with nonexamples: you need to completely think these out
beforehand, or you may get into a situation where your nonexample is not really a non
example.

What is proficient? Knowing the exact dates of the Battle of Gettysburg may not be as
important in 5th grade as understanding what a civil war does to a nation. However, by 11th
grade, they may need to know that information. Do students need to know and perform the
task routinely or is finding the information enough? Does the information change rapidly?

Realities of todays classroom. How much time do you have to work with the content can any
of this be thought about as homework? If you only have social studies twice a week, how can
you maximize the learning? There comes a point in most everything when you simply have to
move on, whether the students know it or not.

How will the knowledge and skill be assessed? Will doing in groups be acceptable or does each
student need to succeed individually? Do you need to assess individual work in a group, and if
so, how will you do that?

Others? What else is important in planning this lesson or series of lessons? What does the
content knowledge as a whole look like?

Did they learn because of what you did or in spite of it?

Office of Clinical Education 36 2016-2017


WEEKLY PLANNING FRAMEWORK
Weekly planning is different from individual lesson planning. You need to think in a broader, more coordinated manner than just figuring out what to do for one day, one
objective, or one activity. You may have the same objective for more than one lesson.

Content area Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Objective

Set up
(get their interest)

Teach and model

Practice

Assess

Resources and materials

Extend and reinforce


center activities
mental floss
substitute plans

Office of Clinical Education 37 2016-2017


IMPACT ON PUPIL PERFORMANCE PROFILE (IP3)
The purpose of the IP3 is to illustrate the positive impact you have on your students learning through data
analysis and the delivery of whole group instruction. Specifically, learning occurs when the instruction
meets the needs of the students. Candidates are required to create and implement a plan that has been
designed utilizing previous student learning data, such as that collected during the Demographic Study, as
well as other measures obtained from classroom assessment data. Additionally, evidence of pupil impact
from the lessons should be collected, analyzed, and discussed. This culminating project should include the
following elements:
Learning objectives that are derived based on previous data from students (such as a pre
test), and are clear, age and subject appropriate, and linked to appropriate standards;
Assessment plans that measure the targeted instructional objectives (and are consistent
with instructional design); contain both formative and summative assessments; contain
clear criteria to define levels of success (such as a rubric); and that are shared with
students prior to the administration of the assessment.
Evidence of at least one arts-integrated lesson which corresponds to the content
standard, and also includes standards related to the selected art form.

The length of time that this will take depends on the skill selected, the instructional strategies you
choose, and other factors. This reflects your ability to use data to drive instruction. Keep in mind that you
may want to do this assignment a few times as practice. These have been suggested as helpful:

1. Work with your mentor to select a skill. Focus on one skill smaller and more concrete is
easier to measure. You are encouraged to collaborate with the music and art teacher in your
school to work toward making connections between the art/music concepts and skills your
students learn in those specials to your arts integrated lessons.
2. Correlate the skill with the teachers curriculum plan/district roadmap and the Florida
Standards. Identify how you will integrate the arts into one of your lessons.
3. Find and use diagnostic/assessment testing data ex., use chapter or unit benchmark or
pretest. The information should be related to the specific skill.
4. Work with your mentor teacher to figure out where to go from the data.
5. Use the aforementioned information to develop lesson plans (3-5), and a rationale for the
learning objectives and activities that are included, based on analysis of student data.
Introductory and culminating lessons must use the full lesson plan format, other lessons
may use the abbreviated format. Clearly identify the instructional strategies that you think
will help students learn the skill. Remember that at least one of these lessons must reflect
an arts integration approach.
6. Evidence of technology integration to support student learning and content accessibility.
7. Specify and use formative assessment information to monitor learning during the lesson(s).
Discuss how formative assessments impact your instructional decision making.
8. Create or use a summative assessment that clearly defines levels of success along with a
student friendly rubric. Criteria should be detailed for both the content and art standards.

The final document must be submitted in APA 6th edition format to Task Stream, and the narrative
should include:
1. A brief introduction of how this skill fits into the curriculum, and the alignment to the FS
2. Documentation giving examples from the assessment instruments (pre and post),
3. Embedded lesson plans with a rationale for instructional design, selection of activities and
instructional focal points, based on formative assessment data.

