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LAPEER ST. CLAIR MACOMB
LAPEER
ST. CLAIR
MACOMB

Times

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

143rd Volume - Issue No. 33

Times Wednesday, August 16, 2017 143rd Volume - Issue No. 33 www.tricitytimes-online.com Avery goodyear Hydraulic Tubes

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Avery goodyear

Hydraulic Tubes owner, family celebrates major milestones

By Tom Wearing

twearing@pageone-inc.com

ATTICA TWP. — For the past 60 years, Stephen ‘Steve’ Lomakoski, 91, has been the owner of Hydraulic Tubes & Fitting (HTF). Born March 26, 1926 in Detroit, Steve was the son of Jozefa and Stefan, Polish immigrants who came to the United States in 1912. His father established a successful Detroit-based trucking business until the

Depression hit in 1929, when the family moved to a farm near Romeo. After graduating from Romeo High School in 1944, Steve was drafted into the U.S. military, serv- ing as a B-17 tail gunner with U.S. Army Air Corps. flying 13 missions over enemy territory. On his eighth mission, Steve’s ‘flying fortress’ was forced to crash land related to enemy action. Fortunately, only one of Steve’s crew sustained inju-

ries. Returning to the U.S. in early 1946, Stephen met his future wife, Evelyn Rumble, on a blind date. The couple married in 1950 and the rest is history. After the war, he took advantage of the G.I. Bill to further his education at the University of Michigan, majoring in mechanical and electrical engineering. Because of the high costs at U-M, he transferred to Wayne State University and earned his degree in

Photo provided
Photo provided

Steve and Evelyn Lomakoski (right) pose with family members Denise Stryker, granddaughter in-law; Jeremy Ferrett, grandson; Stephanie Lomakoski, daughter; Steve Lomakoski II, son; Tara Antonelli, grand- daughter; Pete Stryker, grandson; and Chris Ferrett, grandson.

Pete Stryker, grandson; and Chris Ferrett, grandson. Evelyn and Stephen Lomakoski mark 67 years of wedded

Evelyn and Stephen Lomakoski mark 67 years of wedded bliss this year. January of 1953. Stephen was soon employed by V.L. Grafco, a manufacturer of hydraulic fittings, hoses and compo- nents, whose owner, Vic Graf, suggested he start his own business. On June 5, 1957, Lomakoski started Hydraulic Tubes, Inc. at 5961 Mill Street in North Branch. The original work force included himself and three employees. With increased work volume, the business soon had to double its staff. In 1961, the business moved to a 15,000-square- foot facility at 155 E. 4th St. in Imlay City. But by 1965, business volume had outgrown that building, resulting in a move to 215

Milestone page 6-A

that building, resulting in a move to 215 Milestone page 6-A Smartcamps ISD summer camps a
that building, resulting in a move to 215 Milestone page 6-A Smartcamps ISD summer camps a

Smartcamps

ISD summer camps a learning experience,

see pages 3-A

ISD summer camps a learning experience, see pages 3-A Beauty&beast Movies in the Park on tap

Beauty&beast

Movies in the Park on tap in Almont,

see page 7-A

A ‘super’ guy

Terpenning is choice for superintendent job in Capac

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

CAPAC — On Thursday night, August 10, the school board voted unanimously to hire Levi (Jeff) Terpenning as their next superintendent. Audience members, com- prised of several parents and staff members, applauded the selection. Terpenning was one of three finalists to earn a sec- ond interview earlier in the week and on Tuesday, Board President Monica Standel and trustee Marie Killingbeck visited his cur- rent district, Hillsdale Community Schools, where he serves as high school principal. The other two second round finalists were

school principal. The other two second round finalists were Jeff Terpenning gives a presentation to the

Jeff Terpenning gives a presentation to the Capac School Board. Deane Spencer and Joseph Perrera. Standel and Killingbeck also visited Whittemore-Prescott where

Perrera is the superinten- dent. A site visit to Spencer’s place of employ- ment, the Macomb ISD, wasn’t deemed feasible. The board members shared their findings from the site visits and after brief discussions, indicated that Terpenning was their first choice. The vote was 6-0 in favor of the motion with trustee Barry Geliske absent as he is currently on an overseas military deploy- ment. “We’re anxious to start working with Mr. Terpenning and together move this district forward,” Standel said. She, Killingbeck and

‘Super’ page 6-A

Smart911 a smart move

St. Clair County registry can savelives

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

ST. CLAIR COUNTY — Last year, St. Clair County Central Dispatch received more than 57,600 911 calls. The vast majority of those calls—82 percent—were made with a cell phone. There are some misconceptions about just what information dispatchers can access when mobile phones are being used in an emergency. “A 911 call from a cell phone does not tell us where you are, who you are or anything else about you. It will provide us a call back number but nothing of any other value,” said Central Dispatch Director Tim Conger. It’s one reason why the county joined the Smart911 service earlier

reason why the county joined the Smart911 service earlier St. Clair County Central Dispatch hopes to

St. Clair County Central Dispatch hopes to encourage more residents to create a profile with the free Smart911 system that can relay important information to first responders in the event of an emergency.

this year. This web-based information system lets citizens register basic information about them- selves that dispatchers can access in an emergen-

cy. “Smart911 lets you the caller provide us with any info you want us to know about you, your family, pets, vehicles. The information provided to us is only limited by you. It is secure and not accessible by any one unless you call 911,” Conger noted. So far, just over 400 profiles have been creat- ed by St. Clair County residents since April but emergency services leaders are encouraging more residents to sign up at smart911.com. So far, the system has proven to be effective. In St. Clair County, dispatchers were able to com- municate via text with a caller who hung up while trying to report a disorderly subject that was threatening them. Elsewhere in the state, one man in Grand Traverse County called 911 but couldn’t speak after becoming overcome by smoke in his home. “He had a Smart911 profile and firefighters were able to respond right to his house without

Smart911 page 6-A

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tricitytimes-online.com FACEBOOK facebook.com /Tricitytimes/ The Tri-City Times is printed on recycled paper

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The Tri-City Times is printed on recycled paper ImlayCityprocedeswith‘gatewaymedian’ Project is targeted

ImlayCityprocedeswith‘gatewaymedian’

Project is targeted for completion this autumn

By Tom Wearing

twearing@pageone-inc.com

IMLAY CITY — City officials have taken anoth- er step toward constructing a “gateway median” on Van Dyke (M-53) between I-69 and Newark Rd. On Aug. 1, city com- missioners voted to pay The Spicer Group engi- neering firm $6,130 for initial design costs for the median. City Manager Tom Youatt says the median will provide an improved “first impression” for motorists entering the city from the south. In addition, Youatt

believes the existence of a median at the location could have a calming effect on traffic flow in the area. Youatt says the $150,000 to $200,000 proj- ect is consistent with Imlay City’s M-53 Corridor Plan, and already has the approval of the Michigan Dept. of Transportation (MDOT). The involved section of roadway currently has five lanes, including a rarely used center-turn lane. The existing center lane will be removed to accommodate construction of the median.

Photo by Tom Wearing
Photo by Tom Wearing

A new look is planned for the M-53 ‘gateway median’ entry to Imlay City.

The components of the proposed 10-12 foot wide median include: brick pav- ers, grasses, perennials, ornamental trees, decora-

tive lighting and a ‘gate- way’ welcome sign still in the design phase. “The survey work has been completed and we are

now in the design phase,” Youatt said. “We’ve received artist renderings

Median page 6-A

Page 2-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

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Dispatch log

Editor’s note: The fol- lowing is a compilation of activity and reports from area police departments:

In Imlay City:

August 8

07:20 Suspicious

Circumstance reported at Main St. and Grove Ave. August 9 •09:04 Property Damage Accident (S. Cedar St./ Newark Rd.)

•23:38 Customer Trouble (700 block S. Cedar St.) •Multiple Traffic Stops throughout the

Townsend Dr.) •14:01 Citizen Assist (1800 block S. Cedar St.) •15:09 Property Damage (1900 block S. Cedar St.)

•Numerous traffic stops the 200 block of N. Lester

St. in Capac •animal complaint in the 1300 block of Lathrop Rd. in Berlin Twp. •citizen assist in the 100

09:48 Suspicious Person block of E. Church St. in

(Pennzoil) •12:26 Larceny (200 block E. First St.) •20:47 Assault and Battery (400 block S. Blacks Corners Rd.) •21:27 Medical Assist (600 block Cambridge Ln.) •22:01 Suspicious

16000 block of Hough Rd.

•trespassing in the

throughout the day. August 12 •03:35 Citizen Assist(100 block W. Third

•trespassing in the 15000 block of Helen Dr. in Berlin Twp. August 11 •animal complaint in

day August 10 •01:44 Suspicious Circumstance (400 block N. Almont Ave.) •03:08 Suspicious

Person (300 block E. Third St.)

St.) •13:04 Property Damage Accident (1800 block S.

Capac

•14:30 Larceny (100 Cedar St.)

block N. Main St.)

•14:59 Property Damage Accident (S. Cedar St./ Accident (1800 block S. Morrice Blvd.)

in Berlin Twp. •found property in the 100 block of E. Church St. in Capac August 12 •personal injury acci-

•Multiple Traffic Stops Circumstances (200 block dent at Sullivan and Knoll

•13:52 Property Damage

•20:19 Suspicious

Cedar St.)

•15:32 Medical Assist Circumstance (500 block S.

(500 block S. Cedar St.) •18:05 Suspicious

Circumstance (1900 block throughout the day

Hickory Ln.) •20:58 Animal Problem

(Maple Vista St./Palmer St.) Battery (500 block

Almont Ave.)

roads in Mussey Twp. •neighbor trouble in the

•01:40 Assault and Circumstances (Rotary 15000 block of Imlay City

E. First St.) •23:04 Suspicious

day. August 13 •00:25 Suspicious Circumstances (Milagro Field) •10:02 Suspicious

Circumstances (2000 block S. Almont Ave.) •22:34 Citizen Assist (6900 block Newark Rd.)

Persons (Lions Park)

throughout the day.

In St. Clair County:

Police and emergency responders responded to dispatch calls for these inci- dents, in addition to traffic

stops: August 8 •animal complaint in the 3200 block of Wade Rd. in Mussey Twp.

block of E. Kempf Ct. in Capac

16000 block of Hough Rd.

in Berlin Twp. •noise complaint in the 200 block of N. Hunter St. in Capac

August 11

Park) Numerous Rd. in Mussey Twp.

traffic stops throughout the

•neighbor trouble in the 180 block of Christopher Stone Dr. in Capac August 13 •threats in the 400 block of N. Main St. in Capac •person/vehicle circum-

stance in the 300 block of S. Main St. in Capac •shots heard at Biles and Bowers roads in Mussey

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•23:58 Suspicious Twp.

•assist motorist at

•Numerous traffic stops Downey and Kettlehut

roads in Mussey Twp. •domestic incident in

the 16000 block of Nettney Rd. in Mussey Twp. •general fire in the

13000 block of Hough Rd.

in Berlin Twp.

•harassment call in the

16000 block of Hough Rd.

in Berlin Twp. August 14 •property damage acci- dent at Capac and Sharrard

•larceny in the 100 roads in Berlin Twp.

•suspicious circum- stance at eastbound I-69 and

•panic alarm in the Capac Rd. in Mussey Twp.

In Lapeer County:

Complaints handled by the Lapeer County Sheriff’s Department, in addition to

•multiple citizen assists traffic stops:

in the 100 block of E. Church St. in Capac

•personal injury acci- 1100 block of Blacks

dent 7600 block of Capac Corners Rd. in Goodland

Rd. in Lynn Twp. •trespassing complaint

in the 4600 block of bound I-69 in Attica Twp.

Twp. •road hazard on west-

August 8 •noise ordinance in the

Kettlehut Rd. in Mussey Twp.

•abandoned auto on S. Lake Pleasant Rd. in Attica

•intrusion alarm in the Twp.

14000 block of Hough Rd.

in Berlin Twp.

•suspicious circum- stance on westbound I-69 in

•domestic incident in Attica Twp.

•assist motorist on Lum Rd. in Attica Twp. August 9 •property damage acci-

of property in the 110 block dent on Hannan Rd. in

of N. Main St. in Capac •animal complaint in

the 14000 block of Burt Rd. dent on Brown City Rd. in

Goodland Twp. •alarms in the 4600

the 260 block of North Ave. block of Stanton Lake Rd.

in Berlin Twp. •animal complaint in

Almont Twp. •property damage acci-

the 320 block of N. Lester St. in Capac August 9 •malicious destruction

in Attica Twp. •mental health call in

the 3200 block of Wade Rd. the 2300 block of Lake

George Rd. in Attica Twp. •welfare check in the

block of Downey Rd. in 600 block of N. Fairgrounds

Mussey Twp.

in Mussey Twp. •larceny in the 14000

in Berlin Twp. •animal complaint in

Rd. in Imlay Twp. •assist other department

15000 block of Donald Rd. in the 1900 block of Hickory

in Mussey Twp.

Lane in Imlay City August 10 •suspicious circum- stances in the 4100 block of

14000 block of Turner Rd.

in Lynn Twp.

•911 welfare check in Hunters Creek Rd. in Attica the 14000 block of Alma Twp.

Lane in Mussey Twp. August 10

•intrusion alarm in the

•harassment call in the

•personal injury acci- dent in the 3200 block of N.

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•area check at Capac Lake Pleasant Rd. in Attica

and Tubspring roads in Berlin Twp. •person/vehicle circum-

stance in the 100 block of S. 2700 block of Bay Point

Court in Imlay Twp. •burglary in the 3300 block of Schook Rd. in Goodland Twp. •suspicious circum- stances in the 1300 block of Youngs Rd. in Attica Twp. •vehicle off the road on Slattery Rd. in Arcadia Twp. August 14 •threat to injure and welfare check in the 5800 block of Gark Rd. in Attica Twp. •property damage acci- dent on Clear Lake Rd. in Arcadia Twp. •mental health call in the 3900 block of Five Lakes Rd. in Attica Twp.

Main St. in Capac •personal/vehicle cir- cumstance at Martin Rd. and I-69 in Mussey Twp.

Twp. August 13 •vehicle theft in the

Tri-CiTy Times

Published weekly by Delores Z. Heim. Office:

594 N. Almont Ave. • P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444. USPS No. 014440. Additional entry applicationpending.

Subscriptions: $30 per year Lapeer & St. Clair Counties; Out of Counties $32 per year, Senior Citizens $27 per year In-County. Out-

of-Statemailing$40peryear.OutsideUSA$60

peryear. SingleCopies50¢.

Periodicals paid at Imlay City.

Postmaster please send address changes to P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444.

