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GOLD LINE, METROLINK CONTINUE TALKS OVER CLAREMONT STATION/ PAGE 3 ClaremontClaremont Friday, September 29, 2017
GOLD LINE, METROLINK CONTINUE TALKS OVER CLAREMONT STATION/
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29, 2017 u $1.50 C our ier claremont-courier.com t The Chorale turns COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff

The Chorale

turns

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Members of the Claremont Chorale rehearse on Monday at Pilgrim Place’s Decker Hall. The chorale is celebrating its 50th anniversary with several upcoming events including a dinner and silent auction on October 14 at Taylor Hall. Their annual Christmas concert will take place December 2 and 3 at Claremont United Church of Christ.

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2 and 3 at Claremont United Church of Christ. PAGE 12 t WOLFPACK SPORTS ROUNDUP/ P

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WOLFPACK SPORTS ROUNDUP/ PAGE 9

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12 t WOLFPACK SPORTS ROUNDUP/ P A G E 9 50 PAGE 17 Claremont Community Foundation

Claremont Community Foundation

welcomes Aurelia Brogan/

Council passes Housing Element Update

STORY ON/

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Hello, October.

Visit claremont-courier.com.

LETTERS/ PAGE 2, 8 OBITS/ PAGE 11

CALENDAR/ PAGE 12 CLASSIFIEDS/PAGE 19

114 Olive Street Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5

114 Olive Street

Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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The Claremont COURIER (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 114 Olive Street, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The COURIER is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as pe- riodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, Cali- fornia 91711. Single copy: $1.50. Annual subscrip- tion: $56. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the COURIER, 114 Olive Street, Clare- mont, CA 91711. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copy- right © 2017 Claremont COURIER

one hundred and ninth year, number 37

Claremont COURIER one hundred and ninth year, number 37 READERS’ COMMENTS Metrolink Claremont platform Dear

READERS’ COMMENTS

Metrolink Claremont platform

Dear Editor:

I am not entirely sure what our County Su- pervisor Hilda Solis is trying to do to Clare- mont, but at the Los Angeles County Metro Planning and Programming Committee meeting held on Wednesday, September 20, she offered a motion, which was carried, to study closing and removing the Claremont Metrolink Station from operation. At no time during any of the meetings re- garding the Phase 2B Extension to the Foothill Gold Line has the total loss of Clare- mont’s Metrolink platform ever been sug- gested as a possibility, only that the station would have to be moved to a new location just east of College Avenue. Many of us depend greatly on Metrolink for access to the region. That will not be pro- vided by a Light Rail line, which follows a different route, doesn’t go all the way to San Bernardino (soon Redlands) and does not of- fer on-board work tables or restrooms. Why exactly must we have this popular service eliminated now?

Erik Griswold

Claremont

A nation of laws?

Dear Editor:

The United States is a country of law and order; or at least we used to be. Fed- eral law supersedes state law, state super- sedes county law and county law supersedes local law. That is the way it’s supposed to work. It seems now that states have been openly defying national law and California is one of the worst vi- olators of all. Legalizing marijuana, pro-

viding sanctuary status for illegal aliens, fighting the federal government’s attempt to secure our nation’s borders and trying to limit the First and Second Amendment rights of its citizenry for starters. Some cities across the nation have re- cently passed laws allowing illegal aliens the right to vote in local elections. Most,

if not all, of the federal law violations are

an effort by the Democratic party to pan- der to and enlarge its liberal voting base to ascertain more power in government at all levels. Rather than convincing the bonafide citizens of this country that their liberal agenda and ideology is good for them and the country by winning elections and changing federal laws to their liking, the Democratic party has decided it is easier to enlarge their base through nefarious means. What happens when some state de- cides that their citizens do not have to pay federal income tax? What happens if

a state decides it is going to allow all per-

sons, including illegal aliens, to vote in a national election? What happens if a state decides to discriminate against an ethnic- ity, religion or a political party? What happens if a state decides to remove a cit- izen’s right to privacy, to own property, to travel freely throughout the country or world? Can an FBI or ATF agent now legally use marijuana in California? Where does the lawlessness end? Our country is doomed if we don’t en- force the laws in the hierarchy as dictated by our Constitution.

Kris Meyer

Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 2

ADVENTURES

IN HAIKU

Flu shots and pumpkins Village Venture and leaves change Autumnal Claremont.

—Steve Harrison

and leaves change Autumnal Claremont. —Steve Harrison Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in

Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

GOVERNING

GOVERNING

OURSELVES

Agendas for city meetings are avail- able at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, October 3 Police Facility Community Meeting 570 W. Bonita Ave. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, October 4 Community and Human Services Commission Meeting Council Chamber, 7 p.m.

READERS’ COMMENTS Send readers’ comments via email to edi- tor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 114 Olive St, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words. Viewpoints should not exceed 650 words. We cannot guarantee pub- lication of every letter.

should not exceed 250 words. Viewpoints should not exceed 650 words. We cannot guarantee pub- lication
CITY NEWS
CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 3

Council unanimously passes city’s housing element

A document that has dogged the city for years is at last heading

to the state for final approval.

The city council unanimously passed a group of documents known as the hous-

ing element, which is a vital part of a city’s general plan and

looks at housing de- mographics and serv-

ices and breaks down how many available units per income bracket are available in the city. Claremont has been out of compliance with the housing element since 2014. The unit breakdown was a cause for concern within the city. Of the 412,137 units allotted to the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), 373 had been given to Claremont—157 of which were in the low, very low and extremely low-income bracket, accord- ing to Assistant Planner Elaine Yang, who presented the agenda item to the council. Another requirement of the RHNA— short for Real Housing Needs Assess- ment—is to show that the units could be built by-right, meaning without the need for a conditional use permit or other per- mits. The density for the RHNA is 30 units per acre. The city settled on two properties that could fulfill the RHNA requirement—a sliver of land at Harrison and Cambridge and a seven-acre portion of the Clare- mont Golf Course currently owned by the Claremont University Consortium. The city is not mandated to build these units; rather this process is simply to show the state that Claremont has the space available for it. Indeed, the CUC

Claremont has the space available for it. Indeed, the CUC CITY COUNCIL COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Portions

CITY

COUNCIL

has the space available for it. Indeed, the CUC CITY COUNCIL COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Portions of the

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Portions of the former Claremont Golf Course were identified by city officials as undeveloped land within Claremont in order to satisfy a state requirement nec- essary for final approval of the city’s housing element.

has said multiple times in the past that the site is reserved for future growth of the Colleges. The golf course site required an addi- tional amount of work—since it’s zoned institutional/educational and requires a CUP to build, a high-density residential (HDR) overlay must be placed over the zone for it to qualify, Ms. Yang said. The city already sent a draft of the el- ement to the state, which noted that it met its requirements. After city council approval, the element will be sent back to the state for final approval, after that it will be looked over once more by city of- ficials and published, Ms. Yang said. The frustration with the process was clear from the council, with Coun- cilmember Joe Lyons calling it a “tortur-

ous process” to get the housing element to where it needed to be. Councilmember Sam Pedroza took issue with the system itself, noting the RHNA process “has really held the city hostage in a way.” “It’s such a state way of trying to im- plement a social good, because there’s no magic about 157 units,” he said. “It’s not like we go out there and build 157 units and boom, problem solved.” Both Mr. Pedroza and Councilmem- ber Corey Calaycay noted Claremont has had success in the past when it comes to affordable housing at Courier Place. Mr. Calaycay questioned why it only focuses on building new housing. “Why is it always about building new?” Mr. Calaycay asked. “You have

special interests who benefit from new housing, and no talk about retrofitting housing.” The element was passed unanimously.