Office of Clinical Education 38 2016-2017


4. Evidence of arts integration in one or more lessons. Integration of art concepts and skills that are
aligned with art standards.
5. Incorporation of art standards, skills and concepts into scoring rubric used to determine student
mastery.
6. Discussion which details how all students were engaged in all phases of the creative/artistic
process as defined by the Kennedy Center: 1.) imagine, examine, perceive; 2.) explore,
experiment, and develop craft; 3.) create; 4.) reflect, access, and revise; 5.) share your product
with others. Student engagement and response to the art focused lesson should also be
included. ***NOTE: Students should have an opportunity to reflect upon, and revise, their art
products/performances using the rubrics before they are ready to share their product with
others.
7. Narrative of the student outcomes based on the qualitative/quantitative outcomes (e.g., scores,
grades, evaluations, etc),
8. A visual representation can be a comparison of pre and post scores, and your interpretation of
the outcomes (what do they mean, and what does that tell you about learning?).
9. Explanation as to how results would be shared with students and their parents/caregivers.
10. Description of what you plan to do next on the basis of your results, and a rationale for your plan
moving forward
11. A statement from your mentor teacher about the effectiveness of your instructional strategy and
the impact on student learning.

*Go over the rubric to make sure that you have covered every item.*
This is a critical assignment for the final internship and must be posted to Task Stream.

Office of Clinical Education 39 2016-2017


EDE 4940 IP3 Rubric
The IP3 shows coherence and alignment Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
with prior knowledge in a well sequenced Standard
plan, while also demonstrating evidence of Standards
arts-integration. FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 1. Instructional Design and Lesson Planning. Applying concepts
from human development and learning theories, the effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
b. Sequences lessons and concepts to ensure coherence and required prior
knowledge.
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013) Proficiency:
1. Candidates demonstrate depth and breadth of content knowledge for their
respective roles (Content Knowledge).

The IP3 is designed to build Meets


Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
pupil mastery appropriate to age, subject, Standard
skill and knowledge of student(s) Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area: Quality
of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 1. Instructional Design and Lesson Planning. Applying concepts from
human development and learning theories, the effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
c. Designs instructions for students to achieve mastery;
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
4a. Candidates design educational experiences that result in successful learning
(Educational Design).
The IP3 shows use of Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
appropriate learning goals, and formative Standard
assessment to monitor learning Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area: Quality
of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 1. Instructional Design and Lesson Planning. Applying
concepts from human development and learning theories, the effective educator
consistently:
Indicator:
d. Selects appropriate formative assessments to monitor learning;
The IP3 shows use of Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
diagnostic student information Standard
Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area: Quality
of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 1. Instructional Design and Lesson Planning. Applying
concepts from human development and learning theories, the effective educator
consistently:
Indicator:
e. Uses diagnostic student data to plan lessons; and
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
3: Candidates make professional educational decisions drawing on analysis of data and
research from a variety of sources.

Office of Clinical Education 40 2016-2017


The IP3 shows high expectations for all Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
students' growth and improvement. Standard
Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010)
Area: Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 2. The Learning Environment. To maintain a student centered
learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible, inclusive, and
collaborative, the effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
c. Conveys high expectations to all students;
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013) Proficiency:
5b. Candidates communicate in ways that demonstrate fairness, respect, and
sensitivity to diversity, setting high academic expectations for all students (The
Learner as an Individual in community).
Candidate integrates information and Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
communication technologies in the IP3 Standard
Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 2. The Learning Environment. To maintain a student centered
learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible, inclusive, and
collaborative, the effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
g. Integrates current information and communication technologies;
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
4b. Candidates demonstrate proficiency in educational technology aligned to the NETST
standards (Educational Design).
FL USFSM COE Tracking Codes (2013) Code:
Integrated technology
The IP3 shows candidate adapts the Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
learning environment to accommodate the Standard
differing needs and diversity of students. Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 2. The Learning Environment. To maintain a student centered
learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible, inclusive, and
collaborative, the effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
h. Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and
diversity of students; and
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
5a: Candidates construct learning environments that reflect the diversity of experiences,
perspectives, and cultures of their students and the larger world.

