Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 100

CONTINENTAL CONVEYOR & MACHINE WORKS LTD.

470 St-Alphonse Street East


Thetford Mines, Quebec.
Canada G6G 3V8
Tel. (418) 338-4682
Fax: (418) 338-4751
www.continentalconveyor,ca

CONTINENTAL CONVEYOR (ONTARIO) LTD.


100 Richmond Blvd.
Napanee, Ontario.
Canada K7R 383
Tel. (613) 354-3318
Fax: (613) 354-5789
www.continentalconveyor.ca

COPYRIGHT CONTINENTAL CONVEYOR. 1986


Introduction 3
Foreword 4
Design Data 6
Selection Procedure 8
Bearing Recommendations 24
Special Applications and Specifications 26
Component Selection and Layout Data 27
Material Input and Discharge 29
Screw Feeders 31
Inclined Screw Conveyors 35
Vertical Screw Conveyors 36
Drive Assemblies and Arrangement 37
Special Fabrication Materials 38

Conveyor Screws 40

Shafts 48

Hangers 53
Trough Ends 57
End Bearings 63
Seals 69

Troughs 72
Discharges and Slide Gates 78

Trough Covers 82

Trough Cover Fasteners 84

Installation and Maintenance 86

Assembly Bolts 87

Flange Bolt Patterns 88

Weights and Dimensions 90

Engineering Information 92

Component Code Index 95


96
Index
It is with great pleasure that Continental presents this Screw
Conveyor Catalogue and Engineering Manual which covers our
complete line of screw conveyors and accessories. The information
compiled in this manual is the result of many years' experience in the
design and manufacture of bulk material handling equipment and is
thereby your assurance of the best in both equipment and
recommendations.
With the help of this manual, the screw conveyor user is given
sufficient design information with which to effectuate a sound selection
of both single components and complete screw conveyors alike. All
Continental screw conveyors and components are designed and built in
accordance with the standards established by the industry and are
therefore completely interchangeable with equipment of other
recognized manufacturers.
Continental's production facilities have also kept pace with inherent
advancements in design. Numerous specialty machines have been
designed and methods have been devised that help assure and control
manufacturing tolerances, thus providing for interchangeability of parts,
greater ease of assembly, smoother operation and longer life.
We sincerely hope that you will find this manual complete in detail,
easy to use and extremely helpful in fulfilling your screw conveyor
requirements.

[~~;I~~~~i n an ta 1.1
3
FOREWORD

The basic principle of the screw conveyor remains unchanged today


from when Archimedes first used an internal type helix to remove water
from the hold of a ship. With the technological innovations of the past
cen.tury and a great deal of research in the field, screw (::onveyors have
become precision pieces of equipment that can move materials either
horizontally, on an incline or vertically. They can be used as feeders,
distributors, collectors or mixers and can be equipped to either heat or
cool while performing the task. With proper covers and gasketing they
become weatherproof, dust tight and rodent proof. Their compact design
allows them to fit easily into restricted areas that would otherwise be
unsuitable for most types of bulk material handling equipment. They are
simple to install and support and require very little maintenance. Per foot,
they are undoubtedly one of the most economical types of bulk material
handling equipment available today.

4
1Ci:1continantalj

DESIGN DATA
Engineering and Layout
The following section contains all relevant information and basic
engineering data that is required for specifying and designing the
important features of most screw conveyor installations and
applications. There will, however, be instances when the information
herein will be insufficient with which to effectuate proper design due to
uncommon variables that may be present. Continental staff and
engineers have considerable knowledge in the design of screw
conveyors for special applications and will gladly assist you with sound
suggestions and recommendations for your particular problem.

Conveyor Capacity
The capacity of a screw coveyor is dependant upon three principle
factors, namely conveyor diameter,. trough loading and speed.
By changing one or all of these variables one ultimately varies the
amount of material per hour the conveyor will handle. A small diameter
conveyor will therefore handle the same amountof material per hour as a
large one by either increasing the speed of the small one or by
augmenting the trough loading. It is important to remember however that
when taken to extremes, this can bring about undesireable effects as an
overfull conveyor can become inefficient and one that turns excessively
fast will subject the components to more rapid wear.
When deciding upon trough loading, it should be taken as a general
guide that the less abrasive and more free flowing a material tends to be,
the fuller the trough may be. Conversely, the more abrasive and sluggish
a material is, the less the trough can be filled to allow it to work efficiently.
Therefore, non abrasive, free flowing materials can be conveyed with
trough loadings of 45% while abrasive and sluggish materials require
lower loadings of either 30% or 15%. Exceptions to this rule occur when 8
screw conveyors are used as feeders. This is dealt with further on in the
manual.

6
Material Analysis
The initial step in engineering a screw conveyor is to analyse the
material being handled and ascertain its physical properties in order that
they may be thoroughly evaluated and understood prior to proceeding
with the conveyor sizing and selection. These properties are discussed in
further depth below.

Lump Size: The minimum diameter of a conveyor screw for a given


application is determined by the maximum lump size of the material
being handled. For this reason, it is necessary to thoroughly analyse the
material and determine its maximum lump size and the percentage of
lumps to total volume along with the minimum particle size and screen
analysis when possible. With this information, proper conveyor sizing
can be effectuated.

Flowability: The flowability of a material greatly affects the


horsepower requirement of the conveyor in question. Flowability is
related to the angle of repose of a material and therefore, fine free flowing
materials can be handled at higher trough loadings with lower
horsepower requirements than coarse, sluggish ones. Please refer to the
Classification Code, Table 1 for further information.

Abrasiveness: The more abrasive the material being handled, the


greater the wear the conveyor components are subjected to. For this
reason, it is necessary to determine the abrasive quality of the material in
question prior to sizing the conveyor. Abrasiveness can be determined
by knowing a material's hardness on a Moh's scale and should this not be
available the material can be compared with another known abrasive
material.

Special Applications: These are additional factors which can affect


the operation of the conveyor and are further discussed in the section
entitled Special Applications and Specifications appearing on pages 26
and 27 inclusive. '

Moisture Content: Material moisture content is also a factor that


affects material flow. Excessively dry or wet products tend to flow easily,
however, many develop sluggish characteristics when having a moisture
content between the two extremes. This is not accounted for in the
material tables which follow and such materials should therefore be
reclassified.

Duty Cycle: Machinery design also includes selection of the proper


equipment for the usage it will receive. A conveyor operating for 2 hours
per day does not require the same heavy construction as one designed
for 24 hour usage. This appliesto material thickness and drive sizes alike.
Likewise. shock loads to which the equipment and drive are subjected to
are an important consideration. Treatment of these factors are not
described in suitable enough depth here. however, as previously
mentioned. our engineering staff will gladly assist you to determine the
best conveyor design.
SELECTION PROCEDURE
1. Establish Known Factors
The initial step in engineering a screw conveyor is to analyze the
physical characteristics of the material, the rate at which it is to be
handled and the distance over which it is to be conveyed.
Screw conveyor capacity is defined in terms of cubic feet per hour.
This must be determined in terms of the maximum capacity that is to be
handled. This capacity is often stated in terms of tons per hour or pounds
per hour. In order to change this to cubic feet per hour one must divide
pounds per hour by the density in pounds per cubic foot. In some cases
the material density may vary for the product being handled. Thus, when
calculating the capacity of the conveyor, it becomes necessary to
establish the maximum capacity in pounds per hour and divide this by the
minimum density of the material. This will give the required capacity of
the conveyor in cubic feet per hour.

2. Classify Your Material


Materials are classified as per the Material Classification Code
appearing in Table 1. It is from this that Material Characteristics, Table 2
is compiled. When classifying a material, first look it up in Table 2. If your
material is not listed, it can classified by comparing it with similar
materials that do appear in Table 2 or by referring to the Material
Classification Code, Table. 1.

TABLE 1 MATERIAL CLASSIFICATION CODE

Very fine. 100 mesh and under A


Fine. -1/8" mesh and under B
Granular, -1/2" and under C
SIZE
Lumpy, Containing Lumps over 1/2" D
Irregular, Stringy, Interlocking, Mats Together E

Very free Flowing 1


FLOWABILITY Free Flowing 2
Average Flowability 3
Sluggish 4

Non-abrasive 5
ABRASIVENESS Abrasive 6
Very Abrasive 7

Builds Up and Hardens F


Generates Static Electricity G
Decomposes -Deteriorates in Storage H
Flammability J
Becomes plastic or tends to soften K
Very dusty L
MISCELLANEOUS Aerates and develops fluid characteristics M
CHARACTERISTICS Contains explosive dust N
(sometimes more Stickiness -Adhesion 0
than one may Contaminable, affecting use or saleability p
apply) Degradable, affecting use or saleability Q
Gives off harmful fumes or dust R
Highly corrosive S
Mildly corrosive T
Hygroscopic U
Interlocks or mats together V
Oils or chemical present -which affect rubber products W
Packs under pressure X
Very light and fluffy -may be wind swept y
Elevated Temperature Z

8
TABLE 2
MATERIAL CHARACTERISTICS

Adipic Acid 45 A35 28 6 .5


Alfalfa, Meal 14-22 845WY 20 6 .6
Alfalfa, Pellets 41-43 C25 20 5 .5
Alfalfa, Seed 10-15 815N 1A B -1C ..-1C 5 .4
Almonds, Broken 27-30 C35Q 20 6 .9
Almonds, Whole Shelled 28-30 C35Q 20 6 .9
Alum, Fine 45-50 835U 1A -1B-2B 6 .6
Alum, Lumpy 50-60 825 2A 5 1.4
Alumina 55-65 827MY 30 8 1.8
Alumina, Fines 35 A27MY 30 8 1.6
Alumina, Sized or Briquette 65 037 30 8 2.0
Aluminate Gel (Aluminate Hydroxide) 45 835 20 6 1.7
Aluminum Chips, Dry 7-15 E45V 20 6 1.2
Aluminum Chips, Oily 7-15 E45V 20 6 .8
Aluminum Hydrate 13-20 C35 1A. -1B--3B
,1C 6 1.4
Aluminum Ore (See Bauxite)
Aluminum Oxide 60-120 A17M 30 8 1.8
Aluminum Silicate (Andalusite) 49 C35S 3A. 6 .8
Aluminum Sulfate 45-58 C25 1A--1B-.3B
,1C 5 1.0
Ammonium Chloride, Chrystalline 45-52 A45FRS 3A. 6 .7
Ammonium Nitrate 45-62 A35NTU 30 6 1.3
Ammonium Sulfate 45-58 C35FOTU 1A-.1B- .1C 6 1.0
Antimony Powder A35 20 6 1.6
Apple Pomace, Dry 15 C45Y 20 6 1.0
Arsenate of Lead (See Lead Arsenate)
Arsenic Oxide (Arsenolite) * 100-120 A35R 6
Arsenic, Pulverized 30 A25R 20 5 .8
Asbestos, Rock (Ore) 81 037R 30 8 1.2
Asbestos, Shredded 20-40 E46XY 20 7 1.0
Ash, Black Ground 105 835 1A- 1B- 1C 6 2.0
Ashes, Coal, Dry, -V2" 35-45 C46TY 30 7 3.0
Ashes, Coal, Dry, -3" 35-40 046T 30 7 2.5
Ashes, Coal, Wet, -V2" 45-50 C46T 30 7 3.0
Ashes, Coal, Wet, -3" 45-50 046T 30 7 4.0
Ashes, Fly (See Fly Ash)
Asphalt, Crushed, -V2 45 C45 1A-1B- 1C2C 6 2.0
Bagasse 7-10 E45RVXY 2A- 2B- 6 1.5
Bakelite, Fine 30-45 825 1A- 1B- 1C 5 1.4
Baking Powder 40-55 A35 18 6 .6
Baking Soda (Sodium Bicarbonate) 40-55 A25 18 5 .6
Barite (Barium Sulfate), + V2 -3" 120-180 036 30 7 2.6
Barite, Powder 120-180 A35X 20 6 2.0
Barium Carbonate 72 A45R 20 6 1.6
Bark, Wood, Refuse 10-20 E45TVY 30 6 2.0
Barley, Fine, Ground 24-38 835 1A- 1B- 1C 6 .4
Barley, Malted 31 C35 1A- 1 B- 1C1C 6 .4
Barley, Meal 28 C35 1A- 1B- 6 .4
Barley, Whole 36-48 825N 1A-1 B- 1C 5 .5
Basalt 80-105 827 30 8 1.8
Bauxite, Crushed, -3" 75-85 036 30 7 2.5
Bauxite, Dry, Ground 68 825 20 5 1.8
Beans, Castor, Meal 35-40 835W 1A- 1B- 1C 6 .8
Beans, Castor, Whole Shelled 36 C15W 1A-1B- 1C 5 .5
Beans, Navy, Dry 48 C15 1A- 1B- 1C 5 .5
Beans, Navy, Steeped 60 C25 1A- 1B- 1C 5 .8
Bentonite, Crude 34-40 045X 20 6 1.2
Bentonite, -100 Mesh 50-60 A25MXY 20 5 .7
Benzene Hexachloride 56 A45R 1A-1 B- 1C 6 .6
Bicarbonate of Soda (Baking Soda) 18 5 .6
Blood, Dried 35-45 045U 20 6 2.0

[~;I~~~~~~~~~~~]
9

-1
10
Clay, Ceramic, Dry, Fines 60-80 A35P 1A-1 8-1 C 6 1.5
Clay, Dry, Lumpy 60-75 035 2D
Clinker, Cement (See Cement Clinker)
6 1.8
Clover Seed 45-48 B25N 1A-18-1C 5 .4
Coal, Anthracite (River & Culm) 55-61 B35TY 2A-28 6 1.0
Coal, Anthracite, Sized, -1/2" 49-61 C25 2A-28 5 1.0
Coal, Bituminous, Mined 40-60 035LNXY 1A-18 6 .9
Coal, Bituminous, Mined, Sized 45-50 035QV 1A-1 8 6 1.0
Coal, Bituminous, Mined, Slack 43-50 C45T 2A-28 6 .9
Coal, Lignite 37-45 035T 2D
Cocoa Beans 6 1.0
30-45 C25Q 1A-1 8 5 .5
Cocoa, Nibs 35 C25 2D 5 .5
Cocoa, Powdered 30-35 A45XY 18 6 .9
Cocoanut, Shredded 20-22 E45 28 6 1.5
Caffee, Chaff 20 B25MY 1A-1 8 5 1.0
Coffee, Green Bean 25-32 1A-1 8
C25PQ 5 .5
Coffee, Ground, Dry 25 A35P 1A-1 8 6 .6
Coffee, Ground, Wet 35-45 A45X 1A-1 8 6 .6
Caffee, Roasted Bean 20-30 C25PQ 18 5 .4
Coffee, Soluble 19 A35PUY 18 6 .4
Coke, Breeze 25-35 C37 3D 8 1.2
Coke, Loose 23-35 037 3D 8 1.2
Coke, Petrol, Calcined 35-45 037 3D 8 1.3
Compost 30-50 045TV 3A-38 6 1.0
Concrete, Pre-Mix Dry 85-120 C36U 3D 7 3.0
Copper Ore 120-150 036 3D 7 4.0
Copper Ore, Crushed 100-150 036 3D 7 4.0
Copper Sulphate (Bluestone) 75-95 C35S 2A-28-2C 6 1.0
Copperas (See Ferrous Sulphate)
Copra, Cake, Ground 40-45 B45HW 1A-1 8-1 C 6 .7
Copra, Cake, Lumpy 25-30 035HW 2A-28-2C 6 .8
Copra", Lumpy 22 E35HW 2A-28-2C 6 1.0
Copra, Meal 40-45 B35HW 2D 6 .7
Cork, Fine Ground 5-15 B35JNY 1A-1 8-1 C 6 .5
Cork, Granulated 12-15 C35JY 1A-1 8-1 C 6 .5
Corn, Cracked 40-50 B25P 1A-18-1C 5 .7
Corn Cabs, Ground 17 C25Y 1A-18-1C 5 .6
Corn Cabs, Whole * 12-15 E35 2A-28 6
Corn Ear * 56 E35 2A-28 6
Corn Germ 21 B35PY 1A-1 8-1 C 6 .4
Corn Grits 40-45 B35P 1A-1 8-1 C 6 .5
Cornmeal 32-40 B35P 1A-1 8 6 .5
Corn Oil, Cake. I 25 045HW 1A-18 6 .6
Corn Seed 45 C25PQ 1A-1 8-1 C 5 .4
Corn Shelled 45 C25 1A-1 8-1 C 5 .4
Corn Sugar 30-35 B35PU 18 6 1.0
Cottonseed, Cake, Crushed 40-45 C45HW 1A-1 8 6 1.0
Cottonseed, Cake, Lumpy 40-45 045HW 2A-28 6 1.0
Cottonseed, Dry, Delinted 22-40 C25X 1A-18 5 .6
Cottonseed, Dry, Not Delinted 18-25 C45XY 1A-18 6 .9
Cottonseed, Flakes 20-25 C35HWY 1A-1 8 6 .8
Cottonseed, Hulls 12 B35Y 1A-18 6 .9
Cottonseed, Meal, Expeller 25-30 B45HW 3A-38 6 .5
Cottonseed, Meal, Extracted 35-40 B45HW 1A-18 6 .5
Cottonseed, Meats, Dry 40 B35HW 1A-1 8 6 .6
Cottonseed, Meats, Rolled 35-40 C45HW 1A-18 6 .6
Cracklings, Crushed 40-50 045HW 2A-28-2C 6 1.3
Cryolite, Dust 75-90 A36L 2D 7 2.0
Cryolite, Lumpy 90-110 036 2D 7 2.1
Cullet, Fine 80-120 C37 3D 8 2.0

r@~1con
tinantaiJ
11
Cui let, Lump
Culm, (See Coal, Anthracite)
Cupric Sulphate (Copper Sulfate)
Detergent (See Soap Detergent)
Diatomaceous ~arth
Dicalcium Phosphate
Disodium Phosphate
Distiller's Grain, Spent, Dry
Distiller's Grain, Spent, Wet
Dolomite, Crushed
Dolomite, Lumpy
Earth, Loam, Dry, Loose
Ebonite, Crushed
Egg Powder
Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate)
Feldspar, Ground
Feldspar, Lumps
Feldspar, Powder
Feldspar, Screenings
Ferrous Sulfide, -V2"
Ferrous Sulfide, -1 00 Mesh
Ferrous Sulphate
Fish Meal
Fish Scrap
Flaxseed
Flaxseed Cake (Linseed Cake)
Flaxseed Meal (Linseed Meal)
Flour, Wheat
Flue Dust, Basic Oxygen Furnace
Flue Dust, Blast Furnace
Flue Dust, Boiler, Dry
Fluorspar, Fine (Calcium Fluoride)
Fluorspar, Lumps
Flyash
Foundry Sand, Dry (See Sand)
Fuller's Earth, Calcined
Fuller's Earth, Dry, Raw
Fuller's Earth, Oily, Spent
Gelatine, Granulated
Gelena (See Lead Sulfide)
Gilsonite
Glass, Batch
Glue, Ground
Glue, Pearl
Glue. Veg. Powdered
Gluten, Meal
Granite, Fine
Grape, Pomace
Graphite Flake
Graphite Flour
Graphite Ore
Guano Dry *
Gypsum, Calcined
Gypsum, Calcined, Powdered
Gypsum, Raw, -1"
Hay, Chopped *
Hexanedioic Acid (See Adipic Acid)
Hominy, Dry
Hops, Spent. Dry
Hops, Spent, Wet

12
Ice, Crushed 35-4 5555 0350 2A-28 6 .4
Ice, Cubes 33-3 0350 18 6 .4
Ice, Flaked * 40-4 C350 18 6 .6
Ice, Sheil 33-3 0450 18 6 .4
Ilmenite Ore 140- 160 037 3D 8 2.0
Iron Ore Concentrate 120- 180 A37 3D 8 2.2
Iron Oxide, Millscale 75 C36 20 7 1.6
Iron Oxide Pigment 25 A36LMP 1A-1 8-1 C 7 1.0
Iron Pyrites (See Ferrous Sulfide)
Iron Sulphate (See Ferrous Sulfate) - -I

Iron Sulfide (See Ferrous Su'fide) -!


Iron Vitriol (See Ferrous Sulfate)
Kafir (Corn) 40-45 C25 30 5 .5
Kaolin Clay 63 025 20 6 2.0
Kaolin Clay, Talc 42-56 A35LMP 20 6 2.0
Kryalith (See Cryolite)
Lactose 32 A35PU 18 6 .6
Lamp Black (See Carbon Bla:ck)
Lead Arsenate 72 A35R 1A-18-1C 6 1.4
Lead Arsenite 72 A35R 1A-18-1C 6 1.4
Lead Carbonate 240-260 A35R 20 6 1.0
LeadOre,l/s" 200-270 835 3D 6 1.4
Lead Ore, Vi' 180-230 C36 3D 7 1.4
Lead Oxide (Red Lead), -1 00 Me.sh 30-150 A35P 20 6 1.2
Lead Oxide (Red Lead), -200 Mesh 30-180 A35LP 20 6 1.2
Lead Sulphide, -100 Mesh 240-260 A35R 20 6
Lignite (See Coa!,Ugnite)
Limanite, Ore, Brown 120 C47 3D 8 1.7
Lime, Ground, Unslaked 60-65 835U 1A-18-1 C 6 .6
Lime, Hydrated 40 835LM 20 6 .8
Lime, Hydrated, Pulverized 32-40 A35LM 1A-18 6 .6
Lime, Pebble 53-56 C25HU 2A-28 5 2.0
Limestone, Agricultural 68 835 20 6 2.0
Limestone, Crushed 85-90 036 20 7 2.0
Limestone, Dust 55-95 A46MY 20 7 1.6-2.0
Lindane (See Benzene Hexabhloride)
Linseed (See Flaxseed)
Litharge (See Lead Oxide)
Lithopone 45-50 A35MR 1A-18 6 1.0
Maize (See Milo)
Malt, Dry, Ground 20-30 835 1A-1B-1C 6 .5
Malt, Dry, Whole 20-30 C35 N 1A-1 B-1C 6 .5
Malt, Meal 36-40 825 P 1A-1B-1 C 5 .4
Malt, Sprouts 13-15 C35 P 1A-1B-1C 6 .4
Magnesium Chloride (Magnesite) . 33 C45 1A-1 B 6 1.0
Manganese Dioxide * 70-85 A35 NRT 2A-2B 6 1.5
Manganese Ore 125-140 037 30 8 2.0
Manganese Oxide 120 A36 20 7 2.0
Manganese Sulfate 70 C37 30 8 2.4
Marble, Crushed 80-95 837 30 8 2.0
Marl, (Clay) 80 036 20 7 1.6
Meat, Ground 50-55 E45 HQTX 2A-2B 6 1.5
Meat, Scrap (with bone) 40 E46 H 20 7 1.5
Mica, Flakes 17-22 816 MY 20 7 1.0
Mica, Ground 13-15 836 20 7 .9
Mica, Pulverized 13-15 A36 M 20 7 1.0
Milk, Dried, Flake 5-6 835 PUY 1B 6 .4
Milk, Malted 27-30 A45 PX 1B 6 .9
Milk, Powdered 20-45 825 PM 1B 5 .5
Milk Sugar 32 A35 PX 1B 6 .6

13
Milk, Whole, Powdered 20-36 835PUX 1B 6 .5
Millscale (Steel) 120-125 E46T 30 7 3.0
Milo, Ground 32-36 825 1A-1 B-1 C 5 .5
Milo Maize (Kafir) 40-45 815N 1A-1 B-1 C 5 .4
Molybdenite Powder 107 826 20 7 1.5
Monosodium Phosphate 50 836 20 7 .6
Mortar, Wet * 150 E46T 30 7 3.0
Mustard Seed 45 815N 1A-1 B-1 C 5 .4
Naphthalene. Flakes 45 835 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .7
Niacin (Nicotinic Acid) 35 A35P 20 6 .8
Oat Hulls 8-12 835NY 1A-1B-1C 6 .5
Oats 26 C25MN 1A-1B-1C 5 .4
Oats, Crimped 19-26 C35 1A-1B-1C 6 .5
Oats, Crushed 22 845NY 1A-1 B-1C 6 .6
Oats, Flour 35 A35 1A-1 B-1C 6 .5
Oats, Rolled 19-24 C35NY 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .6
Oleo Margarine (Margarine) 59 E45HKPWX 2A-2B 6 .4
Orange Peel, Dry 15 E45 2A-2B 6
Oxalic Acid Crystals - 1.5
Ethane Diacid Crystals 60 B35QS 1A-1B 6 1.0
Oyster Shells, Ground 50-.60 C36T 3D 7 1.6-2.0
Oyster Shells, Whole 80 036TV 3D 7 2.1-2.5
Paper Pulp (4% or less) 62 E45 2A-2B 6 1.5
Paper Pulp (6% to 15%) 60- 62' E45 2A-2B
Parrafin Cake, -Vi'
6 1.5
45 C45K 1A-1 B 6 .6
Peanuts, Clean, in shell 15-20 035Q 2A-2B 6 .6
Peanut Meal 30 B35P 1B 6 .6
Peanuts, Raw, Uncleaned (Unshelled) 15- 20, 036Q 3D 7 .7
Peanuts, Shelled 35- 45! C35Q 1B 6 .4
Peas, Dried 45- 50' C15NQ 1A-1B-1 C 5 .5
Perlite, Expanded 8-1 2 C36 2D 7 .6
Phosphate Acid, Fertilizer 60 B25T 2A-2B 5 1.4
Phosphate, Disodium
(See Disodium Phosphate) - - -
Phosphate Rock, Broken 75-85 036 2D 7 2.1
Phosphate Rock, Pulverized 60 836 2D 7 1.7
Phosphate Sand 90-100 837 3D 8 2.0
Plaster of Paris (See Gypsum)
Plumbago (See Graphite)
Polyethylene, Resin Pellets 30.:35 C45Q 1A-1 8 6 .4
Polystyrene Beads 40 835PQ 18 6 .4
Polyvinyl, Chloride Pellets 20-30, E45KPQT 18 6 .6
Polyvinyl, Chloride Powder 20-30! A45KT 28 6 1.0
Potash (Muriate) Dry 70 837 3D 8 2.0
Potash (Muriate) Mine Run 75 037 3D 8 2.2
Potassium Carbonate 51 836 2D 7 1.0
Potassium Chloride Pellets C25TU 3D
120-1~0 5 1.6
Potassium Nitrate, -Vi' 76 C16NT 3D 7 1.2
Potassium Nitrate, -1/ a" 80 826NT 3D 7 1.2
Potassium Sulfate 42-48 846X 2D 7 1.0
Potato Flour 48 A35MNP 1A-1 8 6 .5
Pumice, -Vi' 42-48 846 3D 7 1.6
Pyrite, Pellets 120-130 C26 3D 7 2.0
Quartz, -100 Mesh 70-80 A27 3D 8 1.7
Quartz, V2 80-90 C27 3D 8 2.0
Rice, Bran 20 835NY 1A-18-1C 6 .4
Rice, Grits 42-45 835P 1A-18-1C 6 .4
Rice, Hulled 45-49 C25P 1A-18-1C 5 .4
Rice, Hulls 20-21 835NY 1A-1 8-1 C 6 .4
Rice, Polished 30 C15P 1A-1 B-1 C 5 .4

14
Rice, Rough 32- 36 C35N 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .6
Rosin, -Vi' 65- 68 C45Q 1A-1B-1C 6 1.5
Rubber, Pelleted 50- 55 045 2A-2B-2C 6 1.5
Rubber, Reclaimed, Ground 23- 50 C45 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .8
Rye 42- 48 815N 1A-1 B-1 C 5 .4
Rye Bran 15- 20 835Y 1A-1B-1C 6 .4
Rye Feed 33 835N 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .5
Rye Meal 35- 40 835 1A-1B-1 C 6 .5
Rye Middlings 42 835 1A-1 B 6 .5
Rye, Shorts 32- 33 C35 2A-2B 6 .5
Safflower, Cake 50 026 2D 7 .6
Safflower, Meal 50 835 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .6
Safflower Seed 45 815N 1A-1B-1C 5 .4
Saffron (See Safflower)
Sal Ammoniac (Ammonium <J;hloride)- -
Salicylic Acid 29 837U 3D 8 .6
Salt Cake, Dry, Coarse 85 836TU 3D 7 2.1
Salt Cake, Dry, Pulverized 65-85 836TU 3D 7 1.7
Salt, Dry, Coarse 45-60 C36TU 3D 7
Salt, Dry, Fine
1.()
70-80 836TU 3D 7 1.7
Saltpeter (See Potassium Nitrate)
Sand, Dry Bank (Damp) 110-130 847 3D 8 2.8
Sand, Dry Bank (Dry) 90-110 837 3D 8 1.7
Sand, Dry Silica 90-100 827 3D 8 2.0
Sand, Foundry (Shake Out) 90-100 D37Z 3D 8 2.6
Sand, (~esin Coated) Silica 104 827 3D 8 2.0
Sand, (Resin Coated) Zircon 115 A27 3D 8 2.3
Sawdust, Dry 10-13 845UX 1A-1B-1C 6 .7
Sea Coal 65 836 2D 7 1.0
Sesame Seed 27-41 826 2D 7 .6
Shale, Crushed 85-90 C36 2D 7 2.0
Shellac, Powdered or Granulated 31 835P 1B 6 .6
Silica, Flour 80 A46 2D
Silica Gel, + Vi' -3"
7 1.5
45 D37HKQU 3D 8 2.0
Silicon Dioxide (See Quartz)
Slag, Blast Furnace, Crushed 130-180 D37Y 3D 8 2.4
Slag, Furnace Granular, Dry 60-65 C37 3D 8 2.2
Slate, Crushed, -Vi' 80-90 C36 2D 7 2.0
Slate, Ground, -1/ a" 82-85 836 2D 7 1.6
Sludge, Sewage, Dried 40-50 E47TW 3D 7
i .8
Sludge, Sewage, Dry Groundl 45-55 8468 2D 7 .8
Soap, Beads or Granules 15-35 835Q 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .6
Soap, Chips 15-25 C35Q 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .6
Soap, Detergent 15-50 835FQ 1A-1 B-1 C 6 .8
Soap, Flakes 5-15 835QXY 1A-1B-1C 6 .6
Soap, Powder 20-25 825X 1A-1 B-1 C 5 .9
Soapstone, Talc, Fine 40-50 A45XY 1A-1 B-1 C 6 2.0
Soda Ash, Heavy 55-65 836 2D 7 1.0
Soda Ash, Light 20-35 A36Y 2D 7 .8
Sodium Aluminate, Ground 72 836 2D 7 1.0
Sodium Aluminum Fluoride
(See Kryolite) - - - -
Sodium AluminuT Sulphate * 75 A36 20 7 1.0
Sodium Bentonite (See Bentonite)
Sodium Bicarbonate (See Baking Soda)
Sodium Borate (See Borax)
Sodium Carbonate (See Soda Ash)
Sodium Chloride (See Salt) 1
Sodium Hydrate (See Caustic Soda)
Sodium Hydroxide (See Cau~tic Soda)
;

15
Sodium Nitrate
Sodium Phosphate
Sodium Sulfate (See Salt Cake)
Sodium Sulfite
Sorghum, Seed (See Kafir or Milo)
Soybean, Cake
Soybean, Cracked
Soybean, Flake, Raw
Soybean, Flour
Soybean Meal, Cold
Soybean Meal, Hot
Soybeans, Whole
Starch
Steel Turnings, Crushed
Sugar Beet, Pulp, Dry
Sugar Beet, Pulp, Wet
Sugar, Powdered
Sugar, Raw
Sugar, Refined, Granulated Dry
Sugar, Refined, Granulated Wet
Sulphur, Crushed, -Vi'
Sulphur, Lumpy, -3"
Sulphur, Powdered
Sunflower Seed
Talcum, -Vi'
Talcum Powder
Tanbark, Ground *
Timothy Seed
Titanium Dioxide (See Ilmenite Ore)
Tobacco, Scraps
Tobacco, Snuff
Tricalcium Phosphate
Triple Super Phosphate
Trisodium Phosphate
Trisodium Phosphate, Granular
Trisodium Phosphate, Pulverized
Tung Nut Meats, Crushed
Tung Nuts
Urea Prills, Coated
Vermiculite, Expanded
Vermiculite Ore
Vetch
Walnut Shells, Crushed
Wheat
Wheat, Cracked
Wheat, Germ
White Lead, Dry
Wood Chips, Screened ~
Wood Flour
Wood Shavings ~
Zinc, Concentrate Residue
Zinc Oxide, Heavy
Zinc Oxide, Light

* Consult our Engineering Department. .