CicLaVia coming to Claremont CicLaVia, the popular attraction where city streets are closed for walking, biking and enjoying the outdoors, is coming to Claremont next April. The city signed a memorandum of un- derstanding with the cities of Pomona, La Verne and San Dimas to jointly host the event on April 22, 2018. The event has been a staple of Los An- geles County since 2010, holding multi- ple street events in Venice, Koreatown, Mar Vista, San Fernando Valley, Echo Park, East LA, Pasadena and others, ac- cording to the city. The CicLaVia group will be responsi- ble for the production of the event, in- cluding planning, permitting, outreach, programming and working with staff and the community, the city said. The city will be responsible for public safety, street closures and sanitation. The event will cover several streets throughout the east San Gabriel Valley. It will start in San Dimas on Bonita Av- enue and continue to Arrow Highway, ending in Claremont along College Av- enue and First Street. The one-day event will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The city is requesting a $55,000 grant to fund their part of the event, and will be responsible for the matching require- ment of $66,656.58, according to Human Services Director Anne Turner. The next city council meeting will take place on October 10.

—Matthew Bramlett news@claremont-courier.com

Gold Line, Metrolink target Claremont in letter exchange

C laremont has been thrust into the midst of a dra- matic series of events

regarding the upcoming Gold Line expansion, with only months before groundbreaking.

Days after County Supervisor Hilda So- lis made a motion to study eliminating the Claremont Metrolink Station as part of the upcoming Gold Line expansion, Mayor Larry Schroeder wrote a letter requesting they be informed of the process and that the concerns of the Claremont community be included in future planning. The letter, dated September 25, high- lighted Ms. Solis’ motion during the September 20 Planning and Programming Committee meeting, that came as a sur- prise to the city. City leaders expressed concern that the study would be made without the appropriate input from the community. “While we appreciate your leadership in making sure this issue is studied in a timely fashion to limit Gold Line con- struction expenditures and time delays, should a decision be made to eliminate the

station, we firmly believe this decision should not be made lightly and that the im- pacted users and the Claremont commu- nity must be a part of the process,” Mr. Schroeder wrote. Ms. Solis’ motion requested Metro conduct a 60-day study looking into the pros and cons of eliminating the station, including taking a look at current and pro- jected ridership under existing condi- tions, total parking spaces and current parking space utilization rate, impacts and potential mitigations to Claremont Metrolink riders, cost savings and its over- all impact on Claremont. Specifically, Mr. Schroeder requested the following additions to the study: spe- cific language ensuring Claremont staff will be included in the study team, analy- sis of when Metrolink service will be dis- continued during Gold Line construction and how long Claremont will be without rail transit options, and an analysis of how gate operations at all crossings in the city would be changed if the station was eliminated. In a statement provided to the COURI- ER, Ms. Solis said she introduced the mo- tion—as part of the larger San Bernardi- no Line study—calling for more infor-

mation to allow time for community in- put, avoid delays and to prevent cost over- runs on the Gold Line project. “There was never any intention to push for the elimination of the Claremont Metrolink station,” she wrote. “Only to pri- oritize this portion of the study in order to provide the public with more information as quickly as possible.” Councilmember Corey Calaycay, Mr. Schroeder and Assistant City Manager Colin Tudor attended the Metro meeting on Thursday, September 28 as the board gathered input on the motion. Ms. Solis said she would revise her motion at that time to allow for more input from Clare- mont. “This revised motion includes recom- mendations made by the city of Claremont as part of the study team to assist with community engagement and ensure that the study clearly reflects local concerns,” she wrote. A complete report on the board meet- ing will be published online at claremont- courier.com and in next week’s edition.

Metrolink calls for more overpasses, Claremont responds The mayor took a more forceful tone in

a letter to Metrolink CEO Art Leahy Tues- day. Mr. Schroeder wrote in response to a September 11 letter in which Mr. Leahy suggested all crossings throughout the shared corridor be grade separated, mean- ing an overpass should be built at Clare- mont Boulevard, College Avenue and Cambridge Avenue, in addition to Indian Hill and Towne, Garey, Fulton and White Avenues. In his letter, Mr. Leahy drew attention to several safety concerns with street-lev- el crossings, including train frequency, the amount of tracks cars and pedestrians would have to cross, construction impacts and the possibility of cars and pedestrians going around the gates due to increased wait times. “Evidence from around the United States shows that shared corridors pres- ent a serious change to standards and can cause numerous operations, maintenance and safety challenges,” Mr. Leahy wrote. Mr. Schroeder responded to those con- cerns in a September 26 letter. “The city of Claremont is disappoint- ed by this assertion given how far along

TRAIN TIFF/next page

CITY NEWS
CITY NEWS

TRAIN TIFF/from the previous page

we are in the planning process,” Mr. Schroed- er wrote. “We are also incredibly concerned

with the significant impact three additional grade-separated crossings will have on the com- munity.” Mr. Schroeder remarked that although traffic concerns on Indian Hill Boulevard put

a street-level crossing in jeopardy, there are

no such concerns at other Claremont cross- ings due to vehicle counts and surrounding conditions. Mr. Schroeder also addressed Mr. Leahy’s concerns about safety at the crossings. “To our knowledge, upgrading the current vehicle and pedestrian crossings has not been a priority of Metrolink up to this point, despite the concern for safety noted in your letter,” Mr. Schroeder wrote. The mayor did acknowledge impacts to the community when construction begins, but noted that “these impacts do not com- pare to the overwhelmingly negative im- pacts of having grade separation at all cross- ings in Claremont.” Gold Line Construction Authority CEO Habib Balian responded to Metrolink on September 20, noting the claims presented in Mr. Leahy’s letter “are both premature and not based in fact.” “The construction authority has applied the appropriate design criteria and standards in designing the crossings and has gone above and beyond anything that has been done in Los Angeles County rail system to ensure safety at the crossings,” Mr. Balian wrote.

