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COMPETENCY BASED

LEARNING MATERIALS

Sector: TOURISM (HOTEL AND RESTAURANT)

Qualification: BARTENDING NC II

Unit of Competency: BASIC:


Participate in Workplace Communication

Module Title: PARTICIPATE IN WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION

Prepared by: SPCD Faculty

Technical Education and Skills Development


Authority

SAMSON POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE OF DAVAO


Davao City

How to use this Competency- Based Learning


Material
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Welcome to the learners guide for the module: Participate in Workplace
Communication. This learning material contains activities for you to complete.

The unit of competency Participate in Workplace Communication


contains the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for BARTENDING NC II as
BASIC Unit of Competency.

You are required to go through a series of learning activities in order to


complete each learning outcomes of the module. In each learning outcome there
are Instruction Sheets to help you better understand the required activities.
Follow these activities on your own and answer the self-check at the end of each
learning outcome. You may remove a blank answer sheet at the end of each
module (or get from your facilitator/trainer) to write your answers for each self-
check. If you have questions, dont hesitate to ask your facilitator for assistance.

Instruction sheets:

Information Sheet This will provide you with information (Concepts,


principles and other relevant information) needed in performing certain
activities.

Job Sheet This is designed to guide you how to do job that will contribute
to the attainment of the learning outcome.

Assignment Sheet The assignment sheet is a guide used to enhance


(follow up) what you have learned in the information sheet, operation sheet
or job sheet.

Worksheet are the different forms that you need to fill up in certain
activities that you performed

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

You may already have some or most of the knowledge and skills covered
in this learners guide because you have:
Been working for some time
Already completed training in this area

If you can demonstrate to your trainer that you are competent in a


particular outcome, you dont have to do the same training again.

Talk to your trainer about having them formally recognized. If you have a
qualification or certificate of competence from previous training, show it to your
trainer. If the skills you acquired are still current and relevant to the unit/s of
competency they may become part of the evidence you can present for RPL. If
you are not sure about the accuracy of your skills discuss this with your trainer.
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After completing this module ask your trainer to assess your competency.
Result of your assessment will be recorded in your competency profile. All the
learning activities are designed for you to complete at your own pace.

Inside this learners guide you will find the activities for you to complete and
at the back are the relevant information sheets for each learning outcome. Each
learning outcome may have more than one learning activities.

At the back of this learners guide is a Learners Diary. Use this diary to
record important dates, jobs undertaken and other workplace events that will
assist you in providing further details to your trainer or an assessor. A Record of
Achievement is also provided for your trainer to complete once you complete the
module.

LEARNING MODULE
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UNIT OF COMPETENCY:

BASIC: PARTICIPATE IN WORKPLACE


COMMUNICATION

MODULE TITLE:

PARTICIPATE IN WORKPLACE
COMMUNICATON

Competency-Based Learning Material

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PARTICIPATE IN WORKPLACE
COMMUNICATION

Prepared and Compiled By:

INSTRUCTIONS

PRE-REQUISITE MODULES. Before you start this Module, you must already
have finished the Modules on the following:

Develop and update industry knowledge, Observe workplace hygiene


procedures and perform workplace and safety practices
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In this module you will learn and practice how to PARTICIPATE IN WORKPLACE
COMMUNICATION. To do this, you must do the following activities:

1. Read and analyze carefully the elements, performance criteria and range
of variables of the unit of competency: Participate in Workplace
Communication
2. Follow the Instructions/ Learning Steps of each Activity Sheet found before
each Learning Outcome of this module.
3. After performing all the activities, ask trainer for the feed backing if you are
ready to undergo assessment.
4. When you are ready, ask your facilitator for an assessment.

MODULE DESCRIPTOR:

This module covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes in Participate in


Workplace Communication.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon completion of this module, you should be able to:

Learning Outcome 1: Obtain and convey workplace communication

Learning Outcome 2: Participate in workplace meetings and discussions

Learning Outcome 3: Complete relevant work related documents

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS:

Trainee must have already finished the following modules:

None

LEARNING OUTCOME NO. 1:

OBTAIN AND CONVEY WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION

Learning Activity 01:

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Learning Steps Resources

1. Read Info Sheet on OBTAINING Info Sheet 1: OBTAINING AND


AND CONVEYING CONVEYING WORKPLACE
WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION
COMMUNICATION

2. Perform Self Check Questionnaire. Self Check Questionnaire 1.

3. Refer to Answer Key. Answer Key 1.

4. After finishing this Learning


Activity, proceed to the next one.

Information Sheet 1:

Effective Communication in the Workplace

Why is communication important in management and leadership?

Communication is essential for effective functioning in every part of an


organization. Although marketing, production, finance, personnel, and
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maintenance departments may receive direction from corporate goals and
objectives, communication links them together and facilitates organizational
success. The importance of effective communication for managers cannot be
overemphasized for one specific reason: everything a manager does, involves
communicating. Communication is needed to increase efficiency, satisfy
customers, improve quality, and create innovative products.

Effective communication is so important for organizational success that not only


managers, but also their employees must be effective communicators. One role of
a manager is to help employees improve their communication skills. When all
members of a team, department, or organization are able to communicate
effectively with each other and with people outside their group, they are much
more likely to perform well. The successful manager, therefore, needs effective
communication skills.

What is communication?

Communication is the sharing of information between two or more individuals or


groups to reach a common understanding. The most important part of this
definition is that the information or ideas conveyed must be understood. To see
what this definition means in practice, consider giving or receiving incomplete
information. With only a partial understanding, problems will occur.

Good communication is often incorrectly defined by the communicator as


agreement instead of clarity of understanding. If someone disagrees with us, we
may often assume the person just did not fully understand our position; but a
person can clearly understand us and simply not agree. In fact, when a manager
concludes that a lack of communication must exist because a conflict between
two employees has continued for a long time, a closer look often reveals that, to
the contrary, plenty of effective communication is going on. Each fully
understands the other's position, but their communication does not necessarily
produce agreement.

What are the two phases of the communication process?

The communication process consists of two phases.

the transmission phase


the feedback phase

In the transmission phase, information is sent from one individual or group-the


sender-to another individual or group-the receiver. In the feedback phase, a
common understanding is assured.

What is the transmission phase of communication?

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To begin the transmission phase, the sender decides on the message, which is
the information the sender wants to communicate. The sender translates the
message into symbols or language, a process called encoding. Once encoded, a
message is transmitted through a medium to the receiver. The medium is simply
the pathway, such as a phone call or letter, through which an encoded message is
transmitted to a receiver.

What is the feedback phase of communication?