Reference to specific materials in Table 2 should not be construed as indicating that all of the materials
are recommended for screw conveyor application.

16
3. Determine the Design Capacity
Screw conveyors that employ standard, full pitch flighting have a
Design Capacity equal to their required capacity. Required capacity was
determined in Step 1 and is the maximum amount of material per hourthe
conveyor in question must handle.

DesIgn Capacity, however, is not equal to required capacity when a


modified flighting configuration (such as half pitch) is used. This will
alter the output of the conveyor and therefore, when using a modified
flighting, itis necessary to multiply the required capacity by the Capacity
Factors appearing in Table 3 in order to obtain th'e Design Capacity. It is
Design Capacity that is then used to establish the conveyor diameter and
speed.

TABLE 3 CAPACITY FACTORS

6 1 1.32 1.52 1.79


9 1 1/2 1.34 1.54 1.81
10 11/2 1.45 1.67 1.96
12 2 1.32 1.52 1.79
21/2 1.11 1.27 1.50
14 21/2 1.27 1.45 1.71
16 21/2 1.55 1.69 1.90
18 3 1.33 1.53 1.80
20 3 1.60 1.75 1.96
24 3 2.02 2.14 2.28

4. Establish the Diameter and Speed


After having determined the material classification and the' Design
Capacity of the conveyor in question, refer to the Capacity Charts, Table
4, on Pages 18 and 19. The applicable chart forthe material in question is
determined by referring to the "Capacity Chart No."column in Table 2,
Material Characteristics.
Deterrf1ine the appropriate conveyor diameter by referring to the
"cubic feet/hour at maximum A.P.M." column. Once the proper conveyor
diameter has been selected, verify Table 5 to insure that the diameter
selected is large enough to handle the material size in question. Should
the lump size be too great for the diameter selected, proceed to the next
larger diameter that will handle the material. One should note, however,
that this applies only to materials comprised of hard lumps that will not
break up in the conveyor.
Speed is now determined by dividing the Design Capacity arrived at
in Step 2 by the relevant figure in the "Cubic Feet/Hour at 1 A.P.M."
column of the Capacity Chart in question.
For example, a9" diameter conveyor as shown in .Capacity Chart 5,
Table 4, will handle 80 cu.ft./hour at 1 A.P.M. Thus, if the conveyor in
question is to handle 640 cu.ft./hour it must turn 80 A.P.M. (640cu.ft./hr+
8 cu.ft./hr. @ 1 A.P.M. = 80 A.P.M.).

17
TABLE 4 CAPACITY CHARTS

CHART 5 -(45% FULL)

Pulverized, small size, friable non-abrasive and free


flowing materials. Also medium weight, non-abrasive
granular or small lump material mixed with fines.

4 1 175 11237.
0.64 5.60 0.032 4.2001 0.024 2.800 1 0.016 1.960 I 0.011
6 1V2 165 2.28 18.80 0.114 14.10 I 0.085 9.400 0.057 6.580 0.040
9 1V2
2 150 1200 8.00 60.00 0.400 45.00 30.00
0.300 0.200 21.00 0.140
10 1V2
2 145 1600 11.0 80.00 0.550 60.00 0.410 40.00 0.280 28.00 0.190
12 2
2 7~6 140 2700 19.3 135.0 0.720 67.50
0.960 I, 101.0 0.480 '47.30 0.340
3
14 27/16
3 130 4000 30.8 0.770
1200.0, 1.540
2.360 ' 214.0
150.0 1.770
1.150 1 142.5
100.0 1.190 1 100.0
70.00 0.540
16 3 120 5700 47.3 285.0
0.830
18 3 115 7800 68.0 390.0 1.700 136.0
3.400 292.0 2.540 195.0
1.190
20 3
37/16 105 9800 490.0 4.600 3.450 2.300 j 1'71.0
I 93.0 1 367.0 1 245.0 1.610
24 37/16 100 810.0 4.050 ~83.0
16200 162
8.100 607.0 6.070 405.0 2.830

CHART 6 (30% FULL)

Non-abrasive materials consisting of fines, gran~lar. or


medium lumps mixed with fines.

4 1 " 130 57 0.44 2.86 1 0.022 2.140 I 0.016 1.430/ 0.011 1.000 I 0.007

6 1Y2 120 I 180 1.50 9.00 0.075 6.750 0.056


4.500 0.037 3.150 0.026

9 1V2
2 105 565 5.40 28.30 I 0.270 21.20 0.200 14.10 0.135 9.890 I 0.094
10 1V2
2 95 7.60 36.10 I 0.380 27.08 0.285
7251 18.101 0.190 12.68 0.130
12 2
2 7/,~ 90 11751 13.0 58.50 I 0.650 43.88 0.490 29.25 0.325 0.228
20.50
3
14 27;;.
3 85 1790 21.0 89.3
125.5, 1 1.050
1.570 67.00 0.787 44.65 0.525 31.26 0.367
16 3 80 2510 31.4 94.13 1.170 62.75 0.785 43.93 0.549
18 3 75 3420 45.5 128.3 1.702 85.50 0.794
171.0 2.270 1.135 $9.85
20 3
37/,t
70 4350 I 62.0 217.0 I 3.100 1 162.8 2.330 1108.5 1.550 1 15~95 1.085
24 376~ 65 7030 108 352.0 5.400 264.0 4.050 176.0 2.700 1~3.2 1.890

18
CHART 7 -(30% FULL)

Moderately abrasive materials consisting of fines


granular, or medium lumps mixed with fines,

4 1 65 29 0.44 1.430 0.022 1.072 1 0.715 1


0.016 0.011 0.500 I 0.008

6 11h 60 90 1.50 4.500 0.075 3.370 0.056 2.250 0.037 1.570 0.026

9 11h
2 50 270 5.40 13.50 0.270 10.13 0.200 6.7501 0.135 4.7201 0.094
10 1Y2
2 50 380 7.60 19.00 0.380 14.25 0.285 9.5001 0.190 6.650 I 0.133
12 2
27/'6 50 650 13.0 32.50 0.650 24.37 0.487 16.25 0.324 11.37 0.227
3
14 27/'6
3 45 945 21.0 47.30 1.050 35.44 0.787 23.65 0.525 16.54 0.367
16 3 45 1430 31.4 70.60 1.570 52.95 1.177 35.30 0.785 24.71 0.549
18 3 40 1820 45.5 91.00 2.270 68.25 1.702 45.50 1.135 31.85 0.794
20 3
37/'6 40 2480 62.0 124.0 3.100 1 93.00 2.320 I 62.00 1.550 43.40 1.085
24 3 7/'6 40 4320 108 216.0 5.400 162.0 4.050 108.0 2.700 75.60 1.890

CHART 8 -(15% FULL) CHART 9

Highly abrasive lumpy or stringy material which must FEEDERS


be carried at a low Jevel ir1 trough to avoid contact with (95% FULL)
hanger bearings or interference with hanger frames.

4 1
1.381 0.0681 0.051 1 0.034 10.023
6 1Y2 60 45 0.75 2.280 I 0.038 1.710 I 0.028 1.140 I 0.019 0.7981 0.013 4.75 0.237 0.177 0.118 0.082
9 1%
2 50 135 2.70 6.750 I 0.135 5.0621 0.101 3.3751 0.067 2.362! 0.047 16.8 0.8401 0.63010.42010.294
10 1Y2
2 50 190 3.80 9.500 I 0.190 7.1251 0.142 4.750 I 0.095 3.3251 0.066 23.8 1.19010.8921.59510.416
12 2
27/18 50 325 6.50 !16.30 0.325 12.19 0.243 8.150.1 0.162 5.705! 0.113 40.8 2.04011.53011.02010.714
3
14 27A8
3 45 473 23.60 0.525 17.70
i10.5 0.588
0.393 1 17.65
11.80 0.262
0.392 1 8.260
12.36 I 0.274
0.183 100 65.2 1 3.2601 2.445
5.000 3.750 1 1.630
2.500 1 1.141
1.750

16 3 45 708 !15.7 35.30 0.785 26.48


18 3 40 915 '22.8 45.70 1.140 34.28 0.855 22.80 0.570 16.00 0.400 144 7.200 5.400 3.600 2.520

20 3
37A8 40 1240 31.0 1 62.00 1.550 46.50 1.162 1 31.00 0.7.75 1 21.70 0.542 195 9.800 1 7,350 14.900 1 3.43017.00
24 37/18 40 2160 54.0 108.0 2.700 81.00 2.025 54.00 1.350 37.80 0.945 340 12.75 8.500 5.950

I~I continantal,1
19
TABLE 5 MAXIMUM LUMP SIZE
5. Establish
II)
w
Component Group :I:
and Bearing Type (J
Z
From Table 2 determine the w
Component Group for the ma- ~
II)

terial being handled. Now Q.


~
proceed to Component Selec- :)
-I
tion, Table 6 to determine the
6 9 10 12 14 16 18 20 24
type of bearing material recom-
MINIMUM SCREW DIA.
mended for the application.
This data will be used in esta- TABLE 6 COMPONENT SELECTION
blishing the required conveyor
horsepower. The recommen-
ded bearing types shown in
Normal Service- Component group 1 A .babbitted bearing hangers
Table 6 are those most often Component group 1 B .wood bearing hangers
Component group 1C .ball bearing hangers
used with each of the Compo- regular trough
nent Groups shown. Bearing regular flights
cold rolled steel couplings
selection however is often
affected by other constraints
such as the type of product
handled, temperature or noise
level. See the Bearing Recom-
mendations section on Page 24
for further information in this
regard.

Heavy Service Component group 2AD .babbitted bearing hangers cold rolled steei couplings
Component group 2BD .wood bearing hangers cold rolled steel couplings
Component group 2CD .ball bearing hangers cold rolled steel couplings
Component group 2D. .hard iron bearing hangers hardened steel couplings
heavy trough
heavy flights

Extra heavy Service Component group 3A A .babbitted bearing hangers cold rolled steel couplings
Component group 3D0 .hard iron bearing hangers hardened steel couplings
extra-heavy trough
extra-heavy flights

.
.For use with nonabrasive materials. A For use with midly abrasive material.
0 For use with nonabrasive irregular material or ~ For use with midly corrosive materials.
lumpy material containing lumps over 1/2". 0 For use with very abrasive materials.

20
6. Establish "D" Factor
The "0" factor is a constant that is applied to a particular Component
Group of a given conveyor and takes into account the power f.equired to
overcome friction in the conveyor intermediate hanger bearings. To
determine "D"; locate the conveyor diameter and bearing material in the
Friction Factor Chart, Table 7. The figure appearing at the intersection is
the "0" factor that is to be used in the horsepower formula.

TABLE 7 FRICTION FACTORS

7. Establish Required Horsepower


The formula appearing below gives the horsepower (HoP.) required
at the drive shaft of a standard conveyor. The "F" factor referred to in this
formula is obtained from the "Horsepower Factor" column of Table 2,
Material Characteristics.

Where:
L ::: Overall conveyor length in feet.
H.P. = L (OS + OF) 0 ::: Friction factor "0", Step 6.
S ::: Speed in A.P.M., Step 4.
1 000 000
Q ::: Quantity of material conveyed in Lbs./Hr.
F ::: Horsepower factor "F" (from Table 2)

Conveyor flighting deviating in pitch only requires the same


horsepower as standard flighting. If a modified flighting is used, such as
ribbon flight, additional power will be required. Thus, the horsepower
determined above must be multiplied by the appropriate factor from the
Modified Flight Factor Chart, Table 8.

TABLE 8 MODIFIED FLIGHT FACTORS

Cut Flight 130


1 1.29
1.10'1.1511.20
2 1.58
Cut & Folded Flight I N.R 1.50 1.70 I 2.20
3 1.87
Ribbon Flight 1.0511.1411.20 4 2.16
.Not recommended.

21
8. Establish Motor Size
With the horsepower determined in the preceding step, determine the
necessary motor from Motor Selection, Table 9 for the horsepower in
question. This table incorporates factors which compensate for the
additional power required to start a conveyor under full load, overcome
minor choking conditions and power losses brought about by drive
inefficiency.

TABLE 9 MOTOR SELECTION

TABLE 10 TORQUE CAPACITY

22
9. Determine Shaft Size
The maximum horsepower that may be safely applied to a given
shatt, pipe or coupling bolt size at any given speed is determined by
verifying their particular torque rating as shown in Torque Capacity,
Table 10 found on page 22. These ratings are based on Schedule 40
conveyor pipe, cold rolted shafts and standard grade coupling bolts. For
horsepower ratings of heavier pipes, high torque shafts or bolts and
stainless steel or other materials, please contact our engineering
department.
To use Table 10, determine the intersection point between the
conveyor speed ard the motor horsepower and read the shaft size,
conveyor pipe and standard screw size along the bottom.

10. Component Selection


The sizing of major conveyor components is determined by Table 6.
These components have been classified according to the physical
properties of the materials they will be subjected to.
The Component Group selected in Step 5 is used to determine the
physical size of the conveyor components after the diameter, horseposer
and shaft size have been established. To use the table, locate the
component group in question and opposite it find the diameter of the
conveyor screw and coupling shafts as determined in Steps 4 and 9
respectively. Now, one can read off the recommended conveyor screw
part numbers and thicknesses of the trough and cover.

11. Example
A screw conveyor is required to handle 30 T.P.H. of mine run potash
weighing 70 to 80 Ibs./cu.ft. with 90% of volume under 1" however with
the balance being lumps up to 4'.'. The conveyor will have water spray
nozzles along its entire length for dust suppression and 1 paddle per
pitch to effectively distribute the water throughout the conveyed
material. The overall conveyor length is 40 feet.
From Table 2, it is found that Capacity Chart 8 is recommended for
mine run potash with a recommended trough loading of 15%. The actual
volume of material to be conveyed is now calculated:

30 T.P.H. X 2000 Ibs/ton = 60,000 Ibs = 857 cu.ft./hr.


70 Ibs./cu.ft.

With this figure, Design Capacity is calculated by multiplying 857


cu.ft./hr by the Capacity Factor 1.08 found in Table 3 for 1 paddle per
pitch. Thus, the design Capacity is 925 cu.ft./hr.
Aeferring now to Capacity Chart 8, the correct conveyor diameter is
selected by looking down the "Capacity in Cubic feet @ maximum
A.P.M." column until the proper size conveyor is found for 925 cu.ft./hr.
This is found to be a 20" diameter unit. Lump size must now be checked
using Table 5 and it is found that the minimum conveyor diameter
required to handle 4" lumps at 10% of the total volume is 16". Thus, the
20" conveyor is satisfactory. Next, one finds that a 20" diameter conveyor
will carry 31 cu.ft./hr. @ 1 A.P.M. from the next column over. Now by
dividing 925 cu.ft./hr. by31 cu.ft.fhr. @ 1 A.P.M. we obtain a conveyor
speed of 30 A.P.M.

23
The Component Group is now established as being 3D from Table 2.
Next, by referring to Table 6, we find that hard iron bearings are
recommended for a 3D application. The "0" factor is now established
from Table 7 as being 700 for a 20" diameter conveyor. From Table 2 the
horsepower factor of 2.2 is found as being applicable to mine run potash.
Horsepower can now be calculated using the following data:

L 40 feet S = 30 R.P.M.
D 700 Q = 60,000 Ibs./hr.
F = 2.2 (from Table 2, H.P. Factor)

40 (700 X 30 + 60,000 X 2.2)


Thus H.P.
1,000,000
HP. 6.12

This horsepower figure is now multiplied by the Modified Flight


Factor taken from Table 8 for 1 paddle per pitch. Thus 6.12 X 1.29 = 7.89
H.P. Using 7.89 H.P., we verify Table 9 and select a 10 H.P. motor for the
requirement.
Torque capacity is now verified using Table 10and it is found that a
3-7/16" diameter shaft is required to transmit the motor H.P.. From the
Component Selection Shart, Table 6 we find that for a 3D Component
Group using a 20" diameter conveyor screw with 3-7/16" shafts, a 20S724
unit is required witha 1/4" thick trough and 12 ga. covers. Page 28 may
now be referred to for additional layout data and details.

BEARING RECOMMENDATIONS
The selection of a bearing material for use in intermediate hangers is
one that is based largely on experience coupled with consideration for
the particular characteristics of the material in question. The principal
factor affecting bearing performance between various bearing materials
is a rating factor known as PV (pressure velocity). This rating is a
mathematical expression of PIA (pounds per inch of projected area) of
load times SFM (surface feet per minute). Thus, the PV value is the
maximum load and speed that a bearing may be subjected to.
The following list deals individually with the most popular types of
screw conveyor bearing materials indicating their particular areas of
strength and their restrictions. While this list covers most applications, it
is far from being complete as to the number of bearing material on the
market today. Should special applications or conditions be encountered,
Continental engineers will gladly assist in the selection of a suitable
material.

Babbitt and Bronze Bearings


Babbitt and bronze bearings have traditionally been used in
applications where mildy abrasive, irregular or lumpy materials are
encountered. Because of their need for oil or grease lubrication, they are
unaccpetable in applications where contamination is a deciding factor.
Babbitt bearings have a temperature limitation of 130F while lubricated
bronze are limited to 220F. The temperature limit for bronze can be
extended by using special high temperature alloys and/or synthetic
lubricants. The maximum PV of babbitt is approximately 30,000 with a
maximum P of 1500 and V of 1200. Bronze on the other hand has a
maximum PV of 75,000 with maximum P of 3,500 and V of 750.

24
Self Lubricated Bearings
Self lubricated bearings such as oil impregnated hard maple,
graphited bronze, commercial carbon, sintered bronze and
thermoplastic or reinforced fibre have become very popular for
applications involving mild to moderate abrasiveness with irregular or
lumpy materials. .

Oil impregnated wood has proven to be an extremely good bearing


material. Its major drawback is its inability to withstand highly abrasive
cond.itions such as encountered when moving aggregates or sand. Their
temperature limit is approximately 180F. In mildly abrasive conditions,
wood has the property of embedability which permits grit to become
embedded in the bearing sidewall then film over with lubricant thus
holding the shaft harmless. Its maximum PV is 15,000 with a maximum P
of 2,000 and V of 2,000. Its total PV approaches that of babbitt and can
carry higher speeds or loads individually.
Thermoplastic bearings such as ultra high molecular weight
polyethylene (UHMWP) and nylon are the most regularly encountered
thermoplastics. Both operate effective1y in damp conditions, however,
UHMWP is best suited to wet aplications such as ice or fish offal
conveyors because of its low rate of water absorption thus minimizing
shaft seizure due to bearing swelling. Nylon on the other hand absorbs
water at a much higher rate which can lead to swelling problems.
Temperature limitations of UHMWP are 180F while nylon is 250F.
Abrasion resistar:lce of UHMWP is outstanding providing PV limitations
are not exceeded. This same material IS used as chute liners in the gravel
industry. The maximum PV of UHMWP is 4,000 with a maximum P of
1,200 and V of 50. Nylon on the other hand has a maximum PV of 3,000
with a maximum P of 400 and V of 350.
Graphited bronze bearings are useful in certain applications and
have a maximum PV of 50,000 with a maximum P of 1,500 and V of 1,200.
Their maximum operating temperature is 500F. For higher temperature
applications, commercial carbon bearings can be used as their
temperature limits are approximately 600F.

Hard Iron Bearings


Hard iron bearings cast in chilled white iron or Ni-Hard@ materia) are
used when handling excessively abrasive materials. They must be used
in conjunction with hardened coupling shafts, which, depending on the
circumstances can be achieved through induction hardening or hard
surfacing the shaft in question. Hard iron bearings are not normally
lubricated and have a maximum operating temperature of 500F. The
maximum PV of hard iron is 75,000 with a maximum P of 8,000 and a V of
35.
Because of the absence of lubricant when using hard iron bearings
with hardened coupling shafts, it is necessary to limit the operating
speed using the formula below in order that wear may be kept to a
minimum and that excessive squealing noise caused by dry metal on
metal be eleminated.

120
Maximum operating speed (R.P.M
Shaft dia. in inches

25
1<i:1continantGi]

The component selection procedure previously outlined takes into


account the material's physical characteristics, provides for proper cross
sectional loading of the conveyor and specifies, through the component
tables, the type of components best suited for the application in question.
Some material characteristics however will require additional special
features. The following should be taken into consideration when
encountered.
Abrasive Materials
Abrasive materials have a tendency of causing excessive and
accelerated wear on screw conveyor components and should be carried
at low cross sectional loads and slow conveyor speeds. For excessively
abrasive materials or conveyors subjected to heavy, continuous service,
heavy duty components should be specified and abrasive resistant, hard
surfaced materials or alloys should be considered for the application.

Contaminable Materials
Easily contaminable materials such as foodstuffs and certain
chemicals require special components and construction not necessarily
found in standard conveyors as outlined in the selection process. Such
special components and features often include non lubricated
intermediate hanger bearings, end bearing seals, tightly sealed covers,
and often drop bottom troughs for easy access and cleaning of the
conveyor. Certain applications may also require continuously welded
flighting on one or both sides of the pipe and special finishes on the welds
to minimize roughness and alleviate contamination. Many materials will
also require stainless steel to eliminate corrosion.

Corrosive Materials
When corrosive materials are encountered it is advisable to use
components manufactured of stainless steel, aluminum or other
resistant alloys. Hot dip galvanizing may be used in non abrasive
applications.
Degradable Materials
Materials which have a tendency to break up or separate easily,
thereby affecting quality, should be handled in larger diameter, slower
turning screw conveyors to reduce material agitation.

Extreme Temperatures
When handling materials of extreme temperature, it is necessary to
construct the conveyor with special components and alloys designed to
meet these conditions. (With the use of a jacketed type trough, it is
possible to either heat or cool the material while conveying and keep it
within a safe operating temperature). Please consult our engineering
department for their recommendations.

Fluidizing Materials
When handling materials which tend to aerate easily and decrease in
density, thereby increasing in volume, it is important to take into account
the areated density in order that the conveyor size, speed and
horsepower can be adjusted in consequence.

Hygroscopic Materials
Hygroscopic materials which readily absorb moisture must be
handled in tightly sealed conveyors that exclude the exterior

26
atmosphere. The fact that the material will also increase in density and
become more sluggish when in contact with moisture must also be taken
into account when determining conveyor size. horsepower and speed.

Materials that tend to Pack


Materials that tend to pack and have a strong resistance to digging
may be handled by a standard conveyor providing they are aerated prior
to being introduced into the conveyor. Some materials which tend to
pack under pressure and become hard in the clearance between the
trough and conveyor screw can be conveyed satisfactorily if the screw
conveyor operates at a slow speed and a cutting edge is applied to the
leading edge of the flight.

Mixing Materials
If mixing or aeration of one or more materials is necessary during the
conveying process, ribbon flights, cut flights, cut and folded flights or
anyone of the above in combination with paddles may be employed.

Toxic Materials
Toxic materials that can release harmful dust orvapours during the
conveying stage should be handled in a system of sealed construction. In
some cases an exhaust system may be advisable to remove the toxic
vapour or dust.

Viscous or Sticky Materials


Viscous or sticky materials should be handled by a ribbon type
conveyor screw due to their tendancy to adhere to the flight and pipe
junction point on a standard conveyor. Special coatings applied to the
ribbon can often assist the flow of such a material.

COMPONENT SELECTION AND LAYOUT DATA


TABLE 11 HAND OF CONVEYOR
When selecting comp0nents for your screw conveyor, please refer to
Typical Conveyor Layout, Table 12, and the accompanying diagram for
the dimensional standards and recommended layout arrangements.

Conveyor Screws
Conveyor screws are available as either right or left hand units. Right
hand will be supplied unless otherwise specified. In order to determine
the "hand" of a conveyor, refer to Hand of Conveyor, Table 11. Use
standard length conveyor screws whenever possible. The carrying face
of the screw, which moves the material being conveyed is free of lugs for
unimpeded flow. Lugs are positioned on the back or non carrying side of
the screw at each end to guard against the flight folding back. It is
therefore essential that a screw designed for right hand operation be
used that way and vice versa for left hand. Bi-directional conveyor screws
can be furnished for specific operations. Flighting should be omitted
over the last discharge opening and flight ends at hanger positions
should be set opposite each other for continuous flow of material across
the hanger space.
Note that if the edge of the flight on the near side of the conveyor
screw slopes down to the right, the screw is right hand and if it slopes
downward to the left, the conveyor screw is left hand.

27
TABLE 12 TYPICAL CONVEYOR LAYOUT
-trough length .
cocoInlet to discharge
r- B = bearingc.c. --J l~ I
1/2C.
It... A'--~ A lIr asreq'"-11~:C
rJ.l
" ,,-~..-
" " <I!~r-~"-~,,-L;r-L-,,-
' " " " " "
-LC'--L-k"-
"l; ~~~-L
i~ " "
",,-L-
,
[!J :E-.i "'"
"""-""'-"'~-
""""""""",
"..,..-", ,..-~ "" 'T--",,--"~ "~"---""-
F

Las req'd
-L --10'-0" 1 -sa -I

Hangers
Hangers are used as intermediate supports between sections of
conveyor screw. They maintain alignment of the conveyor screws and
provide a bearing support for the coupling shaft.
Hangers must be placed clear of inlet openings. They can be placed
at trough joints as they are designed with spacer bars wide enough for
this purpose. Hangers may be fitted with a wide variety of bearing
materials to suit a diverse range of screw conveyor applications.

Couplings and Shafts


Coupling, drive and end shafts connect and transmit power to the
conveyor screws. It is imperative that the shafts selected be of sufficient
strength to handle the horsepower and load Imposed on them. Their
horsepower rating may be verified as shown in Torque Capacity, Table
10, Page 22.
Most conveyor systems are made up of standard components and in
order to replace or renew an intermediate section of conveyor it is
necessary to dismantle the conveyor from one end. The time involved to
effectuate this work can be greatly reduced by using Quick Release Keys
on the conveyor screws as shown on page 41. These enable an entire
section of screw to be removed from the center of the conveyor without
disturbing preceding sections.

Trough Ends
Trough ends support the conveyor screw and the trough. They
incorporate a bearing assembly to maintain clearance between the

28

tt~
10'-0"
trough and conveyor screws, and, depending on the direction of material
travel, incorporate a thrust bearing to maintain clearance between the
conveyor screws, hangers and trough ends. This provides for smoother
operation, lower power requirements and less wear on the hangers,
bearings and other vital components. The standard duty Type E or the
heavy duty Type H thrust bearings will absorb thrust in either direction,
however it is preferable that the thrust bearing be positioned at the
discharge end of the conveyor.
Seals are incorporated into the trough ends to prevent leakage into
or out of the trough. They also provide added protection for the end
bearings and shafts from the material being handled.
Shelf type trough ends are very often used when handling hot
materials in order that the bearing and drive can be separated by some
distance from the hot trough. They are also used when handling fine or
very abrasive materials which require more effective sealing than can be
achieved with standard seal plates under flange bearings. The seals
generally used in these cases are the Split Gland or the Packed Gland
types ( see page 69 ). When extreme shaft concentricity is required a
double pedestal shelf type trough end is used. This minimizes shaft
mounted reducer wobbling.

Troughs and Covers


Numerous trough and cover configurations are available for varying
applications. Standard lengths should be used whenever possible. See
the section on troughs and covers for specific applications of each.
Gasketing is available between the trough and cover depending on the
application.