Council hears Gold Line update The council heard an update on the Gold Line developments from Assistant City Man- ager Colin Tudor at its meeting Tuesday night. Mr. Tudor, who is also on the Gold Line Construction Authority’s technical advi- sory committee, explained the only draft crossing study that had been completed thus far was for the Cambridge Avenue crossing, which suggested an overpass was not needed. He also relayed that Metro is looking into paid parking at the proposed structure in or- der to cut down on parking spaces and the garage filling up too early. A revised amount of parking spaces is expected from the con- struction authority by November, Mr. Tudor said. Councilmember Sam Pedroza called Metrolink “one of the major driving issues,” as opposed to Metro or Ms. Solis, and re- marked that there is a perceived competition between Metro and Metrolink. “Metrolink is making several efforts to stop the Gold Line from moving past Pomona,” he said, noting that they’re initiat- ing these efforts through studies by the Southern California Association of Govern- ments (SCAG) and Metro. Ms. Solis’ study, he said, is to look at something that “at the very least will be able to be identified, some knowledge that we can use.” “We’re going to fight for this Metrolink sta- tion as much as we can, but we’ve got to play along,” Mr. Pedroza later added. Groundbreaking on the project is set to be- gin in December.

—Matthew Bramlett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 4

Assemblyman Holden 2

Assemblyman Chris Holden (seen at right speaking to the Democratic Club of Clare- mont) made two trips to Pil- grim Place last week. The first was last Wednesday at Decker Hall. The second was to meet with local Democrats at their monthly meeting in the Napier Center.

Democrats at their monthly meeting in the Napier Center. COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff COURIER photo/Kathryn

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff

in the Napier Center. COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff COURIER photo/Kathryn Dunn Claremont activist Marilee

COURIER photo/Kathryn Dunn Claremont activist Marilee Scaff, at right, discusses legislative mat- ters with Mr. Holden during his visit to Pilgrim Place last Wednesday. Mr. Holden gave a 30-minute talk then took audience questions sub- mitted to Gene Boutilier, the event’s emcee and host.

sub- mitted to Gene Boutilier, the event’s emcee and host. POLICE BLOTTER Tuesday, September 19 Police
sub- mitted to Gene Boutilier, the event’s emcee and host. POLICE BLOTTER Tuesday, September 19 Police

POLICE BLOTTER

Tuesday, September 19 Police are looking for a woman who used two fake $100 bills at Norm’s. The woman used the phony bills to pay for $70 worth of food and $30 worth of gift cards around 7:39 a.m., according to Lt. Mike Ciszek of the Claremont Police Department. The thief was described as a Caucasian woman in her 40s with blonde hair, and may be a suspect in a previous fake bill exchange at the same restaurant. The investigation is ongoing. **** Darryl Jackson, 55, entered Stater Bros at the corner of Foothill Boulevard and Towne Avenue around 2:38 p.m. and reportedly tried to take several bottles of alcohol in a black backpack, including a $26 bottle of Absolut vodka, a $40 bottle of Jack Daniels, a $38 bottle of Johnny Walker Red and a $38 bottle of Sea- grams Seven whiskey. After a short foot pursuit in the parking lot, Mr. Jackson of Rancho Cucamonga was arrested for shoplifting. While he was being booked at the jail, police found rock cocaine in his sock, adding a charge of bringing nar- cotics into a jail.

**** Police were called after a witness ob- served 37-year-old Jose Guzman of Pomona going in and out of dorm build- ings at Harvey Mudd College, Lt. Ciszek said. When police contacted Mr. Guz-

man at the intersection of Bonita Avenue and Indian Hill Boulevard, he was riding

a 21-speed bicycle that was determined

to be stolen. Officers also found a hypo-

dermic needle, and he was arrested for theft and drug charges. There was no ev- idence of anything stolen from the Har- vey Mud College dorms, Lt. Ciszek said. **** Police want to know who stole con- struction equipment from a work site at Dartmouth and Foothill. The theft oc- curred between 3 p.m. and 3:15 p.m., when workers from the Claremont Col- leges left the tools alone while moving to another part of the site. When they came back, the tools were gone. It is un- known what tools were stolen or their value. Anyone with information should call the Claremont Police Department.

Wednesday, September 20 Arnold Cuevas, 27, of Rialto was driv- ing his Ford F-150 when he drove into the yard of a home on the 300 block of Armstrong Drive around 12:42 a.m. and tried to flee the scene, Lt. Ciszek said. He was pulled over a short time later on Villa Maria Road, and during a field so- briety test, police determined Mr. Cuevas was too drunk to drive. He was arrested for DUI and hit and run and transported to CPD jail.

**** A misunderstanding led to a Fontana man getting arrested for driving a stolen vehicle. Officers picked up on a Honda Odyssey around 8:37 a.m. that was re- ported stolen out of Fontana on Septem- ber 15, Lt. Ciszek said. The 34-year-old driver was arrested at the scene on the 800 block of Foothill Boulevard. During

the investigation, it was revealed the Honda belonged to the man’s girlfriend. The two reportedly had an argument, he took the car and she reported it stolen. Since then, the couple had reconciled, but the girlfriend neglected to contact the Fontana Police Department to call off the stolen car report. She declined to press charges.

****

A $1,500 laptop was taken from an

unlocked car that was sitting in an open garage. The theft took place at 8 p.m. on the 600 block of Huron Drive, according to Lt. Ciszek. In addition to the Hewlett- Packard laptop, the thief also took a $175 laptop bag. There is no suspect informa- tion.

Thursday, September 21

A local transient was arrested after he

threatened and bumped a woman in front of I Like Pie. Daniel Carleton, 28, was walking south on the sidewalk on the 100 block of Indian Hill Boulevard “yelling and acting bizarre” when he saw a religious pendant worn by a 70-year- old woman, Lt. Ciszek said. He began yelling at her, and the woman reportedly said, “You need to be quiet,” then walked away. Mr. Carleton followed, and al- legedly chest-bumped her back and threatened to hit her. Several passersby held Mr. Carleton down on the ground until police arrived and arrested him for battery.

Friday, September 22

A Claremont High School student

most likely regrets leaving a school-is- sued MacBook alone on a Cahuilla Park

table. The 17-year-old girl went to class around 8 a.m., and when she realized she left the laptop behind, ran back to the park and realized it had been stolen, Lt. Ciszek said. There is no suspect infor- mation, and police are investigating.

Saturday, September 23 Police arrested an Ontario man after he trespassed on private property and re- sisted arrest. Russell Vanderbeck, 53, was seen on a private property on Padua and Miramar Avenues around 5:30 p.m. When officers arrived, Mr. Vanderbeck fled on foot through an open area adja- cent to the property, holding a large wooden stick and shouting obscenities at officers. Officers tried to arrest Mr. Van- derbeck, but he physically resisted by tensing up and he was taken to the ground. He suffered a small cut to his forehead, but was medically cleared and arrested. According to police, Mr. Van- derbeck has been arrested several times in the past for resisting arrest and tres- passing.

**** A Mira Loma man was arrested for DUI after rear-ending another car and trying to leave the scene. Zachary Nut- ter, 29, was driving his Ford Excursion in front of The Press around 11:50 p.m. when he hit a black Subaru Impreza and left the scene, according to Lt. Ciszek. He was later found traveling westbound on First Street approaching Oberlin Av- enue. He was stopped, and police deter- mined he was too drunk to be driving. He was arrested and transported to CPD jail.