The feedback phase is initiated by the receiver, who becomes the new sender.
The receiver decides what message to send to the original sender (now the new
receiver), encodes it, and transmits it through a chosen medium. The message
might contain a confirmation that the original message was received and
understood, or a restatement of the original message to make sure that it was
correctly interpreted, or a request for more information.

How does perception impact communication?

Perception is the process through which people select, organize, and interpret
sensory input to give meaning and order to the world around them. Perception is
inherently subjective and influenced by people's personalities, values, attitudes,
moods, experience, and knowledge. When senders and receivers communicate
with each other, they are doing so based on their own subjective perceptions.

Perception plays a central role in communication and affects both transmission


and feedback. The encoding and decoding of messages and even the choice of a
medium hinge on the perceptions of senders and receivers.

What is nonverbal communication?

The encoding of messages into words, written or spoken, is verbal


communication. Nonverbal communication includes all messages encoded
without using written or spoken language. Nonverbal communication shares
information through facial expressions, body language, and even style of dress.
Physical elements such as buildings, office furniture, and space also convey
messages. Office arrangements convey status, power, and prestige.

Pay close attention to nonverbal behaviors when communicating. Learn to


coordinate your verbal messages with your nonverbal behavior and to be
sensitive to what your employees, managers, and peers are saying nonverbally. It
is easy to underestimate the powerful impact that nonverbal communication has
on the perceptions of others. Nonverbal messages can undermine contrary verbal
or written messages. A message can be given meaning only in a context, and
cues or signals are easy to misinterpret.

When should I use one-to-one (face-to-face) communication?

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Most of a manager's communication time is spent one-on-one, or face-to-face,
with employees. Face-to-face communication provides immediate feedback and is
the richest information medium because of the many information channels
available through voice, eye contact, posture, blush, and body language. It is the
appropriate medium for delegating tasks, coaching, disciplining, instructing,
sharing information, answering questions, checking progress toward objectives,
and developing and maintaining interpersonal relations. Managers also spend
one-on-one, face-to-face time communicating with their managers, colleagues,
and peers.

When should I communicate via the telephone?

Telephone or spoken communications electronically transmitted provide only the


cue of voice inflection, not the visual cues available from face-to-face interaction.
The amount of time spent on the telephone varies greatly with the job. Before
making any call, you should always set an objective and write down what you plan
to discuss. Use the paper to write notes during the call. The telephone is the
appropriate medium for quick exchanges of information and for monitoring
progress. It is especially useful for saving travel time, but it is inappropriate for
personal matters like discipline.

When should I use written communication?

Individually addressed written communications convey only the cues written on


paper and are slow to provide feedback, although they can be personalized.
Written communications meant for a group of people are the lowest in richness,
as they are not focused on a single receiver, use limited information cues, and do
not permit easy feedback. They do, however, provide documentation that the
information has been provided.

You and your employees can ask certain questions before sending messages
inside and outside the organization.

How does technology affect communication?

Exciting advances in information technology have dramatically increased the


speed of communication. You can now communicate more easily with your teams
and can access information more quickly to make decisions. In order to be
competitive, you should keep abreast of the latest advances in information
technology. But you should not adopt these or other advances without first
carefully considering whether and how the technology advance in question might
improve communication and performance in your particular groups, teams,
departments, or organization.

What are the different types of communication networks?

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The pathways along which information flows throughout an organization are called
communication networks. The type of communication network that exists in a
group depends on the nature of the group's tasks and the extent to which group
members need to communicate with each other in order to achieve group goals.
Four kinds of communication networks that can develop in groups and teams are:

wheel
chain
circle
all-channel

Workplace communication skills are not acquired in a day but it really


needs practice and will to do it from inside. Effective workplace communication
not only helps you in saying and expressing yourself correctly but also one of the
ladders to grab higher position. Effective workplace communication skills present
you and your thoughts as a perfect person for the job. So communicating properly
and in a right way is important in every sphere of life.

Organize Your Thoughts

If you are not an organized person then before speaking it is better to manage
and organize what your are going to speak. If it is an instant talk then you can
speak at slow speed (but it should not be too slow) so that you can work on your
thought. But if you have time then it is better to manage your thoughts first. Like
you can pen down what you are thinking and then arrange them in an order so
that it becomes an effective workplace communication.

Listen and Observe Things

Check the people around you who talk effortlessly and very effectively. Observe
what and how they are presenting their thoughts while speaking to others both
professionally and personally. Then ask yourself certain questions based on this
whether you are confident enough to present your thoughts and ideas in a similar
manner or not. Do not try to copy but find out the difference between and work on
the gap.

Do not React Immediately

You are into a conversation and other person is saying something on which your
reaction is required. Make sure that you do not interrupt in between the talk. Wait,
manage your words and then speak. Think about positive as well as negative
points.

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Read a Lot

This is absolutely necessary and true that if you have knowledge then you can
speak effectively and so reading should be considered as an important and
effective workplace communication skill. By reading quality articles not only
related to your job but also on other issues will help you a lot in gaining knowledge
on diverse topics. Therefore after regular reading you will have so many things
and thoughts to share.

Be Confident

It is your first time when you will be facing the audience while delivering a speech.
You are nervous, which is obvious. But apart from this you will have to be
confident. Think about all the positive points and person you think has a positive
influence on your life. This will give boost to your confidence.

Have Right Body Language

Now you have all the above mentioned qualities but this one is missing. It means
that you are destroying all other things as it is an icing on the cake. You body
language must be parallel to your communication and this is also considered as
an effective workplace communication skill. Maintain the right posture and stiff
shoulders to show that you are ready for the conversation. At workplace never sit
in a relaxed way.

Have a Good Command on the Language

Now which so ever language you are using to converse in the office you must
have command over that. Make sure to have good vocabulary and ways to frame
and re-frame the sentences in various ways.

Apart from this make your personality very appealing for good workplace
communication skills. By following all these you can really improve your
communication skills at workplace.

THREE MAIN SKILLS

Employers highlighted three skills needed by all workers: teamwork, flexibility, and
communication. Since many workplaces are currently organized according to a
matrix system, an employee no longer has a specific job. Instead, his or her skills
especially in graphics, computers, or oral presentationsmake the worker a
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valued member of a team. These three skills are essential for the matrix worker,
since he or she must work well with others and be able to switch easily from team
to team, depending on the project. Several companies stressed another
employment factor: good attendance. Some employers stressed repeatedly that
weak attendance policies in school are not helping to train workers for the reality
of work policies. A final quality many stressed was a positive attitude in the
interview and on the job. Most would not hire an applicant who lacked
enthusiasm.