MATERIAL INPUT AND DISCHARGE


Care should be exercised in controlling the loading of a conveyor
since it is designed to handle a specific maximum volume of material.
Difficulties arise when the conveyor is fed from a storage medium
without the use of input volume controls. If the rate of material flow is not
inherently self regulating or cannot be regulated by other controls, a
Screw Feeder or another flow control should be incorporated into the
system in order that a smooth and constant flow will be delivered to the
system. By doing so, all surge loads are avoided. Flow regulation by
Screw Feeder and Rotary Feeder are discussed in further depth below.

Screw Feeders
Screw Feeders consist of a specially designed conveyor screw
enclosed within a tubular housing or a trough with a shroud cover. They
are used for the removal of material at a predetermined rate from a
storage medium regardless of the existing head of material. For further
information on these units see the section entitled SCREW FEEDERS on
page 31 of this manual.

[~;I~~~~~~~~~~ 29
Rotary Feeders
Rotary feeders employ a cylindrical rotor with pockets of specific
volume which deliver a constant flow of material. Their output capacity is
regul.ated by the speed of rotation of the rotor. These units may
frequently be driven from the conveyor drive or end shaft without the
necessity of an additional drive for the feeder itself.

Multiple Inlets
Installations frequently require the use of conveyors with multiple
inlets for feeding from several different sources either individually or
simultaneously. When only one inlet will be open at any given time, a gate
or cut off device may be restricted to a maximum opening that will not
allow overloading of the conveyor. When more than one gate will be
open, considerable care must be taken to limit the flow from each so that
the aggregate rate is not in excess of the conveyor design limit.

~ ~.!~",.
."t""--
,-\~,.
("~:
';;(O""'"
.~"~
~ -, 1: .

Dead Loads
Screw conveyors loaded directly from a storage medium above the
conveyor with a free flowing material are subject to varying dead loads
due to the hydrostatic head of material and the associated loads created
when moving the material from under itself.
This problem can be circumvented by using a side type inlet
incorporating a slide gate if necessary to relieve the screw from excessive
material pressures. Screw rotation should always be towards the
opening to en~ure a constant flow rate.

30
Impact Loads
Frequent requirements are such that materials must fall vertically to
the conveyor inlet creating the possibility of impact damge to the conveyor
screw due to the inertia of the material particles or lumps. This condition may
be overcome by using deflector plates or cushion chambers in the inlet
spout.

Discharge Spouts
Most discharge spouts are of standard design as shown on page 78 of
this manual, however special units can be built to adapt to specific
machinery and can be supplied flared or longer than standard. In all cases,
flighting is usually eliminated beyound the midpoint of the last discharge
opening on a conveyor in order to effect complete discharge of the material
and alleviate any possibility of material carry-over. When conveying
materials that are fluid or easily aerated it may be advisable to install longer
than standard discharge spouts. Intermediate discharge spouts may be
fitted with a variety of control gates or slides. These slides are often manually
operated however they can also be actuated by rack and pinion assemblies,
hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders or by special electric gear motors
complete with limit switches. ~tis advisable that the last discharge spout on
conveyors with multiple discharges or the discharge spout of units with a
single discharge be furnished without a slide of any kind on prevent possible
damage to the conveyor in the event of operation with the slide closed.

SCREW FEEDERS
A screw feeder differs from a screw conveyor in that it is designed to
regulate the volumetric rate of material flow from a hopper, bin or storage
unit. The inlet is flooded to 100% load capacity and by incorporating changes
to the flighting (diameter, pitch, etc.) and the speed of the feeder screw, it is
possible to govern the rate of material discharge. The style of flighting used
in a screw feeder is dependent upon the characteristics of the material being
transported and either a regular pitch, modified pitch or a modified diameter
flight is used.

Screw feeders are usually equipped with a shroud cover for a short
distance beyond the inlet opening. This helps prevent flooding of the
conveyor with material. When very free flowing materials are being handled
it is often necessary to use extended shroud covers, tubular housings or
short pitch flighting for positive material control.

I{!:I continantal,1
31
Uniform Diameter and Pitch Feeders

This type of screw feeder is generally used for handling fine, free
flowing materials. Because the regular diameter and p.itch brings about
material flow from the forepart of the inlet and not along its entire length,
this type of unit should only be used when a hopper is to be completely
emptied or where inert or dead areas of material overthe ir)letdo not pose
a problem. Should the material being handled be on an extremely fine or
free flowing nature, a shortened or half pitch flight should be used to
prevent flooding and overloading of the conveyor being fed.

Variable Pitch Feeders


Screw feeders having a variable pitch are generally used in
conjunction with a screw conveyor in which the material is choke fed
from a bin or hopper. The short pitch handles the full cross sectional load
and .as tt,e mat~rial is tran~ferred int<?the long~r pitch s~ction, the. cross
sectional load IS reduced In proportion to the Increase In screw pitch.
This type of unit is best used with standard or relatively short inlets.
When the inlet runs the entire length of a hopper or bin, it is preferable to
utilize a tapered diameter screw feeder.

Tapered Diameter Feeders


Screw feeders having tapered flights are generally used to convey
materials containing a considerable percentage of lumps They are also
extensively used when it is desirable to draw material from a bin or
hopper along its entire length thereby eliminating dead or inert material
In the forepart of the opening. Using a tapered flight feeder instead of a
regular flight will, in most cases, especially when the feed or inlet
openings is 10ng...f6onsume much less horsepower.

32
Multiple Diameter Feeders
This isa combination feeder and conveyor, the phystcal dimensions
being variable on each. The small diameter feed end operates at full
cross sectional loads and, upon reaching the larger diameter, reduces to
a safer level in proportion to the change in diameter.
These units are generally employed when it is undesirable to use a
variable pitch section under an inlet be it due to the need to eliminate
dead areas, because of an excessively long inlet from a bin or hopper or
because the lump size of the material in question is not compatible with
the short portion of the variable pitch. It is worthwhile to note here that
the feeder portion of a multiple diameter screw can be tapered should it
be desirable.

Live Bottom Feeders


Live bottom feeders are used to discharge materials from straight
sided bins and are composed of several horizontal screws side by side
which cover the complete area of the bin bottom. The material is
therefore drawn out equally from the full width into a collecting conveyor
that runs at right anglesto the bin bottom screws. The live bottom feeder
is used to discharge materials that have tendency to pack and bridge
easily under pressure.

~-. ~-;A,'-A~~~~

33
Screw Feeder Capacity
Table 4, Capacity Chart 9 appearing on Page 19, gives the capacities
of standard screw feeders having fixed diameters and standard pitch
flighting. These units, employing standard conveyor screws, will handle
most Class A and B materials. In order to adapt them to handle materials
not covered by these classes or for special feeding applications where
inlets are extended or material volume above the feeder is excessive, it
becomes necessary to use a combination of one or all of the modifica-
tions to the flight as previously discussed in this section.

Due to the complexity of screw feeder design, we recommended that


you consult our Engineering Department for proper recommendations
concerning your particular needs.

Screw Feeder Horsepower


When calculating the horsepower requirements of a screw feeder,
use the regular horsepower formula given on page 21 and substitute the
"L" value by the "Lf"value calculated using the table below. All values are
In feet.

Tapered Lf + B+ C

Fines or Pulverized
Regular or Straight Lf + 28 + C

Under 1/2" Size Tapered Lf + 28 + C

34
INCLINED S~:REW CONVEYORS
Screw conveyors may be used in the inclined plane and when space
allows, this can be a very economical method of both elevating and
conveying simultaneously. It is most important however to understand
that as the angle of inclination increases, the capacity of the given unit
rapidly decreases. The critical angle at which it becomes most difficultto
convey material on an incline is 450. As one approches this angle
capacity drops very dramatically and once past this critical point and on
towards 900, the efficiency of the unit increases again.
Numerous methods of conveying on an incline are used among
which are shorter than standard pitch, tubular housings or extended
shroud covers. It is also necessary as the angle of inclination becomes
greater to increase the conveyor speed in order to overcome the
tendency of the material to fall back upon itself.
Inclined conveyors can rarely be used as feeders for accurately
measuring material flow. If an accurate flow rate is necessary, a separate
horizontal feeder conveyor is required.
Since additional power is required to convey material on an incline
and this power is a function of material density, consistency and vertical
lift, we suggest that our Engineering Department be contacted for
specific recommendations as to the requirements of your particular
application.

I<!:Icontinant~~
35
VERTICAL SCREW CONVEYORS
The vertical screw conveyor is an extremely efficient and effective
method of elevating and distributing bulk materials. As a ruleofthumb, if
a material can be handled by a horizontal screw conveyor, it can also be
handled in the vertical plane. By having fewer moving parts, the vertical
screw conveyor does away with many of the difficulties commonly
encountered with other types of elevating equipment.
Amongst the numerous advanteges of this type of unit is its flexibility
of design and arrangement. One can convey up to 6000 cu.ft. per hour
using a 16" diameter unit to a height of about 75 feet depending on
material weight and the drive arrangement. These units are space saving
and transfer material from the horizontal to the vertic:al plane very
efficiently. Positive discharge is achieved in any direction and little or no
material segregation or degradation occurs throughout the process.
Since judgement and experience in conveying are required we again
suggest you contact our Engineering Department for our specific
recom mendations.

DRIVE ASSEI\1BLIES AND ARRANGEMENT


Numerous combinations and types of drives are available for screw
conveyors. Some of the more frequently used drives and mechanical
arrangements are described below.

rlJj
Screw Conveyor Drives
Screw conveyor drives consists
of a modified shaft mounted reducer
complete with a V-belt drive and
motor mount in an integral unit. This
assembly combines the reducer out-
put shaft, conveyor thrust bearing,
end seal and adaptor flange for
(> mounting integrally to the trough
end. The electric motor can be
mounted in both the horizontal or
() the vertical plane thereby adding to
these units versatility.
q)
()

,~

r 36
Shaft Mounted Reducers
Essentially very similar to the
screw conveyor drive, this type of
unit requires the use of a thrust bea-
ring, drive shaft and seal assembly.
As with the screw conveyor drive, it
is possible to combine the motor
mount integrally with the reducer
unit, and power is transmitted
I() through a V-beltdrive. Such a unit is
C>I Jr usually used where special sealing

()
~--
~
/;-
arrangements are required on the
conveyor shafts, such as a packed
gland seal, or where very high hor-
sepower must be transmitted which
is not within the parameters of the
screw conveyor drive.
r

Gearmotor Drives
Intergral gearmotor drives can be
used to power conveyors through
either a direct, low speed coupling
mounted to the conveyor drive shaft
(see illustration) or ttlrough a roller
chain drive. The former is traditionally
mounted on a scoop base attached to
the trough end while the latter is
mounted directly to the top of the
conveyor or on a adaptor base or
base plate beside the conveyor.
These units are used in instances
where high horsepower is being trans-
mitted or when a variable speed
gearmotor is used to vary the feed
rates of a metering screw.
~

~I --
Q

~~
/1

~!~1 '/./'~

l~~~~~~~~~~~~
37

'/~~~f
"'""
~
Other Drives and Configurations
Numerous other methods of driving a screw conveyor are available
among which are variable speed D.C. motors with SCR rectifiers,
hydraulic drives or variable pitch sheaves between motor and reducer.
Also, when inertia loads are encountered when starting heavily loaded
conveyors or when high horsepowers are used on large or long
conveyors, fluid couplings should be incorporated in the drive
arrangement. We suggest you contact our Engineering Department for
specific suggestions and recommendations regarding such matters.

SPECIAL FABRICATION MATERIALS


Screw conveyors are normally fabricated of low carbon, hot rolled
steel plate with the exception of the drive, end and coupling shafts which
are of cold rolled bar stock. Certain materials and conditions however
require the use of materials other than mild steel. These materials and
their advantages are discussed in further depth in the following
paragraphs. Further information and assistance can be obtained from
our Engineering Department for your particular applications.

Hard Surfaced Conveyor Screws


Conveyor screws that will be in contact with highly abrasive
materials are often hard surfaced using fusible alloy hard surfacing
materials or hard facing electrodes. These materials are applied to the
flight surface in a width proportional to the conveyor's cross sectional
load. These dimensions are given in Table 13. The dimensions given
pertain to standard application however for extremely abrasive
conditions or higher than normal trough loadings, it may be advisable to
harden the full flight face, periphery and even the pipe.

HELICOID SECTIONAL

TABLE 13
6 1"
9 11/2"
10 11/2'
12 2"
14 2"
16 21/2'
18 21/2'
20 3"
24 3"

38

1
l.+
Abrasion Resistant Steel
If necessary, conveyor screws and components can be supplied
fabricated of abrasion resistant metals with a surface hardness of up to
360 Brinell. This can substantially increase the life of components
such as conveyor screws and troughs which are subjected to the greatest
wear and therefore substantially increase their useful life.

Stainless Steel and Other Alloys


Many requirements call for the use of materials other than mild steel
to be in contact with the conveyed material due to uncommon variables
such as corrosion, contamination or elevated temperature. To suit these
conditions fabrication materials such as stainless steel, Monel, Inconel
and aluminum alloys may be used to suit the applications.

Coating and Plating


Conveyor screws and components may also be plated or dipped to
suit numerous requirements and conditions. Hot dip galvanizing, nickle
or chrome plating and rubber or Teflon coating are often encountered.

High Torque Drive Components


Certain applications may arise where the normal horsepower range
of standard screw conveyor components will be exceeded. For cases
such as these high capacity coupling bolts, shafts and pipes are
available.