—Matthew Bramlett news@claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION
EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 5

Vocal crowd addresses CUSD board; CEF makes donation

T he Claremont Unified

School District board

held its first regular meet-

ing of the 2017-18 school year last Thursday, and a crowd of protesters dominated proceed- ings.

Pasadena residentAnne Bigley led a con- tingent of about 30 peo-

ple wearing lime green shirts with a photo of

her disabled son Christopher Frealy and the words “Let him learn.” Ms. Bigley claimed that Christopher, 10, was promised a spot in CUSD’s Sumner- Danbury Elementary School for orthope- dically impaired students this academic year, but was later told he could not attend. He is currently being homeschooled. “You can imagine how hard it was for Christopher to be told way back in February that he was going to third grade at Danbury by the principal,” Ms. Bigley told the school board, “only to find out on the last day of second grade in June that someone messed up the paperwork and he was no longer welcome there.” Ten more supporters, some from Clare-

welcome there.” Ten more supporters, some from Clare- SCHOOL BOARD mont, spoke during public comment plead-

SCHOOL

BOARD

mont, spoke during public comment plead- ing with the school board to “let Christo- pher learn.” Thirty-five minutes later, the packed crowd of Christopher’s supporters exited— along with the CBS reporter interviewing Ms. Bigley—and the board continued with its agenda. The school board could not comment on the protester demands because they were not on the agenda, according to the Brown Act. A full story on this is published below.

District students recognized Two high school student board mem- bers—Emily Marks of Claremont High and Emmanuel Martinez of San Antonio High School—were sworn in, and took their seats at the front of the room next to the school board members. Claremont High students Carlos Acey- tuno-Lopez and Milton Hwang were rec- ognized by Superintendent Jim Elsasser for designing art on the outside of the school’s nutritional services vehicles. “If you see the vehicles out and about around Claremont, you’ll see them wrapped in beautiful and appropriate artwork,” Mr. Elsasser said. Recent CUSD graduate Bryan Brown, now a freshman at University of Califor- nia, Santa Barbara, was honored for re-

ceiving one of four $2,500 Frederick M. Roberts California Legislative Black Cau- cus scholarships. New special education analyst hired The board unanimously approved the hir- ing of Cheri Vandermey as a board certi- fied behavior analyst after she “emerged as the highest-qualified candidate” over 17 other applicants, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Kevin Ward said. Ms. Vandermey spent four years as a be- havior analyst at the LeRoy Haynes Cen- ter in La Verne, which serves children with autism, learning disabilities and other spe- cial needs. Prior to that, she spent three years working in special education for the Long Beach Unified School District, and is an ad- junct professor at California State Uni- versity, Los Angeles. “She has exceptional references and will be an outstanding addition to the CUSD special education team in support of our stu- dents with behavior needs,” Mr. Ward said. **** Board president David Nemer noted that the district now has 52 courses that count toward University of California admissions requirements, including regional occupa- tional program classes—which provide practical, career-oriented skills—like game design, stage design, video production

and retail marketing. “The old dichotomy between ROP classes and a pathway to college is now less of an either/or kind of decision,” Mr. Ne- mer said. “It’s possible to take these ROP classes and still have that be part of the path- way to a UC enrollment. So it just keeps improving.” ****

The board unanimously approved sub- mitting the unaudited financial actuals re- port from last fiscal year to Los Angeles County. It also approved a waiver to the state to get reimbursed for the costs of 2015- 16 state testing, after the district missed an earlier deadline to apply for reimbursement. **** Continuing an annual tradition, Clare- mont Educational Foundation President Nicole Oullette announced a $126,000 do- nation to fund CUSD art, music and tech- nology programs, generating a round of ap- plause from the audience and expressions of gratitude from each board member. “CEF continues to be a great asset to our community, a great asset to our school dis- trict,” Mr. Nemer said. The next meeting of the CUSD School Board is scheduled for Thursday, October 5 at 6:30 p.m., with public session begin-

ning at 7 p.m.

—Kellen Browning

Pasadena family protests Danbury enrollment denial

P asadena resident Anne Bigley, along with 11 friends and family members, spoke to the Claremont

Unified School District Board of Educa- tion at its last meeting Thursday, Septem- ber 21.

Roughly 30 supporters filled the CUSD board room holding handmade signs and breaking into chants of “Let him learn!” during public comment to protest what they said was unfair treatment of Ms. Bigley’s son Christopher Frealy. Christopher—who has cerebral palsy and accompa- nying medical issues—has attended and still attends an after-school conductive education program at Dan- bury School, which is the only appropriate educa- tional program for her son’s disabilities, Ms. Bigley said. The after-school program at Danbury is run by a private company called ConductAbility out of Glen- dora, explained Jim Elsasser, CUSD superintendent. “They have a consultant agreement with CUSD that allows them to use a classroom at Danbury after school hours for their private program,” he said. The private after-school program is not run by CUSD nor do district employees work at the pro- gram. It is open to students from three years old to young adults and meets four afternoons per week after the close of the regular school day. Ms. Bigley, who filed a due process claim against CUSD and the Pasadena Unified School District on July 24, 2017, thinks Claremont wasn’t forthcoming about why her son could not be enrolled full-time this fall at Danbury. An administrative law judge has since dropped CUSD from the due process complaint. In a June 14, 2017 letter addressed to Mr. Elsasser, Ms. Bigley relates that she initially expressed interest in Christopher attending Danbury in a March 2016 email to Maggie Guerrero-Russell, CUSD special ed- ucation program specialist. Ms. Russell, according to the letter, took Ms.

Bigley on a tour of Danbury in May 2016 and said that the family would need to have Christopher’s In- dividual Education Plan (IEP) submitted to begin the transfer process. A series of meetings were held at PUSD, which in- cluded several IEPs, to outline Christopher’s educa- tion plan for the 2017-2018 school year. “Pasadena Unified offered placement and services at Danbury through the IEP process and we accepted and agreed with that IEP,” Ms. Bigley wrote. By her own admission, no CUSD representative was invited or attended those meetings, and she never went to the CUSD district office to officially apply or to enroll Christopher at Danbury. A series of emails to CUSD staff, most of which went unanswered, were attached to the letter submitted to Mr. Elsasser. Still, Ms. Bigley maintains that she, along with rep- resentatives from the Pasadena Unified School Dis- trict, was “assured that there was a space available” for her son at Danbury for the 2017-2018 school year. Ms. Bigley and her son live in Pasadena, which puts them with the Pasadena Unified SELPA. SEL- PAs—or Special Education Local Plan Areas—are made up of a consortium of school districts and county school offices that oversee special education programs. CUSD, on the other hand, is in the East San Gabriel Valley SELPA. Students with disabilities who live within the school district boundaries of Azusa, Baldwin Park, Bassett, Bonita, Charter Oak, Claremont, Covina-Val- ley, Glendora, Pomona, Walnut Valley and West Cov- ina are all part of the East San Gabriel Valley SELPA. California law requires that a student attend school in the district where their parents reside. However, some students may attend schools outside their home district through an inter-district transfer, a fairly com- mon practice among Los Angeles County schools. For students with disabilities where specialized programs and staff are sometimes required to deem a program “appropriate” under the Individuals with Disabilities Act, a SELPA may enter into an agree- ment with another SELPA or a school district to allow