Office of Clinical Education 41 2016-2017


The IP3 shows a thorough Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
understanding of content knowledge, Standard
including the art form used to Standards
promote arts-integration FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator
consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Indicator:
b. Deepen and enrich students' understanding through content area literacy strategies,
verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter;
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013) Proficiency:
1. Candidates demonstrate depth and breadth of content knowledge for their respective
roles (Content Knowledge).
The IP3 identifies gaps in students Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
subject knowledge and differentiates Standard
instruction accordingly. Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective
educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject
taught to:
Indicator:
c. Identify gaps in students' subject matter knowledge;
Indicator:
h. Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and
recognition of individual differences in students;
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013) Proficiency:
5a. Candidates construct learning environments that reflect the diversity of
experiences, perspectives, and cultures of their students and the larger world (The
Learner as an Individual in community).

The IP3 modifies instruction to address Meets


Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
student misconceptions Standard
Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator
consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Indicator:
d. Modify instruction to respond to preconceptions or misconceptions;
The narrative and the mentor Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
teacher's comments show candidate Standard
support and encouragement of students; Standards
candidate provides immediate feedback FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator
consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Indicator:
i. Support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students to
promote student achievement;

Office of Clinical Education 42 2016-2017


The results of the IP3 show Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
the use of responses from students to Standard
monitor the effect of instruction and to Standards
adjust as needed FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator
consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Indicator:
i. Support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students to
promote student achievement;
The IP3 shows use of multiple Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
data sources to identify student learning Standard
needs and to plan for instruction Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 4. Assessment. The effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
a. Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to
diagnose students learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and
drives the learning process;
Area: Continuous Improvement, Responsibility and Ethics
Accomplished Practice: 1. Continuous Professional Improvement. The effective educator
consistently:
Indicator:
c. Uses a variety of data, independently, and in collaboration with colleagues, to
evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and continuously improve the
effectiveness of the lessons;
The IP3 shows formative and Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
summative assessment procedures that Standard
match the learning objective and lead to Standards
mastery FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010)
Area: Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 4. Assessment. The effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
b. Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning
objectives and lead to mastery;

The IP3 shows modification of Meets


Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
instructional design and assessment Standard
measures to differentiate among learning Standards
styles and degrees of understanding. FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice: 4. Assessment. The effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
d. Modifies assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles
and varying levels of knowledge;

Office of Clinical Education 43 2016-2017


The IP3 documents communication of Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
outcomes and importance to the students, Standard
appropriately to the development of the Standards
child FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice:
4. Assessment. The effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
e. Shares the importance and outcomes of student assessment data with the
student and the students parent/caregiver(s); and
The IP3 shows technology use Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
to organize and integrate assessment Standard
information (i.e. visual representation of Standards
pre/post data) FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area: Quality of Instruction
Accomplished Practice:
4. Assessment. The effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
f. Applies technology to organize and integrate assessment information.
FL USFSM COE Tracking Codes (2013) Code: Integrated technology
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013) Proficiency:
4b. Candidates demonstrate proficiency in educational technology aligned to the NETS-T
standards (Educational Design).
Candidate demonstrates Unacceptable Marginal Meets Advanced Exceptional
collaboration to support student learning Standard
and ongoing professional improvement Standards
FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area: Continuous Improvement,
Responsibility and Ethics
Accomplished Practice:
1. Continuous Professional Improvement. The effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
d. Collaborates with the home, school and larger communities to foster communication and
to support student learning and continuous improvement;
The IP3 shows effective analysis of Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
evidence (data of scores, work/products, Standard
etc.) quantitatively and/or qualitatively Standards
for impact on student learning FL Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (2010) Area:
Continuous Improvement, Responsibility and Ethics
Accomplished Practice:
1. Continuous Professional Improvement. The effective educator consistently:
Indicator:
b. Examines and uses datainformed research to improve instruction and student
achievement;
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013) Proficiency:
4a. Candidates design educational experiences that result in successful learning
(Educational Design).
FL USFSM COE Tracking Codes (2013) Code: Pupil
Impact

Office of Clinical Education 44 2016-2017


The IP3 shows analysis to determine Meets
Unacceptable Marginal Advanced Exceptional
appropriate next steps for student Standard
Standards
FL USFSM Board of Governors (BOG)
Standard:
Critical Thinking
FL USFSM COE Candidate Proficiencies (2013)
Proficiency:
3. Candidates make professional educational decisions drawing on analysis of data and
research from a variety of sources (Evaluation and Decisionmaking).