Page 3-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Learningandgrowingexperience

Lapeer ISD Summer Camps offer variety of educational adventures

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

ATTICA — Dill, calendula and marigold. Ram, ewe and lamb—stu- dents in last week’s animal science and horticulture camp at the Lapeer County Ed Tech Center sunk their hands in the dirt and learned lots of new terminology. This week the Lapeer County Intermediate School District’s summer camp program wraps up. Since mid-June, students from across the county took part in 14 different offer- ings related to the programs offered during the school year. On August 7, kinder- garten through third grade students were hard at work in the Ed Tech Center’s greenhouse and barn, learn- ing about plants and live- stock. “Not all plants can be grown from seed and for those plants with tiny seeds, it’s easier to start with a part of a plant so that’s why we take cuttings,” said paraprofessional Debbie Thompson. A few minutes later she and the students headed to the greenhouse where they took cuttings from a variety of plants like spider, kalan- choe and citronella. They also planted a flower gar- den in a cell pack using dill, calendula, marigold and zinnia seeds. In the classroom next door, Agriscience instructor Tammy Hyatt and Animal

Photo by Maria Brown
Photo by Maria Brown

Paraprofessional Debbie Thompson and summer camp students scope out raised veggie beds at the Ed Tech Center as part of their horticulture lessons.

Center Manager Roslyn Owens helped youngsters

learn the proper terminolo- gy for common livestock. “A boy goat is called

a

The group then learned

buck,”

Hyatt said.

about the proper ways to handle animals. “We went to the barn this morning and the kids helped feed the animals and

pet them. Now, we’ll talk about using halters and

gauze muzzles,” Hyatt said. This week, seventh through ninth graders will delve into advanced veteri- nary science, learning about parasites and diseases. Other courses through- out the summer included introductions to the culi- nary industry, baking, entrepreneurship, film, robotics, welding and more. Instructional Services Manager Dawn Mosher said the ISD’s summer camp offerings have grown significantly in just three years. “In the summer of 2014 we offered a Summer STEMM Camp. That fol- lowing year we decided to add additional camps,” she said, noting there were five programs in 2015. “We hosted 14 camps this year.” The camps offer any- one from kindergarten through ninth grade the chance to explore some- thing unique during their summer break and, poten- tially, get them thinking about life after school. “We wanted students to have hands on learning opportunities that provided them the opportunity to learn what the Education and Technology programs entailed and the careers that could stem from these pro- grams,” Mosher said.

Photo by Maria Brown
Photo by Maria Brown

Ellerie Whitt, Myla Case and Dylan Yakes show off their cuttings and plantings in the horticul- ture summer camp.

ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH

ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH PIG ROAST Sunday August 20, 2017 12noon – 2 pm Adults $10

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Sunday August 20, 2017 12noon – 2 pm

CHURCH PIG ROAST Sunday August 20, 2017 12noon – 2 pm Adults $10 Children 5-12 $5

Adults $10 Children 5-12 $5 Children 4 & Under Free

Includes: Corn on the cob, coleslaw, baked beans, baked potato, pasta salad, bread, cake, pie, pop and water

TAKEOUTS AVAILABLE

Photo by Maria Brown
Photo by Maria Brown

Agriscience teacher Tammy Hyatt demonstrates how to use a gauze muzzle on dogs when administering vaccines.

Free backpacks, food this Friday

CAPAC — Backpacks filled with school supplies will be given to low-income families this Friday, August 18, at Capac Elementary School from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. as part of the Back to School 2017 event. A large food truck with added meat will distribute food from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Attendees will be required to show proof of St. Clair County residency. The backpack giveaways are coordinated by Blue Water Community Action. Specifically, the Capac giveaway is being organized by the McLaren Port Huron Hospital Foundation and is intended to serve families in the western portion of the county in the Capac and Yale school districts. For more information about this event, contact Heather Hayes, McLaren Port Huron Foundation, at (810) 989-3776.

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Call today to book the Escape Room! 586.372.1972
Call today to book the Escape Room!
586.372.1972

Page 4-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Get ready to ‘Party at the Ponds’

TRI-CITY AREA — Seven Ponds Nature Center in Dryden is preparing to celebrate its 50th anniversary on Friday, August 25 from 2-9 p.m. Visitors are welcome to converge at the center and enjoy an Open House, trail walks, history displays, complementary snacks and beverages and more. Representatives from Seven Ponds many clubs, including astronomy, beekeepers, camera, herbs and butterfly, will be on hand. A number of special activities are also planned throughout the day, including a Time Capsule Ceremony at 8:30 p.m. All are welcome to attend. Seven Ponds Nature Center is located at 3854 Crawford Road in Dryden. For more information call 810-796-3200 or visit sevenponds.org.

M-53 road work ongoing in area

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

IMLAY TWP. — Motorists on M-53 are encountering more orange barrels this week. Beginning Monday, August 14, the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) began resurfacing work on the state highway between Imlay City and Bowers roads. Work includes joint

repairs, and milling and resurfacing of the roadway, which is funded with MDOT’s remaining winter maintenance budget. Fortunately, the impact on traffic should be mini- mal as all the work will be done during overnight hours. Traffic is being maintained with flag con- trol. “This project will cre- ate a smoother road surface by repairing joints and eliminating larger bumps

in the roadway,” MDOT said in a statement. The work is expected to be complete by next month. It’s one of two area state highway projects that MDOT is using $720,000 in leftover winter mainte- nance funds for. The other will encompass a portion of M-15 in Genesee County. Overnight work is also being done on M-53 from the Lapeer/Macomb County line north to I-69.

on M-53 from the Lapeer/Macomb County line north to I-69. Also this week, crews start- ed

Also this week, crews start-

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roadway repairs on I-69

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County taps into centralized system

Birth certificates now available online

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

LAPEER COUNTY — An agreement between the state and county will now allow residents to access the Michigan Centralized Birth Certificate System without having to travel to Lansing. Last month, the county signed an agreement with the state that established fees for obtaining certified copies from the database remotely through the Lapeer County Clerk’s office. The fee is $40 for the first copy and $21 for additional copies. The county gets to keep $6 of the $40 fee. Clerk Theresa Spencer stressed that there are no fees for accessing docu- ments housed within Lapeer County’s vault although they charge $10 for one certified copy. According to the

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services’ website, their Vital Records Office has records of births, deaths, and marriages that occurred in Michigan and were

filed with the state as early

as 1867.

In other recent com- mission business:

•commissioners approved the disbursement of $247,533 in county bridge funds to the road commission. •authorized the sher- iff’s department to accept a $22,500 grant from the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority to purchase new taser equip- ment •the board approved submitting a $32,000 grant application to the Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant as it

relates to their participation

in the Thumb Narcotics

Unit.

Facebook photo
Facebook photo

Sanilac County Sheriff Garry Biniecki and Lapeer County Sheriff Scott McKenna present Deputy Dan Kohler with a special award for his rescue of a canoeist last November.

Deputy Kohler is honored for saving man’s life

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

LAPEER — Deputy Dan Kohler is credited with saving the life of a canoeist last year and last week he was formally rec- ognized at Thursday’s county commission meet-

ing. Sheriff Scott McKenna presented a Life Saving Award to Kohler with the help of Michigan Sheriff’s AssociationRepresentative, Sanilac County Sheriff Garry Biniecki. In November 2016, Kohler responded to Twin Lake in Mayfield Township where a 56-year-old Port Huron man had been fish- ing from a canoe when the vessel flipped over, accord- ing to reports at the time. Due to the cold water and heavy clothes he was wearing, the man couldn’t swim the estimated 100 yards to the shore. So he clung to the side of the

canoe and called for help.

A St. Clair Shores man

who was hunting nearby

heard the the man’s calls

for help and called 911.

Deputy Kohler, a mem- ber of the sheriff’s dive team, donned his wet suit

and entered the water, tak-

ing

an inflatable life vest to

the

man in distress. Officers on shore uti-

lized a line and three Rescue Disks to pull the victim to shore. He had been in the water for approximately 45 minutes. “Deputy Kohler never hesitated and put his own life in danger to save another,” McKenna said. “After Deputy Kohler was able to bring the man

ashore, he transported to McLaren Lapeer where he made a full recovery.” Kohler acknowledged the assistance he received

on scene from fellow depu-

ties, the Michigan State Police and Department of Natural Resources.

File photo
File photo

Members of Imlay City High School’s Class of 1967 take part in Blueberry Festival parade.

Imlay’s Class of ’67 reunites

By Tom Wearing

twearing@pageone-inc.com

IMLAY CITY — It was 1967. It was the year Elvis Presley married wife Priscilla in Las Vegas and O.J. Simpson was a run- ning back at the University of Southern California. The war in Vietnam was raging that summer, and there were riots in the streets of major U.S. cities, including Detroit. A “Whiter Shade of Pale,” “Light My Fire” and “All You Need Is Love” topped the record charts, and people flocked to local theaters to see The Graduate, Cool Hand Luke and The Dirty Dozen. It was also the year 98

young men and women strode to the podium at Imlay City High School to collect their diplomas; officially acknowledging them as members of the school’s Class of 1967. To mark the 50th anni- versary of their graduation, 33 members of the Class of 1967 reunited for the 2017 Blueberry Festival. The class members convened that Friday for a dinner party at Countryside Banquet Center; and gath- ered again on Saturday afternoon as participants in this year’s Blueberry Parade. Ironically, said class member Joyce Nolin, this year was the first time the Class of 1967 had reunit- ed.

Nolin recalled some top achievers among her classmates, including Class Valedictorian Brenda Turner; Salutatorian Joe Dobos; and Class President Loren Ettema. Though she could not remember the Class Song, Nolin was positive that the “black rose” was selected as Class Flower. She also recalled her Class Motto, which read:

“The practice is over, and the game is about to begin.” Remembering Nolin sadly noted that 18 members of the Class of 1967 are now deceased, including classmate, U.S. Army Cpl. Henry L. Gutierrez, who was killed in Vietnam on February 1, 1969 at the age of 20.

File photo
File photo

Members of Imlay City High School’s Class of 1967 gather for reunion during Blueberry Festival weekend.

Page 5-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

‘Rock of Ages’ concludes concert series on Aug. 22

By Tom Wearing

twearing@pageone-inc.com

IMLAY CITY — The

Imlay City DDA’s 2017 Summer Concert Series at Lamb-Steele Park comes to

a close on Tuesday, Aug.

22.

The final concert of the season features the return of the “Rock of Ages” big band. Founded in Flint, Michigan in 2002, Rock of Ages features musicians with a passion for swing music. The band’s musical

itinerary includes tradition-

al big band favorites from

the 1940’s, along with “swing,” Motown and cur- rent hits. Band members include:

Becky Holt, keyboard; Doug Ford, bass; Tom Wachterhauser, drums: and David Smith, guitar. The saxophone section features: Joann Ranville, Joe Miller, Steve Figgins, Tom Lendzion and Tom McEachern. Playing trumpet are:

John Rowden, Kurt VanSteenburg, Rick Horton and Stan Visser. The trombone section includes: Gary Smith, Jim Greer and Mike Smith. Rounding out the band’s sound are vocalists:

Malori Pickell, Dave McDonald and Kyla Ford. Concert attendees are encouraged to bring along their own blankets, lawn chairs and snacks to enjoy the show. In the event of inclem- ent weather, the program will be moved inside the Imlay City’s Heritage Church at 543 N. Cedar St. For questions or more information about the Imlay City DDA Summer Concert Series, call 810- 724-2135. Or visit the website at: www.icdda.com

Website photo
Website photo

The big band sounds of ‘Rock of Ages’ will round out Imlay City’s Summer Concert Series on August 22.

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Page 6-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Statesuperintendent tomakestopinDryden

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

DRYDEN — When Cardinal Day arrives August 22, a special guest will be on hand to greet parents and students prep- ping for the new school year. State Superintendent

Brian Whiston is slated to speak at 6 p.m. at Jr./Sr. High School and then do a Q&A session with those in attendance. Dryden Superintendent Mary Finnigan said Whiston will be addressing his Top Ten in Ten strate- gic plan to make Michigan

a top ten education state in

ten years. Finnigan said she invit- ed Whiston to come to Dryden after hearing him speak on several occasions last year. She believes that

Dryden Community Schools already embodies many of the strategies Whiston is advocating for, in particular, personalized learning. “We’ve been trying to do that in Dryden and we’ll be ramping that up this year. We want to remove barriers and move kids to where they best fit,” she said. “For instance, this year we have 13 sixth graders who are so advanced, they’ll be taking seventh grade classes. We’re really blurring the lines when it comes to grade levels.”

Finnigan said the dis- trict’s early college and dual enrollment offerings are well accepted, with Dryden students complet- ing a total of 313 college classes in the 2016-17

Median: Completion is expected this autumn

from page 1-A

and photos of gateway median projects in other communities.” Provided things pro- ceed as he hopes, Youatt says the project can be completed by late autumn. “We’re still looking to complete the design and bid the project out soon (around Aug. 25). That way we can get it done this fall,” he said. If all goes as planned, the bid opening will take

place on September 11 and

a contract awarded on

September 19. “This is going to be a

unique project for the city.

It will be a high profile

improvement and should please Imlay City residents and visitors to the commu- nity,” he continued. “It’s an exciting time to be in Imlay City.” And more to come Youatt notes that the gateway median project

coincides with other scheduled fall road proj- ects in the city, including the resurfacing of Capac Road (M-21) from Almont Avenue east to

M-53.

In conjunction with the project, a 300-foot section of Fairgrounds Rd., north of Capac Rd., will be resurfaced. That Capac Road proj- ect is being engineered by Rowe Professional Services and is expected to cost about $310,000. Half of the project’s

cost ($155,000) will be funded through a 50% matching grant awarded the city by MDEQ

(Michigan Dept. of Environmental Quality). Construction of the median is expected to begin on October 9, with a “substantial completion” date of November 11. Final completion of the project will occur later in November.