a student to attend a program outside their home dis- trict. Prior to 2014, a population of orthopedically handi- capped and medically fragile students within Clare- mont’s SELPA were educated through the Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE). The county distributed funding, hired staff and provided space for students in need of specialized programs, factoring in a student’s deficits and strengths. With the county program in place, Mr. Elsasser said CUSD honored inter-SELPA transfer students not just to Danbury, but in special education programs dis- trict-wide. In the 2014-2015 school year, things changed when CUSD felt it could provide a more meaningful educa- tional experience than what the students were receiv- ing through the county program. At a June 2014 CUSD board meeting, as reported by the COURIER, Danbury had approximately 75 kids with physical disabilities and/or health impair- ments and was preparing for approximately 10 new students after the county take-back. “The SELPA thought we could run the programs cheaper and better, rather than having them adminis- tered by LA County,” Assistant Superintendent of Student Services Mike Bateman said at the 2014 meeting. And, according to the East San Gabriel Valley SELPA website, the cost of contracting with the LACOE had risen sharply, largely due to the escalat- ing overhead of running county offices in Downey. “That is when we stopped taking any new inter- SELPA agreements due to space issues and our obli- gation to serve our SELPA students,” Mr. Elsasser said. In June of 2017, Ms. Bigley made repeated calls to CUSD, PUSD and the East San Gabriel Valley SELPA regarding Christopher’s transfer approval, which still needed to be signed by the PUSD superin- tendent.

SPECIAL EDUCATION TRANSFER/page 8

Cat got your tongue

by Mellissa Martinez

A nybody who knows me can vouch

for the fact that I am not one to tell

animal stories, dress dogs, cook

pet food or, god forbid, push four-legged friends around in strollers. In fact, I have always found it downright annoying when people go on and on about their pets.

This is why it is so shocking that I have totally fallen for my family’s new furry addition. Despite the fact that she routinely crawls on my laptop as I write, sleeps on my neck, attacks my moving toes, trips me in the hallway and shoves her nose between my fin- gers in a blatant attention-grabbing ploy, I have come to adore her. Our new kitty, Dab, is definitely the most spunky, jumpy, speedy, mischievous little short-haired critter that ever lived. Aside from her magnetic personality, there is an- other reason to love her—words. From a language per- spective, there is no way we can deny the importance of cats. The Oxford English Dictionary has more than 100 entries of cat-derived words and idioms. Just con- sider the common ‘fraidy-cat,’ ‘catty,’ ‘cattail,’ ‘cat- walk,’ ‘hellcat,’ ‘kit-cat,’ ‘cat-suit,’ ‘catfish,’ ‘catcall,’ ‘catnap,’ ‘catnip’ and ‘caterwaul,’ which literally means ‘cry like a cat.’ Oh, and…in case you didn’t know, the German word for hangover is katzenjammer or ‘wailing of cats.’ Although ‘catty corner’ and ‘catawampus’ do not come from the same origin as ‘cat,’ ‘caterpillar’ does! This furry worm was adorably coined ‘shaggy cat,’ from the Late Latin catta ‘cat’ and pilosus, ‘hairy or shaggy.’ Catta replaced the earlier Latin feles, and passed into the Romance languages and most Ger- manic languages as a loanword, resulting in cat cog- nates across language families. Consider German katze, Dutch kat, Italian gatto, Portuguese and

German katze , Dutch kat , Italian gatto , Portuguese and LEX IN THE CITY Spanish

LEX

IN THE

CITY

Spanish gato and French chat. Late Latin catta came from the Byzantine Greek katta, which was derived from languages spoken in the Middle East and Northern Africa. The ultimate source of the word is probably Egyptian. This means that even Nubian, spoken along the Nile, and Berber, spoken in Northern Africa, have similar sounding words for cat, kadis and kadiska, respectively. Also re- lated are the Slavic kotuka, Bulgarian kotka, Russian koška, Polish kot, Lithuanian kate, Finnish katti and possibly the Arabic qitt. When it comes to idiomatic expressions, cats are se- riously represented. In some cases we can look to the literal meaning to assess the origin. For example, to look like something that the cat dragged in is an obvi- ous reference to prey. Curiosity killed the cat, while the cat’s away the mice will play and like herding cats are all straightforward references to cat (or mouse) be- havior. The cat’s meow, the cat’s whiskers and the cat’s paja- mas all came out of the flapper culture in the 1920s. There was a fad at the time for slang terms denoting excellence based on animal anatomy (consider, the bee’s knees and a flea’s eyebrows). The pajama refer- ence is a little harder to pin down. At the time pajamas were a relatively new and risqué fashion trend. It is also possible that ‘cat’ in this sense referred to a cool, jazzy person.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 6

It is not unusual for idioms to have uncertain origins. Over time, they usually accumulate several stories, or folk etymology, which provide colorful explanations for the provenance of these nonsensical expressions. For example, one explanation for let the cat out of the bag describes a marketplace practice of switching a cat for a piglet, while another outlines the particularly bru- tal punishment for sailors of being pounded by a knot- ted rope, commonly called a cat-o-nine-tails (kept in a bag when not in use). This rope may also be the source of the idiom cat got your tongue as sailors tended to stay quiet for a long time after a sound flogging. Other cat idioms with uncertain origins, documented as far back as the 17th century, are raining cats and dogs, more than one way to skin a cat and grin like a Cheshire cat. Although the Cheshire cat was popular- ized in Lewis Carroll’s 1865 Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the term was first attested a century ear- lier. Google provides a multitude of fascinating (and gruesome) stories claiming to be the true sources of these phrases, but all accounts are generally refuted. As for the proverb a cat has nine lives, this is a clear reference to agility, intelligence and craftiness of these furry quadrupeds—they are pros at getting out of tough predicaments. A recent New York Times’ article reveals that “unlike other domestic animals, which were tamed by people, cats probably domesticated themselves, which could account for the haughty inde- pendence of their descendants…domestication came from the cat side, not the human side.” My six-year-old, Felix, who himself shares a name with a very famous crafty cat, has made it clear that he is to be considered Dab’s papa. This makes me our cat’s grandmother while his brother has the honor of uncle. We have all accepted our positions as Felix can be quite convincing. He wakes up every morning and descends down the hall with Dab slung over his shoul- der. Together they prowl the kitchen for food—two cool cats with many adventures ahead of them.

for food—two cool cats with many adventures ahead of them. Dogs believe they are human. Cats

Dogs believe they are human. Cats believe they are God.