Office of Clinical Education 45 2016-2017


VIDEOTAPED LESSON ASSIGNMENT

Steps to Completion

1. Write a complete lesson plan for the lesson you will videotape.
2. Arrange for videotaping equipment and its set up.
3. Find out from your mentor teacher which students are not permitted to be videotaped and
organize the classroom so that these students will be out of the cameras view.
4. Arrange for someone to operate the video equipment; make sure they know how to use it
ahead of time, and inform them which children may not be taped.
5. Determine what teaching behaviors/strategies you want to target for this lesson (e.g. pacing,
giving specific praise/feedback, managing transitions, student engagement and ontask behavior,
questioning techniques, cooperative learning strategies, giving directions, verbal/non verbal
communication, facial expressions, voice quality, proximity, etc.) and share this with your
videographer so he/she can target these things when taping.
6. Confirm with the mentor teacher that the arranged time and date of the videotaping session are
acceptable.
7. Immediately after the taping and before viewing the tape, take some quiet time to write some
reflections about your lesson. What went well? At what point(s) in the lesson were students
highly engaged or only marginally engaged? How well did your lesson accomplished your goals
for student learning? Reflect on how well you managed the specific teaching
behaviors/strategies you targeted in this lesson.
8. View the tape.
9. Evaluate of the effectiveness of the lesson as a whole.
10. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses you observed in your teaching.
11. Reflect again on how you managed the specific teaching behaviors/strategies you targeted, and
discuss whether your earlier perceptions were verified or nullified by the video.
12. Write out your plans to improve your effectiveness relative to your targeted
behaviors/strategies.
13. Select a short clip from your video (no more than 3 minutes) to share in seminar. The clip can
showcase a strength or weakness, and will be discussed by the whole class. Your clip must be
viewable on the computer (not on a camera or phone).

Office of Clinical Education 46 2016-2017


VIII. MANDATORY INTERNSHIP FORMS AND SCHEDULE

Form Name To be Completed Send Completed Due Date


by Copy to
Form A Candidate Candidate University Supervisor As soon as Possible
Teaching Schedule

Form B University Supervisor University Supervisor & As soon as Possible


Information Sheet & Mentor Teacher Mentor Teacher

Formative I Mentor Teacher Original in Folder I


Evaluation & University University Supervisor
Supervisor (copies made for student Week 3-5
and mentor teacher) (cream colored)

Formative II Mentor Teacher Original in Folder II


Evaluation & University University Supervisor
Supervisor (copies made for student Week 8-10
and mentor teacher) (yellow)

Summative Copy to Student


Mentor Teacher Copy to Mentor Teacher Copy
Evaluation Form to University Supervisor
Week 14-15
& University (green)
Original to USF SM School
Supervisor of Education

Feedback Survey Candidate Office of Clinical Education, Mid-semester and


sent via USFSM email
End of semester

Feedback Survey Mentor Teacher COE End of Semester


Office of Clinical Education

Office of Clinical Education 47 2016-2017


Evaluation Forms

1. FORMATIVE and SUMMATIVE EVALUATIONS

Formative evaluations are done at approximately the fifth and tenth week of the clinical experience,
both by the mentor teacher and the university supervisor. These forms are included in the packet of
information given to the mentor teacher. The summative evaluation form is completed near the end of
the internship, when all indicators must be at least at a proficient level.

2. PLAN OF ACTION

Action plans can be constructed at any time during the semester, and they do not need to be completed
for indicators rated at 2s on the first formative evaluation form. However, use this form for any
indicators that are evaluated at a 2 or lower on the second formative evaluation form. The information
on the form follows these sections, and the form itself is included in the information packet for the
mentor teacher.