[~;~~~~
~~~~~~~
39
0-- Helicoid Designation
The letter 'H' indicates screw conveyor with helicoid flighting. The figures
to the left of the letter indicate the nominal outside diameter of the conveyor in
inches. The first figure following the letter is twice the diameter of the cou-
plings in inches. The last two figures indicate the nominal thickness of flighting
at the outer edge in 1/64". Thus 12H408 indicates a 12" diameter helicoid
conveyor for 2" couplings with flighting 8/64" or 1/8" thickness at outer edge.
Due to the nature of the forming process, the periphery of a helicoid flight is
approximately 1/2 the thickness of the material at the root where it is welded to
the pipe. Because most wear is concentrated on the periphery, helicoid flights
are less suitable for handling abrasive materials than sectional flights.

Sectional Designation:
The letter'S' indicates screw conveyor with sectional butt welded flighting.
The figures to the left of the letter indicate the nominal outside diameter of the
conveyor in inches. The first figure following the letter is twice the diameter of
the couplings in inches. The last two figures indicate the nominal thickness of
flighting in 1/,64/'. Thus 12S612 indicates a 12// diameter sectional conveyor for
3" couplings with flighting 12/64" or 3/16'/ nominal thickness.

Sectional flights, due to the nature of the forming process, maintain a uniform
thickness between the root and the periphery. They are thus more suitable for
1:\ abrasive applications due to the greater thickness of material at the point
subjected to the greatest wear.

Numerical Designation System for Standard Conveyor Screws

Conveyor screws are supplied with right hand flighting unless ortherwise specified.
Conveyor screws are supplied in standard lengths as shown on pages 42 through 46 unless
ortherwise specified.
Flighting will cover the entire length of the conveyor pipe unless otherwise specified.
Conveyor screws are fabricated of carbon steel unless otherwise specified. For information
regarding materials in which conveyor screws may be obtained, see Special Fabrication
Materials, page 38.

40
CONVEYOR SCREWS

Helicoid Conveyor Screws:


Helicoid flighting is formed by cold rolling special analysis strip into a continuous
helix that produces a work hardened, smoothly finished flight surface. The flighting is
then fastened to the pipe by intermittent welds with steel end lugs at each extremity to
reinforce the tips. They may also be continuously welded on either one or both sides if
so required. The pipe has seamless internal collars inserted and plug welded in both
ends to accept the shafts. Both helicoid and sectional flighting of the same diameter and
shaft size are interchangeable.

Sectional Conveyor Screws:


Sectional flights are blanked from a steel plate, formed into a helix and then butt
welded together to form a continuous helix on the pipe. The flights are normally fastened
to the pipe by intermittent welds however can be continuously welded on one or both
sides if required. The pipe has seamless internal collars inserted and plug welded in both
ends to accept the shafts. Sectional flight conveyor screws can be supplied in special
diameters, pitches, thicknesses, pipe sizes and shaft diameters as well as in a variety of
materials such as stainless steel, Inconel, Monel, copper, brass and other metals.

Sectional Flights:
Sectional flights are formed from steel plate with a lead slightly longer than their
pitch. This assures a tight grip when mounting them on the pipe. They are available in all
standard sizes and can also be supplied in special diameters, pitches, thicknesses and
pipe sizes.

Ribbon Flights:
Ribbon flights are commonly used to handle sticky or gummy materials which
normally build up at the pipe of flight junction point. Their open design minimizes this
problem. They are also used for mixing dry materials in transit as long as the cross
sectional load is greater than the face of the flight. The pipe has seamless internal col-
lars inserted and plug welded in both ends to accept the shafts. Ribbon flight can be
supplied in special diameters. pitches, thicknesses, pipe sizes and shaft diameters as
well as in a variety of materials such as stainless steel, Inconel and Monel.

Paddle Conveyor Screws:


Paddle conveyor screws are commonly used to mix material in transit when con-
veying efficiency is not important. The paddles are bolted through the pipe and are
infinitely adjustable. The pipe has seamless internal collars inserted and plug welded in
both ends to accept the shafts. Paddle screws can be supplied in special diameters,
pitches, thicknesses, pipe sizes and shaft diameters as well as in a variety of materials
such as stainless steel, Inconel and Monel.

Cut and Cut & Folded Flights:


Notches cut in the periphery of a conveyor screw creates a very effective mixing
action with most materials, particularly at high speeds. By folding over the cut, a more
violent mixing action is achieved since the material is spilled over itself. The cut flight is
also useful for moving materials which tend to pack while cut and folded flights are
useful in cooling, heating or aerating light substances.

Internal Collars, Coupling Bolts and Quick Release Keys:


Internal collars are used in all types of conveyor screws to create a close fit be-
tween the inside diameter of the pipe and the outside diameter of the shaft. When
purchased separately they are not drilled for the coupling bolts as the pipe ends are
always drilled after assembly.
Coupling bolts are machined from analysis steel with the thread cut to the proper
length so as only the bolt shank is in contact with the coupling shaft and pipe, thereby
ensuring full torque capacity and minimum wear. Special self-locking nuts are provided
to prevent the nut from working loose during operation which can lead to damage and
downtime.
Quick release keys allow for the removal of an intermediate section of conveyor
without dismantling the entire screw conveyor. To remove a section, the intermediate
bolts are removed, the key is removed and the entire section simply lifts out while the
shafts remains in position in the trough.

1@::lcontinantal,1
41
1<i:1continantal.1
CONVEYOR
SCREWS.HELICOID CARBONSTEEL

Complete
Screw r- A--j 11--D

~
t J::L-1 ~~=~~=~~ ~B
~('f---~r1
~ Ji VcjC'
L-\t~!
L i 1, -I~ Q

Dimensions shown ore approximote. Request certified prints for instollotion.

* 4H204 1/8 1/16 25 3 7.2 0.9


4 * 4H206 3/32 1-1/4 1-5/8 1-1/2 3/8x2-1/8 7'-10-1/2"
3/16 32 4 12.8 1.6
* 6H304 1/8 1/16 52 5 14 1.4
6 1-1/2 * 6H308 1/4 1/8 2 2-3/8 2 1/2x3 9'-10'.
62 6 28 2.8
* 6H312 3/8 3/16 72 7 42 4.2
* 9H306 3/16 3/32 70 7 31 3.1
1-1/2 * 9H312 3/8 3/16 2 2-3/8 2 1/2x3 9'-10"
101 10 65 6.5
9 * 9H406 3/16 3/32 9 30 3.0
91
2 * 9H412 3/8 3/16 2-1/2 2-7/8 2 5/8x3-5/8 9'-10" 121 12 60 6.0
9H414 7/16 7/32 140 14 85 8.6

1-1/2 *10H306 3/16 3/32 2 2-3/8 1/2x3 81 8 48 4.8


10 2 10H412 3/8 3/16 2-1/2 2-7/8 2 9'-10"
5/8 x 3-5/8 130 13 76 7.6

*12H408 1/4 1/8 140 12 67 5.6


2 2-1/2 2-7/8 2 S/8x3-S/8 11'-10"
*12H412 3/8 3/16 180 15 102 8.5
12 *12H508 1/4 1/8 168 14 64 5.3
7/16 3/8 3/16 3 3-1/2 3 S/8x4-3/8 11'-9' 96 8.0
12H512 198 17

31~-7/16 12H614 7/16 7/32 3-1./2 4 3 3/4x5 11'-9" 228 19 120 10.2

14H508 1/4 1/8 3 3-1/2 5/8 x 4-3/8 170 14 84 7.0


14 3 11'-9"
3 14H614 7/16 7/32 3-1/2 4 3/4x5 254 22 132 11.0

16H6.rO 5/16 5/32 3/4x5 228 19 120 10.0


It 3 16H614 7/16 7/32
3-1/2 4 3 3/4x5
]]'-9"
276 27 168 14.3

* HELICOID
CONVEYOR
SCREWS.
STAINLESS
STEEL
Thoseconveyorscrews appearingin the above table precededby an asterix are available in stainless steel
When orderingstate the designationnumberfollowed by -S, the stainlesssteel gradeand the type of weld finish requiredas shownin the following table
The finishes appearingbelow apply only to conveyorscrews havingflighting continously welded to the pipe
EX. 6H304 -S316 Type III
FINISHES
TypeI Weldspatterandslagremoved, weldsnotground
TypeII Weldsgroundto 40-50gritfinishremoving roughness
TypeIII Weldsgroundto 80-100gritfinishto removemostcrevicesfor thosematerialsthatdo notbuildup in crevicesandcontaminate
TypeIV Weldsfinegroundto 140-150gritfinishillimenating
all crevicesFortotal exclusionofconveyedmaterialfromweldedsurface:
TypeV SameasTypeIV butall weldspolishedto brightfinish

42
i<i:/continantal,[
CONVEYOR
SCREWS.SECTIONAL CARBONSTEEL

CompleteScrew I-- A~!


1J[-~

Sectionalscrewscan be manufacturedwith any special features desired, suchas


special thicknessof flight, specialdiameter, pitch, pipe size, etc.

Dimensionsshownore approximate. Requestcertified prints for installation.

65309 10 go. 65 7
6 1-1/2 65312 3/16 2 2-3/8 2 1/2x3 9'-10" 75 8
65316 1/4 85 9
95309 lOgo. 80 8
1-1/2 95312 3/16 2 2-3/8 2 1/2x3 9'-10" 95 10
95316 1/4 115 12
9 95409 lOgo. 100 10
95412 3/16 115 12
2 95416 1/4 2-1/2 2-7/8 2 5/8 x 3-5/8 9'-10" 130 13
95424 3/8 162 16
105309 10go. 2-3/8 2 85 9
1/2 105312 3/16 2 1/2x3 9'-10' 98 10
10 105409 10 go. 107 11
2 105412 3/16 2-1/2 2-7/8 2 5/8.3-5/8 9'-10' 120 12
105416 1/4 140 14
125409 10 go. 140 12
2 125412 3/16 2-1/2 2.7/8 7 5/8 x 3-5/8 11'.10" 156 13
125416 1/4 180 15
125509 10 go. 160 14
125512 3/16 178 15
12 2-7/16 3 3-1/2 3 5/8 x 4-3/8 11'09'
125516 1/4 210 18
125524 3/8 265 22
125612 3/16 187 16
3 125616
125624
1/4
3/8
3-1/2 3 3/4.5 11'.9" 216 18
280 24
145509 10go. 185 16
2-7/16 145512 3/16 3 3-1/2 3 5/8 x 4-3/8 11'09" 214 18
145516 1/4 247 21
14
145612 3/16 213 18
3 145616 1/4 3-1/2 4 3 3/4xS 11'-9 246 21
145624 3/8 342 29
165609 10go. 204 17
165612 3/16 234 20
16 3 165616 1/4 3-1/2 3 3/4 xS 11'-9" 282 24
165624 3/8 365 31
165632 1/2 420 36
185612 3/16 246 21
185616 1/4 294 25
3
185624 3-112 4 3 3/4 x 5 11',9"
3/8 425 36
185632 1/2 530 44
18
185712 3/16 264 23
185716 1/4 303 26
3-7/16 4 4-1/2 4 7/8x 5-1/2 11'oS"
185724 3/8 380 33
185732 1/2 460 39
20S612 3/16 300 26
20S616 1/4 3-1/2 4 360 31
3
20S624
3 3/4 x 5 11'-9"
3/8 410 35
20S632 1/2 506 43
20
205712 3/16 319 27
205716 1/4 379 32
3-7/16
205724 3/8
4 4-1/2 4 7/8.5-1/2 11'-8'
429 37
205732 1/2 525 45

.
245712 3/16 440 37
245716 1/4 510 43
24 3-7/16 245724 3/8
4 4-1/2 7/8.5-1/2 11'.8" 595 50
245732 1/2 690 60

43

-f;'
1-@:lcontinantall
CONVEYOR
SCREWS.SECTIONAL
FLIGHTS
CARBONSTEEL

Sectionalscre...,scon be
monufactured INith any special
features desire'd,suchos:
speciol thickness of flight,
speciol diometE!r,pitch, pipe size,
etc.

Partnumbersfollow thoseon PG43, as do pipesizes exceptfor the letter F witch indicatesflight.


Add the letter H to indicate Half pitch andspecify hand of flights whenordering EX. 12F624-RH or
12F624-H-LH.

Dimensionsshown are approximate Requestcertified pril]ts for installation.

6F309 10 go. 1.3 2.0 14F612 3/16 9.9 86


6 1-1/2 6F312 3/16 2-3/8 1.7 2.0 14 3 14F616 1/4 4 13.2 86
6F316 1/4 2.2 2.0 14F624 3/8 19.8 .86

9F309 lOgo. 3.3 1.33 16F609 10 go. 10.0 ,75


1-1/2 9F312 3/16 2-3/8 4.3 1.33 16F612 3/16 14.0 .75
9F316 1/4 5.5 1.33 16 3 16F616 1/4 4 18.0 ,75
9 9F409 lOgo. 3.3 1.33 16F624 3/8 27.0 ,75
9F412 3/16 4.3 1.33 16F632 1/2 36.0 75
2 2-7/8
9F416 1/4 5.5 1.33 18F612 3/16 18.0 67
9F424 3/8 7.9 1.33 18F616 1/4 24.0 67
3 4
10F309 lOgo. 3.9 1.2 18F624 3/8 36.0 67
1-1/2 2-3/8 18 1/2 46.0 67
10F312 3/16 5.0 1.2 18F632
10 10F409 10 go. 3.9 1.2 18F712 3/16 18.0 67
2 10F412 3/16 2-7/8 5.0 1.2 18F716 1/4 24.0 .67
3-7/16 4-1/2
10F416 1/4 6.7 1.2 18F724 3/8 36.0 .67
5.7 1.0 18F732 1/2 48.0 .67
12F409 lOgo.
2 12F412 3/16 2-7/8 7.2 1.0 20F612 3/16 20.0 .60

12F416 1/4 9.7 1.0 20F616 1/4 28.0 .60


3 4
20F624 3/8 40.0 60
12F509 10 go. 5.7 1.0
20F632 1/2 56.0 60
12F512 3/16 7.2 1.0
12 7/1" 1/4
3-1/2
9.7 1.0 20 20F712 3/16 20.0 .60
12F516
12F524 3/8 14.4 1.0 20F716 1/4 28.0 .60
4-1/2
20F724 3/8 40.0 .60
12F612 3/16 7.2 1.0
20F732 1/2 56.0 50
12F616 1/4 4 9.7 1.0
3/8 14.4 1.0 24F712 3/16 32.0 50
12F624
24F716 1/4 42.0 50
14F509 10 go. 7.2 .86 7/16 4-112
24F724 3/8 64.0 50
14 14F512 3/16 3-1/2 9.9 .86
24F732 1/2 84.0 50
14F516 1/4 13.2 .86

SECTIONALCONVEYORSCREWS
AND FLIGHT. STAINLESSSTEEL
All conveyorscrews appearingin the above table and on page 43 are available in stainlesssteel
When orderingstate the designationnumberfollowed by -5, the stainless steel grade and the type of weld finish requiredas shown in the following table
The finishes appearingbelow apply only to conveyorscrews having flighting continously welded to the pipe
EX. 65309 -5316 Type III
FINISHES
TypeI Weldspatterandslagremoved, weldsnotground
TypeII Weldsgroundto 40-50gritfinishremoving roughness.
TypeIII Weldsgroundto 80-100gritfinishto removemostcrevicesfor thosematerialsthatdo notbuildup in crevicesandcontaminate.
TypeIV Weldsfinegroundto 140-150gritfinishillimenating all crevices.Fortotal exclusionof conveyed
materialfromweldedsurface.
TypeV Sameas TypeIV butall weldspolished to brightfinish.

44
1-7/16
~Icontina~~
CONVEYOR
SCREWS.RIBBON CARBON
:iTEEL

r Lr!.
A
r---r=
L

IAL

Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for instollotion.

6 1-1/2 3/16 1/8 2 2-3/8 2


6:R312 1/2x3 9'-10" 65 6.5 25 2.5
9 1-1/2 9R316 1-112 1/4 3/16 2 2-3/8 2 1/2x3 9'-10' 100 10 50 5.0
10 1-1/2 10R316 1-112! 1/4 3/16 2 2-3f8 2 1/2x3 9'-10' 110 11 60 6.0
12R416
, 1/4 3/16
12 2 2-1/2 2-7/8 2 5/8 x 3-5/8 11'-10" 180 15 71 6.0
12R424 2-1 12 3/8 1/4 216 18 120 10.0
2-7/16 12R524 2-112 3/8 1/4 3 3-1/2 3 5/8 x 4-3/8 ]]'-9" 240 20 120 10.0
14 2-7/16 14R524 2-112 3/8 1/4 3 3-1/2 3 22
5/8 x 4-3/8 ]]'-9" 264 120 10.0
3 14R624 2-1 12 3/8 1/4 3-1/2 4 3 3/4 x 5 ]]'-9" 288 25 120 10.0
16R616 2-1 12 1/4 3/16 276 24 96 8.0
16 3 3-1/2 4 3 3/4xS 11'-9"
16R624 2-1 12 3/8 1/4 324 28 132 11.0
18 3 18R624 ~I 3/8 1/4 4 4-1/2 3 3/4x5 384 33
11'-9" 156 13.0
20 3-7/16 20R724 I 3/8 1/4 4 4-1/2 4 7/8x5-1/2 11'-8" 408 35 168 14.0
24 3-7/16 24R724 . I 3/8 1/4 4 4-1/2 4 7/8x5-1/2 11'-8" 424 36 180 15.0

RIBBON CONVEYORSCREWS.STAINLESSSTEEL
All ribbon conveyorscrews appearingin the above table are available in stainlesssteel.
When orderingstate the designationnumberfollowed by -8, the stainless steel grade and the type of weld finish requiredas shown in the following table.
The finishes appearingbelow apply only to conveyorscrews having flighting continously welded to the pipe
EX. 6R316 -8316 Type III
FINISHES
TypeI Weldspatterandslagremoved, weldsnotground.
TypeII Weldsgroundto 40-50gritfinishremoving roughness
TypeIII Weldsgroundto 80-100gritfinishto removemostcrevicesfor thosematerialsthatdo notbuildup in crevicesandcontaminate.
TypeIV Weldsfinegroundto 140-150gritfinishillimenatingall crevices.Fortotal exclusionof conveyed
materialfromweldedsurface.
TypeV Sameas TypeIV butall weldspolishedto brightfinish

45
I~I continantal,!
CONVEYOR
SCREWS.
SPECIALS PADDLES

Adjustable Welded

T
c
1

Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.

Pipe
Size Adju.table G.D. A B c D E
I Adjustable

4 SPA-415 SPW-415 1-5/8 2 1-1/2 1-3/16 3/16 3/8 .25 .13


6 SPA-620 SPW-620 2-3/8 3 2-1/16 1-13/16 1/4 1/2 .50 .35
SPA-920 SPW-920 2-3/8 3-5-16 1/2 .50
9 4-1/2 2-3/4 1/4
.40
SPA-925 SPW-925 2-7/8 3-1/16 S/8 .75 .36
SPA-1020 SPW-1020 2-3/8 3-13/16 1/2 .75 .65
10 5 3-1/8 1/4
SPA-1025 SPW-1025 2-7/8 3-9/16 S/8 1.00 .85
SPA-1225 SPW-1225 2-7/8 4-9/16 S/8 1.75 1.35
12 SPA-1230 SPW-1230 3-1/2 6 3-11/16 4-1/4 3/8 S/8 1.50 1.05
SPA-1235 SPW-1235 4 4 3/4 1.75 1.00
SPA-1430 SPW-1430 3-1/2 5-1/4 S/8 2.25 1.85
14
SPA-1435 7 4-1/4 3/8
SPW-1435 4 5 3/4 2.50 1.75
SPA-1635 SPW-1635 4 6 3/4 3.25 2.50
16 SPA-1640 8 4-15/16 3/8
SPW-1640 4-1/2 5-3/4 7/8 3.50 2.45
SPA-1835 SPW-1835 4 7 3/4 4.00 3.25
18 SPA-1840 9 5-3/8 3/8
SPW-1840 4-1/2 6-3/4 7/8 4.25 3.20
SPA-2035 SPW-2035 4 8 3/4 4.75 4.00
20 SPA-2040 SPW-2040 10 6-1/8 3/8
4-1/2 7-3/4 7/8 5.00 3.95
24 SPA-2440 SPW-2440 4-1/2 12 7-3/8 9-3/4 1/2 7/8 6.75 5.60

CUTANDFOLDED
FLIGHT *

~ ~I ~
\6 v
CUTFLIGHT*
Rotation
~ fi1"- ~

\t v V
Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.

6 2 1-1/2 7/8
* 9 3 2-1/8 1-1/2
For part numbers add
12 4 2-3/4 2
suffix CF for cut flight and
FF for folded flight to the 14 4-5/8 3-1/8 2-1/2
appropriate sectional con- 16 5-1/4 3-1/2 3

.
veyor screw part number. 18 6 3-7/8 3-3/8
20 6-5/8 4-1/4 3-7/8
24 7-7/8 4-7/8 4-7/8

46

'---~
[~ contin~~~
C:ONVEYOR
SCREWS
.COM~PONENTS

SHORT PITCH, SINGLE: FLIGHT DOUBLE FLIGHT, STANDARD PITCH

Double flight, standard pitch


screws provide smooth, reg-
, ular material flow and uni-
I I form movement of certain
IJ types of materials.

LONG PITCH, SINGLE FLIGHT TAPERED, STANDARD PITCH, SINGLE F:UGHT

Pitch is equal to 1-1/2 diam- Screw flights increase from


eters. Useful for agitating~ 2/3 to full diameter. Used in
fluid materials or for rapid
I movement of very free-flow-Iling
r-~D1 screw feeders to provide
materials. t I uniform withdrawal of lumpy
iD~ 0 materials. Generally equiva-
Ll/- I lent to and more economi-
~ cal than variable pitch.

VARIABLE PITCH, SINGLE FLIGHT STANDARD PITCH WITH PADDLES

I,-varia, Flights have increasing pitch


and are used in screw feed- r-cl ,
Adjustable paddles posi-
tioned between screw flights

I ers to provide uniform with- I

~
rt oppose flow to provide gen-
drawal of fine, free-flowing I tie but thorough mixing ac-
D D
1/
materials over the full length I
t'
Ion.~
\J~ of the inlet opening.

INITERNAL
COLLAR COUPLINGBOLTS QUICK.RELEASE
KEY
Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for instollation.

1 1-1/4 1-5/8 SIC t10 .7 SCB-10 SCB-10HT 3/8x2-1/8 .13

1-1/2 2 2-3/8 SIC 15 2.2 SCB-15 SCB-15HT 1/2 x 3 .25 SQR-15 1.3
2 2-1/2 2-7/8 SIC-20 2.4 SCB-20 SCB-20HT 5/8 x 3-5/8 .50 SQR-20 1.6
2-7/16 3 3-1/2 SIC-25 4.1 SCB-25 SCB-25HT 5/8 x 4-3/8 .56 SQR-25 2.1
3 3-1./2 4 SIC-3D 4.3 SCB-30 SCB-30HT 3/4xS .75 SQR-30 2.5
3-7/16 4 4-1/2 SIC-35 7.3 SCB-35 SCB-35HT 7/8xS-1/2 1.25 SQR-35 4.3

47
rl
CONVEYOR SCREW SHAFTS

Drive Shafts:
Screw conveyor drive shafts transmit the rotary motion from
the drive unit to the conveyor screw. They are manufactured of
high quality, cold drawn steel to close tolerances for the proper
bearing clearances. Coupling bolt holes are jig drilled for perfect
alignment and key seats are precision milled to insure proper
assembly. For applications requiring higher torque capacities,
they can be supplied in high carbon steel. They are also available
in stainless steel. Contact our Engineering Department for further
information.

End Shafts:
End shafts are designed to provide support of the final screw
section. They are manufactured of high quality, cold drawn steel
to close tolerances for proper bearing clearances. Coupling bolt
holes are jig drilled for perfect alignment. They are also available
in stainless steel.

Coupling Shafts:
Coupling shafts are designed to transmit rotation between
individual conveyor screw sections and to provide intermediate
radial support through hanger bearings. They are manufactured
of high quality cold drawn steel and have jig drilled bolt holes for
perfect alignment. They are available in standard configuration
for use with intermediate hangers and in close coupled configura-
tion where the omission of hanger bearings is desireable. For use
with hard iron bearings they are induction hardened to increase
their wearing capacity. For applications requiring higher torque
capacities they can be supplied in high carbon steel. They can
also be supplied in stainless steel. Contact our Engineering
Department for further information.

48
[Ci:1continantal,1
SHAn SELECTION
TABLES
I

Eachtype anddiameter af Drive and Endshaft is availablein several s1ryles,varying only


in length to suit variouscombinationsof end bearingsandseals.
Fromthe table below,determine the shaft style for the required shaft diameter, bearing
type, and seal, then select this style in the required shaft diameter from the Drive and
Endshaft tables on the pagesfollowing.
I)RIVE SHAFTS

BALL FLANGE 1- 2 ~ 1
1
2
2 -
2-7216 1 2
1 2 ..-
3-7 16 1 2
PILLOW 2-;-12 16 4 4 4 5 7 7 7 8
BLOCK 3 3 3 4 6 6 6 7
- 5 5 5 7 10 10 10 12
4 4 4 5 7 7 7 8
3-7 16 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 7
ROLLER FLANGE 1- 2 ~ 2
2
3
3
2-7 16 3 4 - '-
2 3 -
3-7 16 2 3
PILLOW 1_~ 2 4 4 4 6 7 7 7 8
BLOCK 3 3 3 5 6 6 6 8
2-7 16 6 6 6 8 11 11 11 12
- 4 4 4 4 7 7 7 9
3-7 16 4 4 4 5 7 7 ; 8
~7
SLEEVE FLANGE 2-7-12 16 2
2
4
3
3-7 16 3 -
PILLOW 1-~ 2 4 4 4 6 7 7 5
BLOCK :3 3 3 5 6 6 6 8
2-7 16 6 6 6 9 11 11 11 13
5 5 5 6 8 8 8 10
3-7 16 P 5 5 6 8 8 8 9

E:ND SHAFTS

BALL FLANGE, 1-1/2 2


2 2
2-7/16 2 -
3 2
3-7/16 2
PILLOW 1-1/2 5 5 5 6
BLOCK 2 4 4 4 5
2-7/16 4 4 4 5
3 4 4 4 5
3-7/16 4 4 4 5
ROLLER FLANGE 1-1/2 3 4
2 2 3
2-7/16 2 3
3 2 3
3-7f.16 2 3
PILLOW 1-1/2 5 5 5 7
BLOCK 2 - 4 4 4 6
2-7/16 4 4 4 5
3 4 4 4 6
3-7/16 5 5 5 6
SLEEVE FLANGE 1-1/2 2
2 2 -
2-7/16 3 -
3 3 -
3-7/16 3
PILLOW 1-1/2 5 5 5 7
BLOCK 2 4 4 4 6
2-7/16 4 4 4 6
3 5 5 5 7
3-7/16 5 5 5 7

!
!
49
1@:lcontinantal.1
SHAFTS-DRIVE SHAFTS

'-H

Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.


Part numbers shown are for standard cold rolled shafting. For special shafting, add the following suffixes to
the part numbers shown: -H for hardened shafting; -HT for high-torque shafting.

1 50$- 115 5.9 11-3/4


2 50$- 215 6.8 13-1/2
3 50S- 315 7.4 14-3/4
4 50$- 415 8.0 16
7/8 3 3-1/4 1-1/4 1/2 7/8
1-1/2
5 50$- 515 9.0 18
6 50S- 615 9.6 19-1/4
7 50S- 715 11.0 21-7/8
8 50S- 815 12.5 25
1 80S- 120 11.9 13-3/8
2 80S- 220 13.2 15
3 80$- 320 16.0 18
4 806- 420 17.5 19-5/8
7/8
2 7/8 3 4-1/2 1-1/4 5/8
5 80~- 520 18.9 21-1/4
6 80$- 620 23.6 26-1/2
7 806- 720 25.3 28-3/8
8 80~- 820 26.7 30

1 SDf)- 125 20.2 15-1/4


2 SDS- 225 21.8 16-1/2
3 SDS- 325 22.5 17
4 SDS- 425 24.1 18-1/4
5 SDS- 525 26.1 19-3/4
6 SDS- 625 27.6 20-7/8
2-7/16 7 SDS- 725 28.4 21-1/2 15/16 3 5-1/2 1-3/4 5/8 15/16
8 SDS-825 30.3 22-7/8
9 SDS- 925 31.6 23-7/8
10 SDS- 1025 39.3 29-3/4
11 SDS- 1125 40.8 30-7/8
12 SDS- 1225 43.5 32-7/8
13 S~- 1325 44.8 33-7/8

1 SDS- 130 33.5 16-3/4


2 SDS- 230 36.5 18-1/4
3 sds- 330 39.3 19-5/8
4 SDS- 430 44.1 22
5 SDS- 530 46.1 23
1-3/4 3/4
3 1 3 6
6 SDS- 630 52.6 26-1/4
7 SDS- 730 64.1 32
8 SDS- 830 66.1 33
9 SDS- 930 68.3 34-118
10 SDS-1030 71.3 35.5/8

1 SDS- 135 54.3 20-5/8


2 SDS- 235 59.2 22-1/2
3 SDS- 335 63.9 24-1/8
4 SDS- 435 71.0 27
3-7/16 5 SDS- 535 73.9 28-1/8 1-1/4 4 7-1/4 2-1/4 7/8 1-1/2
6 SDS- 635 78.9 30
7 SDS- 735 97.3 37
8 SDS- 835 100.2 38-1/8
9 SDS- 935 106.5 40-1/2

50
[~ontinant~
SHAFTS -END SHAFTS I

Dimensions shown ore opproximate. Request certified prints for instollotion.


Port numbers shown ore for stondord cold rolled shofting. For speciol shofting, odd the following suffixes to
the port numbers shown: -H for hordened shofting; -HT for high-torque shofting.

1 SES~115 4.3 8-1/2


2 SES~215 4.9 9-3/4
3 SES-"315 5.1 10-1/4
1-1/2 4 SES~415 5.8 11-1/2 7/8 3 1/2 7/8
1i-1/4
5 SES~515 6.4 12-3/4
6 SES.,615 7.4 14-3/4
7 SES.715 7.9 15-3/4

1 SES.120 7.4 8-3/4


2 SES-i220 9.2 10-1/2
3 SESi320 10.3 11-5/8
2 718 3 1-1/4 5/8 7/8
4 SES4420 12.3 13-3/4
5 SES-'520 13.4 15
6 SES~620 14.9 16-3/4

1 SESi125 12.9 9-3/4


2 SES.225 15.3 11-5/8
3 SES..325 17.0 12-7/8
2-7/16 15/16 3 1-3/4 5/8 15/16
4 SES..425 19.8 15
5 SES.i525 23.1 17-1/2
6 SES.625 24.5 18-1/2

1 SES-130 21.8 10-7/8


2 SES-230 24.5 12-1/4
3 SES-330 27.3 13-5/8
3 4 SES-430 32.0 16 1 3 1-3/4 3/4
5 SES-530 34.0 17
6 SES-630 36.5 18-1/4
7 SES-730 39.5 19-3/4

1 SES.135 35.8 13.5/8


2 SES,.235 40.8 15-1/2
3 SES.335 44.7 17
3-7/16 4 SESi-435 47.3 18 1-1/4 4 2-1/4 7/8 1-1/21
5 SES.S35 51.3 19-1/2
6 SES~635 5~.5 21-1/8
7 SES~735 60.5 23

51
~ont~~
SHAFTS-COUPLINGAND!HANGERENDSHAFTS

COUPLING
SHAFTS

: : A
, I

G G
STANDARD CLOSECOUPLING
Dimensions shown ore approximote. Request certified prints for installation.
Part numbers shown are for standard cold rolled shafting. For special shafting, add the following suffixes to
the part numbers shown: -H for hardened shafting; -HT for high-torque shafting.

=
~
HANGER

:
I
=~=--=
ENDSHAFTS

c ~=~~
IIII
III
~
~
-1
A

Dimensions shown ore opproximate. Request certified prints for installation.


Part numbers shown are for standard cold railed shafting, add the following suffixes to the part numbers
shown: -H for hardened shafting; -HT for high-torque shafting.

KEYSEATDIMENSIDNS

52
HANGERS

Style 226:
The Style 226 hanger is the most commonly used in screw c:onveyor appli-
cations. Its narrow size and low profile maintains rigidity without compromising
the material flow. It is designed to mount flush with the trough flarlges and there-
fore will not obstruct the trough cover which makes its use desireable with dust
and weather tight covers.

Style 220:
The Style 220 hanger is identical to Style 226 with the exception that it is
designed for mounting directly to the top of the trough flanges. If it is to be used
in conjunction with trough covers, the cover joints must coincide Y/ith the hanger
positions.

Style 270:
The Style 270 hanger is furnished with a self aligning, sealed ball bearing.
This feature reduces friction and thus lowers horsepower requirements making
such units desireable for long conveyors or those operating at high speeds.
Due to the nature of the ball bearing seal they are not recommended for use in
"dirty", gritty or abrasive conditions. An Alemite grease fitting can be supplied
in the event that regreasing is desired.

Style 326:
The Style 326 hanger is used in applications where hot materials are con-
veyed which can bring about linear expansion of the conveyor sc:rew. The han-
ger support bar is free to slide on angle guide bars to compensate for unequal
expansion between the trough and conveyor screw. Its construction is similar
to Style 226 and thus maintains all the advantages thereof.

Style 30:
The Style 30 hanger is used when mounting a hanger to the top flanges of
the trough cannot be achieved. It mounts to the non-carrying side of the trough
and thus minimizes obstruction to the flow of material.

Flared Trough Hangers:


Flared trough hangers are available in any of the above configurations for
adaptation to flared troughs as shown on page 76 of this manual.

Hanger Bearings:
Hanger bearings of oil impregnated wood, UHMW polyethylene, nylon, hard
iron or babbitt can be supplied for Styles 226, 220, 326 and 30. Numerous other
materials are available for special applications as shown on page 25 of this
manual. Style 270 on the other hand is available using only the ball bearing
assembly.

1({:lconti~~~~~~
53
HANGERS T
'-;:===~~
No. 220

l- ~ ~
~ HJ~;
B @J

+. 1

-1c~
Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for installotion.

4 1 SHB-41 6-1/4 3-5/8 1-1/2 7-1/4 2 4 1/4 1/4 5


6 1-1/2 SHB-6 8-3/4 4-1/2 2 9-3/4 2-1/2 4 3/8 1/4 7
1-1/2 SHB-91 2 9
9 12-1/4 6-1/8 13-1/2 2-1/2 4 3/8 1/4
2 SHB-92 2 11
1-1/2 SHB-10 2 10
]()
2 13-1/~ 6-3/8 14-1/2 2-1/2 4 3/8 1/4
SHB-1 2 12
2 SHB-1220 2 16
12 2-7/16 SHB-1225 15-3/4 7-3/4 3 17-1/2 2-1/2 5 1/2 3/8 21
3 SHB-12~ 3 28
2-7/16 SHB-1425 3 26
14 17-3/4 9-1/4 19-1/2 2-1/2 5 1/2 3/8
3 SHB-1430 3 33
16 3 SHB-1630 19-3/4 10-5/8 3 21-1/2 2-1/2 5 1/2 3/8 39
3 SHB-1830 3 41
18
3-7/16 22-1/4 12-1/8 24-1/2 3-1/2 5 5/8 1/2
SHB-1835 4 49
3 SHB-2030 3 43
20 24-1/4 13-1/2 26-1/2 3-1/2 5 5/8 1/2
3-7/16 SHB-2035 4 51
24 3-7/16 28-1/4 16-1/2 4 30-1/2 3.1/2 5 5/8 1/2 ~7

No. 30
r-Aj G 1 FI-
G"L
l I~~= r;-rn
I ~] ..~
L B 1~,c
E
L
1
"="
Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.

6 1-1/2 SHE-61~ 7 4-1/2 2 3 1-1/2 3/4 3/8 1/4 4


1-1/2 SHE-915 2 1-1/2 5
9 10 6-1/8 3-1/2 1 1/2 3/8
2 SHE-920 2 1-1/2 5
r

1-1/2 SHE-1015 2 1-3/4 6


10
SHE-1020
11 6-3/8 3-3/4 1/2 3/B
2 2 1-3/4 6
2 SHE-1220 2 2 8
12 2-7/16 SHE-1225 13 7-3/4 3 5-1/4 2-1/4 1-1/4 1/2 3/B 13
3 SHE-1230 3 2-1/4 18

2-7/16 SHE-1425 3 2-1/4 17


14 15 9-1/4 6-3/4 1-1/4 5/8 3/8
3 SHE-1430 3 2-1/4 19

16 3 SHE-1630 17 10-5/8 3 8 2-1/4 1-1/4 5/8 1/2 21

3 SHE-1830 3 2-1/2 22
18 19 12-1/8 9-1/8 1-3/8 5/8 1/2
3-7/16 SHE-1835 4 3 32

.
3 SHE-2030 3 2-1/2 25
20 21 13-1/2 10-3/8 1-3/8 5/8 1/2
3-7/16 SHE-2035 4 3 36

24 SHE-243p
..~ 4 1"' 3 2 3/4 5/8

55
No. 326

HANGERS

6 1-1/2 SHD-615 7 4-1/2 2 2-1/2 6 3/4 3/8 1/8 7


9 1-1/2 SHD-915 2 9
10 6-1/8 2-1/2 6 3/8 3/16
2 SHD-920 2 10

10
1-1/2 SHD-1015 2 10
2
11 6-3/8 2-1/2 6 3/8 3/16
SHD-1020 2 12
2 SHD-1220 2 14
12 2-7/16 SHD-1225 13 7-3/4 3 2-1/2 6-1/2 1-1/4 1/2 3/16 19
3 SHD-1230 3 25
2-7/16 SHD-1425 3 23
14
3 15 9-1/4 2-1/2 6-1/2 1-3/8 1/2 1/4
SHD-1430 3 31
16 3 SHD-1630 17 10-5/8 3 2-1/2 6-\ /2 1-3/8 1/2 1/4 36
3 SHD-1830 3 6-1 /2 36
18 19 12-1/8 3-1/2. 1-5/8 5/8 1/4
3-7/16 SHD-1835 4 r
48
3 SHD-2030 3 6-\ /2 38
20 21 13-1/2 3-1/2
3-7/16 SHD-2035 4 ,
r 1-5/8 5/8 1/4
48
24 3-7/16 SHD-2435 2S 16-1/2 4 3-1/2 1-3/4 5/8 5/16 58

HANGERBEARINGS
ForhangerNos.30, 220,226, 326. Also avoiloble in other materials.

1 588-10 SBZ-10 581-10 SBW-1D SBU-10

1-1/2 588-15 SBZ-15 581-15 SBW-15 SBU-15

2 588-20 SBZ-20 581-20 SBW-2D SBU-20

2-7/16 588-25 SBZ-25 581-25 SBW-25 SBU-25

3 588-30 SBZ-30 581-30 SBW-3D SBU-30

3-7/16 588-35 SBZ-35 581-35 SBW-35 SBU-35

For hanger No. 270.


Self-aligning,
sealedballbearing.

1-1/2 885-15
2 888-20
2-7/16 888-25

3 888-30

56
TROUGH ENDS

Trough Ends With Feet:


Trough ends with feet are the most commonly used trough ends. The
bottom flange foot is used to support the conveyor and is complete with
slots for bolting the unit in position. All holes are jig punched to assure a
proper fit to the trough end. The flange bearing is bolted in position to
the trough end with a bolt pattern dependant on the style of bearing used.
It is therefore necessary to stipulate the type of bearing when ordering.

Trough Ends Without Feet:


Trough ends without feet are of identical construction to those with
feet with the exception that the trough is fixed in position using separate
flanged feet or saddles. As with trough ends with feet, it is necessary to
specify the type of bearing used when ordering.

Outboard Bearing Trough Ends:


Outboard bearing trough ends are used in conjunction with split gland
or packed gland seals. A shelf welded to the trough end acts as a pe-
destal to which the pillow block bearing is bolted. The shelf type trough
end is interchangeable with all other trough ends and is particularily
suitable for applications conveying hot or abrasive materials from which
the bearing should be isolated. It is necessary to specify the type of bear-
ing used when ordering.

Double Outboard Bearing Trough Ends:


Double outboard bearing trough ends are used in conjunction with
two pillow blocks for applications that require extreme rigidity and con-
centricity of the conveyor shaft. They are most often used at the drive
end when a heavy shaft mounted speed reducer is being used to drive
the conveyor. As with single outboard bearing trough ends it is necessary