—Anonymous

Wildlife in the classroom

by Jan Wheatcroft

Wildlife in the classroom by Jan Wheatcroft up in boring rows and putting masking tape name
Wildlife in the classroom by Jan Wheatcroft up in boring rows and putting masking tape name

up in boring rows and putting masking tape name tags on each desk to make sure no one sat next to a friend. The next morning they piled into the classroom and stared in amazement at the change. They were not happy with the seating arrangements. “Why?” they whined. “Don’t we get to sit with our friends like be- fore?” I explained that when they were able to listen, follow directions and pay attention they could help me move the tables back and begin to work together. And after a few weeks that lovely first group of stu- dents did just that. We had a successful moving day and actually had quite a fulfilling first year. And it was then that the animals made their appear- ance. First to arrive was Slinky the snake. The chil- dren got to touch, hold and feed it and keep its cage clean. They enjoyed reading about snakes as well. Then one day he went missing. This happened just before back to school night. We had searched the en- tire classroom and could not find that little snake. As the parents sat on small chairs and asked ques- tions regarding the fourth grade plans, Slinky slithered across the floor from the bookcase. The parents rose as a group and quickly moved as far away as possible. I scooped him up and let them touch and feel him if they wanted and then he went back into his cage. The next animal was the hamster—a lovely, fat, fluffy beige rodent who lived in a cage filled with green chlorophyll shavings that turned his bottom green no matter how often his cage was cleaned. The

I came to the classroom in the late six- ties fresh from the Claremont Gradu- ate School. I had been placed in a

fourth grade class, my favorite age, and I was full of enthusiasm. I had had two weeks of practice teaching the term before and had survived that first experience. My master teacher was retiring and I was given his class with one week to set up my room. I did not want to have rows of desks and chairs.

With my husband’s help I arranged the desks (each desk was for two children) in groups of four so that we could form small communities where we could work together creating marvelous projects. My bul- letin boards were colorful and I filled the tops of the bookcases with animal cages with the hope that the children would become involved in the responsibility and daily care of living creatures. Thus I began my first day of school as a teacher on my own. The children crowded into the classroom that first morning and I told them they could sit wherever they wanted. I explained how working together on projects would be fun and they could still enjoy sitting by a friend as well. That first day was horrible. I lost all con- trol immediately. They happily sat by their friends and never stopped talking, laughing and being silly. They paid no attention to me, the books in the library, the class rules; it was too much fun and obviously they had fallen into a good thing with a teacher who had handed them the key to do whatever they wanted. I came home that first night in tears. I felt like a total failure. With my husband, I returned to the classroom that evening and we rearranged all the desks, lining them

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 7

children named him Greenbottom and they loved him best. They fought to clean him, to feed him his seeds and to change his water. They held him and patted him and when he died, they wept. We had a sad pro- cession to the “burial grounds” for a funeral with Greenbottom wrapped carefully in a cloth and then put into a small box. Not much work was done that day but it did stimulate a writing exercise. We also had mice and rats and a big rabbit. The children even fought over who would clean the floor from the rabbit each morning. All this good care and handling meant that often a child would get bitten. Then the Humane Society would come and place a yellow quarantine sign in the window. This became a common feature of our room decor. Then came Hairy, our tarantula who arrived as a gift from a friend in Mt. Baldy who had picked him up as he walked across the road one sunny morning. After Hairy, we got the baby alligator. He was a fa- vorite as the children loved to feed him one large goldfish each Friday. They would scoop up a fish and bring it to the alligator who snapped it up in one bite. Having those animals gave my students a chance to observe and connect with them as well as assume the responsibility of feeding and cleaning their living spaces. It helped many of them to overcome their fears, especially with the snake and the tarantula. For some, it gave them a chance to handle small living creatures for the first time. Many years later I did sci- ence experiments with rats and food and the students made guesses as to what was the healthiest food choice. They kept detailed notes, made charts and graphs and decisions from weight outcome. My experience with live creatures was the best way for me to begin my teaching career. It was a good bridge in helping me to connect with a classroom of new faces and to learn from them as they learned from me.

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READERS’ COMMENTS WaterFix not a wise investment [ Editor’s note; The following letter was addressed
READERS’ COMMENTS WaterFix not a wise investment [ Editor’s note; The following letter was addressed

READERS’

COMMENTS

WaterFix not a wise investment

[Editor’s note; The following letter was addressed to Metro- politan Water District of Southern California Chairman Randy Record, with a copy forwarded for publicaiton. —KD]

Dear Chairman Record and colleagues:

All Californians should be troubled by WaterFix, the Department of Water Resources’ plan to bore two tunnels, each as wide as a four-story building and 35 miles long, under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. They are in- tended to modernize the State Water Project that deliv- ers water south to agriculture and southern California cities. The League of Women Voters of California (LWVC) has concluded that this is not a wise investment. The Clare- mont area chapter supports this conclusion and urges you to fund State Water Project system modernization using regional self-reliance as the standard. LWVC is persuaded that the preliminary estimate of $15.5 billion should instead fund a range of job-creating regional projects that would benefit small and medium- sized farms and urban communities currently served by the State Water Project. It could fund measures to sustain some level of through-Delta exports in the near- to mid- term. Regional investments could buffer against growing sea level rise and salt-water intrusion, and could fund deferred maintenance on existing infrastructure. Regional projects to aggressively reuse reclaimed municipal water would significantly increase the security and reliability of our wa- ter supply. For example, reclaimed supplies used to con- junctively manage local groundwater resources would im- prove resilience to drought. Another troubling aspect of WaterFix is the uncertainty that the project will aid recovery of the Bay-Delta Estu- ary fisheries and ecosystem that have been severely dam- aged by decades of water export levels higher than the sys- tem could sustain. Sacramento River water pushes salti- er water west toward the ocean, protecting export water quality, Delta agriculture, and California’s salmon fish- eries. WaterFix environmental documents propose low- er levels of water being diverted from the Delta. How- ever, the amount of allowable flows has yet to be deter- mined by the State Water Board. Aside from restoring an adequate water supply, we are concerned that construc- tion of the massive tunnels will further threaten the ur- ban and agricultural economies surrounding the Delta. Our healthy California economy requires sustainable water delivery systems. That means less, not more, reliance on large-scale water infrastructure that, like Oroville Dam and the State Water Project canals, is vulnerable to de- sign and construction failures, earthquakes, and rising sea levels. When it comes to water, California needs to redefine “visionary” with regional self-reliance in mind.

Tressa Kentner President League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area

President League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area Bailey Jane McHenry Dean and Jackie McHenry

Bailey Jane McHenry

Dean and Jackie McHenry are delight- ed to announce the birth of their first grandchild, Bailey Jane McHenry, who was born on Septem- ber 7 in Santa Cruz to their son Ian McHen- ry and his wife Colleen Kelley. Par- ents and baby are tired but doing well and grandparents can’t stop smiling.

his wife Colleen Kelley. Par- ents and baby are tired but doing well and grandparents can’t

fresh

his wife Colleen Kelley. Par- ents and baby are tired but doing well and grandparents can’t

sweet

well and grandparents can’t stop smiling. fresh sweet Every Friday in print. Every day online
well and grandparents can’t stop smiling. fresh sweet Every Friday in print. Every day online

Every Friday in print. Every day online

claremont-courier.com 621 4761

Claremont C ourier claremont-courier.com
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 8

SPECIAL EDUCATION TRANSFER/from page 4

“I n an effort to track down the inter-SELPA agreement, I con- tacted [Maria Davis] of the

East San Gabriel Valley SELPA,” Ms. Bigley wrote. “She informed me that she had sent the agreement to Pasadena for the superintendent’s signature.”