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION

Oral communication is the mode of choice in most workplaces today; the paper
memo is dead, replaced by voice mail, informal conversation, and sometimes E-
mail or fax-mail. But two writing tasks still loom before the entry level worker:
Writing reports and filling out forms. For example, many companies these days
are seeking certification in a variety of world class standard programs, like ISO or
QS 9000, an automotive quality certification. These certifications require
extensive documentation. Workers have to fill out reports that ask them to
describe exactly what they do and how they do it.

The service industries also fill out countless reports, such as service orders,
patient care reports, and lab reports. Some entry-level employees, like
administrative assistants, may be responsible for compiling or even composing
some parts of a formal report. The smaller the company, the more likely that an
administrative assistant may be asked to do such tasks. Some companies also
like to "grow their own" managers by extending such responsibilities to entry-level
personnel, encouraging them to accept the challenge.

ORAL COMMUNICATION

We can see that employees still need written communication skills. Yet
interpersonal oral communication skills are the ones most prized by employers in
the new informal workplace atmosphere. Some employers, even test technicians
in their ability to follow oral directions. Employees who work with the public or
closely with teams need skills in empathy and feedback techniques, especially in
fields such as customer service, criminal justice, medical, and legal. Critical
thinking and the ability to function as part of a problem-solving group are also
skills that employers look for. At IBM, for instance, the team members have to sell
their ideas to management to receive funding.

Simple conversational skills are also important in the workplace. Some employers
mention telephone etiquette as an important skill. The same annoyances we
suffer from poor voice mail messages are cited by employers, who hate to waste
time tracking down a telephone number to return a message.

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The ability to interview to get important information is also a necessary skill.
Service people must interview clients to write a work order. Legal secretaries who
work for small firms often must interview witnesses. Police officers gather details
of crime, medical office personnel collect information on insurance, and incorrect
information may lead to trouble or even litigation later on.

Entry-level employees are likely to deliver at least some formal presentations. The
most typical is leading tours. Often this task of leading around groups of Cub
Scouts or teachers falls to those lower on the roster, although executives will lead
tours for visiting dignitaries. Even large group presentations are required of some
entry-level people. Rookie police officers are assigned DARE and Community
Watch presentations. They will also have to testify in court. A legal secretary may
have to ask for a continuance in a courtroom if an attorney is detained across
town. An administrative assistant is likely to serve as a greeter and introduce
speakers at formal functions.

TECHNOLOGY

Written and oral communication skills are very important in today's high-powered
workplace, but employees must also be able to use modern technology to
communicate. The technologies most often used for communication are voice
mail, E-mail, fax, and word processing. The employers surveyed preferred the
Microsoft 3-pack of Excel, Word, and PowerPoint, a preference that seems to
mirror national trends. Business use of CD-ROM and Internet is more restricted; in
many companies, only certain workstations have access to the Internet. The
assumption is that employees may waste time surfing. Some industries, such as
automotive, store specifications on CD-ROM. The medical and legal field also
retrieve data from ROM, so students in these programs need to be comfortable
with CD-ROM technology.

10 TIPS TO IMPROVE WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION

Effective Workplace Communication Tips

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1. Set up an atmosphere for communicating. Everyone gets to say what they
want, nobody is punished, and everyone is safe to say what they want with no
fear of retribution. Its important to set up an environment where people actually
can participate freely without having to worry that it will affect their jobs. You cant
just say you have an open door policy; you have to demonstrate that you really
will follow through.

2. Everyone agrees to listen and only person talks at a time. When someone
speaks other people simply listen. There should be no advice giving, rebuttals or
contradicting. Everyone gets a chance to say what they want. Stick to these
guidelines in order to create an atmosphere where people respect each other and
commit to listening to one another without the usual chaos that ensues in regular
meetings.

3. Everyone agrees that there is no such thing as a wrong comment or dumb


question. Think about how you feel when your point of view is crushed. Its very
important, and productive, to validate peoples input. It doesnt really matter
whether they are wrong or right and you dont have to implement their ideas. The
point is simply to help people feel important by accepting their comments.

4. Everyone agrees to talk about the same amount of time. No one person
monopolizes the conversation. No one person is more important than another.
Level the playing field by limiting the demoralizing effect of one person standing
there talking endlessly while everyone else is asleep. Make sure everyone has
voice.

5. We agree to communicate with each other respectfully, with a calm tone


of voice, without harsh language and with no derogatory comments. Louder isnt
always better or more effective. Its much more enjoyable to talk calmly and give
yourself a chance to relax instead of always being agitated.

6. We agree that any information that is communicated will not be used against
someone or to make them feel bad. We promise to not use information to hurt
other people and that we will be a workplace that values individuals input.

7. Keep it simple. Say what you mean, say it briefly and constructively. People fall
in love

with the sound of their own voices and forget that other people have equally
important things to say. Say what you want to say and then get out of the way.
Practice saying things briefly, you will eventually get good at it and be able to
devote your time to more enjoyable pursuits.

8. Leave any personal agendas out of the meeting. When people come in with a
predetermined outcome in mind it tends to derail the whole group.

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9. Keep an open mind and redirect the conversation when you notice that
someone is trying to settle a score or is aggressively advocating for a personal
issue.

10. Keep it positive. Communication ideally builds a positive atmosphere that


promotes solutions rather than only gripe sessions. Remember to model positive
behavior so that everyone follows your lead. Keep the tone upbeat and people
will have a hard time staying cranky.

Once you follow all of these concepts you will be on your way to communicating
effectively. Each one takes practice and commitment from all parties involved.
Practice each area (one at a time) until you master it. At first, you will notice
resistance and people may even think you are nuts. Over time people will enjoy
the new, calmer way of doing things and you will get more work

done. When you have mastered all of them you will experience the peace of mind
that comes from communicating effectively.

Read more: http://socyberty.com/work/10-tips-to-improve-workplace-


communication/#ixzz0xCB4Y9QC

Communication

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1. is a process that allows organisms to exchange information by several
methods. Communication requires that all parties understand a common
language that is exchanged with each other.
2. Are the auditory means, such as speaking, singing and sometimes tone of
voice, and nonverbal, physical means, such as body language, sign
language, paralanguage, touch, eye contact, or the use of writing.
3.

Language

is a system of symbols and the rules used to manipulate them.


Though commonly used as a means of communication among people,
human language is only one instance of this phenomenon.

Nonverbal communication

is the process of transmitting messages without spoken words, sometimes


called body language, messages can be communicated through facial
expressions; gestures; and posture

Body Language

is a term for communication using body movements or gestures instead of,


or in addition to, sounds, verbal language or other communication.

Paralanguage

may be expressed consciously or unconsciously, and it includes the pitch,


volume, and, in some cases, intonation of speech.
It forms part of the category of paralanguage, which describes all forms of
human communication that are not verbal language

Why Communications Skills Are So Important

the purpose of communication is to get your message across to others


clearly.
communication is only successful when both the sender and the receiver
understand the same information as a result of the communication.