to specify the type of pillow block used when ordering.

Discharge Trough Ends:

The discharge trough end is used when material is to flow directly


from the end of the trough. Due to its size, it is necessary that the
trough' loading not exceed 45% or it will restrict material discharge. It
is available with either a bailor a sleeve type flange bearing which must
be specified at the time of ordering.

-I I I@:i continantall
I~I ,"~I 1"11 I~I 1""11"
57
U-TROUGH ,A,
l rc
8

lA
2
t,
TUBULAR
TROUGH FLARED

IL~ ~ rC
K

Dimensions shown ore approximote. Request certified prints for

+.
3
59
[~I continan~
OUTBOARD
BEARING
,rROUGH
ENDS
U-TROUGH
IAi

FLARED
TROUGH
~l
II 1 !1--C
H

p~
EL
M~
'--F-'
Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation
Note: Normally supplied with Std. Dim. "N".
When specified for use with Type SSG Packed Gland Seal,
supplied with SSG Dim. "N".

6 1-1/2 SSU-615 19 SST-615 22


18 SSV-615 9-3/4 4-1/2 1-1/2 5-5/8
1-1/2 SSU-915 27 SST-915 24
9 SSV-915 31
13-1/2
2 SSU-920 30 SST-920 27 SSV-920 36
6-1/8 1-5/8 7-7/8
1-1/2 SSU-1015 37 SST -1015 35
10 14-1/2 6-3/8
2 SSU-1020 41 SST-1020 39 1-3/4 8-7/8
2 SSU-1220 56 SST-1220 49 63
SSV-1220
12 2-7/16 SSU-1225 58 SST-1225 51 64 17-1/2 7-3/4
3
SSV-1225 2 9-5/8
SSU-1230 70 SST-1230 63 SSV-1230 76
2-7/16 SSU-1425 68 SST-1425 62 SSV-1425 75
14 19-1/2
3 SSU-1430 80 SST-1430 74 87 9-1/4 2 10-7/8
SSV-1430
16 3 SSU-1630 115 SST-1630 105 125 21-1/2
SSV-1630 10-5/8 2-1/2 12
3 SSU-1830 129 SST-1830 118 SSV-1830 138
18 24-1/2
3-7/16 SSU-1835 139 SST-1835 149 SSV-1835 144 12-1/8 2-1/2 13-3/8
3 SSU-2030 189 SST-2030 178 SSV-2030 196
20 3-7/16 26-1/2
SSU-2035 195 SST-2035 190 SSV-2035 202 13-1/2 2-1/2 15
24 3-7/16 SSU-2435 246 SST-2435 234 SSV-2435 250 30-1/2 16-1/2 2-1/2 18-1/8

6 1-1/2 8-1/8 3/8 1-3/4 3/16 16-5/8 3/8 5-1/2 10 7


1-1/2 5-1/2 10
9 9-3/8 1-1/2 3/8 2-5/8 1/4 21-1/4
2 1/2 6-3/8 10-1/4 9
1-1/2 5-1/2 10
10
2 9-1/2 1-3/4 3/8 2-7/8 1/4 1/2 6-3/8 10.1/4
2 6-3/8 10-1/4
12 2-7/16 12-1f4 1-5/8 1/2 2-3/4 1/4 26-3/8 S/8 7-1/8 10-3/4 10
3 8 11-1/2
2-7/16 7-1/8 10-3/4
14 13-1/2 1-5/8 1/2 2-7/8 3//8 28-3/8 5/8 11
3 8 11-1/2
16 3 14-7/8 2 S/8 3-1/4 3/8 32-1/2 5/8 8 11-112 11-1/2
3 8 11-112
18 16 2 S/8 3-1/4 3/8 36-1/2 5/8
3-7/16 9-3/8 12-114 12-1/8
3
20 19-1/4 2-1/4 5/8 3-3/4 3/8 39-1/2 3/4
8 11-112
13-1/2
3-7/16 9-3/8 12-114
24 3-7/16 20 2-1/2 5/8 4-1/8 3/8 45-1/2 3/4 9-3/8 12-1/4 16-1/2

60

-1I---C
~"fJCon t i~~
DOUBLEOUTBOARDBEARINGTROUGHENDS

rA~ -'!

f-
L
M_/

Dimensions shown are approxir:nate. Request certified prints for installation.

6 1-1/2 31 9-3/41 4-1/2f1F1-/21 5-5/8T8~ 1


STU-61~i 3/8 ,I 3/16' 3/8

9
1-1/2 STU-91i5 ~~i53
~
13-1/2.1 6-1/SI1-5/SI 7-7/SI 9-3/S~ 1-112 3/8 1/4 1/2 11-3/8 16-3/8
2 63 14-3/4 19-3/4
10 1-~ STU-1015 65 11-3/8 16-3/8
14-1/2' 6.3/811~3/41 8-7/819-1/211-3/4 3/8 1/4 1/2
2 STU-1Q20 75 14-3/4 19-3/4
2 STU-1220 90 14-3/4 19-3/4
12 2-7/16 STU-1225 97 17-1/2' 7-3/4 2 9-5/8112-1/4' 1-5/8 1/2 1/4 5/8 16-7/8 21-7/8
3 STU-1230
,~
99 17-3/16 --17-]
! 22-3/16

14 2-7/16,'. TU-1 5 144 22


19-1/219:'1/4 2 10-7/8113-1/211-5/8 1/2 3/8

~
5/8
-~3 STU-1 0 149 17-5/16 22-5/16
16 STU-1 0 162 21-1/2110-5/8~ 2f.1/2 12 14-7/8 2 5/8 3/8 5/8
i
17-5/16 ,
22-5/16
3 STU-1 $0 196 7-5/16 '
18 24-1/2112-1/8~2.1/2~ 13-3/8 16 2 5/8 3/8 5/8 22-5/16
3-7/16 STU-1$5; 202 18-11/16 23-11/16
20
3 STU-2030 227 17-5/16 22-5/16
26-1/2113-1/2~2.1/2 15 2-1/4 5/8 3/8 3/4
3-7/16 STU-2Q35 235 18-11/16 '1 23-11/16
I
24 3-7/16 STU-2~5 295 30-1/2116-1;2!2~1/2118-1/8 20 2-1/2 I 5/8 3/8 3/4 18-11/16 I 23-11/16

61
119-1/4'
I
[~contin~~
DISCHARGE
TROUGH
lENDS
U-TROUGH
I--A--1
H

FLAREDTROUGH

rL

Dimensionsshownare opproximate. Requestcertified prints for installotion.

6 1-1/2 SDU-615 8 SDV-615 11 9-3/4 4-1/2 1-1/2 3/8 3/16 16-5/8 7


9 SDU-915 11 SDV-915 15
1-~/2 I SDU-920 14 20 13-1/2 6-1/8 1-5/8 3/8 1/4 21-1/4 9
SDV-920
10
1-1/2 SDU-1015 11 SDV-1015
2 SDU-1020 15 SDV-1020 14-1/2 6-3/8 1-3/4 3/8 1/4
2 SDU-1220 21 SDV-1220 28
12 2-7/16 SDU-1225 23 SDV-1225 29 17-1/2 7-3/4 2 1/2 1/4 26-3/8 10
3 SDU-1230 34 SDV-1230 41
2-7/16 SDU-1425 26 SDV-1425 33
14 19-1/2 9-1/4 2
3 SDU-1430 38 SDV-1430 4S 1/2 3/8 28-3/8 11
16 3 SDU-1630 47 SDV-1630 S6 21-1/2 10-S/8 2-1/2 5/8 3/8 32-1/2 11-1/2
18 3 SDU-1830 54 SDV-1830 63
3-7/16 SDU-1835 24-1/2 12-1/8 2-1/2 5/8 3/8 36-1/2
65 SDV-1835 69 12-1/8
20 3 SDU-2030 77 SDV-2030 7S
3-7/16 SDU-2035 26-1/2 13-1/2 2-1/2 5/8 3/8 39-1/2 13-1/2
89 SDV-2035 81
24 3-7/16 SDU-2435 109 SDV-2435 96 30-1/2 16-1/2 2-1/2 5/8 3/8 45-1/2 16-1/2

62
TROUGH END BEARINGS

Ball Bearing Flange Unit:


Flange bearings of this type are commonly used on the
non-thrust end of a screw conveyor. The gray iron housing
incorporates a heavy duty single row ball bearing that is self-
aligning and has a good radial load capacity.

Roller Bearing Flange Unit:


Roller bearing flange blocks of this type incorporate a
heavy, rugged gray iron housing and two tapered roller bearings.
The units have a high radial load rating with good thrust capaci-
ties. They also will handle slight angular shaft mislalignment.

Sleeve Bearing Flange Unit:


This is a babbited type flange bearing that is used in appli-
cations that do not require or are unsuitable for conventional ball
or roller bearings. They have no misalignment capabilities
however do have good radial load capacities.

Roller Bearing Pillow Blocks:


Are of similar construction to the roller bearing flange unit
however are used in conjunction with shelf type trough ends.

Ball Bearing Pillow Blocks:


Are of similar construction to the ball bear.jng flange unit
however are used in conjunction with shelf type trough ends.

[~~;~~~!~~~~~~~
63
TROUGH END BEARINGS

Sleeve Bearing Pillow Blocks:


Are of similar construction to the sleeve bearing flange unit
however are used in conjunction with shelf type trough ends.

Type E Thrust Bearings:


~,...~ The Type E bearing is the most commonly used thrust
bearing and is designed to handle medium to heavy thrust loads
in either direction while maintaining good radial load capacities.
Thrust is created opposite to the material flow in a screw

~ conveyor which will cause accelerated component wear if not


contained. It is thus advjseable to incorporate a thrust bearing,
preferably at the drive end, to keep the conveyor screw in tension.
The thrust is contained by snap rings on the shaft on each side of
the bearing assembly.

Type H Thrust Bearings:


The Type H thrust bearing is used for cases in which
extreme thrust loads are encountered. The shaft is shouldered
and set between two high capacity roller bearings in order to
absorb thrust in both directions. The assembly incorporates lip
type seals within the housing thus eliminating the need for exter-
nal trough end type seals.

Collar & Washer Thrust Assemblies:


Assemblies of this type are used in conjunction with sleeve
type bearings in applications where light thrust loads are encoun-
tered. The collar, washer and grooved shaft are mounted outside
the trough and are intended for use at the discharge end of the
conveyor with the conveyor screw in tension.

Bronze Washer Thrust Assemblies:


The bronze washer assembly is mounted inside the con-
veyor trough at the inlet end and is designed to handle light,
compression thrust loads. It consists of a bronze washer moun-
ted between two machined steel washers fitted between the
trough end and pipe. Due to its interior location it is exposed
continuously to the material being conveyed and thus in some
instances has a limited life.

64
l<i:1
contin~~~~~
END BEARINGS I
BALLBEARING
FLANGE
UNIT

rF=!'D=:;1 1Er-

D ~~
..-J
'-F
Lftm
Lc---l
Dimensionsshownore approximote. Requestcertified prints for instollrltion.

ROLLERBEARINGI:LANGEUNIT

B
-D-. 1Er-

.[
Lc-.l
Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for instollation.

SLEEVE
BEARINGFLANGEUNIT

1 SBF-10SB 2.4 SBF-10SZ 2.4 4 2 3 3/8 3/8


1-1/2 SBF-15SB 5.0 SBF-15SZ S.O 5-1/4 3 4 1/2 1/2
2 SBF-20SB 11.7 SBF-20SZ 11.7 6-1/2 4 5-1/4 11/16 1/2
2-7/16 SBF-25SB 22 SBF-25SZ 22 8 5 6-1/4 7/8 S/8
3 SBF-30SB 35 SBF-30SZ 3S 9-1/2 6 7-1/21/2 1 3/4
3-7/16 SBF-35SB 53 SBF-35SZ S3 10-3/8 7 8- 1 3/4

65
1@:lcontinantal,1
ENDBEARINGS

F,

Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.

ROLLERBEARINGPILLOWBLOCK

F,

~
I I--- -bl!1aL ~ I G
ioo 8- C
Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for instollotion.

1-1/2 SBP- 151 10.8 7':7/8 3-3/8 6 6-1 J 2-1/8 1/2 2-3/8 1-1/4
2 SBp. 201 11.6 8-7/8 3-1/2 6-3/4 7-1 J 2-1/4 S/8 2-1/2 1-5/16
2-7/16 SBP-251 20.5 10-1/2 4 8-1/4 8-3,'4 2-3/4 S/8 2-7/8 1-5/8
3 SBP-30.1 27.4 12 4-1/2 9-3/16 9.1, 3/16 3-1/8 3/4 3 1-7/8
3-7/16 SBP 351 46.5 14 5 10-11/16 11-5, 116 3-3/4 7/8 3-5/8 2-1/4

SLEEVE
BEARINGPILLOWBLOCK

Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for instollation.

1-1/2 SBP- 4.4 SBP- 4.4 6-1/4 3 4-3/4 5 J.~3/8 1/2 2 3/4
2 SBP-: 8.3 SBP-: B.3 7-1/2 4 5-7/8 6-1/8 J.-3/4 5{8 2-1/2 15/16
2-7/16 SBP-:258830883588
15.6 SBP-: 15.6 9-1/4 5 6-7/8 7-3/8 2-J./8 5/8 3 1-1/8
3 SBP-: 24 SBP-: 24 10-3/4 6 8-1/4 8-3/4 2- J./2 3/4 3-1/2 1-5/16
3-7/16 SBP-: 40 SBP-: 40 12 6-7/8 8-7/8 9-5/8 2-7/8 7/8 4 1-1/2

66
J'4
'2
RBRBRBRBRB
15522052255230523552
15882088
~I continan~
THRUSTBEARINGS I
TYPEH

Part Nas. shown include bearing and shaft assembly.


Dimensions are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.

TYPEE

IPLATESEAL

1-1/2 SBE-15DP SBE 4-1/8 5-3/8 4 4-1/4 4 5-15/16 11.2 1-11'/16 1.3/16 19 16
2 SBE-20DP SBE 4-3/8 5-5/8 4-1/8 5-1/4 5 6 1/2 1.11/16 1-114 28 24
2-7/16 SBE-25DP SBE 5-3/8 6-7/8 4-11/16 5-1/4 5 6-1/8 5/8 2 1.3/4 46 40
3 SBE-30DP SBE -30EP 6 7-3/4 5-3/16 6-1/4 6 6-13/16 3/4 2-1/8 1.13/16 69 58
3-7/16 SBE-35DP SBE -35EP 7 9-1/4 5-3/4 7-1/4 7 9-1/8 3/4 2-318 2.3/8 109 93

SEALHOUSING

1-1/2 SBE-15DH I SBE-15EH 4-1/8 5-3/8 5-1/4 4-1/4 4 5-1.5/1.6 ]/2 2-15/16 1-3/16 23.5 20
2 SBE-20DH SBE-20EH 4-3/8 5-5/8 5-3/8 5-1/4 5 6 1/2 2-15/16 1-1/4 33.5 29
2-7/16 SBE-25DH I SBE-25EH 5-3/8 6-7/8 5-15/16 5-1/4 5 6-1./8 5/8 3-1/4 1-3/4 52 46
3 SBE-30DH SBE-30EHI 6 7-3/4 6-7/16 6-1/4 6 6-13/1.6 3/4 3-3/8 1-13/16 79.5 68
3-7/16 I SBE-35DH SBE-35EH 7 9-1/4 7-1/2 7-1/4 7 9-1/8 1 3/4 4-1/8 2-3/8 120 104

67

-15EP-20EP-25EP
I
[~ontin~~
THRUST
BEARINGS
COLLARSAND WASHERS

COLLAR WASHER

~
J:t --JA

Part Nos. shawnincludecollar, washer, andshaft.


Dimensionsare approximate. Requestcertified prints for installation

BRONZEWASHER

/'~ 13/4
~~ 1 -~ ~
!1:':':::'~~- ;:~:':::;T7
~-' .11,

L___~::,-~:,:::::;-=::E:$

Part Nas. shawn include ane bronze and two steel washers.

Dimensions are approximate. Request certified prints for installation

1-1/2 SWB-15 2
2 SWB-20 2
2-7/16 SWB-25 3
3 SWB-30 3
3-7/16 SWB-35 4

68
TROUGH END SEALS

Packing Seal Housing:


Packing type seals are used in conjunction with waste packing or a
cartridge type lip or felt seal. They bolt between the trough end and the
flange bearing however can be mounted independently for use with a
shelf type trough end. The housing incorporates a wide opening at the
top to facilitate waste repacking along with strategic holes for oiling.
They simply but effectively isolate the bearing from the trough end and
potential material carry through around the shaft.

Plate Seal:
Plate type seals are a simple, economical yet effective device which
can be bolted between the trough end and flange bearing or used in
conjunction with a shelf type trough end. Standard units incorporate a
braided packing material that is compressed around the conveyor shaft
when the seal is tightened in position to the trough end, however can also
be supplied with a lip type seal if required.

Split Gland Seal:


Split gland seals use a braided packing material which is compres-
sed between a split adjustable housing to facilitate packing replacement
and regulate the compression applied to the packing. They can be moun-
ted either inside or outside the trough and are generally used in conjunc-
tion with a shelf type trough end.

Packed Gland Seal:


The packed gland seal is used for severe applications that require ef-
fective sealing under all conditions. They can be used under both positi-
ve and negative pressure and can seal the trough either internally or ex-
ternally. A braided packing media is compressed around the shaft by
two compression bolts which can be used in conjunction with lantern
rings and/or grease fittings depending on the application. Due to their
configuration they can only be used in conjunction with a shelf type trough
end.

[~;~~~!!~~~~~~ 69
I~I continan~
SHAn SEALS

PLATESEAL

.
A
t
I~D-JI J
L-B~ c L
Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for instollotion.

1-1/2 SSP-15BB 5-3/8 4 1/2 SSP-15RB 5-3/8 4-1/8 1/2 1/2 2


2 SSP-20BB 6-1/2 5-1/8 5/8 SSP-20RB 6-1/2 4-3/8 1/2 1/2 3
2-7/16 SSP-25BB 7 5-5/8 5/8 SSP-25RB 7 5-3/8 5/8 1/2 4
3 SSP-30BB 7-3/4 6 3/4 SSP-30RB 7-3/4 6 3/4 1/2 5
3-7/16 SSP-35BB 9-1/4 6-3/4 3/4 SSP-35RB 9-1/4 7 3/4 5/8 8

70
[~ntina n~
SHAFTSEALS

SPLITGLAND SEAL~
"It-I!
F- 1 .-~
T I L- rtt-:
r DBA i:: Ii
, i I ~L""_~,
i~ T "t:
I-E-J ~~r
Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.

PACKEDGLAND SEAL

F-
~;Q:E
DB
, I
" =--'-

!l-o--J1
i---B~

Dimensionsshownore opproximate. Requestcertified prints for installation.

1-1/2 SSG-15 5-3/8 4 1/2 14


2 SSG-20 6-1/2 5-1/8 5/8 18
2-7/16 SSG-25 7 5-5/8 5/8 21
3 SSG-30 7-3/4 6 3/4 27
3-7/16 SSG-35 9-1/4 6-3/4 3/4 30

. 71
TROUGHS

Formed Flange Troughs:


Formed flange troughs are the most commonly utilized type
of U-Trough. The top flange is formed from the same steel as the
trough thereby providing rigid onepiece housing section. The
end flanges are jig welded in special positioning machinery for
perfect alignment with the other sections.

Angle Flange Troughs:


Angle flange troughs are fabricated using a heavy structural
steel angle welded flush with the top of the trough edge. The welds
are intermittent however can be continuous seam welds in the
event that dust tight construction is required. The end flanges are
jig welded in special positioning machinery for perfect alignment
with other sections.

Channel Troughs:
Channel troughs are commonly utilized for conveyors
having long distances between conveyor supports. The trough
sides are fabricated of structural steel channels that impart great
rigidity to the trough. A contoured section is bolted or clamped
in position. Troughs of this type are useful for abrasive applica-
tions that require frequent replacement of the lower trough sec-
tion.
Drop Bottom Troughs:
Drop bottom troughs are used in applications where quick
convenient access to the conveyor interior is required. The bot-
tom trough consists of rigid upper side channels to which a
lower contoured section is attached. One side of the lower
contoured section is hinged while the other is attached using
spring clamps or other quick opening clamps.

Flanged Tubular Troughs:


Tubular housings are inherently dust and weather tight.
They are most often used when full cross sectional loads must be
maintained such as in steep angle conveying. The trough section
consists of two semi-circular halves bolted together along the
flanges to form a tubular housing.

Solid Tubular Troughs:


The solid tubular housing maintains all the characteristics of
the formed tubular housing with the exception that it is rolled
from a single plate and continuously welded at the seam for dust
and weather tightness.

72
Formed Flange Rectangular Troughs:
Formed flange rectangular troughs are formed from a single
plate and are commonly used for highly abrasive applications. The
material builds up to form its own trough bottom thl.Js preventing
direct abrasion against the trough wall.

Angle Flange Rectangular Troughs:


Angle flange rectangular troughs are identical to the formed
flange type with the exception that the flange consists of a heavy
structural steel angle welded flush with the top of the trough edge.
The welds are intermittent however can be continuous seam welds
in the event that dust tightness is required.

Flared Troughs:
Flared troughs are primarily used to handle sticky or slightly
viscous materials and are used in conjunction with ribbon
conveyors. The flared trough sides improve the feeding and
conveying action in such cases. The flanges are formed from the
same plate as the trough and the end flanges are jig welded to
ensure perfect alignment.

End Flanges:
Trough end flanges are cold formed on special machinery
and jig punched to assure dimensional accuracy in order that
trough sections will align perfectly.

Trough Saddles & Support Feet:


,
Trough saddles are used to support the trough at interme-
diate points between trough flanges and are normally welded
directly to the trough. Support feet on the other hand are bolted
to the end flange and are used to support the trough sections.

73

r~
~
'a&nD9 pJDpUDJS= . tl'l

.1-1 SL
II L-Ot
8/-Ot l/l-l l/l-91 Sl
l.8 COvl-alS
689 LOvl-alS
l
IL60l OVl-~lS! 61l' OPG-~.LSI "tl I
f;OV~.'v'.lS 569
~OO~ LOVl=~lS 99S LOPG-~.LS ,,91/
LOv~.'v'.lS 9lS Fl
9L/S-OE 99S O~vl-alS tt O~O~.'v'.lS 6 O~PG-~.LS 01-
l/l-9l 9l COOl-alS 69L 00l-:).18
19 f;OO~.'v'lS L9S OOG-~.LS "tl I
II lL 8/-9l II L-l II L- L L~ 809 LOOl-alS L89 LOOl-:).18
S8t LOO~-'v'.lS L~~,O~O~.'v'.lS
LOOG-~.LS ,,91/ Ol
9l/S-9l 90SIO~Ol-alS 619I 0~Ol-:).18i
8 6l O~OG-~.LS 01-
II L-~a .89 COg~-alS I.L
999 08 ~ -:).18 19S f;O9~.'v'.lS OS O8~-~.LS "tl I
Sl lL 8/-~l l/l-l 9/ L-lL 61 69S LOg~-alS 9tt LO9~.'v'.lS lO~ ,,91/ Bl
L08~-::).18 1

9l/S-~l LO8~-~.LSI
ll. IO~g~-alS 09 ~O ~8 ~ -:).18 tS OI.9~-'v'.lS 00 O~8~-~.LSi 01
~Il-~l l. l~g~-alS 00 ~~9~.'v'.lS O~lIf;O91..'v'.lS
G~8~-~.LS ll-
l/l-ll S.S CO9~-alSl.. lit ~9~ O9~-~.LS "tl I
~/l-ll 8/-lZ L09~-alS 69 LO9~.'v'lS O~ LO9~-~.LS ,,91/
Ol l 8/S-0l il 91
9l/S-ll 09 O~9~-alSI l8l O~9~.'v'.lS 09l O~9~-~.LS 01
~/l-ll ll l~9~-alS 6l ~~9~.'v'.lS 90l G~9~-~.LS ll-
l/l-6L l6. COv~-alS 9lS IOPI.-:)lS 61t f;Ov~.'v'.lS ll~ OP~-~.LS "tl I
.1-6l 6 8/-6l lO. LOv~-alS 99. LOPI.-:)lS 6l LOv~.'v'.lS lL LOP~-~.LS ,,91/
l ~/l-6 Sl ~L
9l/S-6l 1 O~v~-alS St. 0I.PI.-:)lSI8Sl O~v~-'v'.lS Ll O~P~-~.LS 01
~/l-6l 68l l~v~-alS'l8 GI.PI.-:)lS 91l ~~v~-'v'.lS ~9L -ll -
G~p~-~.LSI
lIt-it .. Ol~-alS SSt Oll.-:)18 19 f;O~~-'v'.lS lS OG~-~.LS "tl I
lit-it 8/-LI 09 LOl~-alS Ot LO~~-'v'.lS 69l LOG~-~.LS ,,91/
L ~ ~/-l. l LOll.-:)lS'l8ll II
9l/S-LI 86l O~l~-alS 6S Ol.ll.-:)lS SU' OI.~I..'v'.lS OOl O~G~-~.LS 01
~/l-Ll 9l l~l~-alS ll.ll.-:)18 061 ~~~~.'v'.lS 9~L G~G~-~.LS ll-
Ii
l/l-~l IS OO~-alS' -
l6l E:OO~-'v'.lS~O SOO~-~.LS "tl I
8/-~l l8l LOO~-alS -
l LOO~-'v'.lS 6U LOO~-~.LS ,,91/
9l/S-~l l/l-l 9/-9 LL 9l O~O~-alS l81 O~O~.'v'.lS Oil O~O~-~.LSi 01 01
~I L-~L 90l l~O~-alS lSI ~~O~.'v'.lS OL i G~O~-~.LS II
9l/-~l ll v~O~-alS 611 v~O~-'v'.lS l6 P~O~-~.LS I tl -
l/l-l . 06-alS l 06- ~.LS 08l E:06.'v'.lS 99l O6-~.LSI "tl I
8/-1 sa
al I O~6-alS
L06-als l l6Z
6Sl L06- ~.LSI IU LO6-'v'.lS 9Ll LO6-~.LS ,,91/
.I-l 9 9l/S-1 l/l-l 9/l-9 Ot 0~6-~.LS ell O~6-'v'.lS 09L O~6:~.LS 01 6
~/l-1 661 l~6-alS 6l l~6- ~.LS, Stl ~~6-'v'.lS ill G~6-~.LS II
9l/-1 691 v~6-alS SII v~6.'v'.lS L6 P~6-~.LS tl-
81L-6 Ol LO9-alslOl L09-~lS 6S1 LO9.'v'lS SSL

~
9l/l-6
pll-l lit-. L
691
6.1 I
O~9-alSI8l1
l~9-alS .91
O~9-~lS Sll O~9-'v'lS ~LL
LO9-~.LS',,91/
O~9-~lS I' 01
~I 1-01 ~/-6 ~~9-~lS, SOL ~1.9.'v'.lS 06 G~9-~.LS II 9
9l1 LL-6 al v~9-als6.1 v~9-~lS 8 vI.9.'v'.lS ~9 P~9-~.LS tl
8/S-6 III 9~9-alS I
l I 9~9.'v'.lS lS 91-
I
~/l-LI 18 I ~~v-'v'.lS l 9~9-~.LSI
G~P-~.LS
9L/-L 8/S- s t9 v~v.'v'.lS ~S P~P-~lSIII tl v
8/l-L 9S 9~v.'v'.lS ~~ 9~P-~.LS 91-

WOU08 dOJQ 18UUDIf)

JO! s~u!Jd pa!!!~JaJ ~sanbaH .a~Dw!xoJddD aJD UMO4Ssuo!suaw!o

H9nOH.L
WOllO8 H9nOI.L
dOHO liNNYH)

.Jo~DoJ6 JD ,,9l/ = 1 oJo4M po~~!WOo6UDI! oP!S "V/-

H9nO11-n H9nOH.L-n
J9NY1~ J9NY1~
J19NY aJWHO~

SH9nOHJ.HOAJANO)

I"D~UDU!~UO~ I::P}I
I
[~;]~~~~~~~~~~~
CONVEYOR
TROUGHS

FORMED
SOLID
TUBULAR
TUBULAR
TROUGH
TROUGH

FORMED
ANGLE
FLANGE
FLANGE
RECTANGULAR
RECTANGULAR

L 3/4" side flange omitted whereT=3/16" or greater.

Formed Flange Solid Dimensions shown ore opproximote.


Angle FIQI1ge
Tubular Tubular Request certified prints for instollation
Rectangular RectangulQr

-16 STT-616 64 ISTS-6161 53 STR-616 51


66 I STP-614
STP-616 89
14 STT-614 78 STS-614 , 65 STR-614 103
9-5/8
6 t2 STT-612 109 'STS-612 9-11/16
91 STR-612 91 STP-612 142 4-1/2 .
10 STT-61 0 STS-610, 7 1-1/4 9-3/4
138 115
3/16 STT-607I ~

188 STS-607 9-13/16


156
9-7/8
-14 TT-914
TT-912STT':91
111 STS-914 95 STR-914 98 STP-914 130
12 153 STS-912 13-3/16
131 STR-912 134 STP-912 161
9 10 STT-907
192 STS-91 0 13-1/4
164
0

STR-910 172 STP-910 192


259 STS-907I 10 6-1/8 1-1/2 13-5/16
3/16 221 STR-907
STT-903STT-1014
228 STP-907 248 13-3/8
1/4' 343 STS-903 292
13-1/2
-14 119 STS-1014 103
12 STT -1012STT-1010STT-1007
164 ISTS-1012 14-3/16
142
10 10 206 STS-1010 14-1/4
178 }]
3/16' 278 STS-1007 1-1/2 14-5/16
240
1/4" STT-1003 14-318
367 sTs-10031 316
14-1/2
14 STR-1214 124 STP-1214 176
STT- 1212 17-3/16
-12 200 STS-1212 170 STR-1212 170 STP-1212 218
11 STT- 1210 17-1/4
10 251 STS-1210 213 STR-1210 216 STP-1210 260
3/16' STT- 1207 338 STS-1207 286 STR-1207 291
13 7-3/4 2 17-5/16
STP-1207 316
1/4" STT- 1203 446 STS-1203 377
17-3/8
17-1/2
14 'STR-1414 140 STP-1414 192
TT-1412 19-3/16
-12 231 STS-1412 201 STR-1412 192 STP-1412 240
TT-1410 19-1/4
14 10 290 STS-1410 252 STR-1410 245 STP-1410 288
TT-1407 15 9-1/4 2 19-5/16
3/16" 390 STS-1407 338 STR-1407 330 STP-1407 355
TT-1403 19-3/8
1/4" 515 STS-1403 446 19-1/2
-12 TT-1612 260 230 STR- 1612 2)4 8T P-1P-1P-1
612
STS-161~ 262
7)-1/4
10 TT-1610 326 STS-1610 288 STR- 1610 273 8T 610 316
16 21-5/16
3/16' STT-1607 438 STS-1601 386 STR- 1607 375 8T 607 411 17 10-5/8 2 21-3/8
1/4" STT-1603 578 STS-160j 509 STR- 1603 502 8T P-1 603 527 21-1/2
-12 STT-1812 301 STS-1812 264 STR- 1812 248 8T P-1P-1
812 311 24-1/4
10 STT-1810 375 STS-181Q 328 STR- 1810 315 8T 810 373
18 24-5/16
3/16" S'rT -1807 503 STS-1807 439 STR- 1807 432 8T P-1 807 482 19 12-1/8 2-1/2 24-3/8
1/4" STT-1803 661 STS-1803 576 STR- 1803 576 8T P-1 803 608 24-1/2
12 STR- 2012 283 8T P-2'012 346 26-1/4
20
-10 'STT-20101
STT-2007 410
549 I STS-2010
STS-2007 1 363
485 STR- 2010 360 8T P-2 010 418 26-5/16
3/16" STR- 2007 495 8T P-2 007 544 21 13-1/2 2-1/2
26-3/8
1/4" STT-2003 724 STS-2003 639 Si"R- 2003 660 5T P-2 003 698 26-1/2
12 STR- 2412 374 8T P-2 412 434 30-1/4
-10 0 485 STS~2410 1 ~38STT-2407
STR- 2410 475 8T P-2:410 530 30-5/16
24 25 16-1/2 2-1/2
3/16' 649 STS-2407 585STT-2403
STR- 2407 653 8T P-2 407 698 30-3/8
1/4" 855 STS-2403 770 STR- 2403 870 8T P-2:403 908 30-1/2

.Standard Gauge
75

STT-241
9L

a6nD9 pJDpUDIS = .

l/l-S~ 999 Ov~-AJ.S ..~/ L


l/l-ll 8/-S~ l/l-l l/l-9l OF 90S LOv~-AJ.S ..9L/ vl
~/l-S~ L9E O~v~-AJ.S OL-
l/l-6 6LS OO~-AJ.S ..~/ L
l/l-OI 8/-6 ~/l-~ ~I L-EL vE l~~ LOO~-AJ.S ..9L/~ Ol
~Il-6 LEE O~O~-AJ.S OL-
l/l-9 9~S O8~-/\lS .,~/ L
II L-6 8/-9 l/l-l 8/l-ll IE 9L~ LO8~-AJ.S ..9L/& 8L
~Il-9 lLE O~8~-AJ.S OL-
l/l-l 66~ O9~-AJ.S .,~/ L
~/l-8 8/-l l lIl-11 8l 6LE LO9~-AJ.S ..9L/ 91
~Il-l 19l O~9~-AJ.S OL-
8/-8l O~E LOv~-AJ.S ..9L/
l/l-l ~/l-8l l 11 Vl ESl O~v~'AJ.S OL .l
~/l-8l lOl ~~v~-AJ.S lL-
8/-9l 90 LO~~-AJ.S ,.9L/t
l/l-9 ~/l-9l l Ol II 9ll O~~~-/\lS OL II
~/l-9l 69L ~~~~-AJ.S lL-
s ~/l-ll 99L O~6-/\lS OL
l)t-t 6 at 6
~/l-ll 9~L ~~6-AJ.S lL-
8/S-9l OLL ~~9-/\lS lL
l/l- ., L-L l vl 9
8/S-9l 9L v~9-AJ.S ~L-

.UO!~OIlO~SU!
JO! s~u!Jd pa!!!~Ja) ~sanba~ .a~ow!xoJddo aJO UMO4Ssuo!suaw!Q

H9nOHJ.a~HY1~

H9nOH.L
aJHY1~

I"D~UDUI~UO~ !::})I
/<i::1continantal,' END FLANGES
CONVEYORTROUGHS-COMPONENTS
iA1

C~ U.TROUGH

RECT.TROUGH FLAREDTROUGH
Dimensionsshownore opproximote. Requestcertified prints for instollotion.
FLANGETHICKNESS:1/4 "for sizes 6" to 16"; 3/8" for sizes 18" to 24".
See 8olt RequirementSectionfor quontity ond loyout of bolt holes.

4 SFU-4 SFT-4 SFR-4 SFV-4 5-1/4 3-7/16 1 2-5/8 3/8


6 SFU-6 SFT-6 SFR-6 SFV-6 7-1/4 7-3/8 4-1/4 1-1/4 6-3/4 14-1/4 3-5/8 3/8
9 SFU-9 SFT.,9 SFR-9. SFV-9 10-1/4 10-1/2 5-7/8 1-1/2 8-3/4 18-1/4 5-1/8 3/8
10 SFU-10 SFT-10 SFR-10 SFV-10 11-1/4 11-1/2 6-1/8 1-1/2 5-5/8 3/8
12 SFU-12 SFT-12 SFR-12 SFV-12 13-1/4 13-1/2 7-1/2 2 9-3/4 22-1/4 22-1/2 6-3/4 1/2
6-5/8
14 SFU-14 SFT-14 SFR-14 SFV-14 15-1/4 15-1/2 9 2 10-3/4 24-1/4 24-1/2 7-5/8 7-3/4 1/2
16 SFU-16 SFT-16 SFR-16 SFV-16 17-1/4 17-1/2 10-3/8 2 11-1/4 28-1/4 28-1/2 8-5/8 8-3/4 5/8
18 SFU-18 SFT-18 SFR-18 SFV-18 19-1/4 19-1/2 11-13/16 2-1/2 11-13/16 31-1/4 31-1/2 9-5/8 9-3/4 5/8
20 SFU-20 SFT-20 SFR-20 SFV-20 21-1/4 21-1/2 13-3/16 2-1/2 13-3/16 34-1/4 34-1/2 10-5/8 10-3/4 5/8
24 SFU-24 SFT-24 SFR-24 SFV-24 25-1/4 25-1/2 16-3/16 i 2-1/2 16-3/16 40-1/2
40-1/4 12-5/8 12-3/4 5/8

SADDLES& SUPPORTFOOT

~ l.!rft~ ~~~_'A]
-~ A =:J- F F -[~==A.=:1-
-to-. ,
,--i- 1Gr
S /~ l..~c,/l'1 J
Lr

L-c--J
~j
~EL
J~:~j
L-C--J
tJ
~EL

Dimensions shown ore opproximote. Request certified prints for instollotion.

77
8L

.uJaed ~Ioq a6uel! a6Je4~S!p pJepue~s


a4~ 4~!M pall!Jp aJe sa6uel! wooq a4.l .sJo~en~~e ~!~ewnaud 4~!M
JO sws!ue4~aw uo!u!d pUB >t~eJ pa~eJado laa4M U!e4~ JO pue4 4~!M
alqel!eJ\e aJe Aa4~ sa~e6 ap!IS leUO!~uaJ\uo~ 4~!M S\;j .aJa4dsow~e
a4~ O~palPue4 6u!aq le!Ja~eW a4~!O ade~sa a4~ ~uaJ\aJd O~pasol~ua
Ala~aldwo~ pa4S!UJn! aJe WS!Ue4~aW ap!IS pUB a~e6 a4.l 'SUO!~
-eJn6!!uo~ paJ\Jn~ pUe~el! 4~OqU! alqel!eJ\e aJe sa~e6~46!~~sna

:saleD ap!IS paAJn~ puv lel~ 146!.lISna

"JOlEm::>E
::>!lEWn8Ud E JO uo!u!d pUB )f::>EJE J84l!8 4l!M p8!lddns 8q UE::>l!
8lE6lEIl 84l4l!M SV "46noJl 84l lIE!J8lEW liE S8U!!UO::>Aq8J84l pUB
8lE6 8P!IS 8dAllEIl 84l 8P!SU! ll81IE!J8lEW IEnp!S8J 84l S8lEU!W!18
8P!IS p8J\Jn::>841. "lI8Sl! 46noJl 84l Ol AIIEJ68lU! p8lunow S! l! lE4l pUB
46noJl JOA8J\UO::l84l S84::>lEW lE4l 8P!IS p8JnOluo::> E SE4 l! lE4l UO!l
-d8::>X8 84l 4l!M l!Un lEll 84l Ol JEI!W!S S! 8lE6 8P!IS p8J\Jn::>84.l

:sa.e~ ap!IS pal\Jn:)

.Jo~en~~e ~!~ewn8ud e Lj~!M p8!lddns 8q osle ue~ J8A8MOLj


le8LjM U!eLj~ ~e>t~od JO pueLj e J8Lj~!e I\q pe~en~~e S! e~e5 ep!IS
~el~ eLj.L .uJe~~ed ~Ioq pJepue~s eLj~ Lj~!M P811!JP S! e5uel~ wo~~oq
s~1 .e5uel~ ~nods eLj~ o~ 1\1~~eJ!p s~loq pUB s~nods 85JeLj~s!p pJep
-ue~s Lj~!M 8Sn JO~ peu5!sep S! e~e5 UO!U!d pUB >t~eJ ~el~ 8Lj.L

:sale~ aP!IS lel~

.~u!od e6Je4~S!p leu!l


e4~ ~sed le!Je~ew lo Jel\O AJJe~ OU s! eJe4~ 'JOAel\UO~ e4~ lo pue
eweJ~xe e4~ ~e pe~e~ol s! ~! esne~e8 'uJe~~ed ~Ioq ~nods e6Je4~
-S!P pJepue~s e4~ 4~!M pell!Jp S! e6uell wo~~oq e4~ el!4M e~eld
pue 46noJ~ e4~ o~ AI~~eJ!p 6u!~loq JOl pell!Jp S! e6uell pue e41.
.~u!od e6Je4~S!p leu!l e4~ ~e pesn eJe eJn~eu S!4~ lo s~nods

:slnods a6Je4:>S!C pu3 4snl~

.uJa~~Bd ~Ioq pJBpUB~S a4~ 4~!M pall!Jp aJB Sa6UBI!


wo~~oq a4.i "JOAa"UO~ a4~ o~ lallBJBd Uo!~BJado JO! JO ap!S Ja4~!a
WOJ! 6u!uado JO! pauo!~!sod aq ABW ap!IS a4.i "MOl! IB!Ja~BW
!O IOJ~UO~ a4~ JO! ap!IS PUB4 B sa~BJodJO~U! ~! ~B4~ uo!~da~xa a4~
4~!M ~nods a6JB4~S!P pJBpUB~S a4~ O~ IB~!~Uap! S! ~nods a4.i
:ap!IS pueH lft!M tnods a6Jelf:>S!O pJepUetS

"Alqwesse ~Ue!UeAUO~ pUB A~!I!qee6


-Ue4~Je~U! JO! uJe~~ed ~Ioq e6Je4~S!p pJepUe~S e4~ 4~!M pell!Jp
eJe se6uel! wo~~oq e4.l .uo!~elle~SU! Pie!! JO! esool pe4S!UJn!
eq JeAeMO4 ue~ Ae4.l '46noJ~ e4~ O~ Uo!~!sod U! pepleM dO4S
AileJeue6 eJe pUB 46noJ~ e4~ !O e6ne6 e4~ uo 6u!puedep sesseu
->t~!4~ SnO!JeA U! pe~e~!Jqe! eJe s~nods e6Je4~S!p pJepue~s

:Slnods a6Je4:>S!C pJepUelS

S3l. Y~ 3allS aNY Sl.nOdS 3~HYH:>Sla


1<i::1
contina~
DISCHARGE
SPOUT

,,'
"'c

If:''
STANDARD

r B-1

I--A
DISCHARGE

STANDARD
SPOUT

C,,""OFOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
!~~~-
1

DISCHARGE
~~

Lj..

SPOUT
WITHHANDSLIDE.
T
L !::.1cc

~-1

FLUSHENDDISCHAltGE
SPOUT

Dimensions shown ore approximote. Request certified prints for instollation.


Note: See Bolt Requirement Section for discharge flange bolt pattern.

4
16-14 go. 14go 880-416 2 SDH-416 6 SFD-416 1
12 go. 12 go 880-412 3 7 SFD-412
SDH-412 2
16-14-12 14 880-616 4 SDH-616 11 SFD-616 3
6
10-3/16 12 880-612 6 SDH-612 13 SFD-612 5
9 14-12-10 14 880-914 8 SDH-914 18 SFD-914 6
3/16-1/4 10 880-912 13 SDH-912 22 SFD-912 10
10
14-12-10 12 880-1014 10 SDH-1014 21 SFD-1014 8
3/16-1/4 3/ 16 880-1010 16 SDH-1010 27 SFD-1010 12
12 12-10 12 880-1212 17 SDH-1212 36 SFD-1212 13
3/16-1/4 3/ 16 880-1207 29 SDH-1207 48 SFD-1207 22
14
12-10 12 880-1412 22 SDH-1412 46 SFD-1412 17
3/16-1/4 3/ 16 880-1407 38 SDH-1407 62 SFD-1407 29
16 12-10 12 880-1612 21 SDH-1612 49 SFD-1612 16
3fl6-1/4 3/ 16 880-1607 40 SDH-1607 68 SFD-1607 30
12-10 12 880-1812 32 SDH-1812 SFD-1812
18 69 23
3/16-1/4 3/ 16 880-1807 60 97 SFD-1807
SDH-1807 45
20 10 12 880-2012 40 SDH-2012 91 SFD-2012 30
3/16-1/4 3/ 16 880-2007 67 SDH-2007 118 SFD-2007 50
24 10 12 880-2412 52 SDH-2412 116 SFD-2412 39
3/16-1/4 3/ 16 880-2407 87 SDH-2407 151 SFD-2407 65

4 5 4-1/2 2-1/2 4-5/8 3-3/4 11


6 7 6 3-1/2 5-5/8 5 14
9 10 8 5 7-7/8 7-1/8 19
10 11 9 5-1/2 8-7/8 7-7/8 20
12 13 10-1/2 6-1/2 9-5/8 8-7/8 24
14 15 11-1/2 7-1/2 10-7/8 10-1/8 27
16 17 13-1/2 8-1/2 12 11-1/8 30
18 19 14-1/2 9-1/2 13-3/8 12-3/8 33
20 21 15-1/2 10-1/2 15 13-3/8 36
24 25 17-1/2 12-1/2 18-1/8 15-3/8 42

79
08

l l ~/1-61 tt l/l-9l 9/&-S l ~/l-ll Sl ~l


Ol II ~/I-LI If: l/l-S"9 9/&-&l ~/l-S l Il Ol
l/l-8l lIt-It ~/1-91 Sf: l/l-l9 9/&-~ l ~/l-.l 61 aL
l/l-9l lIt-at ~I lIt-Of: 9/l-ll
S"S" ~/l- l II 9L
l/l-Sl lIt-at .1 l/l-ll 9/l-0l
OS" ~/l-ll SI ~L
Sl lIt-at &1 l/l-~l l/l-~ 91l-9 ~/l-OI 1 lL
l lIt-at ~/I-II U 6 9ll-l 6 II OL
l/l-ll Ol II Ol 9 9/l-l 8 01 6
Ol 6 8 l/l-S l l/l-8l S 9 l 9

lBv dLOv~-::>as GVV VlJLOvl-:)OS 917 dLO~l-,jas lO17 ~LOvl-.:Jas 9~/ ~/1-91/E
Blv d~~v~-::>as S8 VlJl ~vl-:)OS 69 dl~~l-,jaS 09E ~l~vl-.:JaS 01
~l
l~
BB dLOO~-::>aS OS VlJLOOl-:)OS g dLOOl-,jaS S~E ~LOOl-.:JaS 9~/ ~/1-91/E
Lv d~ ~o~-::>as Ol
90 VlJl ~Ol-:)OS 9~ dl~Ol-,jaS all ~l~Ol-.:JaS l~ 01
6 dLOB~-::>aS SO VlJLOS~-:)OS 90 dLO8~-,jaS LLl ~LOB~-.:JaS 9~/ ~/1-91/E
96l d~~B~-::>aS v9G VlJl~S~-:)OS 69l dl~8~-,jaS ~l~B~-.:JaS Ol-ll
at
017l l~
Bvl dLO9~-::>aS L~G VlJLO9~-:)OS 9ll dLO9~-,jaS L6~ ~LO9~-.:JaS 9~/ ~/1-91/E
9L
6~l d~~9~-::>aS S8~ VlJl~9~-:)OS 66~ dl~9~-,jaS gg~ ~l~9~-.:JaS l~ Ol-ll
Bll dLOv~-::>as tOG VlJLOv~-:)OS LOl dLO~~-,jas 9S~ ~LOv~-.:Jas 9~/ ~/1-91/E
vOl vL
d~~v~-::>as 9L~ ~l~v~-:)OS 99~ dl~~~-,jas 09~ ~l~v~-.:Jas l~ Ol-ll
v6~ dLO~~-::>as vL~ ~LOl ~-:)OS 9L~ dLOl~-,jaS B9~ ~LOl~-.:JaS '9~/ ~/1-91/E
lL
9L~ d~ ~~~-::>as SS~ VlJl~l~-:)OS 09~ dl~l~-,jas ~17~ ~l~l~-.:JaS ll- Ol-ll
9~ dO~O~-::>as G~~ ~O ~O~-:)OS 17l~ dO~O~-,jas lO~ ~o~o~-.:Jas 91-/ ~/1-91/E
OL
Ll~ dv~O~-::>as L6 ~v ~O~-:)OS 9~~ d~~O~-,jas l6 ~v~o~-.:Jas l~ OI-ll-~1
~~~ dO~6-::>aS 68 VlJO~6-:)OS ~O~ dO~6-,jaS ~S ~O~6-.:JaS 01- ~I 1-91/E
O~ 6
dv~6-::>aS ~8 ~v ~6-:)OS 176 d~~6-,jaS 17L ~v~6-.:JaS vI- OI-ll-~1
vL d~~9-::>aS GS VlJl ~9-:)OS L9 dl~9-,jaS L17 ~l~9-.:JaS l~ 91/E
L "eo v~ 9
d9~9-::>aS ~S VlJ9~9-~aS 99 d9~9-,jaS 917 ~9~9-.:JaS 'D60L-lL-~L-91