Smart911:

from page 1-A having to search for him,” Conger said. He said the application is also helpful for citizens with disabilities or impair- ments. “Smart911 gives us the ability to text you if we receive a 911 call from your phone which is important for the hearing or speech impaired,” Conger said. So far, a vast majority of Michigan counties are system users and Smart911 is in use in states across the country. “Anyone can make a Smart911 profile but the system will only work in counties that have joined the Smart911 system. It is also nationwide as well. So if a person in St. Clair County travels to another county that is a user of the Smart911 system it will work there regardless of the state they travelled to,” Conger noted. Users will be asked to enter information about their household, addresses, phone numbers, emergency contacts, preferred provid- ers for things like ambu- lance providers and hospi- tals, vehicles owned and animals in your residence. Participants have the

option of providing more detailed information that could be helpful for first responders too like the color of their home, num- ber of residents and the location of bedrooms in the home. The program offers the ability to upload photos of children which Smart911 says could aid police when looking for a lost or abducted minor. “You can put your phone, spouse’s phone and your children’s phones all on the same profile. The system will tell us which family member that phone belongs to,” he said. “You can create pro- files for those in your fam- ily that may not have access to a computer sys- tem such as elderly par- ents.” All information is optional and the citizen has the ability to choose what details they would like to include. Regardless of how much information a user chooses to disclose, Conger encourages all resi- dents to log on and create a profile. “Please help us by cre- ating a Smart911 profile for you and your loved ones. The service is free and the time is well spent,” he said. For more information, visit www.smart911.com.

he said. For more information, visit www.smart911.com. State Superintendent Brian Whiston will visit Dryden

State Superintendent Brian Whiston will visit Dryden Community Schools next week to meet with parents, stu- dents and staff.

school year. Any high

schooler who earns a suffi- cient score on the PSAT test qualifies. “We keep trying to do

new things

side of the box,” she said. This fall, at the ele- mentary school, the pre- school and kindergarten programs will utilize the Montessori model, consid- ered a student-centered approach. Several years ago the elementary began using multi-age classroom settings and for the coming school year will have one each 1st and 2nd grade, 3rd and 4th grade and 5th and 6th grade classes. Goal #2 of Whiston’s seven Strategic Goals calls for “high-quality instruc- tion in every classroom

to

think out-

through highly coherent,

child-centered instructional model where students meet their self-determined aca- demic and personal goals to their highest potential.” Whiston has served as State Superintendent since July 2015. Prior to making the move to Lansing, he served as superintendent of Dearborn Public Schools, Michigan’s third largest school district. Finnigan readily admits that getting parents to embrace this change took time and effort. When

a group of eighth grade

students were placed in a ninth grade science class, administrators and teachers had multiple meetings with concerned parents. “Struggle is a part of life and we want to teach kids to embrace the strug- gle. That’s where most of the learning will occur,” Finnigan said. In this mastery model, the intent is to push learn- ers beyond their comfort zone but, as the same time, provide a safety net. Students can take a risk and if they fail, they still have time to rebound and obtain all the necessary credits before graduation. So far, the evidence is there. “Last year we had the highest SAT scores in sci- ence, social studies and English in Lapeer County,” Finnigan said. The first day of school in Dryden is Monday, August 28.

‘Super’:

from page 1-A

Treasurer Bill Ellis will comprise the committee tasked with negotiating a contract with Terpenning. His first day on the job in Capac will be August 28, eight days before the new school year begins on September 5 in Capac. “Because his district starts August 23, Jeff wants to get his building up and running. His last day on the job with them will be the 25th,” Standel said. Terpenning is a native of Deckerville and, in his presentation to the board last week, stated his desire was to return to the Thumb to live and work. “I don’t view Capac as a stepping stone,” the 55 year-old said in his second round interview. Board members said they valued his experience outside of the classroom. Before enrolling at Saginaw Valley State University at the age of 30, Terpenning worked in retail settings, including stints as a store manager with D&C Dime Stores and the Tractor Supply Company. He was employed with Teen Ranch, a private care facil- ity for troubled youth. He coached various sports including football at several schools in the Thumb, was a high school teacher in Centreville for eight years and has been principal in Hillsdale for the last five years. As a teen, Terpenning was an FFA member and attended several conven- tions as an educator. During his presentation to the board, Terpenning showed pictures of the

horses and cattle he owns. He described himself

as “very approachable

the person you’re going to see at the grocery store,” Terpenning told the board. He said he puts a lot of value in creating a positive culture in a school district and believes it’s important to prevent “self-inflicted wounds.” Earlier this year, in April, both Terpenning and Perrera earned interviews

when Sandusky was look-

I’m

ing to hire a new superin- tendent. Terpenning earned

a second round interview

in that situation. In May, Perrera was one of five finalists for the Bay City superintendent post, along with Capac’s Dr. Steve Bigelow. Bay City leaders eventually tapped Bigelow for the job and he departed Capac Schools on June 30 after two years on the job. Since Bigelow left, Dr. Chuck Smith has served as interim superintendent. A total of 33 candi- dates applied for the Capac job. Board members nar- rowed the field to six final- ists, interviewing Terpenning, Spencer, Perrera and Hillman’s Jason McElrath, Hale’s Loren Vannest and Peter Toal of Flint’s Westwood Heights. “We were happy with the services the Michigan Association of School Boards offered us in nar- rowing down our choices. It was a smooth process that ultimately resulted in us choosing Mr. Terpenning,” Standel said. At Thursday’s meeting, the board also approved hiring Sean Lively as their next elementary principal and Richard Cross as their jr.-sr. high assistant princi- pal/athletic director.

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Photo provided
Photo provided

Steve Lomakoski (center) prepares to cut the

cake, while HTF President John Berney and Jim Musser (a former HTF owner) look on.

Milestone: Celebrating accomplishments

from page 1-A

N. Main St. in Almont. With continued growth over the years, Lomakoski and HTF President John Berney decided to move the business to a 95,000-square-foot facility at 434 McCormick Drive in Lapeer. Accolades & honors Last Saturday, Aug. 5, Lomakoski’s family, friends and business asso- ciates gathered at Attica Twp. Park to recognize and honor the man and the business he founded in

1957.

“After 60 years, it

Stephen and Evelyn’s large family includes five children: Diana, Sharon, Linda, Stephanie and Steve; along with eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. From the heart Antonelli said her grandfather is loved, respected and revered by family members, some of whom offered personal comments. “When I asked family members to best describe Grandpa,” said Antonelli, “they responded with words like wise, humble, dedicated, dependable,

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into the U.S. mili-
tary in 1944, serv-
ing as a B-17 tail
gunner.
Photo provided

makes me feel good that something I created so many years ago, with the help of my blind date and the children she raised, still exists,” Lomakoski said. “What makes this so great is that HTF is in the hands of qualified people, the Berney family.” Lomakoski family spokesperson Tara Antonelli acknowledged her grandfather for his many fine qualities, and for the example he set for other family members and others whose lives he touched over the years. Antonelli said her grandfather, Stephen, and grandmother, Evelyn, have yet another reason to cele- brate this year, noting that the couple is marking their 67th year of marriage.

treasured and inspirational. “Others said ‘he was the smartest man I have ever known’ and ‘what every man should try to be.’” As the second of Lomakoski’s eight grand- children, Antonelli offered some words and thoughts of her own. “Grandpa has gifted all of us with a legacy to be proud of and for us to carry on,” said Antonelli. “He is very loved and respected by all of his kids and grandchildren. “We are a very blessed family,” she continued. “Both Grandpa and Grandma are the glue that keeps us all together. “The love and support they’ve given us is uncon- ditional.”

Photo provided
Photo provided

Steve poses for photo during his years in U.S. Army Air Corps.

Page 7-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Beauty & The Beast at Almont Park Aug. 18th

Rock painting project part of the summer fun

Website photo
Website photo

‘Beauty & the Beast’ will be screened at the Almont community Park on Friday, August 18.

pavilion, all are invited to paint rocks in conjunction with the Kindness Rocks Project (KRP). KRP founder Megan Murphy says she came up with the idea for the project after experiencing a per- sonal epiphany. “In the spring of 2015, having just returned from a trip to India,” Murphy recalls, “I was on my rou- tine morning walk when I experienced an epiphany.

“Like many others,” she says, “I walk each morning to clear my head and tap into deeper insight.” It was during one of those daily walks, says Murphy, that she found her- self looking for inspiration- al signs and messages along the way. “That was when I had the idea to paint inspira- tional messages on rocks and drop them for others to stumble upon,” Murphy

says. She says she wants to provide inspiration and share moments of kindness with unsuspecting people, by randomly dropping the painted messages for others to find. “Kindness is truly con- tagious,” she says. Megan Murphy is a women’s empowerment coach whose focus is to inspire and encourage strong women.

By Tom Wearing

twearing@pageone-inc.com

ALMONT — “Movie Night in The Park” returns to Almont Community Park on Friday, August 18. Co-sponsored by Orchard Arbor Gleaner’s Insurance and Almont Parks & Recreation, the evening’s film feature will be “Beauty and the Beast,” starting at 8 p.m. The 2017 film version of “Beauty and the Beast” is a live-action feature that retells Disney’s earlier ani- mated classic. Attendees are encour- aged to bring along their own chairs and blankets to enjoy the free movie. They will be provided arm bands at the check-in table.

Concessions will be available for purchase from members of Almont’s Project Graduation Committee who are raising funds on behalf of the Almont High School Class of 2018. The showing of Beauty and the Beast comes on the heels of a Friday, July 21 “Movie Night in the Park” that attracted an estimated 270 people. Park Board Chairman Gary Peltier pointed out that unlike the Park Board’s summer concerts in the park, “Movie Nights” take place in the eastern-most portion of the park. “The movies are not shown at the park pavilion, but across the bridge on the north side of the bike path

near the sledding hill,” Peltier noted. “The inflat- able screen is huge; proba- bly 15-20 feet wide. And the sound is excellent. “It reminds me of the sound and view we used to get at a drive-in movie the- ater,” said Peltier. “It has that look and feel.” Peltier advised that in the event of inclement weather, the movie will be cancelled. “The movies will not be relocated to the Lions Hall, as are the concerts,” Peltier added. “The hall will not be available.” Otherwise, he encour- ages attendees of all ages to arrive early and take advantage of pre-movie activities for children. Kindness Rocks Besides the park slides and play toys at the park

Photo provided
Photo provided

Visitors make themselves comfortable during last month’s ‘Movie in the Park’ in Almont.

Business briefs

Editor’s note: Notices for this column must be received in writing by noon Monday prior to the publication date. Notices may be edited due to space constraints.

Scotts sales on the rise

IMLAY TWP. — Last month the Scotts Miracle-Gro Company reported an eight percent increase in third quarter sales. For the quarter ended July 1, 2017, com- pany-wide reported net sales were $1.08 billion, compared with $994.1 million compared to the

same time period in 2016. Additionally, their board of directors announced a six percent increase in shareholder dividends, moving to $0.53 per share from $0.50 per share. The Scotts Miracle- Gro Company is the world’s largest marketer of branded consumer

products for lawn and gar- den care.

Hyponex

is

one

of

several brands in the Scotts Miracle-Gro com- pany’s portfolio. The Hyponex facility in Imlay Twp. produces bagged dirt and wood chips for the retail market.

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Page 8-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Our Opinion

Don’t get burned by debt collection scam

U nfortunately, there are people out

there who prey upon the honesty

and integrity of others. Scammers

know no boundaries, and their

grubby fingers reach into all segments of the population. The internet and modern technology has increased the opportunities for scammers to anonymously fill their pockets with other people’s hard-earned money. The Michigan Department of Treasury is asking residents to be alert for a new scam that implies the federal government will pay their outstanding state tax debts or other state debts. Within the last month, the state Treasury Department has noticed an increase in cases where individuals are attempting to pay their outstanding state debts with routing numbers from two U.S. Department of Treasury Bureaus—the Financial Management Service (FMS) and the Bureau of the Public Debt (BPD). Individuals are using these federal routing numbers with their Social Security Number as the check- ing account number and listing the bank as either the FMS or the BPD. As a part of this scam, the U.S. Department of Treasury warns that groups are holding seminars throughout the United States that fraudulently teach attendees to use these federal routing numbers to resolve their outstanding government debts. Deputy Treasurer Ann Good, who heads up the Treasury’s Financial and Administrative Services Group says people who try to pay their state debts in this way will have their payment rejected. She says the Treasury will work with residents to resolve their outstanding debts. Individuals who think they may have an outstanding state tax debt or other state debt are encouraged to call state Treasury Department's Office of Collections at 517-

636-5265.

For more information about state tax debt or other state debt collections, go to www.michigan.gov/treasury.

Letters from our readers

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Friends of Trail seek matching funds

For the first time since the old Polly Ann rail cor- ridor was acquired in 1999, area residents have the opportunity to develop a portion of the Polly Ann Trail in Lapeer County. Lapeer County, with support from the Friends of the Polly Ann Trail, has applied to the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund for a $300,000 devel- opment grant. This grant requires a $100,000 local match. The Friends group

has pledged $25,000, and the Lapeer County Community Foundation has also pledged $25,000. Requests to other founda- tions have been submitted. We will need your help to make up the balance. Trail improvements in this transformational proj- ect will include drainage and surfacing with fine limestone which meets the Recommendations for Accessibility Guidelines for Outdoor Developed

Areas of the U.S. Access Board as designated by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Specific improve- ments include replacing six culverts, making two bridge approach structures meet ADA standards, branch clearing for path- way clearance from Imlay City to Dryden (5.5 miles), ditch improvement for drainage, and installation of eight inches of crushed limestone surfacing from Imlay City to Dryden (5.5

miles). You can help make this happen! Your donation will make a difference! For more information, to view our video, and to make a donation, go to:

http://www.patronicity. com/LapeerPollyAnnTrail. Thank you for consid- ering this request. —David Howell Chairman Friends of the Polly Ann Trail Dryden

Clover Buds say ‘it does take a village’

Wow! Another great year for the Lapeer County 4-H Beef Clover Buds. This year we had 17 par- ticipants in the program. This is a group of children ages 5 to 8 who are too young to show on their

own, but are still interested and usually at the fair all week helping other family members with their animal projects. We have so many this year to thank. This year we honored Howard Redd with Redd Electric in Almont with a plaque for sponsoring our Clover Bud t-shirts for the past 15 years. Here is a company that has never had

a child or grandchild in

4-H, but stepped up to the plate to sponsor our little people. The day of the show the Clover Buds all wear the same very colorful

shirts so that each child is equal and no one stands out from the others in the show ring. Accepting the award was Ian Redd, son of Howard. A big ‘Thank You’ to Ray and Shelly Swain for always allowing our large group to use their campsite and supplying the food for

a fun practice night in

which we work with the kids and their calves to get

Photo provided
Photo provided

Lapeer County 4-H Beef Clover Buds pose for photo at this year’s Eastern Michigan State Fair.

ready for show day. Thank you to the Eastern Michigan State Fair Board for always being supportive and helpful with making our show day such a great success and supply- ing the judge. Speaking of judge, we thought for sure this year would be different

and there would be one winner with the judge com- ing from the other side of

the state. Clover Buds are judged on their showman- ship, handling and knowl- edge of their calf. They all did such an incredible job that each one was a first place winner. Thank you to Julie Slack who assisted and will take over the program next year. Here is a family who the day of show had taken their daughter down in the city to be sworn in and leave for the Naval Academy and still made it back for the show to assist and watch their son com- pete. Thank you to Katie Newton, a senior still in 4-H, who helped out prac- tice night with Kayla Phillips, a former 4-Her who graduated from col- lege this year and now helps with practice night

and also in the show ring on show day. Thank you to Amy Phillips for taking our photos and always supply- ing several copies for our thank you cards. She does this all on her own time while caring for two ill rel- atives. Can you believe the love and dedication these people have for our youth in Lapeer County? So no matter if you’re a parent, grandparent, leader, board member, business leader and 4-Her or FFA member, it does take a village to raise a child. Thank you for your support and to anyone we might have failed to men- tion.