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Although all of us have been communicating with others since our infancy,
the process of transmitting information from an individual (or group) to
another is a very complex process with many sources of potential error.

Consider the simple example:

Terry: "I won't make it to work again tomorrow; because I have a morning
sickness due to my pregnancy
Boss: Terry, this is the third day you've missed and you have a lot of things
to do in the house? Who will do this?

Barriers to Effective Communication

The choice of words or language in which a sender encodes a message


will influence the quality of communication.
language is a symbolic representation of a phenomenon, room for
interpretation and distortion of the meaning exists.

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defensiveness, distorted perceptions, guilt, project, transference,
distortions from the past
misreading of body language, tone and other non-verbal forms of
communication (see section below)
noisy transmission (unreliable messages, inconsistency)
receiver distortion: selective hearing, ignoring non-verbal cues

FORMS OF COMMUNICATION

a. Verbal - The meaning of words can be altered significantly by changing the


intonation of one's voice. Think of how many ways you can say "no"-you
could express mild doubt AND terror. Vocal meanings vary across
cultures. Intonation in one culture can mean support; another anger

Types of Verbal Communication

1. Speaking
Speech communication refers to the processes associated with
the production and perception of sounds used in spoken
language.
2. Writing
is the representation of language in a textual medium; that is with
the use of signs or symbols.
It is distinguished from illustration such as cave drawings and
paintings.

b. Non-Verbal - is facial expressions like smiles, gestures, eye contact, and


even your posture. Nonverbal communication is made up of the following
parts:

o Visual - This often called body language and includes facial


expression, eye movement, posture, and gestures. The face is the
biggest part of this. All of us "read" people's faces for ways to
interpret what they say and feel.
o Tactile - This involves the use of touch to impart meaning as in a
handshake, a pat on the back, an arm around the shoulder, a kiss,
or a hug.
o Vocal - The meaning of words can be altered significantly by
changing the intonation of one's voice. Think of how many ways you
can say "no"-you could express mild doubt AND terror. Vocal
meanings vary across cultures. Intonation in one culture can mean
support; another anger. you can make another person more
comfortable with you by selecting and emphasizing certain
behaviors that fit within your personality and resonate with another.
o Use of time, space, and image
o

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Start by Understanding Your Own Communication Style

Good communication skills require a high level of self-awareness.


Understanding your personal style of communicating will go a long way
toward helping you to create good and lasting impressions on others.
you can make another person more comfortable with you by selecting and
emphasizing certain behaviors that fit within your personality and resonate
with another.

Be An Active Listener

People speak at 100 to 175 words per minute (WPM), but they can listen
intelligently at up to 300 words per minute.
gain information, obtain directions, understand others, solve problems,
share interest, see how another person feels, show support, etc.

Use Nonverbal Communication

are facial expressions like smiles, gestures, eye contact, and even your
posture.

Give Feedback

what we hear can be amazingly different!


is a verbal communications means used to clearly demonstrate you are
actively listening and to confirm the communications between you and
others.

Supportive and effective listener

Stop Talking: Asks the other person for as much detail as he/she can
provide; asks for other's views and suggestions.
Looks at the person, listens openly and with empathy to the employee; is
clear about his position; be patient
Listen and Respond in an interested way that shows you understand the
problem and the other's concern
is validating, not invalidating ("You wouldn't understand"); acknowledge
other's uniqueness, importance
checks for understanding; paraphrases; asks questions for clarification
don't control conversation; acknowledges what was said; let's the other
finish before responding
Focuses on the problem, not the person; is descriptive and specific, not
evaluative; focuses on content, not delivery or emotion
Attend to emotional as well as cognitive messages (e.g., anger); aware of
non-verbal cues, body language, etc.; listen between the lines
React to the message, not the person, delivery or emotion
Make sure you comprehend before you judge; ask questions

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Use many techniques to fully comprehend
Fight distractions

Communication process

Sender
encoding
channel
decoding
receiver feedback
context

Source

As the source of the message, you need to be clear about why you're
communicating, and what you want to communicate.

Message

The message is the information that you want to communicate.

Encoding

This is the process of transferring the information you want to communicate


into a form that can be sent and correctly decoded at the other end.
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Your success in encoding depends partly on your ability to convey information
clearly and simply, but also on your ability to anticipate and eliminate sources
of confusion (for example, cultural issues, mistaken assumptions, and missing
information.)

Channel

Messages are conveyed through channels, with verbal including face-to-face


meetings, telephone and videoconferencing; and written including letters,
emails, memos and reports.

Decoding

Just as successful encoding is a skill, so is successful decoding (involving, for


example, taking the time to read a message carefully, or listen actively to it.

Receiver

Your message is delivered to individual members of your audience.


To be a successful communicator, you should consider these before delivering
your message, and act appropriately.

Feedback

Your audience will provide you with feedback, verbal and nonverbal reactions
to your communicated message.
Pay close attention to this feedback, as it is the only thing that allows you to be
confident that your audience has understood your message.

Context

The situation in which your message is delivered is the context.

Effective Use of Questioning

Questioning can..... arouse curiosity


stimulate interest in the topic
clarify concepts
emphasize key points
enhance problem-solving ability
encourage students to think at higher cognitive levels
motivate student to search for new information
ascertain students knowledge level to aid in modifying instruction

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ASK ONE QUESTION AT A TIME
ASK FOCUSED QUESTIONS.
AVOID LEADING QUESTIONS.
AFTER YOU ASK A QUESTION, WAIT SILENTLY FOR AN ANSWER.