The agreement was never signed or submitted to CUSD. Had PUSD fulfilled that obligation, it may have learned that CUSD had discontinued inter- SELPA transfers in 2014. On June 13, Ms. Bigley was informed by the Pasadena Unified School District that there was “no space” for Christopher at Danbury. As reported by the COURIER in 2013, conductive education centers around the concept of “neuroplas- ticity,” or the idea that the brain can reorganize itself if taught how to do so. Conductive ed teachers incor- porate rhythm and movement with verbal tasks to help the brain form new neural connections. The story focused on the White family, who traveled from Chicago in 2010 to spend a summer in Clare- mont so their son Payton could attend Danbury. “We fell in love with the program,” Ms. White said. “I called my husband and told him we have to move.” In June 2011, the Whites purchased a home in Claremont solely to have their son attend the pro- gram, which at that time was only offered in a hand- ful of cities across the nation. For the time being, moving to Claremont or work- ing with the Pasadena school district to open its own conductive ed program are the only solutions for a vulnerable population of kids in need of this highly- specialized program. For the Bigleys, moving to Claremont isn’t an op- tion. And given the CUSD/SELPA agreement since the LACOE take back, the district’s hands are tied. Mr. Elsasser explained the district’s position in an email provided to the COURIER by Ms. Bigley. Mr. Elsasser was responding to Ms. Bigley’s friend who had contacted him on behalf of the family. “I understand that your questions come from a place of concern for a child, which is both honorable and appreciated,” he wrote. “While the district and SELPA always seek to work collaboratively with our colleagues and neighboring school districts through- out the San Gabriel Valley, given the purpose of and resources allocated to SELPA programs, our primary responsibility is to ensure access to this program to residents of the district and our SELPA-partnered dis- tricts.

—Kathryn Dunn editor@claremont-courier.com

of the district and our SELPA-partnered dis- t r i c t s . ” —Kathryn
SPORTS
SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 9

Extra effort helps CHS take title at prestigious meet

C laremont High School senior Alyssa

Cantrell started out playing soccer,

so she is accustomed to being

knocked down. But that was soccer, and now her passion is running cross-country.

Last Saturday at the Bob Firman Invitational in Boise, Idaho, the girls elite 5k race started with a mass of 167 runners that quickly merged down to three columns, and then two. That’s when Cantrell, whose legs felt “a little wobbly” before the race, stumbled and fell. And as she attempted to get up, someone knocked her down again. She got up and ran with a vengeance, setting her sights on one runner after another, determined to pass each girl. That big effort made Claremont’s day, because even fin- ishing in 45th place at 19.04, the girls claimed the team title with 137 points, narrowly edging out Bozeman, Mon- tana, which tallied 140. “When I fell, it knocked the wind out of me. It took half a mile to just to catch my breath,” Cantrell said.

half a mile to just to catch my breath,” Cantrell said. Photos by Jose Ancona Alyssa

Photos by Jose Ancona Alyssa Cantrell, left, battles it out on Saturday at the Bob Firman Invitational meet in Boise, Idaho. Though Cantrell fell early in the race, she recovered and ran well enough to get 45th place, which helped the Pack win the elite 5k race.

“If she [Cantrell] hadn’t done that, we would not have won,” Coach Bill Reeves said during practice on Tues- day at CHS. Junior Sydney Hwang led the Claremont charge with her 10th place finish at 18:10 over the 5000-meter, 3.1 mile course. Behind Hwang were Azalea Segura Mora, 15th at 18:16, Tess Rounds, 36th at 18:59, Cantrell 45th and Angie Gushue, 50th at 19:13. The race included many top-ranked teams, so Coach Reeves told his team to come out fast and go for a top- three podium finish. Their victory may have been a sur- prise to some, but it put the Pack on the radar and now the girls rank ninth in the nation. Rankings for cross-country are calculated by Mile- split.com, which is a nationwide news website for dis- tance runners. Athletic Director Mike Collins said it is the highest rank- ing of any Claremont team in any sport going back to at least 1994, when he started at CHS. Collins did note that Kori Carter was a number-one ranked hurdler in 2010. Hwang ran in the shadow of teammate Annie Boos the past two seasons, but has emerged as the new leader of the girls team. She finished just 30 seconds behind the race’s winner, Mountain View, Idaho’s Lexy Halladay. Hwang fixed her eyes on Annie Hill of Glacier High School from Kalispell, Montana (their mascot is also the Wolfpack) and stuck with her the entire race. At the fi- nal turn Hwang made her move, passing Hill, but the Mon- tanan wouldn’t quit and narrowly won the sprint. “That kind of fires me up,” Hwang said. “I will have to work on my closing speed to make sure I don’t lose on the kick again.” It took 30 minutes for the scores to be tabulated and Coach Reeves estimated the girls had placed third. “I was so shocked and surprised, I did not think we could win. We all started jumping up and down,” Hwang said. “I am really proud. It took every person to work hard to get that win.” “It was a great day for the girls,” Coach Reeves said. Hwang also credited Coach Reeves’ tough workouts with making the team both fit and focused. The boys team took 13th, with Aaron Reyes leading the Pack in 53rd at 16:23, followed by Adam Trafecanty, 68th at 16:33, Vicente Huerta, 84th at 16:41, Jeremiah Alar- con, 88th at 16:43 and Michael Carpenter, 114th at 16:56. With both the boys and girls varsity teams in Idaho, it was up to their teammates to fill in locally at the Billy York Invitational in Riverside. But if those runners represent- ed Claremont’s second tier, you would not know it from the results.

second tier, you would not know it from the results. Claremont junior Sydney Hwang rounds a

Claremont junior Sydney Hwang rounds a curve on her way to a 10th-place finish in the Bob Firman Invi- tational meet.

Claremont won team titles in the girls varsity A, JV boys, JV girls, frosh/soph boys and frosh/soph girls races. Boys varsity took the third place team title. Claremont took two individual titles, with senior Kait- lyn Heckers winning the JV race and sophomore Mae Key Ketter winning the frosh/soph race. The Pack took 11 of the top 12 places in the girls JV race. Coach Reeves planned to rest his top runners for the second league meet on Wednesday at Bonelli Regional Park to save their legs for the Clovis Invitational on Oc- tober 7 and league finals on October 28.