Sincerely, —Lapeer County Beef Clover Buds Lapeer

Foundation raises funds at golf outing

The Venture Global Engineering Foundation is pleased to announce that it has raised over $300,000 for local charities and school groups at its recent golf outing held on July 22, 2017. This is the Foundation’s fourth golf outing and it has yet again surpassed the first three outings in money raised. The all-volunteer Foundation was estab- lished to raise funds to sup- port local community orga- nizations and charities. The main fundraising event for the foundation is its annual golf outing. The first two golf outings were held on a single golf course and raised and distributed $35,000 and $100,000 respectively. Due to the event’s pop- ularity, the third annual golf outing was held on two golf courses and the event was able to raise and distribute over $210,000 to charities. This year’s fourth annual outing was held on two courses, and as in pre- vious years, was a sellout and raised record funds. The outing is held at the prestigious Wyndgate Country Club and the WestWynd golf course in

Oakland Township. Within the next few weeks an awards ceremony will take place and all of this year’s charities and school groups will be invit- ed to attend. At this cere- mony the Venture Global Engineering Foundation awards the individual orga- nizations with the amounts the outing has raised. The organizations are encour- aged to provide the audi- ence an overview of their program and how these funds will help them achieve their goals. The charities and groups benefitting from this year’s outing are: The Believe Foundation, Chippewa Valley Football, The New Day Foundation for Families, Romeo High School Class of 2018, Stevenson High School Band Boosters, Romeo Foundation for Educational Excellence and a local nursing/senior center. If you would like additional information on the Foundation, please check out our Facebook page or visit our web site at vge- foundation.net —Venture Global Engineering Foundation Almont

A life full of smiles and song

W e step inside the dou- ble glass doors at the

hall and feel the comfort- able chill of air condition- ing. There are four men huddled in the corner of the lobby. They vary in age and size, and one of

Observations in ink CatherineMinolli
Observations in ink
CatherineMinolli

them has hair down to his waist. They’re dressed in matching red polo shirts. They’re not plotting or planning something. They’re simply singing. Their voices melodic and almost otherworldly as they harmonize in the extraordinary way that’s unique to barbershoppers. As we continue into the main room at the Walter F. Bruce VFW Post on the banks of the St. Clair River in St. Clair Shores, we see it’s filled with pockets of these ethe- real singers. Dozens, per-

haps hundreds of barber- shop quartet vocalists lift their voices—and the vibration in the room—to something that feels like heaven. It’s joyous. It’s happy. It’s festive and upbeat—much like the host of the party and cen- tral figure of the gleeful affair—Mr. John ‘Johnny’ Wearing. The 92-year-old World War II veteran is celebrat- ing a life well lived as friends and family mem- bers from across the coun- try gather at his living wake on Sunday. Rather than have a party Mr. Wearing couldn’t attend, the spirited gentle- man climbed on board when his trusted friend Matt Seely proposed an idea. Have a living wake. An opportunity to bid fare- well, to celebrate a full life well lived, and to enjoy the friendship and love the many whom Mr. Wearing has attracted into his life over the years. A remarkable, energet- ic man, I grew to love Mr. Wearing, who I got to know through my col- league, his son, Tom. Widely known as ‘Tommy Boy,’ the writer,

Photo by Tom Wearing
Photo by Tom Wearing

Mr. Wearing belts out ‘Little Pal’ with fellow barbershoppers Matt Seely, Carl Dahlke and Scott Houghton.

Photo by Tom Wearing
Photo by Tom Wearing

Mr. John ‘Johnny’ Wearing with good friend Fr. Don Worthy after a special mass at St. Philomena Catholic Church in Detroit. Fr. Worthy was born and raised in Imlay City.

Photo by Nancy Rae Gilliland
Photo by Nancy Rae Gilliland

John ‘Johnny’ Wearing and his son Tom ‘Tommy Boy’ share special moment at Mr. Wearing’s living wake.

musician, friend and fami-

ly man extraordinaire is lit-

erally a chip off the old block. Known to break out

in song at any given

moment, and to beat on tabletops, jars and any other random surfaces with the skilled hands of a sea- soned drummer, Tommy Boy is just as fun to hang out with as is his dad, Johnny. The two share a special bond that’s evident at

Sunday’s party. They’ve lived the lives of active musicians, hard workers and human beings who’ve experienced the highs and lows of authenticity. A tail gunner who flew 35 missions in the B-17 ‘5 Grand,’ Mr. Wearing is the only living member of his crew. That doesn’t stop the descendants of his crew- mates—their sons and

Smiles and Song page 11-A

Photo provided
Photo provided

Waiting for the Indians.

Still ‘King of the Wild Frontier?’

I got an email from Bill Chemerka, a retired his-

tory teacher, and probably the most knowledgeable historian anywhere about all things “Alamo”

most was a theater lobby card from Walt Disney’s “Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier.”

Seeing that card from the three-part series of

and “Davy All  th bl gay Crockett.” Bill founded The Alamo Society, edited its
and “Davy
All  th bl gay
Crockett.” Bill
founded The
Alamo Society,
edited its Journal,
wrote regular
“Crockett
Chronicles,” wrote
several books,
appeared on TV
and in movies,
Rck
etc
If it’s about
blg
the Alamo or
the same name
made me feel like I
had jumped on
H.G. Wells’ “Time
Machine.” I was
instantly transport-
ed back to late
1954 and early
1955. Walt Disney
filmed and aired a
three part series
about Davy
Crockett. I didn’t
Crockett, Bill is
the “go to” guy for
sure
Bill was cutting back
on his vast collection of
material and sent me a list
of things for sale. I picked
out a few and sent him a
check. A few days later the
stuff arrived including a
large print of the storming
of the Alamo, numerous
items and pictures from the
2004 movie, “The Alamo,”
starring Billy Bob Thornton
(a box office bomb), and a
few other goodies.
But the thing that
grabbed my attention the
know who
Crockett was but
after watching the show, I
sure did. I went Crockett
crazy like most every other
Baby Boomer.
The first episode, Davy
Crockett Indian Fighter,”
aired on the evening of
December 15, 1954. A few
hours later, on the 16th, I
turned seven years old.
Chemerka was also
watching that night and
says the series was the
inspiration for him becom-
ing a history teacher. I can
attest that it was also the
spark for my life-long
interest in American histo-
the spark for my life-long interest in American histo- Fess Parker, the Baby Boomers’ Davy Crockett.

Fess Parker, the Baby Boomers’ Davy Crockett.

ry. The second episode in

the trilogy, “Davy Crockett Goes to Congress” aired on January 26, 1955 and the final episode, “Davy Crockett at the Alamo” was shown on February 23,

1955.

Later Disney produced two more Crockett epi- sodes, “Davy Crockett’s Keelboat Race” and “Davy Crockett and the River Pirates.” They were good but nothing like the others. Disney had no idea of what he had created. Every kid in America now knew who Davy Crockett was and wanted anything and every- thing that had his name or picture on it, especially

every- thing that had his name or picture on it, especially The real David Crockett contemporary

The real David Crockett

contemporary

paint-

ing.

Indian War but I’m pretty sure he didn’t forge the peace single-handedly. And

Chief Redstick was a ficti- tious character. But the action was fun to watch. That episode was filmed in the Great Smokey Mountains and used real Cherokee Indians in the film. A lot of Boomers were a little disappointed in “Davy Crockett Goes to Congress.” Not much action here. Crockett was a leader for sure. He was a justice of the peace and served two terms in the Tennessee legislature. He was elected to Congress in

1827 and 1829 as a

Photo provided
Photo provided

Awaiting their fate at the Alamo.

coonskin caps. The mer-

chandise frenzy only lasted

a few months but Disney

made a fortune. Much of that stuff is very valuable today as we Boomers try to buy back our youth. Of course, as a seven- year-old, I didn’t know the

accuracy of the story. I had no idea who Davy Crockett was, I knew nothing of Davy in Congress or at the Alamo. So for quite a while

I assumed that everything I saw was true. Was it? Sadly, no. Some of it was. There was a man named David Crockett who did fight in the Creek

Democrat. Then he broke

with Jackson over a num- ber of issues and was

defeated in 1831. In 1833 he returned to Congress, this time as a Whig. In

1835 he was again defeat-

ed. By the way, it was the Tennessee State Capitol where the congressional scenes were filmed, not the Capitol in Washington but

how would I know that at seven? And why would I care? My favorite episode,

Davy Crockett page 11-A

Howell issues six month review

D uring the first six months of this year, as

the 99th Legislature got underway, the House of Representatives made a great deal of headway on legislation that deals with your priorities. I will con- tinue to fight for measures to improve the quality of life in Lapeer County com- munities. I introduced legisla- tion, both last session and in the current session, to lift the unfair state tax that was imposed on retirees’ pensions in 2011. That will remain one of my top pri- orities, because people who carefully planned for their retirement years based on a certain amount of income now have to adjust for the taxes that eat away at their fixed incomes. The House passed leg- islation in June to elimi-

nate the pension tax on certain police and fire per- sonnel, which I consider a

step in the right direction. In March the House passed landmark

legislation to sub- ject the governor and lieutenant governor to the Freedom of Information Act and place similar open-records requirements on the Legislature. The measures passed in the House on a strong

bipartisan vote, and are currently in the Senate for consideration. Transparency bills were the very first mea- sures I signed on in sup- port last session, and I am equally passionate about them this session. I am fiercely dedicated to ensur-

ing that all of state govern- ment is held accountable to hard-working taxpayers. I also voted to expand career and technical educa- tion for high-

school students whose skill sets are more attuned to vocational occupations. Education is never a one-size- fits-all situation, and those who choose not to go to college deserve instruction that will help them

a tl .  .  .

will help them a tl .  .  . tatR. ayHll land the jobs

tatR.

ayHll

 .  . tatR. ayHll land the jobs they want in the workforce. I previously

land the jobs they want in the workforce. I previously served as presi- dent of the Lapeer County Intermediate Board of Education and recognize the need for such opportu- nity. Young people can come out of training ready to fill any one of the high-

paying, in-demand jobs for skilled tradesmen and women. We have approved a balanced budget that con- tains record funding for roads and bridges, includ- ing $450 million in the upcoming budget to help address the state’s trans- portation needs. And we continue our investment in education with an addition- al $25 million in overall K-12 per-student funding, and $25 more in funding per high school student. The House has taken action on many of the pri- orities we included in our Action Plan this spring, but we still have much to accomplish in the next 18 months. I am committed to carry the voice of our Lapeer County communi- ties to Lansing and stand up for what we see as important issues.

Page 9-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Scents of the open window

The Silk Road opened

up the Orient to the west- ern world, but the scent road opened up the heart of Nature. —Diane Ackerman, A Natural History of the Senses

W e awoke to a cool, breezy day. “Would

you please put the screen in my study window?” I asked my husband. “I have a day of writing and read- ing ahead.” “Sure. I’ll get to it after breakfast. How about the bedroom windows?’” “Might as well while you’re at it. Would be nice to sleep in fresh air for a change.” We hadn’t used the screens since we installed the convenience and com- fort of air conditioning too long ago to remember when. The drop in temper- ature prompted me to open my office window and inhale the fine August morning. Nature blew the spices of her sweet breath upon my face. She spoke of phlox, coneflower, and cucumber without a word. My skin tingled. As Helen Keller said, “Smell is a potent wizard that transports us across thousands of miles and all the years we have lived.” Hours later, I shifted from writing to reading chair. The soothing patter of a soft rain fell upon the gutters and downspouts. Ah, it had been too long since I’d smelled that scent and heard that sound like children running through the house. A sniff of wet forest swooped me up and away to Yosemite, the Olympic National Forest, and the Great Smoky Mountains. I was a child again, swing- ing with my cousins on Uncle Mix’s front porch in Peter Creek. We watched the heavens pour in cur- tains on Kentucky’s musky mountains. We laughed and sang silly songs. I rested my eyes and

heard my granny’s voice echo in my mind. “Now love your enemies, for our Father makes His sun to rise on the evil and the

good, and sends rain on the just and unjust.” Well, I’m thankful my loving God has me cov- ered, for I am prone to be both. He

Htvg...

to be both. He Htvg... knows I need sun and rain for my flowers and food

knows I

need sun

and rain

for my

flowers

and food

same as

Granny

did.

 I cri-  tiqued manu-

I cri-

tiqued
manu-

As

scripts, the ferns outside my open window danced in their cleansing shower. Then, sunshine broke through the clouds and struck their fronds in a fragrant, molec- ular outburst. I remembered my older sister’s Open Window classroom in Detroit’s Gabriel Richard Elementary School, back in the mid-1950s. There I stood again, waiting for my sister outside the door, the sun beaming through the tall windows upon reclin- ing wooden chairs lined up along a wall. The room smelled of sunshine and fresh air. Dear Reader, I’m grasping Nature’s meaning. Ventilation and sunlight are the best disinfectants for what ails us—body, mind, and spirit. And if Helen Keller were with us today, I believe she would declare that air conditioning tends to close up the heart of Nature. It is the open win- dow that carries us away to worlds we’ve walked before. The scent of beauty and harmony, the wild and cultivated, helps heal our broken heart. Email Iris at irisleeu@sbcglobal.net.