Figure 1. The Five Competencies on Achieving Necessary Skills

Resources: Identifies, organizes, plans, and allocates resources


1. Timeselects goal-relevant activities, ranks them, allocates time,
and prepares and follows schedules
2. Moneyuses or prepares budgets, makes forecasts, keeps
records, and makes adjustments to meet objectives
3. Material and Facilitiesacquires, stores, allocates, and uses
materials or space efficiently
4. Resourcesassesses skills and distributes work accordingly,
evaluates performance, and provides feedback

Interpersonal: Works with others


1. Participates as Member of a Teamcontributes to group effort
2. Teaches Others New Skills
3. Serves Clients/Customersworks to satisfy customers'
expectations
4. Exercises Leadershipcommunicates ideas to justify positions,
persuades and convinces others, responsibly challenges existing
procedures and policies
5. Negotiatesworks toward agreements involving exchange of
resources, resolves divergent interests
6. Works with Diversityworks well with men and women from
diverse backgrounds

Information: Acquires and uses information


1. Acquires and Evaluates Information
2. Organizes and Maintains Information
3. Interprets and Communicates Information
4. Uses Computers to Process Information

Systems: Understands complex interrelationships


1. Understands Systemsknows how social, organizational, and
technological systems work and operates effectively with them
2. Monitors and Corrects Performancedistinguishes trends, predicts
impacts on systems operations, diagnoses deviations in systems'
performance, and corrects malfunctions
3. Improves or Designs Systemssuggests modifications to existing
systems and develops new and alternative systems to improve
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performance

Technology: Works with a variety of technologies


1. Selects Technologychooses procedures, tools or equipment
including computers and related technologies
2. Applies Technology to Taskunderstands overall intent and proper
procedures for setup and operation of equipment

3. Maintains and Troubleshoots Equipmentprevents, identifies, or


solves problems with equipment, including computers and other
technologies

Basic Skills: Reads, writes, performs arithmetical and mathematical


operations, listens, and speaks

1. Readinglocates, understands, and interprets written information


in prose and in documents such as manuals, graphs, and
schedules
2. Writingcommunicates thoughts, ideas, information, and
messages in writing; and creates documents such as letters,
directions, manuals, reports, graphs, and flow charts
3. Arithmetic/Mathematicsperforms basic computations and
approaches practical problems by choosing appropriately from a
variety of mathematical techniques
4. Listeningreceives, attends to, interprets, and responds to verbal
messages and other cues
5. Speakingorganizes ideas and communicates orally

Thinking Skills: Thinks creatively, makes decisions, solves problems,


visualizes, knows how to learn, and reasons
1. Creative Thinkinggenerates new ideas
2. Decision Makingspecifies goals and constraints, generates
alternatives, considers risks, and evaluates and chooses best
alternative
3. Problem Solvingrecognizes problems and devises and
implements plan of action
4. Seeing Things in the Mind's Eyeorganizes, and processes
symbols, pictures, graphs, objects, and other information
5. Knowing How to Learnuses efficient learning techniques to
acquire and apply new knowledge and skills
6. Reasoningdiscovers a rule or principle underlying the
relationship between two or more objects and applies it when
solving a problem

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Personal Qualities: Displays responsibility, self-esteem, sociability, self-
management, integrity and honesty
1. Responsibilityexerts a high level of effort and perseveres towards
goal attainment
2. Self Esteembelieves in own self-worth and maintains a positive
view of self
3. Sociabilitydemonstrates understanding, friendliness, adaptability,
empathy, and politeness in group settings
4. Self Managementassesses self accurately, sets personal goals,
monitors progress, and exhibits self-control

5. Integrity/Honestychooses ethical courses of action

a. Barriers to effective communication include:

our choice of channel, whether it be spoken or written word or


by illustration
our perception of the message and the perception of the
receiver
the self-esteem of both the sender and receiver
the attitudes of both the sender and receiver
the environment in which the communication is taking place.

b. Important components or points of a spoken communication


are:

our facial expression/s contribute 55% of the message


the way we speak contributes 38% of the message (our tone,
volume and
rate of speech)
only 7% of the message is conveyed by the actual words
spoken.

c. Feedback is important when giving or receiving instructions


because it makes it clear to both the sender and the receiver
that the message as intended is fully understood.

d. Individual team members can help the team by:

encouraging participation in discussion

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helping communication between individuals and within the
group
listening effectively
respecting other team members point of view
mediating in conflict situations
relieving tension, and
monitoring the group or teams performance.

SELF CHECK QUESTIONNAIRE No. 1

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1. What are the three skills needed by all workers in obtaining and conveying
workplace communication?

2. The technologies most often used for communication are voice mail, E-
mail, fax, and word processing

3. What are the steps in improving communication skills at the workplace?

4. What are the forms of communication?

5. Non-verbal communication is made up of what parts?

6. What is communication?

7. Effective Workplace Communication Tips


8. 1. Set up an atmosphere for communicating. Everyone gets to say what
they want, nobody is punished, and everyone is safe to say what they want
with no fear of retribution. Its important to set up an environment where
people actually can participate freely without having to worry that it will
affect their jobs. You cant just say you have an open door policy; you
have to demonstrate that you really will follow through.
9. 2. Everyone agrees to listen and only person talks at a time. When
someone speaks other people simply listen. There should be no advice
giving, rebuttals or contradicting. Everyone gets a chance to say what they
want. Stick to these guidelines in order to create an atmosphere where
people respect each other and commit to listening to one another without
the usual chaos that ensues in regular meetings.
10. 3. Everyone agrees that there is no such thing as a wrong comment or
dumb question. Think about how you feel when your point of view is
crushed. Its very important, and productive, to validate peoples input. It
doesnt really matter whether they are wrong or right and you dont have to
implement their ideas. The point is simply to help people feel important by
accepting their comments.
11. 4. Everyone agrees to talk about the same amount of time. No one person
monopolizes the conversation. No one person is more important than
another. Level the playing field by limiting the demoralizing effect of one
person standing there talking endlessly while everyone else is asleep.
Make sure everyone has voice.
12. 5. We agree to communicate with each other respectfully, with a calm
tone of voice, without harsh language and with no derogatory comments.
Louder isnt always better or more effective. Its much more enjoyable to
talk calmly and give yourself a chance to relax instead of always being
agitated.
13. 6. We agree that any information that is communicated will not be used
against someone or to make them feel bad. We promise to not use
information to hurt other people and that we will be a workplace that values
individuals input.

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14. 7. Keep it simple. Say what you mean, say it briefly and constructively.
People fall in love
15. with the sound of their own voices and forget that other people have
equally important things to say. Say what you want to say and then get out
of the way. Practice saying things briefly, you will eventually get good at it
and be able to devote your time to more enjoyable pursuits.
16.
17. 8. Leave any personal agendas out of the meeting. When people come in
with a predetermined outcome in mind it tends to derail the whole group.
18. 9. Keep an open mind and redirect the conversation when you notice that
someone is trying to settle a score or is aggressively advocating for a
personal issue.
19. 10. Keep it positive. Communication ideally builds a positive atmosphere
that promotes solutions rather than only gripe sessions. Remember to
model positive behavior so that everyone follows your lead. Keep the tone
upbeat and people will have a hard time staying cranky.
20.

e. Non-verbal communication is made up of the following parts:

o Visual - This often called body language and includes facial


expression, eye movement, posture, and gestures. The face is the
biggest part of this. All of us "read" people's faces for ways to
interpret what they say and feel.
o Tactile - This involves the use of touch to impart meaning as in a
handshake, a pat on the back, an arm around the shoulder, a kiss,
or a hug.
o Vocal - The meaning of words can be altered significantly by
changing the intonation of one's voice. Think of how many ways you
can say "no"-you could express mild doubt AND terror. Vocal
meanings vary across cultures. Intonation in one culture can mean
support; another anger. you can make another person more
comfortable with you by selecting and emphasizing certain
behaviors that fit within your personality and resonate with another.
o Use of time, space, and image -