Action plans are most often completed jointly by the university supervisor, the mentor teacher, and the
candidate so that communication about the necessary changes is clear. For any action plan that is not
successfully completed, the Pre-completion Educator Professional Support Committee (PEPSC)
documentation must be filed with the COE. The PEPSC is initiated when there are repeated concerns
about a candidates ability to progress appropriately through the program.

Area/s for improvement Specific recommended changes


These should link back to specific indicators on the Interim
Evaluation form
Resources / additional assistance Timeline for review

3. MENTOR TEACHER FEEDBACK

The mentor teacher feedback form is included in the information packet for the mentor. The survey
asks for information about the internship experience, and includes data useful to the university and the
districts to make programmatic improvements.

4. CANDIDATE FEEDBACK

At about the midpoint of the semester, candidates are asked to complete a survey about the feedback
they are getting to improve their teaching performance. This information is collected electronically, so
please take a few minutes to respond to the email when you receive it.

Office of Clinical Education 48 2016-2017


FORM A

INTERNSHIP TEACHING SCHEDULE

Candidates Name Name of Mentor Teacher(s)

Candidates Home Address School Assigned and Telephone Number

Candidates Telephone Number(s) School Address

Candidates Email Address Are you working a part-time job?

Are you taking additional courses? Do you have children living at home? What
are their ages?

Directions: Please fill in your schedule, including lunch, recess, and times when students are at special
classes. Please indicate if you are scheduled to be in another teachers room regularly.

Time of Day Subject and Level Room #

Our lunch time is Place

Our conference time is _ Place

The school day officially begins at and ends at_

Office of Clinical Education 49 2016-2017


FORM B
Information Sheet

It is important for the mentor teacher and the university supervisor to be in frequent communication regarding the
progress made by the candidate. This sheet is designed to be completed and exchanged so that both individuals
know how to contact each other.
Please give this half to the University Supervisor:

Mentor Teachers Information

Mentor Teachers Name:


Home Phone: School Phone:
Email address: Planning period:_
Available times for conference:
Name of Candidate:

Comments:

------------------------------------------------------
Please cut here and give to mentor teacher:

Universitys Supervisors Information

University Supervisors Name:


Home Phone: Work Phone:
Email address:
Available times for conference:
Name of Candidate:

Comments:

Office of Clinical Education 50 2016-2017


Office of Clinical Education 51 2016-2017
University of South Florida Sarasota Manatee
School of Education
Final Internship Formative I Evaluation
Each section of this evaluation is aligned with the appropriate Florida Educator Accomplished
Practices as indicated at the Pre-Professional Level. Please fill in your responses like this not
like this: . Please limit your comments to the space provided at the end of this evaluation.
USFID U
NCES Code:
Please bubble your USF ID
U

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Intern Name: Todays date:

Evaluators Name: Evaluators Position:

Grade Level: , 0 0 0 0 0

Program Area: Elementary Education

Campus: Sarasota North Port


Degree Level: Bachelors MAT

Assessment Rubric: Please use the COE Performance Level Indicators (the 5-point scale provided below) to rate
your candidates competency as a beginning teacher on each indicator. Keep in mind that in order to receive a
passing grade on the final internship, every indicator must be a 3 or above by the end of the internship.

Directions: Using the following scale, please rate your candidates competency on each indicator.
1. Unacceptable incomplete or insufficient demonstration of skill
2. Marginal approaching but not yet consistent demonstration of skill
3. Meets standard consistently demonstrates skills with some support and coaching
4. Advanced meets all and exceeds some criteria for proficient demonstration of skill
5. Exceptional exceeds all criteria for demonstration of skill
6. N/A not assessed at this time
1 = Unacceptable, 2 = Marginal, 3 = Meets standard, 4 = Advanced, 5 = Exceptional, 6= NA