Sock drawer reveals a newhousehold tool

Y ou know those gripper socks they send you

home with every time you’re in the hospital? Someone in Iowa sent two pairs home with Mike to give to me, not realizing, I suppose, that I’d gathered quite a few of my own over the years. It’s true that the skid- proof socks are smart, especially for someone who is more and more prone to tripping over her own shadow. (I’m fairly sure that’s why the tactful relative gave them to Mike instead of handing them directly to me.) Well, once in awhile, but rarely, I actually DO think to use them; but hadn’t seen the need to keep a whole sock drawer full of them. I’d given (or thrown) my share of them away. As I considered doing the same with these, I hit on an idea. I folded the smaller pair into itself the way I fold socks, keep- ing the treaded surfaces facing each other, with a soft surface against my hand and the other smooth side facing out. Then, tuck- ing my hand inside, I ran it over a dusty surface, then on down to the mop boards. Voila—the best dust cloth I’d ever used! The next day, I did the same with the larger pair and tucked my foot into it and found it was a quick way to dustmop the hard- surface floor in my bath- room. Who knew?

ctv...

room. Who knew? ctv... Oh, and by the way, some of you may have won- dered

Oh, and

by the

way,

some of

you may

have

won-

dered

about a

ll little auto-cor- a rect my computer must have done last week. I had mentioned
ll
little
auto-cor-
a
rect my
computer
must
have done last week. I had
mentioned a little knot of
women having that conver-
sation about grief; and I’m
thinking either I misspelled
knot as know, or my com-
puter thought there
couldn’t be such a thing as
“a knot of women.” At any
rate, genie that it is, my
computer fixed it—turned
it into “a known of
women.” I saw there was a
mistake it didn’t fix—I
make them a little more
frequently now that my
eyes aren’t as sharp as they
once were—but that wasn’t
it. Just so you know
Email Willene at
willenetanis@aol.com.
Editor’s note: Though
our columns and stories go
through a process and pass
across a series of eyes
before publication, we, too,
sometimes miss those mys-
terious auto-correct issues.
Though we continue to
strive for perfection, some-
times we’re reminded that
we’re human and therefore

prone to a mishap now and then. We’ll keep striving, though!

Page 10-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Town Talk

Editor’s note: Due to space con- straints announcements will be posted one week in advance of the event. Notices must be received in writing by noon Monday prior to the publication date.

For Senior Citizens

Gentle Yoga Tuesdays from 9-10 a.m. at First Congregational Church in Almont. Practice led by Dina Miramonti, RYT.

Imlay City Senior Center “Texas Hold ‘Em” 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.

Dinner and an evening of card playing with friends, 50/50 raf- fle and prizes of high and low for each table every 3rd Monday at the Washington Senior Center, 57880 Van Dyke, Washington Twp., MI 48094, from 4-8 p.m. Call for further details, 586-752-6543.

Swing Dance Lessons offered at the Port Huron Senior Center, 600 Grand Avenue in Port Huron, every Tues. from 7:30-9 p.m. and the 1st and 3rd Thurs. of the month from 7:30- 9 p.m. with instructors Lyle Malaski & Kristina Morton. Call 810-984-5061 for more info.

Council on Aging Membership is open to individuals 18 and older. The Capac Senior Center is open 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. weekdays. We offer a variety of activities such as fit- ness and craft classes, a book review group, cards and bus trips. Call Lori at 395-7889 for more info.

Almont and Dryden area senior citizens meet the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 12 p.m. at the Almont Lions Hall, 222 Water St., for a potluck and program. Call 798-8210 for more info.

Adults 55 and over are invited

to Berlin Twp. Senior Center to play cards from noon-3 p.m. the 2nd Wednesday of every month. Bring a sack lunch, beverages provided. Senior stretch exercise on Tuesdays 10-11 a.m. Potluck luncheons will be served the 4th Tuesday of every month at noon. Call 810-395-4518 for details.

Ryan Smith, a certified alcohol and drug counselor will be available at the Imlay City Senior’s Center on the 4th Thursday of every month from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.

Free Meals, Food

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church ‘Food for Families’ kitchen is open to the public for free, hot meals every Monday and Wednesday from 4-5:30 p.m.

This Heart Loves Food Pantry is open the 1st Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Gateway Assembly Church, 2796 S. Van Dyke Rd., Imlay City.

The Attica United Methodist Church will be holding a free community meal on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month from 4:30-6:30 p.m. For more info please call 810-724-0690 or visit www.atticaumc.org.

The Attica Food Bank at the Attica United Methodist Church, 27 Elk Lake Rd., is open from 2-4 p.m. the 2nd and 4th Monday of each month. Proof of residency and need required.

The Capac Community Food Pantry, 112 S. Main Street, is open each Wednesday from 1-3 p.m. Please call LOVE, INC. at 810-245-2414 in advance to ensure your food voucher will be received before you stop in to shop. Any ques- tions, please call Joyce Kaufman at 810-395-7532.

The Capac Kitchen serves free

AFFORDABLE INDEPENDENT LIVING APARTMENTS WITH: • 3 Nutritious Meals Daily • Compimentary Satellite TV •
AFFORDABLE INDEPENDENT LIVING APARTMENTS WITH: • 3 Nutritious Meals Daily • Compimentary Satellite TV •
AFFORDABLE INDEPENDENT LIVING APARTMENTS WITH:

AFFORDABLE INDEPENDENT LIVING APARTMENTS WITH:

• 3 Nutritious Meals Daily

• Compimentary Satellite TV

• Life-enriching Activities

• Light Housekeeping

• Health Services

Available

TV • Life-enriching Activities • Light Housekeeping • Health Services Available www.SanctuaryatMapleVista.org
TV • Life-enriching Activities • Light Housekeeping • Health Services Available www.SanctuaryatMapleVista.org

www.SanctuaryatMapleVista.org

www.SanctuaryatMapleVista.org

meals every Tuesday from 4:30-6 p.m. at Zion United Methodist Church.

Free meals for people in need are offered at the North Branch Senior Center on Monday and Thursday eve- nings from 5:30-7 p.m. Call 810-441-0322 for more info.

Orchards’ Cupboard Food Pantry is open the 3rd Saturday of every month 9 a.m.-noon. Food distributed at 74903 McKay Rd., Bruce Twp., 586-336-4673. www. orchardsonline.org.

Museums

The Dryden Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month and the museum opens every Monday from 5:30-7 p.m.

The Capac Historical Society is open to visitors daily from 1-3 p.m. and 1-4 p.m. on Sundays. Call 810-395-2859 for more info.

The Imlay City Historical Museum welcomes visitors and is open on Saturdays from 1-4 p.m. Our museum features period rooms that appear as they would have been prior to the turn of the 20th Century and into the 1930s. Fabulous artifacts and antiques greet guests in every room and transport them back to when life was a simpler time. Visitors will find exhibits relating to railroading, military, and Imlay City business of the past—and much more. In addition, the museum features exhibits of influential and famous hometown people Stop by and take a look!

The Almont Community Historical Society Museum is open Saturdays from 1-4 p.m. Please stop by and learn about your community. Society meet- ings are held at the museum on the second Monday of the month at 7 p.m. For more info call 810-796-3355.

Youth Events

Ready, Set, Go! Workshop. This is a FREE workshop for

3-5 year olds & parents/care-

givers! Enjoy fun projects that

will develop your child’s skills and prepare them for school! Children also enjoy a snack, story time, and a free book! Call the Family Literacy

Center today to reserve your seat at 810-664-2737 and for more info on dates and times.

Play groups available. Free 6 week sessions. At these FREE 90-minute playgroups, chil- dren will participate in story- time, developmentally appro- priate games and crafts, learn new skills, and enjoy a snack

and social time with other chil- dren. Parents will have the chance to talk to other adults with same-age children. Register now for the next ses- sion! Numerous locations and dates available. For more info and to sign up call the Family Literacy Center at 810-664-

2737.

Support Groups

The 10A Friday AFG Imlay City meeting usually held at FOC Lutheran Church will be meeting at the Ruth Hughes Library until further notice. This begins on Aug. 4. Contact Ginger Miller at 810-724-5772 for more information.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings are held every Monday night at 8 p.m. at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Imlay City.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Al-Anon meetings are held every Wednesday night at 8 p.m. at the Capac United Methodist Church, Capac, MI.

Lapeer Area Citizens Against Domestic Assault meets 1-3 p.m. every Wednesday in the Lapeer Court House for per- sonal protection order clinic. For info 810-246-0632.

FOR WIDOWED MEN & WOMEN: Lunch-Cards- Friendship. Join us every 3rd Tuesday of each month from 11:45 a.m.-4 p.m. at Cavis Pioneer Restaurant, 5600 Lapeer Rd. in Kimball Twp. 48074. No RSVP necessary. For more info call Joanne K. at 810-324-2304. This activity is sponsored by Widowed Friends, a peer support group www.widowedfriends.org.

Widowed Friends invites all widowed to join us for break- fast and friendship in a safe setting every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month at 9 a.m. at Sero’s, 925 Gratiot in Marysville. For more info, call Julie at 810-388-0868.

Grief Share, a 7/14 series for

those that have lost loved ones support group will begin Sept. 7 at the Imlay City Senior Center located in the Lamb- Steele building on Third Street. Pre-register by calling Tracy at 810-724-6030 or Ginger Miller at 810-724-5772.

TOPS 620 Lapeer weight- loss group meets Tuesday nights at the Hunter’s Creek Mobile Home Park Club House, 725 DeMille Rd. in Lapeer. Weigh- in from 6-6:30 p.m., meeting from 6:30-7:30 p.m. For more info call 810-664-7579.

TOPS 888 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets Wednesdays at the 25 Pine Ridge Dr. in Lapeer. Weigh-in at 8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. meeting. Call Linda

at 810-245-3955 or Phyllis 810-

395-7035 for more info.

For those that have experi- enced the death of a loved one,

a support group is available

facilitated by a trained United Hospice Service (UHS) bereavement volunteer. Marlette Regional Hospital, 2770 Main Street in Marlette, hosts this support group the 1st Friday of each month at 10 a.m. in the Administration Conference Room. For more info, call 800-635-7490 or visit www.marletteregionalhospital. org.

Fundraisers

Woman’s Life Chapter 855 will continue its Bottle & Can Drive, to help those in need, throughout the year of 2017. Call for the nearest drop off location. For large donations a pickup service is available.

810-392-5136.

The Imlay City Christian School is holding a fundraiser for TAFFY (Tuition Assistance Fundraising For Youth). Come join us for euchre the 2nd Saturday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Imlay City Christian School, 7197 E. Imlay City Rd. in Imlay City. For more info, call 810-724-

5695.

Craft Shows/Bazaars Rummage Sales

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church is holding their 23rd Annual Indoor- Outdoor “Junque’& Treasures Sale” We will have everything imaginable - SOMETHING

c  AREA UNITED METHODIST CHURCHES St. Paul’s Lutheran Church (ELCA) 200
c 
AREA UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCHES
St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church
(ELCA)
200 North Cedar (M-53)
Imlay City, MI
4411 Newark Road
Attica, MI 48412
859 N. Van Dyke Road
Imlay City, Michigan 48444
810-724-1200
810-724-2702
Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
email: nlcc@newlifechristian.net
www.newlifechristian.net
Pastor Tim Martin
Sunday 2:30 pm
Tuesday 7:00 pm
Friday Youth 7:00 pm
Pastor Alan Casillas
firstapostolichome.com
Sunday 10 a.m. Service
15
15
15
Attica
Capac
Imlay City
U.M.C.
U.M.C.
C.R.C.
Almont
First Baptist Church
14952 Imlay City Rd., Capac
27 Elk Lake Road, Attica, MI
Wayne Boyd, Pastor
Light of Christ
Community
Church
Church 810-395-2112
(810) 724-0690
Sunday School - 9:15 am - All Ages
Sunday Service: 10:30 am
Junior Church and Nursery Available
Bible Studies Every
Monday and Tuesday Evenings
Tuesday Morning
395 N. Cedar (M-53)
www.imlaycitycrc.org
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Youth Ministry
MOPS Program
Community Men’s & Women’s
Bible Studies
881 Van Dyke - 810-798-8888
Sunday Bible Classes: 9:45 am
Worship Services
10:30 am & 6:00 pm
Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 pm
2720WinslowRoad
Sunday Worship: 10 a.m
Attica Food Bank: Serving those
in need in Attica Twp, 2-4 pm,
2nd and 4th Monday
Rev. Ron Rouse
www.atticaumc.org
Imlay City, MI 48444
fbc@airadvantage.net
Live Webcasting Sunday all worship services
1 Mile South of I-69 Overpass
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
810-724-4315
over Sermonaudio.com/fbcalmont
15
Come as you are - everyone is welcome!
Proclaiming the Sovereign Grace of God
Phone: 810-724-6999
Come Grow With Us!
15
15
15
16
15
Dryden
Imlay City
Sacred Heart
Catholic Church
GATEWAY
ST. JOHN’SLUTHERANCHURCH
U.M.C.
(ELCA) 109 E. Kempf Court • Capac, MI
U.M.C.
ASSEMBLY
(810) 395-7557
810-724-1135
74903 McKay Rd., Romeo
810-796-3341
Pastor Patricia Hoppenworth
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
EVERYONEWELCOME!
Corner of 4th St. & Almont Ave.
(Across from the Library)
www.imlayumc.org
9:15 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship
Nursery Available
Jr. Church for K-5th grade
Youth Group 6th-12th grade
5pm-6:30pm Sundays
Rev. Dr. Marcel Allen Lamb
700 Maple Vista, Imlay City
5394 Main Street - Dryden
Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri 8 am • Wed. 10 am
First Sat. 8 am
2796 S. Van Dyke Road - Imlay City
MorningWorship- 8:45a.m. &10:30a.m.
EveningService- 5:00p.m.
WednesdayFamilyNight - 6:45p.m.