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ANSWER KEY

1. The following are the three skills needed by employees in obtaining and
conveying workplace communication:
a. Teamwork
b. Flexibility
c. Communication

2. The technologies often used in communicating are:


a. voice mail
b. E-mail
c. Fax
d. word processing

3. The steps in improving communication skills at the workplace are:


a. Organize Your Thoughts
b. Listen and Observe Things
c. Do not React Immediately
d. Read a Lot
e. Be Confident
f. Have Right Body Language
g. Have a Good Command on the Language

4. The forms of communication are

a. Verbal
b. Non-verbal

5. Nonverbal communication is made up of the following parts:

a. Visual
b. Tactile
c. Vocal
d. Use of time, space, and image

6. Communication is the sharing of information between two or more individuals or


groups to reach a common understanding.

7. The Ten Effective Workplace Communication Tips are:


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Set up an atmosphere for communicating.
Everyone agrees to listen and only person talks at a time.
Everyone agrees that there is no such thing as a wrong comment or
dumb question.
Everyone agrees to talk about the same amount of time
We agree to communicate with each other respectfully, with a calm tone
of voice, without harsh language and with no derogatory comments.
We agree that any information that is communicated will not be used
against someone or to make them feel bad.
Keep it simple
Leave any personal agendas out of the meeting.
Keep an open mind and redirect the conversation when you notice that
someone is trying to settle a score or is aggressively advocating for a
personal issue.
Keep it positive.

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LEARNING OUTCOME NO. 2:

PARTICIPATE IN WORKPLACE MEETINGS AND DISCUSSION

Learning Activity 02:

Learning Steps Resources

5. Read Info Sheet on 9. Info Sheet 2: PARTICIPATING IN


PARTICIPATING IN WORKPLACE MEETINGS AND
WORKPLACE MEETINGS AND DISCUSSION
DISCUSSION

6. Perform Self Check Questionnaire. Self Check Questionnaire 2.

7. Refer to Answer Key. Answer Key 2.

8. After finishing this Learning


Activity, proceed to the next one.

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Information Sheet 2:

Practice Business Meeting Etiquette: Proper Etiquette and Manners

By Donna Reynolds

Business meeting etiquette is basically good common sense, but one that takes a
little practice. If your meeting (as many of them are) is to discuss a business plan,
then you'll benefit from being prepared.

Certainly, we can all identify what not to do when planning and/or attending a
meeting, but often what we really need is a set of guidelines or rules of etiquette
as to how to do this successfully. Here are some business etiquette tips to help.

Attending a Meeting:

1. Be on time. Always arrive a few minutes before the meeting is set to


begin. This indicates respect for the person planning the meeting and
shows that you are organized.
2. Be prepared. Before the meeting, be sure to read any related material or
review policies and procedures that will be addressed. You will be much
better able to provide valuable input.
3. Bring a notebook and pen. It's proper manners to give the speaker your
undivided attention. Even if you don't take a single note, this will show that
you are interested in the agenda and serious about your role at the
meeting.
4. Participate. When the chairperson asks for feedback and you feel that you
have something to contribute, be sure to do so. Ask questions as well.
5. Be polite and attentive. Never engage in cross-talk in a meeting and be
courteous to the person who has the floor. Listen to what is being said and
resist the urge to argue with anyone.
6. Conduct yourself professionally. Meetings are a great place to let
people know that you are serious and have something to offer. If you
display proper etiquette and manners, this message will be sent. Use this
opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding.
7. Thank the chairperson. It's such a little thing, but thanking the person who
organized the meeting is not only good etiquette, it is also a sign of respect.

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Running a Meeting:

1. Plan ahead. If you are


responsible for calling a
meeting, plan ahead before
sending out the meeting
notification. Make sure that all
interested parties are invited.

2. Set a clear agenda. In your


meeting invitation, clearly state
the agenda of the meeting. List
the action items and request that attendees come prepared to address
these issues. Attach related documentation for review and request input.

3. Set a time limit. In today's business environment, everyone is busy. By


setting a clear time limit, you are showing that you respect your coworkers'
need for time management as well as your own.
4. Dress professionally. You want to be taken seriously, and appearance is
important. Even if it is "casual Friday," wear appropriate business apparel.

5. Encourage punctuality. Never be late to your own meeting! Set an


example and plan to be in the room a few minutes before the start time.

6. Manage the meeting. Stick to the agenda and keep an eye on the time.
Politely discourage cross-talk and make sure that every person has an
opportunity to speak. Move the agenda along, but not so fast as to miss
key points. If the meeting goes off-topic, remind the group of the agenda at
hand and suggest that unrelated matters be addressed at another time.

7. Avoid engaging in petty bickering or arguments. Remain calm and


diplomatic, no matter how heated the discussion may become. This
portrays your good manners to the group.

8. Summarize. At the end of the meeting, sum up the action items and if
necessary, request another meeting.

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9. Follow-up. Once the meeting is over, follow up with all attendees. Send a
list of action items, resolutions and issues that remain open. Thank people
for taking the time to attend, and request feedback.

Types of meetings in an organization are divided into 5 categories.

1- Briefing meetings

2- Business meetings

3- Planning meetings

4- Consultation meetings

5- Review and Evaluation meetings

TEN TIPS IN HAVING A GREAT PROJECT MEETING

1. Inform and remind team of purpose just before


meeting

By informing attendees just before they are not only less likely to forget it but they
will also come with any material or information needed to support the discussion
topics.

2. Minimize participants

Invite only those who are truly needed. As the number of participants goes up so
does the tendency to get bogged down. Often, those who are not needed will
show up to obtain any information resulting from the meeting.

3. Establish and follow an agenda

As a rule, every meeting should have an agenda that has at least three points; the
topics, the time allocated for each topic, and the talker, the one who is taking the
lead for a given topic.

4. State the purpose and intended outcome

Meeting leaders should not assume that everyone automatically understands the
meeting purpose and the desired outcomes. By stating them clearly at the
beginning, it will get the meeting started quickly and keep it on track.

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5. Attempt to involve each team member

Meetings can often get off balance when a few attendees do all the talking and
dominate the discussions. The meeting leader should attempt to involve each
member to ensure that group synergy occurs.

6. Use diagrams, pictures and graphics

The adage, a picture is worth a thousand words is no truer than in meetings.