Instructional Design and Lesson Planning


Aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at an appropriate level of rigor C 0 0 0 0 0
Uses diagnostic student data to plan lessons C 0 0 0 0 0
Develops learning experiences that require students to demonstrate a variety of
applicable skills and competencies C 0 0 0 0 0
Effectively scaffolds information within lessons C 0 0 0 0 0

Office of Clinical Education 52 2016-2017


Demonstrates personal and professional organization and time management skills C 0 0 0 0 0
Learning Environment
Organizes, allocates, and manages the resources of time, space, and attention C 0 0 0 0 0
Manages individual and class behaviors through a well-planned management
system; establishes and enforces rules and procedures C 0 0 0 0 0
Models clear, acceptable oral and written communication skills C 0 0 0 0 0
Uses non-verbal communication C 0 0 0 0 0
Utilizes current and emerging assistive technologies C 0 0 0 0 0
Establishes and maintains effective relationships with students for learning C 0 0 0 0 0

Instructional Delivery and Facilitation


Delivers engaging
Relates and and challenging
integrates the subject lessons
matter with other disciplines and life experiences C 0 0 0 0 0
Employs higher-order questioning techniques C 0 0 0 0 0
Applies varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate
C 0 0 0 0 0
technology, to teach for student understanding
Differentiates instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and
recognition of individual differences in students C 0 0 0 0 0
Supports, encourages, and provides immediate and specific feedback to students C 0 0 0 0 0
Utilizes student feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction C 0 0 0 0 0

Assessment
Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose
the learning
students process
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives C 0 0 0 0 0
Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning
C 0 0 0 0 0
objectives and lead to mastery
Uses a variety of assessment tools to monitor student progress, achievement and
C 0 0 0 0 0
learning gains
Shares the importance and outcomes of student assessment data with the student
C 0 0 0 0 0
and the students parent/caregiver(s)

Continuous Professional Improvement


Monitors
Identifies progress relative to professional
areas of pedagogical strength andgrowth and development
weaknesses C 0 0 0 0 0
Uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and
C 0 0 0 0 0
continuously improve the effectiveness of the lessons
Engages in targeted professional growth opportunities and reflective practices, both
independently and in collaboration with colleagues C 0 0 0 0 0
Seeks mentorship for areas of need or interest C 0 0 0 0 0

Professional Responsibilities and Ethical Conduct


Adheres to the Code of Ethics and the Principles of Professional Conduct of the
the education
Education profession
Profession of Florida and fulfills obligations to students, the public, and C 0 0 0 0 0
Please provide a statement about your assessment of the candidates strengths and areas for improvement at
this point in the final internship:

Intern Signature: Evaluator Signature:


Office of Clinical Education 53 2016-2017
University of South Florida Sarasota Manatee
School of Education
Final Internship Formative II Evaluation
Each section of this evaluation is aligned with the appropriate Florida Educator Accomplished
Practices as indicated at the Pre-Professional Level. Please fill in your responses like this not
like this: . Please limit your comments to the space provided at the end of this evaluation.
USFID U
NCES Code:
Please bubble your USF ID
U

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Intern Name: Todays date:

Evaluators Name: Evaluators Position:

Grade Level: , 0 0 0 0 0

Program Area: Elementary Education

Campus: Sarasota North Port


Degree Level: Bachelors MAT

Assessment Rubric: Please use the COE Performance Level Indicators (the 5-point scale provided below) to rate
your candidates competency as a beginning teacher on each indicator. Keep in mind that in order to receive a
passing grade on the final internship, every indicator must be a 3 or above by the end of the internship.

Directions: Using the following scale, please rate your candidates competency on each indicator.
1. Unacceptable incomplete or insufficient demonstration of skill
2. Marginal approaching but not yet consistent demonstration of skill
3. Meets standard consistently demonstrates skills with some support and coaching
4. Advanced meets all and exceeds some criteria for proficient demonstration of skill
5. Exceptional exceeds all criteria for demonstration of skill
6. N/A not assessed at this time
1 = Unacceptable, 2 = Marginal, 3 = Meets standard, 4 = Advanced, 5 = Exceptional, 6= NA