SlROdS J9HYH)SIO

I"D~UDU!~UO~I~~
~contin~~
DISCHARGE
SPOUTS

Dimensionsshownore opproximote. Requestcertified prints for instlJllotion.


Note: See Bolt RequirementSection for dischargeflange bolt patterr .

6 16.14.12go. 16 ga. SGF-616M 31 SGF-616P


10.3f16 12 51 SGC-616M 26 SGC-616P 49
SGF-612M 32 SGF-612P
14.12.10 14 SGF-914M 47
55 SGC-612M 27 SGC-612P 52
9 SGF-914P 67 SGC-914M 41 SGC-914P
3f16.1f4 10 SGF-910M 57 SGF-910P
63
79 SGC-910M 53 SGC-910P
14.12.10 14 SGF-1014M 61 SGF-1014P
77
10 84 SGC-1014M 58 SGC-1014P
3f16.1f4 10 SGF-1010M 66 SGF-1010P
84
88 SGC-1010M 62 SGC-1010P
12
12.10 12 SGF-1212M 93 SGF-1212P 112
86
SGC-1212M 71 SGC-1212P
3f16.1f4 3/16 SGF-1207M 103 SGF-1207P
92
121 SGC-1207M 86 SGC-1207P
12.10 12 SGF-1412M J15 SGF-1412P
106
14 140 SGC-1412M 82 SGC-1412P
3f16.1f4 3/16 SGF-1407M 117 SGF-1407P
110
141 SGC-1407M 101 SGC-1407P
12.10 12 SGF-1612M 117 SGF-1612P
125
16 148 SGC-1612M 90 SGC-1612P
3f16.1f4 3/16 SGF-1607M 132 SGF-1607P
124
160 SGC-1607M 111 SGC-1607P
12.10 12 SGF-1812M 155 142
18 SGF-1812P 184 SGC-1812M 129 SGC-1812P
3f16.1f4 3/16 SGF-1807M 161
172 SGF-1807P 203 SGC-1807M 156 SGC-1807P 190
10 12 SGF-2012M 180
20 SGF-2012P 217 SGC-2012M 144 SGC-2012P
3f16.1f4 3/16 SGF-2007M 191 SGF-2007P
185
226 SGC-2007M 176 SGC-2007P
10 12 SGF-2412M 214
24 223 SGF-2412P 262 SGC-2412M 187 SGC-2412P 230
3f16.1f4 3/16 SGF-2407M 250 SGF-2407P 286 SGC-2407M 230 SGC-2407P 270

6 7 6 5 16-1/2 8-1/2 9-1/4 9-13~16


9 10 8 7-1/8 20 10 11-1/2 11-15/16
10 11 9 7-7/8 20-1/2 11 11 12-11/16
12 13 10-112 8-7/8 23-1/2 12-1/2 12-1/2 13-11/16
14 lS 11-112 10-1/8 24-1/2 13-1/2 13-3/4 14-15/16
16 17 13-112 11-1/8 26-1/2 14-1/2 14-1/2 15-15/16
18 19 14-112 12-3/8 30-1/2 16 16 17-3116
20 21 15-112. 13-3/8 33-1/2 17 17-1/2 18-1/4
24 2S 17-112 15-3/8 39-1/2 19 23-1/2 20-7/8

.
81
'l9

.Ll5noJ~ edA~
n pJepUe~S e U!LI~!M peJ!nbeJ S! uo!~~es SSOJ~ Jelnqn~ e sselun
JOAeAUO~ lO LI~5uel eJ !~ue ue JeAO pesn wapleS eJe AeLl.l .sJepeel
MeJ~S U! ~eIU! eLl~ Je~le AI~~eJ!p eilleq e se JO SJOAeAUO~ MeJ~S
peU!I~u! U! se LI~ns suO!~e~!ldde JOl Uo!~~es SSOJ~Jelnqn~ e e~eeJ~
O~Ll5noJ~ pJepue~s e ep!su! ~!l O~ peu5!sep eJe SJeAO~ pnOJLlS

:SJaAO:) pnOJ4S

'Slu!of J8AO~ 84lle SS8Ul469 J84le8M J!84l 8Se8J~U!


Ol su8ueq 4l!M p8!lddns 8Je A841'U09!Sod U! padwel~ 81660l JO p8d
-wel~ M8J~S 'P8l10q 8Je PUg 6U98)fSe6 4l!M P84S!UJn1 AlleWJOU 8Je
A841'MOUS JO u!eJ P84S Ol J8lU8~ 84l U! p8)fe8d 8Je PUg S8P!S 4loq
UO UMOp p86uel1 8Je A841"SS8Ul469 J84le8M 10 88J68p 46!4 e 6u!
-J!nb8J SU0ge~!ldde JOOPlnO J01 P8PU8lU! 8Je SJ8AO~ 100J d!H

:SJaAO~ jOO~ d!H

.s~U!Or JeJ\o:)
aLl~ ~B sua~~Bq JO asn aLl~ Ll6noJLI~ aJ\!~:)aJJa aJOW uaJ\a paJapuaJ
aq UB3 LI:)!LlM sSaU~Ll6!~ JaLl~BaM pUB ~snp J!aLll a:)uBLlUa O~ 6U!~
-a)jsB6 LI~!M pa!lddns aq UB:) AaLl.l .Ll6noJ~ paJBIJ B JaJ\o ~!J AIJad
-OJd O~ JapJO U! Jap!M aJB AaLl~ ~BLI~U! SJaAO:) IBUO!~UaJ\uo:) WOJJ
AIUO JaJJ!p pUB ~BIJ pUB pa6UBIJ-!WaS 'pa6UBIJ 'SaIA~S 6u!pe:)aJd
aLl~ JO aaJLI~ liB U! paLlS!UJnJ aq ABW SLl6noJ~ paJBIJ JOJ SJeJ\o~

:SJaAO~ 46noJ.l paJel~

'sedA~ 6u!p
-e~eJd e4~ ue4~ p!6!J ssel 4~nw eJe Ae4~ se6uel~ ~o >t~el J!e4~ o~
ana .peJ!nbeJ OS~! pe~e>tse6 eq ue~ JeJ\eMo4 ~46!~ ~snp JO Je4~eeM
peJap!suo~ ~ou aJe 'sdwel~ 6u!Jds 4~!M uo!~~unrUo~ U! AI!Jew!Jd
pasn eJe Aa4.1 .sa6pa pa6uel~ aJ\e4 ~ou op Aa4~ ~e4~ uo!~da~xa
a4~ 4~!M SJa/\o~ 6u!pa~aJd OM~ a4~ o~ Jel!w!s aJe SJaJ\o~ ~el::l
:SJaAo:) lel.:t

'slu!of Jal\o:) a4lle suaueq 6u!sn


Aq paSeaJ:)U! aq ue:) sSaul46!l Je4leaM pUB lSnp J!e4l 'S46noJl
pa6uel! 4l!M S\;j 'Sla>jse6!o esn a4l Aq pa:)ue4ua SSaUl46!l
Ja4leaM pUB lSnp J!a4l al\e4 ue:) pUB paJ!nbaJ aJe sdwel:)
adAl 6U!JdS aJe4M SUO!le:)!ldde U! pesn eJe Ae4.L "Al!P!5!J pUB
4l5uaJlS Sl! a:)ue4ua Ol Sap!S 4l0q uo padw!J:) Al145!IS AIUOS! 006
le 5u!eq !O pealSU! 4:)!4M a5uel! a4l!O uO!lda:)xa a4l 4l!M SJal\o:)
pe5uel! Ol sl:)adsaJ lie U! le:)!luap! aJe SJel\o:) pa5uel!-!Was
:SJaAO:) pa6uel.i-!Was
'sdwel:)
al550l JO sdwel:) MeJ:)S 'Slloq 4l!M a:)eld U! peJn:)as aq ue:)
Aa4.L "Slu!of Jal\o:) lie le pasn aq PlnO4s sualleq SSaUl45!llSnp
eleldwo:) JO.::l "A:)ua!:)!!!e J!a4l aseaJ:)u! Ol pala>jse5 aq ue:) pUB
SSaUl45!llSnp pUB Je4leaM poo5 eP!l\oJd Aa4.L "ap!s 4:)ea UO ,,0/
AlaleW!xoJdde Jal\O 006 le e5pe UMOp peUJnl e aleJodJo:)u! pUB
Jal\o:) JOAeI\UO:)pasn AIUOWWO:)lSOWa4l aJe SJal\o:) pa5uel.::l
:SJaAO:) pa6uel.i

SH3J\O:> H~nOH.l
r<i:T
contin~~ FLANGED SEMIFLANGE
COVERS \\r-~ B--~
L
.I
--::
u;--::
:: T
LT ~ ::-14!!~
II
_-13
Iii
4! L-T

A
FLAT FLAREDTROUG,H
C--:- B --~
Iii
41
II
T iLi
!!
.L
r I \\
L!I
LT ~ II
I

C
Dimensionsshownore opproximote. Requestcertified prints for installation.

4 16 go SCF-416 2.0 SCM-416 2.0 SCL-416 1.6 - 8 7-1/4


6 .16 SCF-616 2.4 SCM-616 2.4 SCL-616 2.0 SCV-616 3.9 10-1/2 9-3/4 17-3/8
9 .16 SCF-916 3.2 SCM-916 3.2 SCL-916 3.0 SCV-916 5.0
14 SCF-914 4.0 SCM-914 4.0 SCL-914 3.5 SCV-914 5.9 14 13-1/4 22
10 .16 SCF-1016 3.4 SCM-1016 3.4 SCL-1016 3.2
14 SCF-1014 4.9 SCM-1014 4.9 SCL-1014 3.7 15 14-1/4
12 .14 SCF-1214 5.0 SCM-1214 5.0 SCL-1214 4.5 SCV-1214 7.4
12 SCF-1212 7.1 SCM-1212 7.1 SCL-1212 6.2 SCV-1212 10.6 18 17-1/4 27
14 .14 SCF-1414 5.6 SCM-1414 5.6 SCL-1414 5.0 SCV-1414 7.9
12 SCF-1412 7.8 SCM-1412 7.8 SCL-1412 7.0 SCV-1412 11.1 20 19-1/4 29
16 .14 SCF-1614 6.1 SCM-1614 6.1 SCL-1614 5.5 SCV-1614 9.0
12 SCF-1612 8.5 SCM-1612 8.5 SCL-1612 7.7 SCV-1612 12.5 22 21-1/4 33
18 .12 SCF-1812 10.0 SCM-1812 10.0 SCL-1812 8.8 SCV-1812 14.5
10 SCF-1810 12.4 SCM-1810 12.4 SCL-1810 11.3 SCV-1810 18.0 25 24-1/4 37
20 .12 SCF-2012 10.5 SCM-2012 10.5 SCL-2012 9.8 SCV-2012 15.8
10 SCF-2010 13.4 SCM-2010 13.4 SCL-2010 12.3 SCV-2010 19.5 27 26-1/4 40
24 .12 SCF-2412 11.8 SCM-2412 11.8 SCL-2412 11.0 SCV-2412 17.0
10 SCF-2410 15.2 SCM-2410 15.2 SCL-241 0 15.2 SCV-241 0 21.8 31 ;30-1/4 46
.= StandardGauge

HIP ROOF SHROUD

Dimensionsshownore opproximote Request certified prints for instollotion.

4 .16 go SCH-416 2.1 3.6 8 5/8 5 3-5/8


SCD-416 1-1/4
6 .1 16 SCH-616 2.6 4.6 10-1/2 3/4 7 4-1/2
SCD-616 1-1/4
9 .1 16 SCH-916 3.4 SCD-916 6.3 14
114 4.3 1-1/8 10 6-1/8 1-1/2
SCH-914 SCD-914 8.0
10
.1 6 SCH-1016 3.7 SCD-1016 7.0
14 15 1-1/4 11 6-3/8 1-1/2
SCH-1014 4.6 SCD-1014 8.5
.1 4 SCH-1214 5.4 10.5
12 SCD-1214 18 1-3/8 13 7-3/4 2
12 SCH-1212 7.5 14.6
SCD-1212
14
1 4 SCH-1414 6.0 SCD-1414 12.0
12 20 1-3/8 15 9-1/4 2
SCH-1412 8.4 SCD-1412 16.7
01 4 SCH-1614 6.5 14.3
16 SCD-1614 22 1-3/4 17 10-5/8 2
12 SCH-1612 9.1 19.8
SCD-1612
01 2 SCH-1812 10.8 25.0
18 SCD-1812 25 2 19 12-1/8 2-1/2
10 SCH-1810 13..3 30.6
SCD-1810
.1 2 SCH-2012 11.6 25.3
20 SCD-2012 27 2-1/4 21 13-1/2 2-1/2
10 SCH-2010 14.3 SCD-2010 30.2
24 .1 2 SCH-2412 12.7 SCD-2412 28.6
31 2-5/8 25 16-1/2 2-1/2
10 SCH-2410 J6.3 SCD-241 0 36.8

.= Standard Gauge

83
va

liD~UDUI~UO~ I:i>~

"sez!s 46noJ~ SnO!JeA


JO! eJnsseJd 6u!P104 !O ~uew~snfpe e~!u!!u! JO! sMolle elPu!ds
elqe~snfpe U'v' "leAOWeJ pepedw!un 6U!MOlle AqeJe4~ JeAO~ e4l
Jeel~ o~ 006 ~no s~oA!d Jeq UMOp Pl04 e4.1 '46noJ~ JOAeAUO~ e4~ o~
eseq J!e4~!0 ~UOJ!JOdo~ e4~ 6u!PleM Aq pelle~Su! eJe Ae4.1"peJ!nbeJ
eJe uo!~~e 6u!dwel~ eA!~!sod pUB JO!Je~U!46noJ~ e4~ O~A~!I!q!SSe~~e
>t~!nb Ue4M SJeAO~ 6u!4~ee JO! pesn eJe sdwel~ e1660.1

:sdwel:> ;)1660J.

.seJ~ue~ ,,9~ uo peuo!~!sod AllenSn eJe Ae4~ ese~ 4~!4M


u1 sSeU~46!~ Je4~eeM Je~eeJ6 JO~ 6u!~e)jse6 4~!M uo!~~unfuo~
u! pesn eq ue~ Ae4.l .uo!~eJedo J!e4~ epedw! pinOM ~e4~ e6uel~
elqnop e4~ o~ enp S46noJ~ e6uel~ pewJo~ uo pesn eq ~ouue~
Ae4~ UO!~~e 6u!dwel~ J!e4~ ~o eJn~eu e4~ o~ ena .e6uel~ 46noJ~
JO JeAO~ 46noJ~ e4~ o~ pe~loq JO pe~eA!J eJe pUB lee~s e6ne6
AAee4 ~o pe~e~!Jqe~ eJe Ae4.l .uo!~!sod U! SJeAO~ pe6uel~-!WeS
JO ~el~ PIO4 o~ pesn AIUOWWO~ eJe sdwel~ JeAO~ edA~ 6u!JdS

:sdwel~ 6U!JdS

'seJ~ue~ ,,9 ~ uo peuo!~!sod pUB DU!~e)jSeD 4~!M


UO!~~UnrUo~ U! pesn eq Pln04s Ae4~ sSeU~4D!~ Je4~eeM pUB ~snp 10
eeJDep e ~Jedw! o~ 8Je Ae4~ 11.uo!~!sod U! JeAO~ e4~ sPl04 peUe~4D!~
u84M ~e4~ MeJ~S qwn4~ e 10 ~S!SUO~ Ae4.i 'peJ!nbeJ S! Jo!Je~u!
4DnOJ~ e4~ o~ sse~~e )j~!nb ue4M uo!~!sod U! SJeAO~ 10 sedA1lle DU!
-u!e~eJ 10 sueew eA!~~e11e ~eA eldw!s e ep!AoJd sdwel~ MeJ~S

:sdwel:> M8J:>S

.SUO!~B~!lddB ~45!~ .le4~BeM


pUB ~snp U! esn .101 pepue~u! ~OU e.lB Ae4~ lepow 5U!pe3e.ld e4~
4~!M sv 's.leJ\o~ ~BIJ pUB pe5UBIJ-!WeS 4~!M esn .lJ e5pe 5U!dd!.l5
.leMO.l.lBU B e~B.lod.lO~U! Ae4~ ~B4~ uo!~de~xe e4~ 4~!M dWBI~ JO edA~
5u!pe~e.ld e4~ O~ eld!~u!.ld 5U!~B.ledo pUB eZ!S U! IB~!~Uep! e.lV

:sdwel~ asealau )f:>!"O JaAO~ lel~

'suO!~e~!ldde ~Ll6!~ JeLl~eeM


pUB ~snp uou U! UO!~!SOd U! SJeAO~ 6U!PIOLI ~O pOLl~ew eA!~~e~~e
ue eJe AeLll. .dsel~ eSeeleJ >t~!nb e Aq peu!of dwel~ pe~e>tse6
e~e!d OM~ e ~O ~S!SUO~ AeLll. .SLl6noJ~ e6uel~ peWJO~ pUB SJeAO~
Ll6noJ~ pe6uel~ LI~!M pesn AIUOWWO~ eJe edA~ S!LI~ ~O sdwel~

:sdwel:> asealau )t:>!"O

SH3N3.lSV~H3J\O:>
COYERFASTENERS
QUICKRELEASECLAMPS

SPRINGCLAMPS

Dimensions stlown ore approximate.