They can reduce meeting durations by as much 28%. Whenever practical,
encourage participants to use diagrams, pictures and graphics instead of handing
out pages full of text.

7. Park important but unrelated topics

There may be times when an important topic, which is not on the


agenda, will come up. Rather than divert the focus of the meeting, it
may be better to list (park) the topics for another meeting.

8. Record action items, actionees, and due dates

Many times meeting discussions are very interactive but if the results are not
translated into action items may fail to be productive. Almost every meeting
should conclude with a) a description of actions to be taken, b) who has accepted
the action, and c) when the action item is to be completed.

9. Issue a brief written meeting summary

Taking a few minutes to document a meeting can go a long way. By summarizing


a) who attended, b) main topics discussed, c) conclusions reached, and d)
actions to be taken, information will be easily recorded and disseminated.
Meeting summaries should be kept to one page containing bullet-type
statements.

10. Periodically measure the effectiveness of the project


meetings

When project meetings begin being held many meetings will often be the most
ineffective due to new participants, circumstances, unfamiliarity with roles, etc. By
periodically measuring a meetings effectiveness, they can often be brought to a
higher level of efficiency.

SELF CHECK QUESTIONNAIRE

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1. Give ten (10) Effective Workplace Communication Tips

2. What are the examples of nonverbal, physical means of


communication?

3. What are the 5 categories in terms of types of organizational meetings?

4. Name business etiquette tips in attending a meeting

5. What are the good etiquettes in attending meetings in the work place?

ANSWER KEY

1. The ten tips of effective workplace communication are the


following:
Set up an atmosphere for communicating.
Everyone agrees to listen and only person talks at a time.
Everyone agrees that there is no such thing as a wrong comment or
dumb question.
Everyone agrees to talk about the same amount of time.

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5. We agree to communicate with each other respectfully, with a
calm tone of voice, without harsh language and with no derogatory
comments.
We agree that any information that is communicated will not be used
against someone or to make them feel bad.
Keep it simple. Say what you mean, say it briefly and constructively.
Leave any personal agendas out of the meeting.
Keep an open mind
Keep it positive.
2. The non-verbal, physical means of communication include:
body language
sign language
paralanguage
touch
eye contact
or the use of writing.
3. The Types of meetings in an organization which are divided into 5
categories are:
1- Briefing meetings
2- Business meetings
3- Planning meetings
4- Consultation meetings
5- Review and Evaluation meetings

4. The following are some business etiquette tips

Be on time
Be prepared.
Bring a notebook and pen
Participate
Be polite and attentive
Conduct yourself professionally
Thank the chairperson

5. In attending work place meetings the following are considered good


etiquettes:

Be on time
Be prepared
Bring a notebook and pen
Participate.
Be polite and attentive
Conduct yourself professionally
Thank the chairperson

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LEARNING OUTCOME NO. 3:

COMPLETE RELEVANT WORK RELATED DOCUMENTS

As a future industry worker you will need to be familiar with administrative


protocols relating to how forms and documents are completed, used and stored.

Administrative tasks that you will be expected to perform will most likely include
preparing documents and completing forms in accordance with government
legislation and regulations, and also with organizational policies and procedures.
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It is expected that at the end of this section you should be able to:

select the appropriate form for your purpose


complete workplace forms and documents in accordance with
organizational protocols and procedures
follow organizational protocols and procedures for the submission of
personal documents.

Workplace forms and documents

Most business operations rely on complete and accurate workplace documents


for communication, information management and record keeping. Your role may
require you to write emails and letters, and complete documents and reports.

Determine authorizations and permissions

You might prepare documents to be signed by delegated persons, or be


authorized to sign certain documents yourself. Some information is protected by
privacy and confidentiality policies that determine who can see it.

Identify any rules and formats that apply

Organizations are often specific about how to present formal correspondence and
case management notes, as well as reporting and record keeping, including for
legal purposes. Workplace guidelines, templates and forms are often provided to
ensure that these tasks are completed correctly.

Check your information thoroughly

Misleading, incorrect or missing information is not only frustrating for the people
who process or refer to the information; it could have client service, financial, duty
of care or reporting implications for which your organization is legally liable. If you
are in rural or regional areas, incorrect information could delay important
processes that could severely affect your client.

If you are unsure how to fill out forms or complete documentation, always ask
dont guess.

Administrative protocols

A protocol is simply a set of rules that describe the standard way to approach a
task. Following administrative protocols means that you perform tasks in
accordance with your organizations policies, procedures and expectations.

Some of the areas covered by administrative protocols may include:

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designated officers required to approve or sign a document
timeframes set for completion or submission
restrictions on who can access or use the information
storage and archiving requirements
obtaining comparative quotes for goods or services.

Selecting appropriate forms

Your day-to-day duties may require you to complete a range of forms, for
example, personal time sheets and leave forms, business forms such as
purchasing orders, and case-related forms such as client registration forms,
referral forms and client contact records. These forms range in complexity,
audience, format and formality.

You need to be able to select the appropriate form for your purpose and
complete it accurately. The example below shows the forms that you might
need to complete a purchasing process. The process and forms used by
your organization may be different.
Obtain quotations complete fax cover sheet and quotation form
Order goods complete a requisition/purchase order
Accept goods sign a delivery sheet
Inventory enter goods into inventory.
Select from the list below to see some examples of forms that are relevant
to your future organization (samples):

Authorization to Act
Client registration form
Confidentiality form
Equipment checklist
Induction checklist
Message form
Requisition form
Timesheet
Volunteer driver form

Communicating your message

On occasion, you may be required to develop a new form or document for a


specific purpose.

The format you choose will be determined by the preference of your organization.
Whatever format you choose, pay particular attention to how well your document
conveys your message, through:

its purpose, message and audience


the layout of the information
use of headings and paragraphs to make the document easy to read
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use of logos, disclaimers, privacy and copyright statements.

Form/document title Purpose Who signs

Feedback

Your documents could include:


client registration forms, contact registers, client letters, case reports
purchase orders, invoices
HR forms, leave forms, timesheets, rosters
meeting minutes, management reports
any other forms that you complete in your workplace.

Activity: Administrative protocols

This activity can be completed as described below, or you could look at other
workplace protocols that are relevant to your job and describe one of those
instead. Make sure you discuss it with your teacher or trainer first.

Find out about the protocols for purchasing supplies and equipment in your
organization and complete the following:

A. Make a list of the documents used for purchases involving:


a. use of petty cash
b. ordering from a preferred supplier
c. obtaining quotes from suppliers
d. receiving goods on delivery
e. paying for goods and services.

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B. List the staff members responsible for the approval/sign-off of the
documentation needed for each of these purchasing processes.