Monday - Friday: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Weekday Masses
586.336.4673

Sunday Mornings
Sunday10:00a.m.
Weekend Masses
10:30 am
Supervisedchildcareduringall services
Sat. Vigil Mass 5 pm
Sun. 9 am - English
11 am - Spanish
Confessions 1/2 hr. before each Mass & 4pm Sat.
Adult &Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Children's Church during service.
ndayhl
Phone: 810-724-8110
COME & MAKE A
DIFFERENCE WITH US!
9:00a.m.SeptemberthruMay
Pastor Jeffrey S. Krist
810-724-0687
15
StaffedNurseryDuringWorship
15
15
Father Paul Ward
15
15
15
West Berlin
U.M.C.
Imlay City
Church of Christ
Christ Evangelical
Lutheran Church
FirstCongregationalChurch
United Church of Christ
905 Holmes Rd. - Allenton, MI
Corner of Almont Road
1970 S. Almont Ave., Imlay City
at corner of Newark Rd.
275 Bancroft - Imlay City
(Corner of 5th Street)
201 E. St. Clair, Almont, MI
810-798-8855
810-724-7855
810-724-6207
Sr. Pastor: Keith Langley
810-395-2409
670 N. Van Dyke
Imlay City, MI 48444
Sunday Service
Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am
Morning Worship 11:00am
1st Sunday of the
Month Evening Service 2:30pm
Wednesday Bible Classes (all ages) 7:00pm
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Worship 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship Service at 10:15 a.m.
SundaySchool &MorningAdult Group9:30a.m.
WorshipService10:30a.m.
WorshipService-11:00a.m.
Nursery available and Jr. Church
for ages 3 thru 5th grade
Pastor
Rev. Dr. Renee C. Jackson
810-724-3306
Ralph O. Stuebs
Rev. CurtisClarke
“No matter who you are or where you are
Cell-(567) 674-0438
Jr./Sr. High Youth Group ~ Sunday’s 6-8pm
Kidz 4 Christ ~ Wednesday’s 6-7:30pm
COME WORSHIP WITH US!
15
on life’s journey, you are welcome here!”
15
John Barker, Minister
Come to the WELS
15
Pre-School - 5th grade
15
15
Goodland
16
Community
St. Cornelius
Catholic Church
St. Nicholas
Catholic Church
St. John The
Evangelist
Catholic Church
HolyRedeemer
LutheranChurch
Church
Family of
Christ
Lutheran Church -
Missouri Synod
3834 N. Mill Street
P.O. Box 208
Dryden MI 48428
4331 Capac Road
Capac, MI 48014
872 Capac Rd.
Allenton, MI 48002
4538 Dryden Rd. • Dryden, MI
2008 N. Van Dyke
810-796-3951
810-395-7572
Box 82
Imlay City, MI 48444
7191 Imlay City Road
Imlay City
Bible Study - 9:00 am
810-395-7074
www.lutheransonline.com/holyred
www.stnicholascapac.com
www.stjohnsallenton.com
Weekday Masses:
Weekday Masses:
Weekday Masses:
Wed. & Thurs. 8:30 a.m.
810.724.1747
Worship Time - 10:30 am
Children’s Church - 10:30 am
Wed. & Fri. 8:30 a.m.
8:00 am - BIBLE CLASS; 9:30 am- WORSHIP
11:00 am- SUNDAYSCHOOL &BIBLE CLASS
Weekend Masses:
Weekend Masses:
Thurs. & Fri. 8:30 a.m.
Weekend Masses:
ALLWELCOME!!!
Worship Service: 10:00 am
Pastor Chad Hampton
Phone 810-724-2620
lutheranfamilyofchrist.org 16
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.
Sunday - 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Saturday - 6:00 p.m.
Sunday - 9:00 a.m.
Pastor StevenHelms
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor
ChristianPreschoolAvailable
17
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor
15
15
15

FOR EVERYONE!!! Free Shuttle Service Lunches, Bake Sale & Farmers Market (Fresh Daily) Donations Drop off ~ Sat. Sept. 9, to Tues. Sept. 12,

10 am to 4 pm Sale starts:

Thurs. Sept. 14 9am -7pm;

Fri. Sept. 15 9 am - 7pm; Sat.

Sept. 16 $2 Bag 9am - 12noon.

Sponsored by The D of I and K of C. Location: Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church 10828 Brandon Road Emmett

Mi. 48022 (On M-19 - North of

I-69 - South of M-21)

Medical Care

Lapeer County Health Department, 1800 Imlay City Rd., Lapeer - Regular Immunization Clinic Hours:

(held in 2nd floor clinic area) Mondays 1-3:30 p.m. Walk-In, Wednesdays 8:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. By Appointment Only, Thursdays 1-3:45 p.m. By

Appointment Only. Additional Immunization Clinics Offered:

By Appointment Only (held in 2nd floor clinic area). Walk-In (held in lower level). For addi- tional info, to check if we accept your insurance, or to schedule an appointment please call 810-667-0448.

Free hearing and vision screens for children of preschool age are available at the Lapeer County Health Department. To schedule an appointment please call 810-667-0448 or

810-245-5549.

Capac Pharmacy is teaming with Support Million Hearts by offering in-pharmacy blood pressure screenings, 136 North Main St. in Capac, Tuesdays, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Everyone is invited to come and have their blood pressure read for free.

Events

Euchre, Aug. 18. St. John’s,

873 Capac Rd., Allenton.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m., cards start at 7 p.m. Snacks, pop and water included. More informa-

tion, call Roni Brinker 810-

533-1034

Other

Free tutor training for people who would like to help others in our community improve English skills. Volunteer basis. Please call for orientation before training at 810-664-2737.

Volunteer for the Habitat for Humanity of Lapeer County at the office. Interested parties can call 810-664-7111 and speak to Carolyn, Cheryl or Pete at 810-

660-7823.

Club News

Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) of Imlay City, Post 2492,

598 N.AlmontAve. (Fairgrounds

Rd.) Overseas Veterans Meetings 2nd Thursday, every other month, 7 p.m.; Post Meetings 1st Thursday every month, 7 p.m.; Auxiliary Meetings 1st Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.

Almont/Dryden Masons meets 7 p.m. every 2nd Thursday of the month at Masonic Center in Almont.

The Imlay City American Legion Post 135 meets the 2nd and last Wednesdays of the month at 7:30 p.m. The post is located at 212 E. Third Street.

Contact them at 724-1450 or

americanlegionpost135@fron-

tier.com.

The Evening Star Quilt Guild meets the last Wednesday of each month at the Davison Senior Center, 10135 Lapeer

Rd. in Davison. Meetings start

at 6:30 p.m. and doors open at 6

p.m. For more info call Lisa,

810-358-7294.

Markets

Every Sunday Lapeer County’s largest Flea Market will be held at the Lapeer Center Building,

425 County Center St. in

Lapeer. From 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Up to 75 booths inside and outside sell a huge variety of items to the public. This long-running community event is sponsored

by the Lapeer Center Building, a non-profit organization for 60 years. There is no admission charge. For info on space rent- als, contact Logan: 810-347- 7915. Visit www.LapeerCenter. com for building rental and Peacock Alley catering infor- mation, or call 664-2109. Email:

lapeercenter@charter.net. The Lapeer Center Building Flea Market has been voted “The

Best of the Best.”

Free screening for kids entering school

ST. CLAIR COUNTY — The St. Clair County Health Department is offer- ing free screening for any child entering preschool or kindergarten in the fall. Don’t delay and have your child screened before school starts! Appointments are available and walk-ins will be accepted. Screening is offered at the St. Clair County Health Department located at 3415 28th Street, in Port Huron. Screening Schedule:

August 21 - September 1 Mondays: 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.- 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday 8 a.m.- 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Why should you get your child screened? •All children must have a hearing and vision screen

before entering kindergar-

ten. •Screening can help your child succeed in school. An undiagnosed hearing and vision problem can interfere with your child’s development. •St. Clair County Health Department under the direction of The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is committed to providing children with hearing and vision screens to ensure they have the skills neces- sary to succeed in school and learning. •Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent temporary difficulties from becoming permanent prob- lems. For more information or to schedule an appoint- ment call (810) 987-5300.

Photos by Tom Wearing Ice cream & magic Members of the Cagle family (top) of
Photos by Tom Wearing
Photos by Tom Wearing

Ice cream & magic

Members of the Cagle family (top) of Lapeer, Colton, 4, Mike, Kristen, and Addie, 1, find an ideal ice cream eating spot beneath a large tree at Lamb Steele Park while waiting for The Amazing Clark (below) to begin his magic show. The Imlay City DDA’s yearly Ice Cream Social and Magic Show typically draws a large crowd to the park in conjunc- tion with the DDA summer concert series.

Free yoga in the park Aug. 23

IMLAY CITY — Want to experience the benefits of yoga? You can do so for free on Wednesday, August 23 as Peaceful Moon Yoga ‘Pops Up in the Park’ in Imlay City. Anyone interested in participating is wel- come to come to Lamb Steele Park (behind City Hall) from 5:30-6:30 p.m. for a free yoga session led by Catherine Minolli. Participants should bring a blanket or yoga mat and wear comfortable clothes. The ‘Pop Up in the Park’ events are sponsored by the Imlay City Downtown Development Authority. For more infor- mation or to schedule a Pop Up, contact DDA Director Dana Walker at 810-724-2135. For a class schedule or more information on Peaceful Moon Yoga in down- town Imlay City, contact Catherine Minolli at 586-

255-1275.

Page 11-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Photos by Tom Wearing
Photos by Tom Wearing

John ‘Johnny’ Wearing poses for photo after mass with Sue Hinchman, daughter of B-17 Pilot Roy Brockman (left) and Pat Reynolds, wife of military historian Derek Reynolds (right).

Smiles and Song:

from page 8-A daughters—from turning out at the party to celebrate with him. As the program begins, Matt asks everyone to rise and take part in singing the national anthem. Again, the room is elevated by the harmonic sounds of heart- felt voices—voices that are like a big, beautiful gift to all in attendance; voices that seamlessly rise with the rocket’s red glare, and boom with pride over the land of the free and home of the brave. In all my years I’ve never heard such a glorious rendition of the exhaulted song. After presentations of plaques commemorating his WWII service and his

day

It sounds like a prayer, and perhaps it is as he contin- ues.

,”

Mr. Wearing sings.

So till we meet

decades-long participation in the Barbershop commu- nity, Mr. Wearing makes a determined request— ‘to

again, Heaven knows

'Even as his life on this plane draws to a close, Mr. Wearing remains--as always --a man with a gleam in his eyes and a song in his heart.'

sing one last song.’ And he does—it’s an animated, stirring acapella version of ‘Little Pal.’ “Little Pal, if Daddy goes away, promise you’ll be good from day to

where or when, Pray for me now and then, Little Pal ” I cannot speak. It’s so brave and beautiful. Ethereal and bittersweet. A gift. A blessing. Another

reason to stand in awe when it comes to the life of Mr. John ‘Johnny’ Wearing. One of a kind, with a kind, kind heart. And in typical Wearing clan fashion, his request to sing ‘one last song’ doesn’t quite work out. He sings a couple more, including one that reverberates in a crescendo of sound as all of the barbershoppers in the room get up to join him. Even as his life on this plane draws to a close, Mr. Wearing remains—as always—a man with a gleam in his eyes and a song in his heart. That’s yet another lesson he gifts me with. And I’m so grate- ful for the reminder. Email Catherine at cminolli@pageone-inc. com.

the reminder. Email Catherine at cminolli@pageone-inc. com. The Alamo scenes were shot in a Disney studio.

The Alamo scenes were shot in a Disney studio. It looked real to me!

Davy Crockett:

from page 9-A and that of most Boomers I think, was “Davy Crockett at the Alamo.” Here Davy joined others from several states to keep Mexican leader Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna from taking freedoms from those in the new Texas territory. He went to Texas to find good land and ended up in the Alamo in a fight to the death with Santa Anna’s troops. In this epi- sode by Disney, Davy led

three other men to the defense of the Alamo. They were fictitious. But with names like Thimblerig and Busted Luck, how could you not root for them? In reality, Crockett led about 20 men into the fort. The battle scenes were filmed on a sound stage in Disney Studios in California. But they looked real to me! All of the defenders of the Alamo were killed in Disney’s

film and in real life. The exact number of defenders is unknown but probably was near 250. Davy, our hero, was the last man standing according to Disney. How the real Davy died has been a subject of debate ever since. So how do I feel now about the Disney film? I’ve seen it many times since 1954, in color, and though now I know what was fact and what was fiction and can see some of the “mis- takes” in the film, I still love it. Get a copy and see

what I mean. By all contemporary accounts, and there were many in books and news- papers, Crockett was an outstanding frontiersman, excellent hunter, good fam- ily man, leader of men and politician with integrity. He had his faults, but all- in-all he was a pretty good guy to have as a hero in the 1950s. Thanks to Disney and Fess Parker for bringing him to life. He’s still “King of the Wild Frontier.” Email Rick at rick.liblong@cox.net.

Visit www.tricitytimes-online.com forallyourlocalnews! Tri - CityTimesOnline

Visit www.tricitytimes-online.comforallyourlocalnews!

Visit www.tricitytimes-online.com forallyourlocalnews! Tri - CityTimesOnline

Tri-CityTimesOnline

Page 12-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Renaissance Festival kicks off Saturday, open until October

HOLLY — The Michigan Renaissance Festival is back and cele- brating 39 years of family fun, kicking off this Saturday, August 19. More than 250,000 fans flock to the grounds every year to escape from this realm and journey into a time when kings and queens rule and mer- maids and fairies are more than just a dream. New events and attrac- tions for 2017 include

Merlin’s Magic Quest, an

interactive contest; Throne of Swords Pub where guests can sit on a throne while sipping cocktails; Valley of Aberdare Obstacle Course and more. Once again, the Festival features themed weekends and activities beginning with a Royal Pet and Ale Fest August 19-20 and concluding with

a Chocolate Festival and

celebration of Shakespeare

Obituaries

Sept 29-October 1. The Festival is open weekends and Labor Day, plus Friday September 29, from 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. rain or shine. Admission at the gate is Adults $22.95, Children 5-12 $13.95, four and under are free! Discount tickets are avail- able at participating Kroger, Walgreens, Goodwill and Menards stores or online at www.

MichRenFest.com

Photo provided
Photo provided

See all kinds of perfor- mances and test your own skills at the Renaissance Festival’s new Magic Quest or Obstacle Course.

Ruth Hibbler, age 96, of Imlay City, Michigan, died Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at Connie’s Adult Foster Care in Imlay City,

MI. Ruth Davenport was born January 2, 1921 in Lapeer, MI. She is the daughter of the late Ralph and the late Muriel (Davis) Davenport. She is a 1939 graduate of Lapeer High School. Ruth lived most of her life in the Imlay City and Lapeer areas. She mar-

ried Herold Lyle Hibbler on April 15, 1950 in Lapeer, MI. She was pre-

deceased by her husband, Herold, on October 30,

2012.

She was mostly a homemaker, raising her family. For years she had worked at Lapeer Manufacturing. Ruth was a

“Rosie the Riveter” during World War II. Ruth attended Hunter’s Creek Community Church

in Lapeer. She was a mem-

~ Ruth Hibbler, 96 ~

Church in Lapeer. She was a mem- ~ Ruth Hibbler, 96 ~ ber of Lapeer Co-operative

ber of Lapeer Co-operative Extension Ladies 4-H sup- port group and a 4-H lead-

er. She is survived by two sons: Lyle (Marilyn) Hibbler of Attica, MI and Allen (Karen) Hibbler of Imlay City, MI; her son-in- law: Dean Pittenger of Imlay City, MI; ten grand- children: Gene (Amanda) Pittenger, Joel (Lauren) Pittenger, Jason Pittenger, Joshua (Christine) Hibbler, Eric (Heidi) Hibbler,

Melissa (Zack) Jolicoeur, Chelsea Hibbler, Becca Hibbler, Alivia Hibbler, Dustin (Erin) Hibbler; eight great-grandchildren:

Payton, Paige, McKenzie, Gavin, Caden, Braylon, Lilly and Parker; and her sister-in-law: Eva Hoffert of Waterford, MI. Ruth was preceded in death by her husband:

Herold Hibbler; daughter:

Donna Pittenger; sister:

Clara Cronin; and her brother: Lawrence

Davenport.