Request certil:ied prints for instollation.

Normal spacing2'-6"

16to12 SCG-1L SCG-1R 1/4 1/8 9/32


10t03/16 SCG-2L SCG-2R 5/16 3/16 3/8

SCREW CLAMPS

I
A
Dimensions shown ore opproximate.
-1 ~
Request certified prints for installation.

T Normol spocing2'-6"

Flangedcovers SCW-1 1
All sizes, 4 to 24
Flatcovers SCW-2 9/16

Dimensions shown are approximate.

i \ Request certified prints for installation.


.~

Normol spacin!J5'-0"

85

.a
98

'SlIoq UJOM JO Iueq pUB sel04 1I0q jO 6u!UepiM JOj I:>edsu! 01 paMO/le aq /snw ..~o/; 10 a:>ueJeal:> WnW!U!W 'V "aJnl!el I.IJea U! ~lnSaJ
Alle:>!po!Jed peAOWeJ eq slloq 6u!ldno:> le4~ pepuewwo:>eJ S! I! 'UOil:>eUuO:> PlnOM ~e4~ speol ~snJ4~ 6u!JJalSUeJ~ pUB s6u!Jeaq Ja6ue4 6U!~:>~uO:> wall
JOAeAUO:> pUB lIe4s eA!Jp e~ Ie pe!WSUeJI S! enbJOIISe46!4 e41 e:>u!s ad!d MaJ:>s a4~ ~uaAaJd O~SJol.aAUO:> 6uo! U! ~u~odw! I.IJeln:>!lJed S! S!41
"uo!~eJado 6u!Jnp peal ~snJ4~ IInl Japun awnsse plnoM l.a4~ uo!~!sod a4~
':>Ie 's6u!Jeeq jO UOil!PUO:> U! I.lIeU!pn~!6uOI suo!~:>as MaJ:>S Jol.aAuo:> a4~ sa:>eld pUB a:>ueJeal:> al04
'e6pe JelnO e411e sseU>I:>!~ 146ill 'slu!od e6Je4:>S!p pUB e>lejUI :>I:>e4:> ~Ioq 6u!ldno:> o~ anp ..>I:>els.. lie SaAOWaJ S!41 "pua a6Je4:>S!p a4~ WOJll.eMe
01 swell luejJodWI 'slueuodwo:> pe6ewep JO JeeM eA!Sse:>xe JOj Aile:> SMaJ:>S palqwasse lie a:>Jol 'a:>eld U! 6u!Jeaq Ja6ue4 4:>ea 6u!~loq aJOl~
-!pOiJed welsAs JOAeAuo:> e411:>edsui 01 e:>!I:>eJd po06 sl II -UO!I:>adsul
NOI.lnV:)
'uO!le:>IJqnl eJinbeJ
~OU op s6UiJeeq :>!ISeld jO sedAi Auew pUB pe:>ejJns-pJe4 'UOJi-pJe4 'pOOM
peleu6eJdwi-110 'ezuoJq peleu6eJdw!-el!4deJ6 'ezuoJq peleu6eJdw!-I!O "b'U!SnOIlBill OII./!JI1JOdWBI
JBb'UI1I1I/Oq PUI1 b'U!JI1BqJBb'UI1I1lIb'nOJIII /JI1I1Sb'u!/dno:J Bill lJBSU/ "9
'sUOil!PUO:> 6u!leJedo e41 pUB pelPue4
6u!eq le!JeleW e41 uo puedep lue:>!Jqnl jO ectAl pUB A:>uenbeJj e4.l 'UO!I "Sl/oq b'u!/dno:J uBlllb'!l
-e:>!Jqnl :>!po!Jed eJinbeJ AileJeue6 s6u!Jeeq UO!I:>!JjjO ectAl Je410 JO !qqea "UO!I:JB~ MBJ:JS ISJ!I Bill 10 pUB Bl!SOddO Bill DIU! /JI1I1S b'u!/dno:J lJaSU/ "g

'pe6ewep ",J/, I.q 6u!SnO4 a4l ~Owouoq


eq hew slees e41 se 'e~e:>!Jqnl JeAO IOU op '~ue:>!Jqnl pepuewwo:>eJ e a4l SJl1al:JM9J:JS JOA9AUO:J94lll14l 9JnS 9q OSIV .SpU9 9d!d JOA9AUO:J
esn 01 eJns eq 'peJ!nbeJ sl s6u!Jeeq JellOJ JO Ileq jO uolle:>!Jqnl ue4M 94l PUI1spua 6u!SnO4 94l u9aMlaq p9J!nb9J S! 9:JUI1JB91:J,,'/~ Ol ,,"j, V
'~uew~edea 6u!Jeeu!6u3 s,leIUeU!~Uo~ JO ejep UO!le:>!Jqnl s,JeJnj:>ej
"Sl46!1~94l ~O9P!S 6U!fi.JJI1:J
-nuew 6u!Jeeq e41l1nsuo:> 'SUO!lepUewwo:>eJ UO!le:>!Jqnl :>!j!:>eds Jo:j IBIJ9lBW 94l 9l!SOddO 9q Pln04S 6U!l46!1~ 94l uo s6nl 6u!lJoddns 941
'peJ!nbeJ eq uo!~e:>!Jqnl
Ple!J Pln04s s6u!~~!J uo!~e:>!Jqnl Jo UO!I!ppe e4~ JOj ep!AoJd SI!Un
.lNV.lHOdWI
4:>ns 'uO!le:>!Jqnl Ple!J luenbesqns eJ!nbeJ IOU hew pUB eJ!1 JOj pelees
hllUenbeJJ eJe 's6u!Jeeq pue pUB sJe6ue4 JoJ 4~oq 's~!un 6u!Jeeq IIe8
'Sl/oq
ou!ldno:1 LfI!M aJn:1as 'pua ad!d Jol.al\uo:1 aLfI DIU! ueLfs al\!Jp JO pua
aLfI OU!dd!lS 'OU!SnOLf aLfI U! UO!I:1aS MaJ:1S Jol.aI\UO:1ISJ!1 aLfI a:1e/d 'p
lOU Op 4:)!4M ~o ewos pUB UOne:)!Jqnl eJ!nbeJ 4:)!4M ~Oewos 's6u!Jeeq
~OsedAl SnOJeWnU eZ!lnn },ew we~s},s Jo},elluo:) MeJ:)S 'v' -UO!~e:)!Jqnl 'SMaJ:1S laS UaILfO!IIOU 00 'OU!JeaqaLfI U! IleLfs al\!JpJO pua aLfll1aSu/ 'f:

3~N'V'N3.lNI'V'W 'OU!Jeeq ISnJLfI


pue ale/d pUB OU!SnOLf aLfI a/qwesse 'peleUO!Sep S! pua ISnJLfII/ 'l

03)f:)3H:) N338 SVH IN3ViN~IlV lllNn 1:13MOd lln~ A lddV 'pUB a6Je4:1SiP
ION 00 AI!JeJU8WOW J8MOd AlddE 'PUE4 Aq D!J!UJnl l!q!40Jd W81SAS e4~ ~e u!6eq Pln04s I.lqwesse '~!Un 6u!Jeeq ~SnJ4t e eJ!nbeJ ~OU seop
841 ~o 14D!8M PUE 8Z!S 841 ~I lU8WUD!IE8J 8J!nb8J AEW SJ8DUE4 'sJn:>:>o we~s~s elj~ II 'pUB ~SnJlj~ elj~ ~e U!6eq S~eMle PlnoljS ~lqweSSeJO~eIlUO:1 'v'
DU!PU!q ~I lU8WUD!IE )j:J84:> 01 PUE4 Aq JOA8I\UO:J 841 UJnl '8lQ!Ssod ~I
3.LON
.LNV.LtJOdWI
'Sl/oq a6ueJj ua11l6,1 ualll
"paJ!nbaJ J! SDU!Jeaq alea!Jqnl of:L 'li/laajJad saul/JalUaa wolloq 6uIsnoll alII/BAal pue u61/V 'Sl/oq ua11l6,1
IOU 00 'Ii/asoo/ sa6ueJj pUB aliI laauuoQ '6uIMeJp JO sJfJew lIalew
"DU!SnOLI aLII 6uIsn 'aauanbas JadoJd Jlalll ul suollaas 6uIsnoll JOliaAUOa aliI aae/d ./.
01 pua aLlllloq pue yeLls aLII 01 DU!Jeaq pua pue pua DU!SnOLI aLII Llaell'v' "Z L
A1aW3SSV
"Slloq Du!/dnoa
Llaelle pue uO!laaS MaJaS lsel aLII DIU! yeLls a/l!Jp JO pua leu!J aLillJasul "L L
J8!JJe:> 84~ 4~!M AI8~e!peWW!
"UO!laaS MaJaS Jol.a/luoa Llaea JOJ sdalS Du!paaaJd aLilleadal:J "OL P81!18q Pln04s w!e!:> e '~!sueJ~ u! p8Bewep AI8J8A8S 8Je s~u8uodwo:> AUe II

"pua lalu! aLII pJeMOl SuO!laaS MaJaS aLII DU!aJOJ Jaye UO!laaS puoaas aLII W8~SAS JOA8AUO:> e 10 81!1 8:>!/IJ8S 84~
JO pua ad!d aLII pue DU!Jeaq JaDUeLi aLII uaaMlaq aaueJea,a ,}o/, aLII Molle pU8~X8 Alle!~UB!csqns ue:> 8Bewep JOU!W O~UO!~U8"e AIJe3 PI8!1 84~ U! AI!Se8
01 aJns a8 "Slloq Du!/dnoa aLII 01 pua al!soddo aLII Llaell'v' "Slloq Du!/dnoa peJ!ed8J 8q Allensn ue:> 8Bewep JOU!VIJ 8Bewep JOI ~:>8dSU! pUB S~U8W
Lll!M aJnaas pue uO!laaS Jol.a/luoa puoaas aLII U! yeLls Du!/dnoa e lJasul "6 -n:>op BU!dd!4S 4~!M s~u8uodwo:> lie >1:>84:>.JOA8AUO:> 84~ 10 ~d!8:>8J uodn

"DU!SnOLI aLII 01- 3.l0N


sa,Due lLlD!J Ie S! JaDUeLi aLilleLil aJns a8 "Slloq JaDUeLllSJ!J aLII ualLlD!l "8
"suO!~elle~su!
"yeLls a/l!Jp JO pua lSJ!J aLillSU!eDe I.IWJ!J SMaJaS las DU!Jeaq pua ualLlD!l "L 4:>ns JO~ Allenp!"!pU! paJapJO aq ~snw s~loq Alqwasse Ja4~o pUB
6u!ldno~ "Alqwasse pUB ~uawu6!le O~UO!~Ua~~eIn~aJe:>aJOW aJ!nbaJ
pa>lJeW-4:>~eW pUB palqwasse dO4S uaaq 10U a"e4 4:>!4M SJOAa"UO~
"pesn eq Plno4s 9~ "ON se 4:>ns sJe6
-ue4 edli1,uo!suedxe 'Sle!Je~ew eJn~eJedwe'46!4 o~ ~:>erqnsSJOAelluo:> "S~loq 6u!pnl:>U! 's~uauodwo:> AJeSsa:>au
Jo,j "ep!s 4:>ee uo Allenbe pep!lI!p eq Plno4s spue ed!d pue 6u!Jeeq lie apnl:>u! osle s~!un palqwasse-do4S "aw!1 uo!~elle~su! ssal aJ!nbaJ
Je6ue4 e4~ ueeMleq e:>ueJeel:> elqel!elle e4"SJOAelluo:J elq!sJelleJ Jo,j pUB Pia!! a4~ U! alqwasse O~Ja!sea aJe Aa4~ '~uawd!4S aJo!aq pa>lJew
-4:>~ew pUB pau6!le-aJd aJe SJOAa"uo:> palqwasse-do4S a:>u!s
"PUS sd!d pUB 6u!Jesq Js6ue4 S41 USSMISq s:>UeJeSI:> 6u!uunJ
SSJ! AIUO 41!M pUS ISIU! S41 pJeMOI Js6ue4 S416U!AOW Aq SP!S ISIU! S41 uo "Pla!~a4~ U! P8"!~ pUB pau6!le aJe 4:>!4M s~uauodwo:>
s:>ueJesl:> Molle 01 JS~SJd SJSsn SWOS "s6Je4:>S!p JOASAUO:> S411SSJeSU lenp!"!pu! Aq JO pa>lJeUJ-4:>~eUJpUB P8lqUJasse-do4s uaaq se4 4:>!4M
SP!S S41 UO 6u!Jesq Js6ue4 S41 pUB pUS sd!d JOASAUO:> S41 USSMlsq ~!un a~aldwo:> e se Ja4~!a pa4s!uJn~ aq AeUJ UJa~SAsJOAa"uo:> MaJ:>s V

3:>N'VN3.lNI'VII\I18 NOI.l'Vll'V.lSNI
87
99

%9 %9 -,,/; 8.1.9 8/.9 l%l~ ~,~~ 0/,91- 9/s ~I. vl


9'/,,9 91/'19 ~o/~~ 8Y~~9 ./.9 l%l~ 9'/r.~~ 0/,1- 9/s 01. Ol
o/LS %S '~/s~l %g 8~.S l%l~ ~~ 8;'~1- % 01. 81.

%9 0/1: %9 %9 %~ O~ %01 % a 91.

91/sIS 8'.1.,g 8;';S -"h'~ 9'Is,s ./,6 0/. a vI.


9yS 'IL 8'/,V 8';';S 0/,1. 9~,L t/&L 0/. a ll.

9/1~ "IL~l 8'!tV 0/. ~,~ %g 81&9 9ft a 01.

~ '~.lel tk 8/.V ~
""'I. "/,g 8/,9 % a 6
~o/~l
~
8'/,V 'I.v lf, I. 9'1t~ o/,~ % 9 9
".Ie~ 8J, '1. ,/, I. 0/, % % 9 v

'UO!JSIISJSU! JO! sJu!Jd pe!!!JJa~ Jsanbel:l 'eJsw!xoJdds eJS UMO4S SUO!SUew!o

S3~NV1~H~nOH.1-n
SNH3l.l Vd .1108 3~NV1~
-[~~~~~ ~ I ~UO~I;}) I
~
TUBULAR TROUGH FLANGES

- --
~t-. -,
V'~g
'--::
C
4A
/:-O-"'O~

\ ~
'" o:::::.?.
--c
~ 01
g
1,0 /. ...;.o-O,~
0

'-:::O.=.?:'.~
6 BOL'-S 8 BOLTS 10 BOLTS 12 BOL'-S

DISCHARGE SPOUT FLANGES

ALL 4 SIDES DRILLED ALIKE

Dimensions shown are approximate. Request certified prints for installation.

4 12 '/4 5 7Y2 2% 2'/4 0/8

9
6 12
12
0/8 7 10 2'0/,8 3 'Y'8 ~
0/8 10 13 4 4
10 12 0/8 11 14V4 45h8 40/8 %
12 12 0/8 13 171/4 5'1a 5'/4 %
14 20 15 191/4
0/8 3% 3'/2 3'/2 %
16 20 0/8 17 21V4 30/4 4 4 1f8
18
20
20 Y2

Y2
19 24V4
~ 40/8 40/8 1%
20 21 26'/4 47ja 40/4 40/4 1%
24 20 25
'12 30V4 5% 50/8 5,/~ 1Y8

89
06

%5 snu!w JO snld s! 146!"M U! SUO!IB!JB/I "lq!SS!WJ"d), SUOllelJell 9:JUeJ91011l1W pJepUelS OII:J9[qnsy


peSo hIUOWWO:J IOU Inq pelSl1 9Je S921S9S941.

v~v.~l glS' gLS.9 9l9'S ,,8


6l0.9 glS' gLS.g 9l9'L "L 'I' &"09~ UC"~ ~~"O~
09 ~ .g ~98' L6S.v ogL"~~ ..l~
9l9'9 ,,9 9~~ 9~J."~ oog'S ogL"O~ ..O~
~99.B agl' 90.v &99'9 ,,9 69"'L 9()6' ~S'9 9~9"8 ..8
Og"~ au' OW' OOO.g ,.l/~-v 'I' 0&"9, B~L' 6S~'S
~v9.l~ ~g~.
9~9"9 ..9
~l9' oog.p "v 96"Z& 9~9' ~'v 99"9 ..9
oge.~~
eg.e~
99'
009'
S~L~
OO'~
OOO.p
OOg.&
..l/~-1:
"I:
~9"ZZ
Z&"'~
~&9"
LCY'
8." OOg"y ..~
~9G cog" ..
969"~ 199' ~LL.~ 9LS"l ,.l/~-Z ~O"O~ 9LC" 9l~'l 9L8"~ .Z/~'l
6~O.6 9~' og.~ 9L&"l ..l "'"L CYC" 689'~ 9L"~
eOv"g oo~. OO~.~ 006.~ .l/~-~ 69S", ~B~' 8'~ 006"~
.Z
.Z/~..~
v~~.g let. 96S. 099'~ "v/~-~ 99& 09~' 9~'~ 099"~ ..~/~.~
699. Qg' 66g. g~&.~ ,,~ VVS"Z 09~" g~S' g~.~ ..~
Ovv"~ 80'~6l' vv. 09O'~ ..vll: L&6"~ B~~' .~9' ogo"~ ..~/
v~l"~ ~g~. OVS' ..l/~ ,O&'~ LB~' 00.' ove" ..l/~

3dld 133J.5 AAV3H VHJ.X3 31BnOa 3dld 133.lS 09~ 31nO3H:>S


g~p"g9 oor;" ogl"~~ o!;l"~~ ..U
gLO"09 OOg" ogl"O~ o!;l"~~ ..~~ ~
gCL"pg oor;" ogl"6 o!;l"O~ ..O~
BlL"BV OOg" S~9"6
9~9'8 ..6 ~
BB"Cp OOg" 9~9'l S~9"S ..8 ~go88 L89' 9l"~~ ogL"~~ ..Zl.
SVO"B oor;" 9~9'9 S~9"l ..l ~ 1:1:~9 E69' VW"6 ogL"O~ ..01.
CLg"Bl lCv" ~9l"9 S~9"9 ..9 61:1:~ cog' 9~9"l 9~9"9 ..8
BLL"Ol gLC" &~8'v CGG'S ..g"~/~-v Lgo8l lEv' ~9l"9 9~9"9 ..8
~9"L~ ggC" 06~'v OOO'S ~ 8L"Ol 9LE' ~S"" &99"9 ..!i
B6"p~ OOS"v ..v
~gG~
LCC" 9~8"& 86~~ LEE' 9ZS" OOg"y ..~
8~C" VOC"& OOO"v "~/~-I: ~gol~ 8~E' 'VOC" OOO"y ..ZII.-&
gGO~ 00" 006'~ OOS'C ..& gloO~ 00' 006"~ OOg"& ..&
~99"L ga" &~&"~ SlS'~ "~/~-~ ~99L 9a' ~"~ 9l9"~ ..ZII.-Z
llO"g 8~l" 6&6'~ SlC'~ ..~ lloog 8~l' 66"~ 9l&"~ ..Z
~C9"C OOl" 009"~ 006"~ "~/~.~ ~1:91: DOl' oog"~ 006"~ ..ZII.-I.
L66G ~6~" 8l~'~ 099'~ ",/~.~ L66l ~6~' Sl~"~ 099"~ ..~/I.-I.
lL~G 6L~" 196" S~C'~ ..~ lL~ol 6L~' 196" g~&"~ ..1.
CLp"~ yg~" ~Vl" OSO'~ ..,/& ~L~o~ V9~' ~"l" ogO"~ ..~/&
LBO"~ Lv~" GY9" ave' ..~/~ 88Oo~ Lv~' 9"9" OVS" ..ZII.
BBL" 9l~"
6~~ "
&~V' Sl9' ..8/& 881:L" 9l~' ~"" 9l9" ..8/&
~gCg" ~O&' OvS" ..,/~ ~gl:go 6~~' ~O" Oyg" ..~/I.
gp~C" gSO" 9~~' SOv' g~~I: 960' 9~~"
..8/~ gOY" ..8/1.

3dld 133.lS AAV3H V~.lX3 3dld 133.lS 09 31nO3H:>S


99"6v 9L' OOO"~~ ogJ.G~ ..l~
gg"gv 9L' OOO"~~ ogJ..~~ ..~~ Jf.
8v"Ov 99' O~O"O~ OgJ..O~ ..o~
00" lYE' ~V6"B g~9.6 ..6 Jf.
99"8~ ll' ~B6"L g~9.B ..8 &9.&9 OOy' 86,~ OSl"U ..~~
L9"~ ~O' C~O"L g~9.J. ..l Jf. BY.OY 99. O~O'O~ OSl"O~ ..o~
L6"8~ Del' Sgo"9 g~9.9 ..8
LvO"S
69.Y~ LLZ. ~LO'8 9l9.8 ..S
~g"v~ GGl' gg.g ..9 L6'B~ OSl. 900'9 9lg.9 ..9
vg"~~ Lvl'Ll' goS"v OOO.g ..l/~-~ Jf.
OOL"O~
60~"6 9ll'
elO"v
evs"c
OOg.p
OOO.p
..~
.ol/~-E
~9'y~
6L'O~
60~'6
89l.
Ll.
Bll.
LVO'9
9~O"v
evg'
gg.g
OOg.p
OOO.p
...
..g

..~/~-t
9L9"L 9~l' 890"C OOg. ..E 9L9'L 9~l. 990" 009. ..C
6L"9 Ol' 69V"~ gJ.B.~ .ol/~-l &6L'9 Ol. 69v'~ 9/'8G ..~/~.~
99" v9~' Lgo"~ gJ..~ .ol &99'& vg~. LOO'~ g/'G ..~
8~L"~ gy~' O~9"~ 006'~ .ol/~.~ B~L'~
L~"~
9Y~. O~9'~ 006'~ ..~/~-~
Ov~' OBI:"~ 099.~ ..~/~.~ &L~'~ OY~. 08t"~ 099'~ .../~.~
8L9"~ ~. 6vO.~ g~.~ ..~ 6L9'~ ~. 6VO'~ g~.~
~~ . ~~. ..~
OC~ "~ v~B' OgO.~
ova.
..~/E ~&~'~ v~8' OSO'~ .../C
O~98" 60~' ~~9" .ol/~ O~9B' 60~. ~~9' ova. ..~/~
9Lgg" ~60' C6v" gJ.9. ..8/E 9LGG' ~60' 6v' g/.g' ..S/C
8v~v"
Lvv~"
880'
890'
V9"
69~"
OV!;.
gOp.
..~/~ 9V~y' 980. V9" Opg. .../~
..8/~ LYY~' 900. 69~" gOy. ..S/~

3dld 133l.S l.H~13M CH'VCN'Vl.S 3dld 133l.S O~ 31nC3H~S


M31:1:)S I:IOA3J\NO:) ~O A laW3SSV NI C3Sn A l1VWI:ION S3ZIS S3dld

.
SNOISN3WIO 18 ~SlH~13M
r@:1continantal.l_-

STANDARD SHEET GAUGES

8 11/64 .1644 6.875


9
.165 6.7320
5/32 .1495 6.250 .148 6.0384
10 9/64 .1345 5.625
11
.134 5.4672 5.781 1406
1/8 .1196 5.000 5.794 5.906
12
.120 4.8960 5.156 .1250
7/64 .1046 4.375 5.150 5;250
.109 4.4472 4.531 .1094
13 3/32 .0897 3.750 .095
4.506 4.594
14 3.8760 3.906 .0938
5/64 .0747 3.125 3.863 3.938
.083 3.3864 3.281 0781 3.219 3.281
15 9/128 .0673 2.812 .072 2.9376 2.969 .0703
16 1/16 0598 2.500 065 2.897 2.953
2.6510 2656 .0625 2.575
17 9/160 .0538 2.250 2.625
.058 2.3664 2.406 .0563
18 1/20 .0478 2.000 2.318 2.363
.049 1.9992 2.156 .0500
19 7/160 .0418 1.750 .042
2.060 2100
1.7126 1906 .0438
20 3/80
1.803 1.838
.0359 1.500 .035 1.4280 1.656 .0375
21 11/320 .0329 1.375 .032 1.3056 1.531
1.545 1.575
22 1/32 .0344 1.416 1.444
.0299 1.250 .028 1.1424 1.406
23 9/320 .0313 1.288 1.313
0269 1.125 .025 1.0206 1.281
24 1/40 0281 1.159 1.181
.0239 1.000 .022 .8970 1.156 0250 1.030 1.050
25 7/320 0209 .875 .020 .8160 1.031 0219 .901
26 3/160 0179 .750 .919
.018 .7344 .906 .0188
27 11/640 0164 .687 .773 .788
.016 .6528 .844 .0172
28 1/64 0149 .625 .014
.708 .722
.5712 .781 .0156 .644
29 9/640 0135 .562 .656
.013 .5304 .719 .0141
30 1/80 .0120 .500 .579 .591
.012 .4896 .656 .0125 .515 .525

WEIGHTS OF STEEL PLATES

WEIGHTS OF ROUND AND SQUARE STEEL BAR

3/16 .094 .120 1-1/8 3.380 4.303 3 24.03 30.60


7/32 1277 .1620 1-3/16 3.766 4.795 3-1/4 28.21 3591
1/4 .167 .213 1-1/4 4.172 5.313 3-1/2 32.71 41.65
9/32 .2133 2676 1-5/16 4.600 5.857 3.3/4 37.55 47.81
5/16 .261 332 1-3/8 5.049 6,428 4 42.73 54.40
11/32 .3137 .3992 1-7/16 5.518 7.026 4-1/4 48.23 61.41
3/8 .376 .478 1-1/2 6.008 7.650 4-1/2 54.07 6885
13/32 .4377 .5562 1-9/16 6519 8.301 4.3/4 60.25 76.71
7/16 511 .651 1-5/8 7.051 8978 5 6676 85.00
1/.2 .668 .850 1-3/4 8.178 10.413 5-1/4 73.60 93.71
9/16 .845 1076 1-7/8 9.388 11.953 5-1/2 80.78 102.85
5/8 1.043 1328 2 10.681 13.600 5-3/4 88.29 112.41
11/16 1.262 1.607 2-1/8 12.058 15.353 6 96.13 122.40
3/4 1.502 1.913 2-1/4 13.519 17.213 6.1/2 112.82 143.65
13/16 1.763 2.245 2-3/8 15.062 19.178 7 130.85 166.60
7/8 2044 2.603 2-1/2 16.690 21.250 7.1/2 150.21 191.25

.
15/16 2.347 2.988 2-5/8 18.400 23.428 8 170.90 217.60
1 2.670 3.400 2-3/4 20.195 25.713 8-1/2 192.93 245.65
1 1/16 3.015 3.838 2-7/8 22.072 28.103 9 216.30 275.40