Activity: Select and complete forms

This activity can be completed using any of the example forms provided with this
resource. You could also use forms from your workplace discuss this with your
teacher or trainer first.

A. Find and complete a workplace form relating to each of following scenarios:


registering a client referred to your parenting course
recording your work hours
taking a new staff member through the induction process.
B. Write a brief statement identifying the protocols and procedures that apply.
C. Complete each form using fictional (made up) details.

If there is any part of the process that you are unsure of, or you dont understand
what details are required by the form, ask your supervisor for advice.

Activity: Communicating your message

Choose two examples of written workplace communication and identify the


following:
purpose
topic
format
audience.

Organizational policies and procedures

Procedures provide specific guidelines for completing a task, such as filling out
and submitting a form. The procedures are normally based on organizational
policy, which deals with broad issues, roles and functions relating to the specific
area, such as case management, workplace safety or purchasing.

If you are unsure of the policies or procedures that apply in your workplace, ask a
more experienced co-worker to assist you, or refer to your organizations

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guidelines or manuals. Procedures you must follow may be similar to the following
examples:

Grievance process
Staff appraisal process

Case example

You have written a letter to a client and pass it to the receptionist to include with
the daily mail. He asks you who approved the letter, and then explains that there
are specific procedures for sending letters. These are in place to ensure that all
communication with clients is professionally presented and in line with client
management policies.

You learn that there is a template you must use a pre-formatted document on
letterhead, with instructions for content wording. There is also a process of
proofreading and approval before the letter can be sent.

Case example

A colleague has an accident at work. There is an accident/incident report form


and other documents that must be filled out. This ensures that the organization
complies with workplace health and safety (WHS) legislation.

The WHS policy that guides this process is supported by procedures for recording
information and processing the necessary forms.

Feedback

Your documents could include:


client registration forms, contact registers, client letters, case reports
purchase orders, invoices
HR forms, leave forms, timesheets, rosters
meeting minutes, management reports
any other forms that you complete in your workplace.

Activity: Administrative protocols

This activity can be completed as described below, or you could look at other
workplace protocols that are relevant to your job and describe one of those
instead. Make sure you discuss it with your teacher or trainer first.

Find out about the protocols for purchasing supplies and equipment in your
organization and complete the following:
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D. Make a list of the documents used for purchases involving:
f. use of petty cash
g. ordering from a preferred supplier
h. obtaining quotes from suppliers
i. receiving goods on delivery
j. paying for goods and services.
E. List the staff members responsible for the approval/sign-off of the
documentation needed for each of these purchasing processes.

Activity: Select and complete forms

This activity can be completed using any of the example forms provided with this
resource. You could also use forms from your workplace discuss this with your
teacher or trainer first.

F. Find and complete a workplace form relating to each of following scenarios:


registering a client referred to your parenting course
recording your work hours
taking a new staff member through the induction process.
G. Write a brief statement identifying the protocols and procedures that apply.
H. Complete each form using fictional (made up) details.

If there is any part of the process that you are unsure of, or you dont understand
what details are required by the form, ask your supervisor for advice.

Activity: Communicating your message

Choose two examples of written workplace communication and identify the


following:
purpose
topic
format
audience.
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Consider whether the selected documents are suited to their purpose? Could they
be improved in any way?

Feedback

Purpose should be stated in the content of the document.


Topic should be evident as a heading or introductory text.
Formats should describe whether it is a print or online document, formal or
informal, a form, letter or brochure.
Audience may be stated, or evident in the format, language and style of the
communication.

Workplace activity: Organizational procedures

Choose two examples of workplace forms and identify the policies and
procedures that apply.

Feedback

Your examples could have included:


Purchase order form Purchasing policy, procedure for ordering stores
Consent form (under 18s) Client management policy, client registration
procedures
Hazard report form WHS policy, procedure for reporting a hazard.

All of the forms that you complete in your workplace will be guided by policies
and/or procedures.

Personal documents

Personal documents are any documents that contain information about a specific
person, for example, a completed performance appraisal form is a personal
document, while an invoice for stores is not.

Other examples of personal documents include:


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Human resource management documents containing personal information
about staff, for example, staff records, payslips, certificates, tax forms, and
performance appraisals.

Case-related documents that contain personal information about clients, for


example, Centrelink forms, medical reports, release of information consent
forms, proof of Aboriginality, agency referrals, agency contract agreements,
and case notes.

Personal documents that need to be sighted for official purposes, for


example, birth certificates, driving licenses, Blue Cards, Disability Services
Positive Notice Cards, visas, and qualifications.

Your organization will have protocols and procedures in place to maintain a


clients legal right to privacy. All forms that relate to a client should be considered
as being of a personal nature.

Every organization will have different practices for storing information. It is


important that you fully understand how this is done in your organization, and why.

Workplace policies and procedures for storage and access of information provide
a guide for workers to follow, and if you are conscientious in adhering to these,
information can be kept secure and in good order, and will be easily accessible to
those who need it.

At the end of this section you should be able to:

keep information in accordance with organizational guidelines


provide access to information to appropriate individuals
maintain confidentiality and security of information
report breaches of confidentiality to the appropriate person.

To function as an effective and productive member of your organization, it is


important that you know how to select equipment that is appropriate for the task,
and then use it in accordance with designated instructions. The maintenance of
that equipment is also critical to ensure that it is always operational.

At the end of this section you should be able to:

select and use equipment appropriate to the task according to


organizational procedures and manufacturers instructions

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store and dispose of equipment and materials in accordance with
organizational procedures
deal with issues and problems arising from the operation of equipment in
accordance with organizational protocol
undertake training to use particular equipment as needed.

Self Check Questionnaire 3:

1. Make an example of a list of the documents used for purchases

2. What are Personal documents?

3. What are other examples of personal documents ?

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Answer Key:

Date Date
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1. The following are examples of a list of the documents used for
purchases:
use of petty cash
ordering from a preferred supplier
obtaining quotes from suppliers
receiving goods on delivery
paying for goods and services.

2. Personal documents are any documents that contain information about


a specific person, for example, a completed performance appraisal form
is a personal document, while an invoice for stores is not.

3. Other examples of personal documents include:

o Human resource management documents containing personal


information about staff, for example, staff records, payslips,
certificates, tax forms, and performance appraisals.

o Case-related documents that contain personal information about


clients, for example, Centrelink forms, medical reports, release of
information consent forms, proof of Aboriginality, agency referrals,
agency contract agreements, and case notes.

o Personal documents that need to be sighted for official purposes, for


example, birth certificates, driving licenses, Blue Cards, Disability
Services Positive Notice Cards, visas, and qualifications.

Date Date
Code No Participation in Page no.
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