Instructional Design and Lesson Planning


Aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at an appropriate level of rigor C 0 0 0 0 0
Uses diagnostic student data to plan lessons C 0 0 0 0 0
Develops learning experiences that require students to demonstrate a variety of
C 0 0 0 0 0
applicable skills and competencies
Effectively scaffolds information within lessons C 0 0 0 0 0

Office of Clinical Education 54 2016-2017


Demonstrates personal and professional organization and time management skills C 0 0 0 0 0
Learning Environment
Organizes, allocates, and manages the resources of time, space, and attention C 0 0 0 0 0
Manages individual and class behaviors through a well-planned management
system; establishes and enforces rules and procedures C 0 0 0 0 0
Models clear, acceptable oral and written communication skills C 0 0 0 0 0
Uses non-verbal communication C 0 0 0 0 0
Utilizes current and emerging assistive technologies C 0 0 0 0 0
Establishes and maintains effective relationships with students for learning C 0 0 0 0 0

Instructional Delivery and Facilitation


Delivers engaging
Relates and and challenging
integrates the subject lessons
matter with other disciplines and life experiences C 0 0 0 0 0
Employs higher-order questioning techniques C 0 0 0 0 0
Applies varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate
C 0 0 0 0 0
technology, to teach for student understanding
Differentiates instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and
recognition of individual differences in students C 0 0 0 0 0
Supports, encourages, and provides immediate and specific feedback to students C 0 0 0 0 0
Utilizes student feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction C 0 0 0 0 0

Assessment
Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose
the learning
students process
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives C 0 0 0 0 0
Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning
C 0 0 0 0 0
objectives and lead to mastery
Uses a variety of assessment tools to monitor student progress, achievement and
C 0 0 0 0 0
learning gains
Shares the importance and outcomes of student assessment data with the student
C 0 0 0 0 0
and the students parent/caregiver(s)

Continuous Professional Improvement


Monitors
Identifies progress relative to professional
areas of pedagogical strength andgrowth and development
weaknesses C 0 0 0 0 0
Uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and
C 0 0 0 0 0
continuously improve the effectiveness of the lessons
Engages in targeted professional growth opportunities and reflective practices, both
independently and in collaboration with colleagues C 0 0 0 0 0
Seeks mentorship for areas of need or interest C 0 0 0 0 0

Professional Responsibilities and Ethical Conduct


Adheres to the Code of Ethics and the Principles of Professional Conduct of the
the education
Education profession
Profession of Florida and fulfills obligations to students, the public, and C 0 0 0 0 0
Please provide a statement about your assessment of the candidates strengths and areas for improvement at
this point in the final internship:

Intern Signature: Evaluator Signature:


Office of Clinical Education 55 2016-2017
University of South Florida Sarasota Manatee
School of Education
Final Internship Summative Evaluation
Each section of this evaluation is aligned with the appropriate Florida Educator Accomplished
Practices as indicated at the Pre-Professional Level. Please fill in your responses like this not
like this: . Please limit your comments to the space provided at the end of this evaluation.
USFID U
NCES Code:
Please bubble your USF ID
U

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Intern Name: Todays date:

Evaluators Name: Evaluators Position:

Grade Level: , 0 0 0 0 0

Program Area: Elementary Education

Campus: Sarasota North Port


Degree Level: Bachelors MAT

Assessment Rubric: Please use the COE Performance Level Indicators (the 5-point scale provided below) to rate
your candidates competency as a beginning teacher on each indicator. Keep in mind that in order to receive a
passing grade on the final internship, every indicator must be a 3 or above by the end of the internship.