The funeral was held

Saturday, August 12, 2017, at Muir Brothers Funeral Home of Imlay City, 225

N. Main Street, Imlay City,

MI. Pastor Mike Hollenbeck officiated. Interment followed at Imlay Township Cemetery. Funeral arrangements were made by Muir Brothers Funeral Home of Imlay City. Please be sure

to sign our online register

muirbrothersfh.com

~ Mr. Leslie “Pat” Burgess, 85 ~

Mr. Leslie “Pat” Burgess, age 85, of Lapeer, formerly of Attica, died Tuesday, August 15, 2017. Pat was born May 1, 1932 in Almont, to Harvey and Florence (Edgett) Burgess. Pat married Kathryn Ferrett, on June 12, 1954 in Imlay City. Pat and Kathryn attended Trinity United Methodist Church in Lapeer. Pat owned and operated a dairy and crop farm for most of his life. He also worked many years as a press operator for Aircraft Specialty in Lapeer. He loved anything to do with tractors and tractor pulls, especially John Deere. Mr. Burgess is survived by his wife: Kathryn

Burgess of Lapeer; children:

Patty (Brent) Gibson of Lapeer, Jackie Burgess of Lapeer, Sandy Nuncio of Elkton, Leslie (Brenda) Attica, Steve (Sheila) Burgess of North Branch and Tim (Trish) Burgess of Lapeer; grandchildren:

Michelle, Rachel, Mike, Maggie, Serina, Antonio, Hayley, Pat, Morgan, Tonya, Justin, James, Tyler, Rachel, Joey, Nicole, Johnny and Issiac; 27 great- grandchildren; sisters: Joan Straus of Lapeer, Laura (Gerry) Rowbotham of Vassar and Linda Greenman

of Imlay City; and many

many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents:

Florence and Harvey Burgess; and sisters: Ruby, Evelyn, Clara, Dorothy, Betty and Mary Ellen. Visitation will be 4-8 p.m. Wednesday, August 16, 2017 at Muir Brothers Funeral Home in Lapeer. Pat’s funeral service will be 11:00 a.m. Thursday, August 17, 2017 at the funeral home, Rev. Grant Lobb will officiate, with burial to follow in Stiles Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Trinity United Methodist Church or Kindred Hospice. Condolences and mem- ories may be shared at www.MuirBrothersLapeer. com

CONSUMER ALERT Families of St. Clair County & Surrounding Areas ? Out-of-town funeral homes and
CONSUMER ALERT
Families of St. Clair County
& Surrounding Areas
?
Out-of-town funeral homes and cremation
“societies” are suddenly and aggressively
marketing discount cremation in your area.
Families are
asking
Are some funeral homes
“specialists” in cremation?
All local funeral homes offer cremation choices. Under
Michigan law it is illegal for a funeral home to own or operate a
crematory. Consumers cannot “deal directly” with crematories.
The only licensed crematory in the Thumb is May Memorial in
Port Huron Township.
More Questions? More Answers.
Call your local Funeral Director
or visit pollockrandall.com/consumeralert
The intent of this consumer alert is to assist the community in making
informed decisions.

~ Mary J. Vineyard, 89 ~

Mary J. Vineyard, 89, of Almont, passed away

Monday, August 14, 2017

at Angelica’s Place in

Romeo. She was born September 30, 1927 in Maysville, Oklahoma the daughter of Clarence and Zella (Long) Moslander. She married Johnie W. Vineyard on June 23, 1953. She had worked at US rub-

ber in Detroit, then became

a housewife to raise her

children. Mary enjoyed crafting, lovingly making many Teddy Bears and

dolls including their cloth-

ing. She is survived by her sons John (Suzanne) Vineyard of Almont, Garry (Debra) Vineyard of Almont and Douglas (Kimberly) Vineyard of Almont; grand- children Logan and Gabrielle Vineyard; step-

grandson Michael (Leah)

Hundt, step-great-grand- daughter Ava Hundt; one sister Lilli Dias and two brothers Robert and George Moslander. She was pre- ceded in death by her par- ents, her husband Johnie and one brother. Cremation was entrust- ed to Muir Brothers Funeral Home in Almont. To sign

the online guest book please visit www.MuirBrothers.

com.

~ Barbara Ann Kanaziz ~

Barbara Ann Kanaziz, age 83, of Imlay City, Michigan died Friday, August 11, 2017 at her home in Imlay City. Barbara Ann Davis was born July 10, 1934 in Jacksonville, AL. She is the daughter of the late Vilas and the late Buna (Couch) Davis. Barb grew up in Jacksonville, Alabama. Her family moved to Roseville, Michigan after high school. She married Arthur James Kanaziz, Sr. on January 18, 1954 in Wyandotte, Michigan. She was employed by Morrice and Lengemann, Attorneys At Law, as the office manager. Barb was a member of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Imlay City. She was also a par- ticipant with the SAP’s

in Imlay City. She was also a par- ticipant with the SAP’s Ministry at St. Cornelius

Ministry at St. Cornelius Catholic Church in Dryden. Barbara is survived by her husband of 63 years: Arthur James Kanaziz, Sr.; her daugh- ter: Michele Woodland of Brooksville, FL; three sons: Arthur (Renea) Kanaziz, Jr. of Missouri, Charles (Mary) Kanaziz of North Branch, MI and

Christopher Kanaziz of Slidell, LA. Also surviv- ing are nine grandchil-

dren and six great-grand-

children.

A Mass of Christian burial was held Tuesday, August 15, 2017 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 700 Maple Vista,

Imlay City, MI. The Rev.

Fr. Paul Ward, pastor at

the church, officiated. A Rosary / Scripture service was held on August 14, 2017 at Muir Brothers Funeral Home of Imlay City, 225 N. Main Street, Imlay City, MI. Burial followed at Imlay Township Cemetery, Imlay City, Michigan. Funeral arrangements were made my Muir Brothers Funeral Home of Imlay City. Please be sure to sign our online register at muirbrothersfh.com

~ Judith Ann Zahnow, 74 ~

Judith Ann Zahnow, born October 10, 1942, passed away peacefully at home on July 30, 2017 surrounded by her three daughters. Judith devoted her entire life to her three daughters. Everything she did was for them. Judith will be remembered as a compassionate, loving, caring mother, sister, aunt and cousin. She had the

heart of an angel. She was not just a mother to her daughters, rather a mother to anyone in need. She opened her heart and her home whenever need- ed throughout her life. Judith was a leader in her own way and will be praised for her willingness to go above and beyond, even when she wasn’t asked. Her husband, Myron

Edward Zahnow, preceded her in death. Judith is survived by three daughters: Rev. Jennifer E. Zahnow, Shawn Zahnow, and Lisa

A. Zahnow. Donations can be

made in memory of Judith

A. Zahnow to Nathan

Adelson Hospice, 4141 Swenson Street, Las Vegas, NV 89119 or online at www.nah.org.

~ Robert Patrick Green, 34 ~

Robert Patrick Green (Rob), age 34, of Clermont, Florida, for- merly of Capac, passed

away very suddenly from

a massive heart attack on

July 19, 2017. Rob was born June 22, 1983 in Port Huron, Michigan to Pat and Sue Green. He was a graduate of Capac High School, class of 2002. He moved to Clermont, FL in 2011. He was employed as a server at Disney’s Wilderness Lodge in Orlando. Surviving are his par- ents, Pat and Sue Green of

Orlando. Surviving are his par- ents, Pat and Sue Green of Clermont, FL and brother, Zach

Clermont, FL and brother, Zach Green of Orlando.

He is also survived by his aunts and uncles: Mike and Debby Green of Florida, Colleen and Mike Wagner of Capac and Sheryl and Mike Barr of Carsonville; as well as many cousins in Michigan and Florida. Rob was predeceased by his loving grandparents Ray and Jennie Green of Capac and Bob and Pauline Miller of Croswell;

as well as his very special cousin, Jennalee Green in

1993.

Cremation has taken

place.

Page 13-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Rural Lifestyles

An ode to August

I haven’t always liked summer. For a time in my early teens, the hot sun
I haven’t always liked
summer. For a time in
my early teens, the hot
sun and I didn’t get along.
I had a
perpetual
n
headache
that start-
ed in
June and
before the school bells
ring. I get fewer phone
calls and emails and that’s
okay. It gives me the
chance to wander outside
and write columns (like
this one!).
Obviously, it’s a great
time in the veggie garden.
Most plants are hitting
lasted
through
August
so I
their stride, a gardener can
plan on incorporating the
harvest into meals and
we’re not tired of zucchi-
chose to
ni
yet.
stay in

the shade
Bown
or vege-
tate
indoors
with a book. It wasn’t an
awful existence but as
someone not so fond of
winter, I really wanted to
soak up those warm rays
when I had the chance.
Eventually, my eyes
adjusted to the brightness
and my head stopped
throbbing due to the sum-
mer environment.
Technically, I had a new
headache trigger by then-
college exams! Getting to
like summer again as a
newbie gardener was fun
and now, experiencing the
season with kids is an
even greater thrill. And
I’ve decided that August
has to be best the summer
month. Essentially, every-
thing in my life aligns to
this place where there’s
peace and satisfaction.
Work-wise, things are
usually pretty quiet this
time of year. The festivals
and fairs are over and
everyone’s finding some
last minute summer fun
There’s no excuse to
not have a fresh vase of
flowers on your table.
Perennials, annuals and
weeds—all are in full
bloom right now. Just
about anything and every-
thing pairs well with some
Queen Anne’s lace, gold-
enrod and some sprigs
He doesn’t mind push-
ing a lawn mower
regardless of the sea-
son.
of sage.
In general, I don’t
mind mowing the lawn but
I’m rather grateful when
the grass’ enthusiasm

wanes in this eighth month. It seems like the only “outside” time I get in May, June and July involves a mower or weed whip so I welcome the chance to spend a Saturday afternoon doing something else, even if it’s also a futile exercise, like sweep- ing three inches of pine needles off the patio. Early summer feels like a constant game of catch up in the yard too. Weeds are popping up everywhere, shrubs grow out of their bounds and require a trim, and it seems like every plant needs dividing. Now, plants and trees are settled and just being. I love to see our field crops in full stride this time of year too. The field corn is reaching toward the sky and obscuring the landscape, in a mostly good way. It becomes this green screen that provides a temporary privacy fence of sorts along our yard. The soybeans are blousy and putting their energy into pod and bean produc- tion. The sugar beets are transitioning from pushing out leaves to storing the sweet stuff in their roots. By now, at least one crop is harvested-wheat-and the straw is baled. There’s hay

to cut but

and forever hay. It’s all an indication that the fall harvest isn’t far off but that’s a September thing. The thought of sipping a cup of coffee outdoors

there’s

always

Photo by Maria Brown
Photo by Maria Brown

This time of year it doesn’t take much effort to put together a bouquet.

some morning feels like it could become reality. When that opportunity comes, I’ll scan the back- yard, start to make a men- tal list of what practical projects I should tackle post-Labor Day and then daydream about some not-

as-practical ones. Wouldn’t

a water garden be nice?

The sun in its course seems a bit more hospita-

ble right now. Sleep in on

a Saturday morning in

June and you’re assaulted with brightness once the shade opens. Now my bleary eyes get a chance to adjust. It’s certainly easier to corral children and point them towards the bathtub since the August sun starts to set at a rea-

sonable hour. Yes, more reasonable things will dominate life as the days march toward September but, for now, I’m savoring the easy breezy days of August.

Tomatoes for breakfast for me. The kids—they want popsicles. Why not?!? Contact Maria at mbrown@pageone-inc. com.

Weather

almanac

Lapeer station Minimum temp. 45.6 on Tuesday, 8th Maximum temp. 815.3 on Wed., 9th Rainfall .50 inches Growing Degree Days for corn development:

For the week of August 8-14 Emmett station Minimum temp. 50.8 on Sunday, 13th Maximum temp. 83.7 on Thursday, 10th Rainfall .17 inches Growing Degree Days for corn development:

Current: 1,919

Current: 1,931

Forecast: 2,072

Forecast: 2,045

Growing degree days are accumulated from March 1 and forecast through August 21. Weather data courtesy of Enviro-weather, www.enviroweather.msu.edu

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Report fish, wildlifewith‘Eyes intheField’ app

TRI-CITY AREA — The Department of Natural Resources invites Michigan residents to con- tribute to conservation efforts by reporting their fish and wildlife observa- tions with the new Eyes in the Field application. Available at michigan. gov/eyesinthefield, the application replaces 15 separate observation forms the DNR had been using to gather important information about the state’s fish and wildlife populations. “Observation is a key part of managing Michigan’s diverse natural resources, and we rely on the public as additional eyes in the field to help in our monitoring efforts,” said Tom Weston, the DNR’s chief technology officer. “This new applica- tion is a one-stop shop where citizen scientists can report what they observe while spending time outdoors.” Eyes in the Field includes forms for report-

Web image
Web image

App users will start their submission by choosing a category for the observation.

ing observations of dis- eased wildlife, tagged fish, mammals such as cougars and feral swine, fish such as sturgeon, birds such as wild turkeys, and reptiles and amphibians such as eastern massasauga rattle- snakes. Additional obser- vation forms will be added in the future. The application is mobile-friendly, so it will work well on any device – smartphone, tablet or desktop computer – and is compliant with federal

Americans with Disabilities Act accessibil- ity guidelines. To report their data, users select an observation location point on a map and submit other details, including habitat type and appearance of the animal, depending on the type of observation. Observers also can submit photos, videos and audio files through the application. It’s important to note that Eyes in the Field does not replace the DNR’s

Report All Poaching (RAP) hotline (800-292- 7800). The RAP hotline – now accepting text mes- sages, which may include photos, in addition to tele- phone calls – is a toll-free, 24-hour, seven-days-a- week number that enables the public to report viola- tions of fish and game laws, as well as other natu- ral resource-related laws. The DNR also offers a web-based RAP form, which is available via a link from Eyes in the Field.

Lapeer Conservation District hosts Sept. 7 farm tour in Davison

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

DAVISON — The Lapeer Conservation District will host a tour of Marsh Haven Farms on September 7. The 100 acre farm uses mostly organic practices to produce hay, corn, soy- beans, wheat, oats, rye, vegetables, beef, pork, chicken and eggs. Guests will go on a walking tour of the farm to see multi-species grazing systems, wetland protec- tion practices, hoophouse vegetable production, cover crop use in hoop- houses, manure manage- ment, and general nutrient management.