91
'l6
.Jnwea~ saaJ5ap = PPP' X (Z -'J4e::l saaJ5ao) .J4e::l saaJ5ap = Z + (SZ-Z X Jnwea~ saaJ5ao)
lua:) saaJ5ap = ssS' X (Z -"J4e::l saaJ5ao) .J4e::l saaJ5ap = Z + (S. ~ X lua:) saaJ5ao)
.SJn~4 ijeMOI!>t = Z9Z,6Z000" x 'n".l.8 'n".l.8 = S~P X sJnoH ~~eMOI!>I
" s~~eMOI!>t = 9P? x JaModasJOH 'JaModasJOH = p. ~ X s~~eMOI!>I
, Jnade/\ leAa4:) = P ~O ~ X JaModasJOH "JaModasJOH = 996' X Jnade/\ leAa4:)
SJa~aww~J501!>t = SZ9.~ X spunocj ~OO::l "spunod ~OO! = Z' L X sJa~awweJ501!>I
salnof = 9S ~ X spunod ~o::l "spunod ~OO! = LL' X salnOr
"sa!JOle:> = ZSZ X "n".l"8 "n".l.8 = S9600"0 x a!JOle:)
silun 's'n pUB O!JI8W JOI SlueISUO~ UO!SJ8AUO~ le8H pUB J8MOd
"sJa~aw :>!qn:> = SP9L' X spJeA :>!qn:) "SpJeA :>!qn:> = 90" ~ X sJa~a~ :>!qn:)
"sJa~aw :>!qn:> = 9 ~SZO. X ~aa::l :>!qn:) .~aa! :>!qn:> = L ~"S X sJa~a~ :>!qn:)
"sJa~aw :>!qn:> = PSSLOO" X suOlle~ 'suOlle5 = L ~.P9Z X sJa~a~ :>!qn:)
"SJa~!10~:>a4 = SP9" L X spJeA :>!qn:) .spJeA :>!qn:> = SO ~" X SJa~!lo~:>aH
'SJa~!10~:>a4 = 6LZS" X (" U! .n:> Zp'OS ~Z) Sla4sn8 .("U! on:> ZP"OS ~l) la4snq = P6LS"Z X SJa~!lo~:>aH
.SJa~!10~:>a4 = 9 ~SZ' X ~aa::l :>!qn:) "~aa! :>!qn:> = L ~S' X SJa~!lo~:>aH
.sJa~!10~:>a4 = PS9L0. X suolle9 "SUOlle5 = L ~P.9Z X SJa~!lo~:>aH
"sJa~!1 = 9 ~.9Z X ~aa::l :>!qn:) "~aa! :>!qn:> = L ~SO' X sJa~!l
.sJa~!1 = PSSL. X suolle~ "SUOlle5 = L ~P9Z" X sJa~!l
"sJa~11 = 99P6' X s~Jeno "s~Jenb = S99S0. ~ X sJa~!l
"sJa~!1 = L99 ~O" X sa4:>ul :>!qn:) 'sa4:>U! :>!qn:> = ZO' ~9 X sJa)!l
"sJa~aw!~ua:> :>!qn:> = 69" X sweJO p!nl::l 'sweJp P!nl! = ~a. X sJa~aw!~ua:) :>fqn:)
.sJa~aw!~ua:> :>!qn:> = L9"9 ~ X sa4:>ul :>!qn:) "Sa4:>u! :>!qn:> = ZO ~90' X sJa~aw!~ua:) :>!qn:)
"sJa~aw!~ua:> :>!qn:> = LS"6Z X sa:>uno p!nl::l 'sa:>uno P!nl! = 9 ~90. X sJa~aw!~ua:) :>!qn:)
silun .s'n pUB O!JI8W JOI SIUBISUO~ UO!SJ8AUO~ 8wniOA
.sJa~aWOI!>t aJenbs = 669S"l X sal!~ aJenbs .sal!W aJenbs j= ~9S' X sJa~aWOI!>I aJenbs
.sJa~aWOI!>t aJenbs = 69POPOO" X saJ:>'v' saJ:>e = PO ~'LPZ X sJa~aWOI!>I aJenbs
"saJe~:>a4 = 69POP' X saJ:>'v' 'saJ:>e = PO ~LP-Z X saJe~:>aH
"sJa~aw aJenbs = ~99" X spJeA aJenbs .spJeA aJenbs = 66S6 ~. ~ X sJa~a~ aJenbs
"sJa~aw aJenbs = 6Z60" X ~aa::l aJenbs ~aa! aJenbs = L99L"0 ~ X sJa~a~ aJenbs
'sJa~aw!~ua:> aJenbs = 9 ~Sp.9 X sa4:>ul aJenbs "sa4:>U! aJenbs = SS ~" X sJa~aw!~ua:) aJenbs
.sJa~aW!II!W aJenbs = 9rSP9 X sa4:>ul aJenbs "Sa4:>u! aJenbs = SS ~OO' X sJa~aW!II!~ aJenbs
Silun .s'n pUB O!JI8W JOI S.UBISUO~ UO!SJ8AUO~ e8JV
"("5>1 OOO~) su.l :>!J~a~ .("sql OPZZ) u.l SSOJ9
= S09 ~O' ~ X ("sql OPZZ) U.l SSOJ9 = ~ZP96" X ("5>1 OOO~) su.l :>!J~a~
.("5>1 OOO~) su.l :>!J~a~ "("sql OOOZ) U.l ~aN
= 6 ~L06" X ("sql OOOZ) u.l ~aN = ~ZO ~. ~ X ("5>1 OOO~) su.l :>!JJa~
"sweJ501!>t = 6SSP" x ("pA'v') spunod .("PA'v') spunod = Z9POZ-Z X sweJ5.01!>I
'sweJ50I!>t = SSlO" X ("pA'v') sa:>uno "("AP'v') sa:>uno = Ll"S X sweJ501!>I
.sweJ5 = LS"6Z X (Ja~eM) sa:>uno p!nl::l .(Ja~eM) sa:>uno P!nl! = S~90" X sweJ9
.sweJ5 = S"9Z X ("pA'v') sa:>uno .("PA'v') sa:>uno = asO" X sweJ~
.sweJ5 = 9P90. X su!eJ~ .su!eJ5 = Zp.S ~ X sweJ~
"sweJ5 = 6 ~O ~OO" X sauAO "SaUAp = ~S6 X sweJ9
silun 's.n pUB O!JI8W JOI SluelSuo~ UO!SJ8AUO~ 146!8M
"SJa1awol!>t = SZS9" ~ X sal!LAJ le:>!1neN "Sal!LAJle:>!~neN = 6S69" X SJa1aWOI!>I
"SJa1awOI!>t = 9609" ~ X sal!LAJ a1me1S .S81!LAJa1me1S = L ~l9" X SJa1awol!>I
.sJa~awol!>t = 9PO000' X ~aa::l lea! = S"09l' X SJa1awol!>I
'sJa~aw = OPP ~6" X spJeA .spJeA = ~960" ~ X sJa~a~
.sJa~aw = OSPO" X ~aa::l '~aa! = SOSZ' X sJa~a~
'sJa~aw = PSZO. X sa4:>ul "sa4:>u! = OL'6 X sJa~a~
'SJ8~8W!II!W = ~00P"9G X sa4:>ul "sa4:>U! = OL60. X sJa~aW!II!~
sllun 's'n pue :)!Jlaw JOI sluelSuo:) UO!SJaAuo:) 416ual
":)0 P!O aJn~eJadwa~ e ~e Ja~eM 8Jnd !O weJ5 ('j) uo~ (:>!J~aw) ~ = sweJ501!>t 000 ~
-ol!>t ~ !O awnloA a4~ = Ja~aw!:>ap :>!qn:> ~ = Ja~!1 ~ ("5>1) weJ501!>t ~ = sweJ50~:>84 O~
("IH) Ja~!lo~:>a4 ~ = sJa~!1 00 ~ ("5H) weJ50~:>a4 ~ = sweJ5e:>ap 0 ~
("I) Ja~!1 ~ = sJa~!I!:>ap 0 ~ ("50) weJ5e:>ap ~ = sweJ5 0 ~
("IP) Ja~!I!:>ap ~ = sJa~!I!~ua:> 0 ~ ("5) weJ5 ~ = sweJ5!:>ap 0 ~
("I: Ja111ijU8:> ~ = ("Iw) sJa~!I!II!W O~ (..5p) weJ5!:>ap ~ = sweJ5!~ua:> 0~
8J"nSB8W p!nbn pUB ~a (:5: weJ5!~ua:> ~ = ("5w) sweJ5!II!W O~
('w) Ja18W on:> ~ = sJa~aw!:>ap on:> 000 ~ 146!8M 10 S8JnSB8W
(.wp)Ja~aw!:>ap 'n:> ~ = sJa~aw!~ua:> on:> 000 ~ ("w>t) Ja~aWOI!>t ~ = SJa1aWOOO ~
('w:Ja~aw!~ua:>.n:> ~ = (ww)sJa~aW!II!W'n:>ooo ~ ("w) Ja1aW ~ = SJa1aW!:>ap 0 ~
8JnSB8W :)!qn~ ("wp) Ja~aw!:>ap ~ = sJa~aw!~ua:> 0 ~
(z'w) Ja~aw "bs ~ = sJa~awl:>ap 'bs 00 ~ ("w: Ja~aw!~ua:> ~ = ("ww) sJa~aW!II!W 0 ~
(Z"Wp) Ja~aw!:>ap "bs ~ = sJa~aw!iua:> "bs 00 ~ 416u81 10 S8JnSe8W
(z.w: J81aW!1ua:> "bs ~ = (o"ww)sJa~aW!II!w"bs 00 ~
8JnSe8W 9Jenbs "000 ~ = l!>t 00 ~ = 01:>a4
(z"w>l)Ja~aWOI!>t"bs ~ = saJe~:>a400~ :O~ = e:>8p:0~/~ = !:>ap:oo~/~ = Qua:>:ooo~/~ = !II!W
(" Je4) aJe~:>a4 ~ = saJ:>e 00 ~ :sald!~lnW pue SUO!S!A!p-qns JO! pasn aJe sax!!aJd
(" Je) 8Je ~ = (ow) sJa~aw bs 00 ~ 5U!MOII0! a4.l .~45!aM JO! weJ5 a4~ pue A~!:>ede:> JO!
9JnSe9W 9Jenbs S,JoJ.8AJns Ja~!1 a4~ '4~5ual JO! Ja~aw a4~ aJe s~!un led!:>u!Jd a4.l

W31SAS ~IH13W NOI1VWHO~NI O~~IH33NION3


ENGINEERING II~FORMATION ENGLISH SYSTEM
Long Measure Avoirdupois or Commercial Weight
1 mile = 1760 yards = 5280 feet. 1 gross or long ton = 2240 pounds.
1 yard = 3 feet = 36 inches. 1 net or short ton = 2000 pounds.
1 foot = 12 inches. 1 pound = 16 onces = 7000 grains.
Surveyor's Measure 1 ounce = 16 drams = 437.5 grains.
1 mile = 8 furlongs = 80 chains.
Measures of Pressure
1 furlong = 10 chains = 220 yards. 1 pound per square inch = 144 pounds per square
1 chain = 4 rods = 22 yards = 66 feet = 100 links foot = 0.068 atmosphere = 2.042 inches of
1 link = 7.92 inches. mercury at 62 degrees F. = 27.7 inches of V"!'ater
Square Measure at 62 degrees F. = 2.31 feet of water at 62
1 square mile = 640 acres = 6400 chains. degrees F.
1 acre = 10 square chains = 4840 square yards = 1 atmosphere = 30 inches of mercury at 62
43,560 square feet. degrees F. = 14.7 pounds per square inch =
1 square chain = 16 square rods = 484 square 2116.3 pounds per square foot = 33.95 feet of
yards = 4356 square feet. water at 62 degrees F.
1 square rod = 30.25 square yards = 272.25 1 foot of water at 62 degrees F. = 62.355 pounds
square feet = 625 square links. per square foot = 0.433 pound per square inch.
1 square yard = 9 square feet. 1 inch of mercury at 62 degrees F. = 1.132 foot of
1 square foot = 144 square inches. water = 13.58 inches of water = 0.491 pound
An acre is equal to a square, the side of which is per square inch.
208.7 feet. Column of water 12 inches high; 1 inch diameter =
Dry Measure .341 Ibs.
1 bushel (U.S. or Winchester struck bushel) =
Cubic Measure
1.2445 cubic foot = 2150.42 cubic inches. 1 cubic yard = 27 cubic feet.
1 bushel = 4 pecks = 32 quarts = 64 pints. 1 cubic foot = 1728 cubic inches.
1 peck = 8 quarts = 16 pints.
The following measures are also used for wood
1 quart = 2 pints.
and masonry:
1 heaped bushel = 1'/4 struck bushel. 1 cord of wood = 4 x 4 x 8 feet = 128 cubic feet.
1 cubic foot = 0.8036 struck bushel. 1 perch of masonry = 16V2 x 1 V2 X 1 foot = 243/4
1 British Imperial bushel = 8 Imperial gallons =
cubic feet.
1.2837 cubic foot = 2218.19 cubic inches.
Shipping Measure
Liquid Measure For measuring entire internal capacity of a vessel:
1 U.S. gallon = 0.1337 cubic foot = 231 cubic 1 register ton = 100 cubic feet.
inches = 4 quarts = 8 pints.
For measurement of cargo:
1 quart = 2 pints = 8 gills. 1 U.S. shipping ton = 40 cubic feet = 32.143 U.S
1 pint = 4 gills. bushels = 31.16 Imperial bushels.
1 British Imperial gallon = 1.2003 U.S. gallon = British shipping ton = 42 cubic feet = 33.75 U.S.
277.27 cubic inches. bushels = 32.72 Imperial bushels.
1 cubic foot = 7.48 U.S. gallons.
Circular and Angular Measure Troy Weight, Used for Weighing Gold and Silver
1 pound = 12 ounces = 5760 grains.
60 secondes (") = 1 minute (').
1 ounce = 20 pennyweights = 480 grains.
60 minutes = 1 degree (O).
1 pennyweight = 24 grains.
360 degrees = 1 circumference (C).
1 carat (used in weighing diamonds) = 3.086
57.3 degrees = 1 radian.
21T radians = 1 circumference (C). grains.
1 grain Troy = 1 grain avoirdupois = 1 grain
Specific Gravity
The specific gravity of a substance is its weight as apothecaries' weight.
compared with the weight of an equal bulk of pure Measure Used for Diameters and
water. For making specific gravity determinations Areas of Electric Wires
the temperature of the water is usually taken at 1 circular inch = area of circle 1 inch in diameter
62 F. when 1 cubic foot of water weighs 62.355Ibs. = 0.7854 square inch.
Water is at its greatest density at 39.2F. or 4 1 circular inch = 1,000,000 circular mils.
1 square inch = 1.2732 circular inch = 1,273,239
Centigrade.
Temperature circular mils.
The following equation will be found convenient for A circular mil is the area of a circle 0.001 inch in
transforming temperature from one system to ano- diameter.
ther: Board Measure
Let F = degrees Fahrenheit; C = degrees Centi- One foot board measure is a piece of wood 12
grade; R = degrees Reamur. inches square by 1 inch thick, or 144 cubic
~ = -..f.- = -B- inches. 1 cubic foot therefore equals 12 feet
180 100 80 board measure.

93
v6
.S8W!l "U x U" JO "~U,, 8wnioA 84l S8Se8J:)U! S8W!l "U" J8l8We!p
84l 5U!Se8J:)U! '5u!Z!leJ8U85 ~S8W!l JnOl8WniOA Sl! S8Se8J:)U! 8d!d e 10 J8l8We!p 84l 5u!IQnoai8seq
J8MOIIO e8Je X 8seq J8ddn 10 e8Je
8seq J8MOI!O e8Je + 8seq J8ddn!o e8Je) x J4D!84 x / ~ =
p!weJAd JO 9UO:> e !O WnJ~SnJ! 94~ !O 9wnlo/\
J4D!94 x 8seq !O e8Je x / ~ = p!weJAd JO 9UO:> !O 9WnIO/\
J4D!84 x 8seq !O e8Je = ws!Jd JO JepU!IA:> !O ewnlo/\
J8J8We!p e !O 8qn:) x 9lSoO = ' , eJe4ds e !O ewnlo/\
J8J8We!p 84J !O 8Jenbs x 9 ~P ~ o = ' eJe4ds e!o eeJe e:>e!Jns
e8Je 84J!O JOOJ8Jenbs x PSl ~0~ = , el:>J!:> e !O Je~ewe!a
J8J8We!p 84J!O 8Jenbs x PSSLoO = el:>J!:> e !O eeJ'rj
8Jenbs !O 8p!S x PSl ~0~ ~
eeJe lenbe !O 91:>J!:>e !O Je~eWe!a
J8J8We!p x 19S5"O = : eeJe lenbe !O eJenbs e !O ep!s
8:)U8J9!Wn:)J!:) x S ~"O =
el:>J!:> !O Je~ewe!a
J8J8We!p x 9~P~o = , el:>J!:> !O e:>UeJ9!Wn:>J!~

S3wmOJ\ aNY SY3~Y


.~.d.!:!
.sqlll~ui 0009 x .doH . ...
enbJO.l
0009
(.~od"!:! x sql lI~UO anbJOl
.doH
(sn!pe!:! lI~lid)
(.sql lI~UO anbJOl 41881uo peal
.~od"::I
:sql 000 x "dOH 4~aa.Luo peol
.oqo
(.~"d::l x "sql) lIlaal uo peal
"dOH
.~. do!:! x 19l" x ,,(JalaWeiO lI~lid) ll'J"d":I
l~
"~"d.!:! x 9~v~o x ,,(JaJawe!o lI~l!d) = .~"d ::I

"alnu!w Jad Jeao!o suoilnlOAaJ lenba .~.d.!:!lal


.aJnu!w Jad Jaa! ui Jeao !O auil lI~l!d !O paeds lenba .~" d":! lal
.pai!!~eds aq Jsnw anbJOI JO Juawow OUilSiMJallJ uo UMOU)jaq Jsnw
paads aliI JallJ!a JaModasJOll UaA!Oe liWSUeJJ OJpalunow S! Jeao e lI~illM uodn ijells e uoisap 01-

~NIl~YHS ~NIN~IS3a aNY 3nOHOJ. aNY H3MOd3SHOH ~NIJ.Yln:>lY:>

"~olE}e "sql ELOeO" = "~ol9}e "sql e09LO" = eJnsseJd "U! "bsJed "sql L"V~}B J!'v""U on:> ~ 10}40!eM

"~ol ~l}B "sql 9L"6S = "~ol9}e "sql SSEG9 = Je}eM 4seJ~ "}I"n~ ~ 10}40!eM

"(" ~ol9 }e Je}eM 4SeJ~) leal U! Je}eM 10 }40!e4 x EEv" = ("U! bs Jed spunod) eJnsseJd Je}eM

"~ol}e I.Jn~Jew se4~u! 9~vOG = "~olE}e I.Jn~Jew se4~u!


9~vOG = "~olE}e f.Jn~Jew Se4~u! SSEOG = "~ ol9}e Je}eM 4SeJI}eel S60EG = eJnsseJd "UI "bS Jed ql ~

"~olE }e f.Jn~Jew se4~u! l6"6l = "U! "bs Jed spunod L"v ~ = eJnsseJd ~!Je4dsow}'v"

"SUOlleO S" ~E = leJJ~ ~

"se4~u! ~!qn~ ~El = uolleE) ~

"sel!W LE~l9" = Je}eWOI!>t ~

"se4~u! LE"6E = 'W~ OO~ = Je}eVlj ~

"seeJ6ep 96l" LS = Ue!pBI:I ~


"{puo~es Jed puo~es Jed leal 9 ~ GE se ue>je} I.luoWWO~J 1.J,!lIeJE) 10 uO!}eJele~~'v" = 6

"sJn04 Jed 'n"l"g OOO'eel = uo!}eJe6!JleI:lI0 uol ~


"punod Jed "n"l"g v "OS ~'~ = eJnsseJd ~!Je4dsoW}B}e wealS pe}eJn}BS 10 }eeH le}ol

"punod Jed "n"l"g v 'OL6 = "~ol~~}e Je}eM 10 uo!}eJodeIl31 }BeH }ue}Bl

"punod Jed "n"l"g S~"Ev~ = e~llo uo!sn~ 10 }eeH }ue}Bl

"punod Jed "n"l"g 009'v ~ = uoqJej 10 enlel\ }eeH

"n"l"g S~vE = JnoH BMOI!>t ~

">jJOM spunod-}oo~ 9"LLL = "n"1"8 ~

"~o ~ Je}eM "ql ~ es!eJ O} peJ!nbeJ }eeH = "n"l"g ~

"Jn04 Jed "n"l'8 LvSl = dH ~

"M">t 9vL" = dH ~

"e}nu!w Jed >jJOM 10 spunod-}oo~ OOO'EE = dH ~

SlNY.lSNO:> aNY S'V'lnl/\l~O~ ~NI~33NI~N3

~
PART NUMBER CODES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

PREFIXES
SBB Hanger Bearing, Babbitt SGC Slide Gate, Flat (Non Dust Tight)
SBC Bronze Collar SGF Slide Gate, Curved (Non Dust Tight)
SBE End Bearing, Type E
SHA Hanger Style 226
SBF End Bearing, Flange
SHB Hanger Style 220
SBH End Bearing, Type H
SHC Hanger Style 270
SBI Hanger Bearing, Hard Iron
SHD Hanger Style 326
SBP End Bearing, Pillow Block
SHE Hanger Style 30
SBS Hanger Bearing, Self-Aligning
SBU Hanger Bearing, UHMW Polyethelyne SIC Internal Collar
SBW Hanger Bearing, Oil Impregnated Wood
SBZ Hanger Bearing, Bronze SOT Trough End W/O Feet, Tubular
SOU Trough End W/O Feet, U Shape
SCB Coupling Bolts SOY Trough End W/O Feet, Flare
SCC Close Coupling Shafts
SCD Shroud Cover SPA Paddles, Adjustable
SCF Trough Cover, Flanged SPT Support, Trough
SCG Clamps, Spring SPW Support, Fixed
SCH Trough Cover, Hip Roof
SCL Trough Cover, Flat SQR Quick Release Key
SCM Trough Cover, Semi-Flanged SSD Discharge Spout, Standard
SCQ Cover Clamp, Quick Release
SSG Seal, Packed Gland
SCT Cover Clamp, Toggle
SSH Seal, Packing Housing
SCV Trough Cover, Flared
SSP Seal, Plate
SCW Cover Clamp, Screw SSR Trough End, Singe Outboard Bearing,
SOC Slide Gate, Dust Tight, Curved Rectangular
SOF Slide Gate, Dust Tight, Flat SSS Seal, Split Gland
SOH Discharge Spout With Hand Slide SST Trough End, Single Outboard Bearing,
SOL Saddle Tubular
SOS Drive Shaft ssu Trough End, Single Outboard Bearing,
SOU Discharge End, U Shape U Shape
SOV Discharge End, Flare ssv Trough End, Single Outboard Bearing, Flare

SEH End Shaft, Hang~r STA Trough, Angle Flange


SEA Trough End, Rectangular STC Trough, Channel
SES End Shaft STD Trough, Drop Bottom
SET Trough End, Tubular With Feet STF Trough, Formed Flange
SEU Trough End, U Shape With Feet STP Trough, Rectangular Angle Flange
SEV Trough End, Flare With Feet STR Trough, Rectangular Flange
STS Trough, Solid Tube
SFD Discharge Spout, Flush End STT Trough, Flanged Tubular
SFR Trough Flange, Rectangular STU Trough End, Twin Outboard Bearing,
SFT Trough Flange, Tubular U Shape
SFU Trough Flange, U Shape
Trough Flange, Flare SWB Bronze Washer
SFV

SUFFIXES
M Rack and Pinion Actuated E With End Shaft
P Pneumatically Actuated D With Drive Shaft
BB Ball Bearing EP With End Shaft and Plate Seal
RB Roller Bearing DP With Drive Shaft and Plate Seal
SB Sleeve Bearing, Babbitt EH With End Shaft and Housing Seal
SZ Sleeve Bearing, Bronze DH With Drive Shaft and Housing Seal

95
96
""""""'-'-' 8PiiS 'S81eD
~8 -8L

~~"
... ~
:~:'..~~:::::::::;~~;~;,~~~J:~ "9L -lL'9'

6L :~~:~~~~:~~~:~:~f~~~~
,., I.,.!I!qeMol~
M E"
9~ , ' Sle!J81eW 6uiziPinl~:::::::::::::::::::::
SIB!JejBW sno:JS!1\
SJOAeAUO:> MeJ:>S IB:>!jJel\ E"
i' 'IcV' :::::::::::::::::::::;~~~!:~~~qeMOI~
A. 9i' 'IcV:'
G6 9'P
~~
:.Ic~:
"'..j"...' Sj!~
..", ",.,.. .."'.' 'SJeAO:> 46noJj,..,', 9L '
9 'le '6l
SL"
,
.."...
"".",
..,.",..,
,..."..
JBlnqnj
JBln6uBj:>eJ
LL' :~::
SL"" 68
"'" ,.,.." .'...,..", n e6UBII pewJol".., ~
~i:::~~ "".,. ""' peJB11 ~
~
", t 4:)I!d pull J818We!p WJOj!Un

PL""""" WOjjoq doJp


PL"'" ~ 'G;:' :::::::::::::::;:::::::::::::J818~~!~P~:~~~
lL"'" ..,' n e6UBII ,euuB4:>
el6uB 'S46noJj, O" ..""""'-"1"""'...'" f.JeIOJ

~l -69
SIBes pue 46noJj,
19-9g'el "
spue 46noJj, ::::::::::::::::r:=::::::::::::J~18~~~o~~~\~~J8POO~
ll'"
'P" ""'-."-"",-'.-'-'- I.,.1:)ede:) pue J8MOd8SJO4 'SJ8pOO~
SIB!JejBW:>!XOj, 98 've-
ll"""" elqBj AI!:>BdB:> enbJoj,
eg""'"
8
SJe4SBM jsnJ4j,
19 'pg'" S6U!JBeq jSnJ4j, ~
9l"'" eweJjxe 'SeJnjBJedwej, 9l -.""""""." i

I C
CCc..l:
,.~,.
C
S8Jn
leJOOW81 8W8JIX 3
.L 6'l6
-,"""::r"".":' +... ~:;:!-
"~., w81sI.s 4Sil6u3
LL 'f.. 9 , I nol.e l P ue 6uIJooul6u 3
jeel jJoddns V6-l6 ' -~", UOlleWJOjUI 6uIJOOUI6u3
g.-~. '6 .sAOIiB
pUB leejS SSeIU!BjSJe4jO
(9
~:~::::::::: SUO!jBln:>IB:> peeds
SUO!jB:>!I!:>eds pUB SUO!jB:>!lddB IB!:>edS
LL'L
99-9
~S-SL. sejB6 ep!IS

S
~S
~
~g
g~
6~g
810
OS' '~.. , SJeAO:> pnOJ4S I 3

6U!Z!S IIB4S -
elqBj UO!j:>eles IIB4S vL ..~
pue Je6UB4 as
pue:::: L
::::::::::::::::::::::::6~;1~~6~ 9
" :SIIB4S L
9 ,-.,., SIu8W86ueJJe pue s8ilqw8sse 8A!JO
SeJnpe:>oJd UO!j:>eles '--""'..." " SpU8 46noJI 86Je4:)S!O
19
S6U!JBeq
, 6U!jB:>!Jqnj-Iles
Sj46!11 6L 's
6L 's :::::=:=~:::::::::::::::::::::::::~~;;~t~:4 ~,7~
~-~. SMeJ:>S JOAeAUO:> 'IBUO!j:>es 6L 's
~L -69-
pue 46noJj 'SIBes 1-- :::==:::I:::::::::=::::::::::::::::::::::::::.~;~~~~~~~e4:)siO
-6~ SJepeel MeJ:JS 1-6 '00~..~.: , t-.-, SUOISU8WIO
LL 'f ',' SelPPBS LI- ..., ~...j SUO!leln:)le:) poods pue J818We!o

S Ll- .".'...'..'JOI:)ej"O"
C' '-.SJepeel !.JBjO~ ov- SM8J:)S JO!.aAUO:) pJepUelS JOj W81sI.s uOileu6!S80
a .'.--'..."--.'.""" elep U6!S80
Sj46!11 LI-
'.SMeJ:>S JOAeAUO:> 'uoqq!~ I.,.!:)ede:) U6!S80
9l SIeiJ81eW 81qepeJ680
S46noJj JBln6uBj:>e~
oc- '.""...'--,""', speol peaa
~ t.'.--'~.-T-"
I
a
L'V .~'V , sAeJj esBeleJ Jj:>!no "- Sl46ilj P8PIOj pue In:) pue Ino
9\7
0 8
6 C'... ...6U!jBld sa
99 SJj:>Olq MOII!d 19 'sv'~v'~v""-Lv"""""",.
06 SUO!SUeW!p pue SeZ!S ed!d L\7
c' ...SMeJ:>S JOAeAUO:> elPpBd .."..~~.."""" -'--"1.-r-~"' "SleIJ8IeW 8AISOJJOO
gp'lv ..., OJ 6u!puej SIB!JejeW 'Jj:>Bd
9l"
Ll \7
9\7
d 9\7"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
E.
ll UO!j:>eles JOjOV'j l\7"
' "'.,'- ..'.' SI46ill P8PIOj pue In:)
'...,UejUo:> 9\7
, elqej JOj:>el 6Ulj46111 eJnjS!oV'j
pe'I'poV'j
R
~i:
6 '<:6.. 19
,..., le!Jeiew 6U!X!V'j
Ll
..,. '. wejsAs :>!JjeV'j
S " , elqej UO!jB:>!I!SSel:> IB!JejeV'j
9l
9"
~ '.~"-" S
9~-6 '.elqBj S:>!jS!Jej:>eJe4:> IB!JejeV'j 9l" I elJ8 1 ew 8 lq eulweluo"-' "
,...,-. S!SAIBUB le!JejeV'j .' ';".1"".'..." elep Inol.el pue UOil:)818S
E
9S... Ll
'SUO!j:>nJjSU! e:>UBUejU!eV'j re"
l
W 99"
Ol- c elqBj eZ!S
eZ!S dwnl
dwnl 6
-- , UO!jB:>!Jqnl 99 'VII
99-

"...'.
C'
UO!j:>npOJjUI.,...
SJBIIO:> leUJejUI.,...
, \7L 'ZL"
L~'
6~ 'II~"
,
"-c
4..-
f..;.
"-'-,._-,_.
c; "'rf7~-SlJe4:)
81qel JOI:)ej I.,.1:)edeo
I.,.!:)edeo

L\7.\7 ..:C'... SUO!j:>nJjSU! UO!jellejSUI


, :>
98 68'88.
6l ~ ..-eld!jlnW e6JB4:>S!P pue 'SjelUI
jndUI Lv '~v
O 9
89
L8 ::::::::::::::!:~~:::~:::;E:~:
g SJOAeAUO:> MeJ:>S peU!I:>ul,...
~ SpeOlj:>Bdwl

I L9 'vg :::~~1tlli::::::::;~~J~'~~~~;~
-,... Sle!JejBW :>!do:>sOJ6AH 99-9
9G 89
V6 '~G" .-!.peJlnOOJ SBlnWJOl'JeMOdeSJOH
::::::::::::=1~I;::=:::~e~~;
~~~..4 SUOllepU8WWO:)8J 6UIJe88
L... sjueuodwo:> eA!Jp enbJoj 46!H VG
GS -os '6 "j.. SMeJ:>S JOAeAUO:> P!o:>!leH VG
'-"'i.". , S6UIJe8q 8ZUOJq pue II!qqe8
GF 'OF : .B
9""""""" ..SMeJ:JS JOAeAUO:> pe:>BjJnS PJBH
SG""""""""" s6u!Jeeq UOJ! PJBH SL-lL
..~ SJe6UBH
SS -S '8G -' SIIB4S pue Je6UBH 6&
6
9l'.
GS"
S"""" "
,... ~..,,- SIeiJ81eW 8AiSeJqv
...1 1 S6U!JBeq Je6U~

X3CNI 3n~O'V1V:> ~OA3ANO:> M3~:>S

:::::'ZII'VII""
'~v
OTHER
CONTINENTAL
PRODUCTS

.Bucket elevators
.Conveyor pulleys
.Conveyor idlers
.Belt conveyors
.Vibrating feeders
.Engineered systems

CONTINENTAL CONVEYOR & MACHINE WORKS LTD. CONTINENTAL CONVEYOR (ONTARIO) LTD.
470 St-Alphonse Street East 100 Richmond Blvd.
Thetford Mines, Quebec. Napanee, Ontario.
Canada K7R 383

.
Canada G6G 3V8
Tel. (418) 338-4682 Tel. (613) 354-3318
Fax: (418) 338-4751 Fax: (613) 354-5789
www.continentalconveyor.ca www.continentalconveyor.ca

LITHO IN CANADA