Directions: Using the following scale, please rate your candidates competency on each indicator.
1. Unacceptable incomplete or insufficient demonstration of skill
2. Marginal approaching but not yet consistent demonstration of skill
3. Meets standard consistently demonstrates skills with some support and coaching
4. Advanced meets all and exceeds some criteria for proficient demonstration of skill
5. Exceptional exceeds all criteria for demonstration of skill
6. N/A not assessed at this time
1 = Unacceptable, 2 = Marginal, 3 = Meets standard, 4 = Advanced, 5 = Exceptional, 6= NA

Instructional Design and Lesson Planning


Aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at an appropriate level of rigor 0 0 0 0 0
Uses diagnostic student data to plan lessons 0 0 0 0 0
Develops learning experiences that require students to demonstrate a variety of
0 0 0 0 0
applicable skills and competencies
Effectively scaffolds information within lessons 0 0 0 0 0

Office of Clinical Education 56 2016-2017


Demonstrates personal and professional organization and time management skills 0 0 0 0 0
Learning Environment
Organizes, allocates, and manages the resources of time, space, and attention 0 0 0 0 0
Manages individual and class behaviors through a well-planned management
system; establishes and enforces rules and procedures 0 0 0 0 0
Models clear, acceptable oral and written communication skills 0 0 0 0 0
Uses non-verbal communication 0 0 0 0 0
Utilizes current and emerging assistive technologies 0 0 0 0 0
Establishes and maintains effective relationships with students for learning 0 0 0 0 0

Instructional Delivery and Facilitation


Deliversand
Relates engaging and challenging
integrates the subject lessons
matter with other disciplines and life experiences C 0 0 0 0 0
Employs higher-order questioning techniques 0 0 0 0 0
Applies varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate
0 0 0 0 0
technology, to teach for student understanding
Differentiates instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and
recognition of individual differences in students 0 0 0 0 0
Supports, encourages, and provides immediate and specific feedback to students 0 0 0 0 0
Utilizes student feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction 0 0 0 0 0

Assessment
Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose
the learning
students process
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives C 0 0 0 0 0
Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning
0 0 0 0 0
objectives and lead to mastery
Uses a variety of assessment tools to monitor student progress, achievement and
0 0 0 0 0
learning gains
Shares the importance and outcomes of student assessment data with the student
0 0 0 0 0
and the students parent/caregiver(s)

Continuous Professional Improvement


Monitors
Identifies progress relative to professional
areas of pedagogical strength andgrowth and development
weaknesses C 0 0 0 0 0
Uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and
0 0 0 0 0
continuously improve the effectiveness of the lessons
Engages in targeted professional growth opportunities and reflective practices, both
independently and in collaboration with colleagues 0 0 0 0 0
Seeks mentorship for areas of need or interest 0 0 0 0 0

Professional Responsibilities and Ethical Conduct


Adheres to the Code of Ethics and the Principles of Professional Conduct of the
the education
Education profession
Profession of Florida and fulfills obligations to students, the public, and C 0 0 0 0 0
Please provide a statement about your assessment of the candidates strengths and areas for improvement at
this point in the final internship:

Intern Signature: Evaluator Signature:

Office of Clinical Education 57 2016-2017


i
One source of data regarding effectiveness of program completers is Florida Department of Education. In
Annual Program Performance Reports, assessment of student learning growth is reported by student
subgroups: White, African American, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, Free/Reduced Price Lunch
eligibility, Students with Disabilities, English Language Learners.
ii
Knowledge, skills, and dispositions refers to those that are appropriate to the roles for which the
candidate is preparing, including but not limited to knowledge of subject areas and disciplines, teaching
and leadership, individual and organization growth, data literacy and analysis skills, technology-enhanced
learning, and professional dispositions.

iii
Diversity is defined by the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) and is
adopted by the SOE faculty as a fair definition of diversity. Diversity is inclusive of individual differences
(e.g., personality, interests, learning modalities, and life experiences), and group differences (e.g., race,
ethnicity, ability, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, nationality, language, religion,
political affiliation, and socio-economic background).

iv
Diversity is defined by the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) and is
adopted by the SOE faculty as a fair definition of diversity. Diversity is inclusive of individual differences
(e.g., personality, interests, learning modalities, and life experiences), and group differences (e.g., race,
ethnicity, ability, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, nationality, language, religion,
political affiliation, and socio-economic background).

v
CAEP 2013 teacher preparation clinical experience standard 2.3; supports Advance Program standards
2016, A.2.2.

vi
National norm to be Title I eligible is that at least 40% of the student population is eligible for FRPL
programs. Schools actually designated as Title I vary by state and by school district criteria.

Office of Clinical Education 58 2016-2017