Speakers for the event include the farm’s operator and Lapeer/Macomb County MAEAP Technician Rob Malcomnson, Michigan State University Extension Educator Phil Kaatz, and Kendrick Flowers, USDA - NRCS District Conservationist. The event begins at 4 p.m. with an orientation and walking tour, followed by a meal and Q&A ses- sion. Please RSVP by Sept. 5 by calling the Lapeer Conservation District at 810-664-0895 ext. 5; or email rob.malcomnson@ mi.nacdnet.net or Phil Kaatz MSU Extension at

810-667-0341.

mi.nacdnet.net or Phil Kaatz MSU Extension at 810-667-0341. The meeting counts toward a Phase 1 edu-

The meeting counts toward a Phase 1 edu- cational credit in the Michigan Agriculture E n v i r o n m e n t a l Assurance Program.

The farm is located at 2267 N. Henderson Rd., Davison, MI 48423. This meeting counts for MAEAP Phase 1 edu- cational credit. Pesticide applicator credits are also available.

MI 48423. This meeting counts for MAEAP Phase 1 edu- cational credit. Pesticide applicator credits are

Page 14-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Announcements

Page 14-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017 Announcements Gibbs/Hibbler vows spoken Dustin Hibbler and Erin Gibbs were united

Gibbs/Hibbler vows spoken

Dustin Hibbler and Erin Gibbs were united in marriage on Saturday, July 22, 2017 at the Imlay City Christian Reformed Church, officiated by Pastor Ken Vanderhorst. Dustin is the son of Allen and Karen Hibbler, and Erin is the daughter of Sam and Michelle Gibbs. Attending the bride as maid of honor was Alivia Hibbler, with bridesmaids Claire Gibbs, Becca

Hibbler, Chelsea Hibbler, Katie Zaborowicz and Saranda Conn. Attending the groom as best man was Matthew Zaborowicz with grooms- men Andy Marshall, Daniel Louis, Zack Jolicoeur, Tristan DiCesare, and Jason Pittenger. The bride and groom graduated from Calvin College in May of 2017 and now reside in Lansing, Illinois.

Lakelyn Love comes home

Mike and Kim Campbell of Almont are proud to announce the birth of their daughter Lakelyn Love Campbell born on August 1, 2017, at 10:58 a.m. Lakelyn weighed 6 lbs. 2 ounces, was 18.5 inches long, arrived four weeks early, and is healthy and thriving. She was wel- comed by her siblings Gavin, Melina, Steele, Cross, and Sullivan. Proud grandparents are Steve and Cathy Campbell

Sullivan. Proud grandparents are Steve and Cathy Campbell of Almont and Don & Joan Dupree of

of Almont and Don & Joan Dupree of Bruce Township.

I-69ThumbRegionawardstwogrants

LAPEER — Four Lapeer County businesses competed in the business competition spon- sored by the I-69 Thumb Region at the White Horse Inn on August 8th. The presentations from business sectors demonstrated the vast array of businesses in the county. Simply Enjoyable Snacks won first place for the success in assembling, labeling and distributing its products and In2 Yoga won second place for its marketing and growth plan. “This competition was put in place to support the growth of small businesses in Lapeer County and the I-69 Thumb Region,” said Patricia Lucas, Executive Director of the Lapeer Development Corporation. “The goal of the

competition is to help spur eco- nomic activity and increase jobs.” Simply Enjoyable Snacks will move on to a regional con- test, with a chance to win $5,000 for first place, $3,000 for second place or $1,000 for third place in the regional finals. The regional competi- tion will take place on September 21st at the Lapeer Country Club. For more infor-

v i s i t

m a t i o n ,

www.i-69thumbregion.org.

Competition prizes have been made possible through a grant from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and other sponsors. The I-69 Thumb Region is

a partnership of the Flint and

Genesee Chamber of Commerce, Shiawassee Economic Development Partnership, Lapeer Development Corporation, Economic Development Alliance of St. Clair County, Sanilac and Huron County Economic Development Corporation and Tuscola County Economic Development Corporation.

Photo provided
Photo provided

Amanda Godfrey of Simply Enjoyable Snacks accepts grant check for first place.

Photo provided
Photo provided

Lisa Madden of In2 Yoga accepts second place grant check from Patricia Lucas.

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Page 15-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Marty Rankin is honored by city commissioners

Longtime community servant resigned due to recent move

By Tom Wearing

twearing@pageone-inc.com

IMLAY CITY — City commissioners on Tuesday, Aug. 15, issued a procla- mation to Marty Rankin in recognition of his many years of service to the City of Imlay City. Two weeks ago, Rankin tendered his resignation because he no longer resides in the city. Most recently, Rankin had served as the city’s Mayor Pro- Tem.

City charter requires that all elected and appoint- ed city commissioners reside within the Imlay City limits. Reading from a procla- mation dated August 15, 2017, Mayor Walt Bargen acknowledged Rankin’s faithful and conscientious service to the community for more than 20 years. Bargen noted that from 1990-2017, Rankin had served on numerous city boards and commissions, in addition to his stints as

Mayor and Mayor Pro- Tem. “We present this proc- lamation to Mayor Pro-Tem Marty Rankin as a token of our appreciation,” said Bargen. “We extend best wishes to him and his fam- ily in their future endeav- ors.” Thinking back on his multiple terms as a city commissioner, Rankin said “I’ve actually gotten a lot more out of this experience than I’ve given.” Rankin said Imlay City

Photos by Tom Wearing Fun in the sun It was a perfect evening for ice
Photos by Tom Wearing
Photos by Tom Wearing

Fun in the sun

It was a perfect evening for ice cream and magic at Lamb Steele Park, as staff from Imlay City’s Lakestone Bank dish up generous helpings of ice cream for attendees. Shown below and waiting for the Amazing Clark to begin his show are: Cora Sorbie, Laura Andrade, Victoria Shadbolt, Josie Sorbie, Elliana Tatro and Greyson Shadbolt.

plish things on behalf of Imlay City residents. “I consider myself very fortunate to have served on the commission and I’ve always done my best to serve the community. “I sincerely hope more younger residents decide to get involved in city govern- ment in the years ahead. “We’re going to need their involvement,” he said. “We need to have more people take the time from their busy schedules to serve the community.” Jack Rankin lauded In an unrelated matter, Ruth Hughes Library Director Tracy Aldrich thanked the city commis- sion for its recent donation

in memory of longtime Imlay City business owner Jack Rankin, the father of Marty Rankin. For many years, the elder Rankin owned and operated Rankin’s Bakery on Third Street in down- town Imlay City. Aldrich said the library has selected a memorial book, ‘75 Twists on Your Favorite Sweets,’ to honor Jack Rankin for his contri- butions to the community. “We will insert a memo- rial bookplate into the vol- ume,” said Aldrich. “Our library depends on the gen- erosity of voters and dona- tions from our patrons. Thank you for your sup- port.”

residents have been the beneficiaries of a long suc- cession of city commis- sions dedicated to their best interests. He noted the DDA’s downtown renovation proj- ect and expansion at the city’s industrial park as important accomplishments that took place during his tenures as a commissioner. “We’ve had the good fortune of having outstand- ing people serve over the years,” said Rankin. “Of course, we’ve had differing opinions from time to time, but we’ve always been able to work together and come to an agreement and accom-

City has 60 days to fill seat

Rankin’s resignation creates void on commission

By Tom Wearing

twearing@pageone-inc.com

2011 election. This time the city will advertise for candidates who must submit an appli- cation, resume and cover letter to City Clerk Nicole Frost no later than 4:30 p.m.

on Friday, Sept. 1. The commission is expected to interview all candidates during a special meeting and select a new commissioner by the con- clusion of that meeting.

IMLAY CITY — Former Mayor Pro-Tem Marty Rankin’s resignation on August 1 leaves a void on the Imlay City Commission. Rankin, who had served multiple terms on the city commission, had to step down because he has moved out of the city. Per city charter, com- mission members must reside within the city lim- its.

City Manager Tom Youatt said the city has 60 days to fill the vacant seat on the commission. He noted that a new commissioner will serve out the remainder of Rankin’s 4-year term which runs through November 6, 2018. Youatt said he would recommend a protocol for filling the vacancy at the commission’s Tuesday, Aug. 15 regular meeting. Previous commissions have required that appli- cants be interviewed by the full commission. An exception occurred following the resignation of former Mayor Rodney Warner in 2011. That commission decid- ed to appoint former com- missioner Tim Kaiser who had received the next-high- est vote total in the May

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Free Shred Day at Lakestone Bank

IMLAY CITY — Lakestone Bank & Trust (Lakestone) will host its next Free Community Shred Day of 2017 on Saturday, August 19, at the Imlay City Office located at 1875 S. Cedar St.

(M-53).

Two Xtreme Shreds, LLC shredding trucks will be on site at the Lakestone Imlay City (M-53) Office from 9 a.m.-noon, or until the trucks are full, for peo- ple to drop off their shred- ding. Paperwork is depos- ited into a special bin. Once the bin is full, it is lifted and the contents are dropped into the mobile shredding truck. Each 96 gallon bin of paper takes less than three minutes to shred. It is not necessary to remove staples, paper clips or bindings—the truck will shred through them. Items that should not be included

are: compact discs, floppy disks, magazines or news-

papers. Please limit paper- work to be shredded to 10 banker’s boxes to help ensure everyone can take part in this service. This event is open to the entire community. You do not need to be a Lakestone Bank & Trust customer to participate. This is the 12th con- secutive year the Bank has hosted Free Community Shred Days. There will be two more Shred Days in

2017.

On Saturday, October 14 our Armada office will be accepting shredding. Our last Shred Day of 2017 will be on Saturday, October 21 at our down- town Lapeer office. All shred days run from 9 a.m.- noon or until the trucks are full. More information is available online at LAKESTONEbank.com.

Join Tri-City Times on Facebook

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Page 16-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-AUGUST 16, 2017

Celebrate Lapeer Days

By Maria Brown

mbrown@pageone-inc.com

LAPEER — Organizers have a lot of pride in what Lapeer Days stands for. There’s the simple, long-standing tra- dition it was built upon more than a century ago, when the Bostick family hosted a business grand

opening in 1902 and were inspired to launch a com- munity festival the next year. Today, the festival thrives thanks to the gen- erosity of the community. Things kick off this Friday and continue through Sunday, August 18-20. “Our committee is a non-profit organization that’s funded by donations

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The Tri-City Times offers an Online Edition subscription program and for half the print price, you can access a digital edition of every week’s news- paper no matter where you are. For just $15 for 52 weeks, readers can head to the Tri-City Times Web site, www.tricitytimes-online.com, log into their account and read complete issues dating back to March 2010.

To take advantage of this great deal, visit our website and in the left navigation bar, select ‘Subscribe now.’ You’ll be prompted to select a user name and password and enter your pay- ment information. For more information, call our offices at 724- 2615 or email tct@pageone-inc.com.

 

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LAPEER ST. CLAIR MACOMB
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Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Times

 

143rd Volume - Issue No. 32

     

Great gas giveaway!

Hundreds line up for fuel deals courtesy of Gateway Assembly

 

By Tom Wearing

 

twearing@pageone-inc.com

IMLAY CITY — The lines were unusually long at the Imlay City Marathon station Tuesday morning, Aug. 8, as

hundreds of motorists took advantage of the “Free Gas Giveaway” sponsored by the Gateway Assembly church. The gasoline giveaway took place in conjunction with Gateway Assembly’s “This Heart Loves Community Festival” on Friday, Aug. 11 from 6-10 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 12 from 9 a.m-3 p.m. Gateway’s Promotions

Director Shelly Simpson said

this marks the second year the church has sponsored the “This Heart Loves” gas giveaway. She said last year’s program was so well-received that church members were eager to

do it again. “This is our way of giving back and showing love for our community,” said Simpson. “In addition, we are able to acknowledge and thank our vet- erans for their service by giving them free fill-ups.” Simpson noted that non-vet- erans received $1 off per gallon of gas, up to 15 gallons. One veteran who took advantage of the gas giveaway

was Capac resident Jerry

Robberstad, who served in the U.S. Air Force from 1956-1962. “Man, this is fabulous,” said Robberstad. “It feels great to know there are people who care enough to honor our service in

this way.” That spirit of appreciation was shared by Gateway’s younger members, many of whom busily waved in custom- ers in the front of the station at Van Dyke and M-21. “We just want to do good things and to encourage people to come to the Lord,” said 13-year-old Nathan Wampler. Marathon owner Mike Botrus said he was approached

last year by Gateway represen-

www.tricitytimes-online.com Members of Gateway Assembly Youth Group wave ‘free gas’ signs in front of Marathon
www.tricitytimes-online.com
Members of Gateway Assembly Youth Group wave ‘free
gas’ signs in front of Marathon station on Tuesday morn-
ing. The second annual gas giveaway coincides with this
weekend’s ‘This Heart Loves’ Community Fest.
Photo by Tom Wearing

tatives who suggested the idea of a gas giveaway. “We thought it was a good idea and got involved,” said Botrus. “We got a lot of positive feedback last year.

“It’s been a good way for us

to give back to our customers and to the community,” he said. “At the same time we can sup- port the veterans.” Gateway Youth Pastor Tyler

Giveaway page 6-A

State school funds up, Fed funds going down

Almont Supt. Dr. William Kalmar assesses district’s present, future

Michigan are expected,

“At-Risk” funding is

which bodes well for the

expected to increase.

By Tom Wearing

Education’s recent approv- al of a 2017-2018 budget that projects a surplus of

“This actually is better

Candela’s resignation; and

district.

Kalmar was also

twearing@pageone-inc.com

than we expected,” he said,

a

severance package

“We

budgeted for a

pleased to report that the

“because we had some

awarded to Candela.

$100

increase per pupil,”

district has experienced

ALMONT — Schools

$55,000.

unanticipated expenses in our 2016-2017 budget.”

Meanwhile, Kalmar

said

Kalmar, “but we

limited turnover among the

Supt. Dr. William Kalmar

From a financial stand- point, Kalmar said the dis- trict plans to apply $56,502 from the 2016-2017 bud- get; leaving the district

said

the district has settled

think we should get a bit

staff.

 

is generally optimistic

The unexpected expenses included the cost

a

three-year contract with

more than that.

“We’ve had a resigna-

about the district’s present

support staff and is cur-

“We

may be looking at

tion of one fourth-grade

state and its future.

of hiring an interim princi- pal—Rob Watt—at the

rently in negotiations with

$120

a pupil; and we

teacher (Kristin Zichichi)

The reasons for his

the

teacher’s union.

should

also be getting a

and some coaching chang-

optimism?

with a fund balance of

high school; an interim

Per-pupil increases

$25

‘bonus’ at the high

es are are still up in the