—Steven Felschundneff

GIRLS TENNIS

The CHS girls varsity tennis team continued their winning ways by defeat- ing South Hills High School, 16-2, last Thursday in Claremont. The Pack’s number one doubles team, juniors Astrid Petropoulos and Emma Behrens, won all three of their matches without dropping a game. Number three doubles team, seniors Jillian Ontiveros and Grace Wride, saved two match points to beat South Hills’ number-one doubles team, 7-6 (6). Claremont’s number-one singles player, freshman Goldie La, improved her overall record to 13-0 with a win over the South Hills’ number one player. The Pack returned to action on Tues- day with a home match against Bonita High School. The girls moved to 3-0 in league play with a 14-4 win over the Bearcats. Singles players Elizabeth Wu, Jahday Drewery, Caren Uribe and La dominated by winning all nine singles sets. Their overall record is now 4-2.

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Claremont went 3-1 in pool play dur- ing the Ayala tournament last weekend, but lost in the finals, which were decided by a single set of play. Claremont beat Arcadia in the first set before losing to Martin Luther King. The girls lost to Glendora 3-0 last Wednesday but played well, keeping each set within a handful of points. The loss was a disappointment, but Glendora is a very competitive team so Claremont had to play faster, which will make the Pack a better team, according to Coach Angel Posada. He also praised the efforts of Kylie Robinson, calling her a “natural all- around athlete. “It’s nice having a player like her. She is like another coach on the court be- cause of her knowledge of the game and she has the trust of her teammates.” They played Bonita at home Wednes- day in another tough match, losing to the

Bearcats, 3-1. Bonita took the first set, 25-22, but Claremont came back and got a decisive victory in the second set, 25- 16. The third set was a real barnburner, resulting in a 28-26 Bearcat victory. Per- haps deflated by the tough loss in the third set, the Pack fell 25-12 in the final set. The girls are now 1-2 in league and 5- 4 overall. They have another league match against Ayala on Friday.

BOYS WATER POLO

Last Thursday the boys won their sea- son opener, 5-4, in an away game against Glendora. The team took a lot of shots on goal, taking two or three attempts be- fore connecting. Many of the missed shots were just poor luck, such as hitting the goal post or having a tipped shot re- covered by Glendora, according to Coach Kristin Rodriguez. Over the weekend they were in the Villa Park tournament, which meant the boys played a fatiguing seven games in

one week. Coach Rodriguez is hopeful the pace will make them stronger as league gets into full swing. CHS played Bonita Wednesday, re- sults will appear in the next edition of the COURIER.

FOOTBALL

The Pack lost a very close non-con- ference away game against Alta Loma, 33-31 last Friday. Claremont played well and led with less than a minute to go, but ultimately could not hold on to their lead. Quarterback Reggie Retzlaff had 12 completions from 22 attempts for 200 yards, including nine carries for a total of 61 yards and two touchdowns. Junior Elijah Bennett had three recep- tions for 84 yards and one touchdown. Senior Andrew Johnson had 26 carries for 88 yards and one touchdown. The boys’ record is now 2-3 and they will play at Glendora next Friday in the Palomares League opener.

—Steven Felschundneff steven@claremont-courier.com

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architect

WOOTTON

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Attorneys at Law

134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor

Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 482-1422

Specializing in Family Law in Claremont since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation with Children, Property Division, Alimony, Child Support

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COX and PATEL, DDS

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optometry

Ann M. Johannsen, O.D. Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.

OPTOMETRY

695 W. Foothill Blvd.

Established 1972

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Building a better Claremont since 1985

chiropractor

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(909) 621-1208

• Joint & Muscle Pain • Headache

• Sciatica • Pinched nerve

• Most Insurance accepted

• Personal injury

dentist

PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S. D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.

Cosmetic & General Dentistry

615 W. Foothill Blvd.

Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 624-6815

1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers, White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.

real estate broker

Geoff T. Hamill

Broker Associate, ABR, CRS, GRI, E-PRO, GREEN, SRS, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900

Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty

Phone: (909) 621-0500

Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

#1 in Claremont sales & listings since 1988

Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time Meticulous care and attention to detail

volvo

EXCLUSIVELY VOLVO 1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO CALL: SAM NASRI (909) 605-5700 WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVOLVOCARS.COM GOING ABROAD? CALL ABOUT “EUROPEAN DELIVERY”

toyota

CLAREMONT TOYOTA 601 AUTO CENTER DR., CLAREMONT (909) 625-1500 SALES • SERVICE • PARTS

attorney

BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK

A Law Corporation

414 Yale Avenue, Suite K

Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 621-4707

41 years experience in: Business Law, Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.

c.p.a.

LIGHTFOOT • RALLS & LIGHTFOOT LLP

Certified Public Accountants

675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300

Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 626-2623

Tax Planning & Preparation • Accounting

financial consultants

SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN

CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER®

Professional Securities offered through LPL Financial Member of FINRA/SIPC

419 Yale Ave. Claremont

(909) 625-1052

“Your financial security is my priority”

advertising

COURIER

Advertise your professional service here.

Call Mary Rose for rates and great ideas on ways to boost your busi- ness.

(909) 621-4761

www.claremont-courier.com

mazda

ONTARIO MAZDA ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (877) 822-2209

NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS SERVING YOUR NEEDS OVER 35 YEARS 15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE. WWW.MAZDAOFONTARIO.COM

fiat

fiat FIAT OF ONTARIO ONTARIO AUTO CENTER 1201 AUTO CENTER DR. (888) 349-3110 WWW.FIATOFONTARIO.COM

FIAT OF ONTARIO ONTARIO AUTO CENTER 1201 AUTO CENTER DR. (888) 349-3110 WWW.FIATOFONTARIO.COM

attorney

MIKE F. O’BRIEN

Attorney at Law

212 Yale Avenue

Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 626-9999

www.mikefobrien.com

www.facebook.com/moblawoffices

Specialist in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Se habla español.

design/build

HARTMANBALDWIN

DESIGN/BUILD

100 West Foothill Blvd.

Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 670-1344

www.hartmanbaldwin.com

Since 1984

Residential remodeling, historic restorations, and custom home building

naturopathic doctor

Integrative Health Institutes Dr. Tamara D Trebilcock, ND

665 E. Foothill Blvd. Suite D

Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 625-1100

www.integrativehi.com

Natural, safe and effective patient-centered care. Specialties: hormone balancing, high choles- terol/ blood pressure, digestion, fertility, anxiety and depression.

tax preparation/EA

D. PROFFITT, EA

Claremont, CA 91711

Phone: (909) 445-1379

dee@dproffittea.com Visit my website at www.dproffittea.com

Income Tax Specialist since 1981

Payroll Service • Accounting

nissan

EMPIRE NISSAN ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 234-2544

15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.

NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS WWW.EMPIRENISSAN.COM

volkswagen

EXCLUSIVELY VOLKSWAGEN 1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO CALL CHRIS OR DON (909) 605-8843 WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVW.COM WE REFUSE TO BE UNDERSOLD

Janice Davis Loving mother and wife Longtime Claremont resident Janice Marie Christenson Davis died peacefully

Janice Davis

Loving mother and wife

Longtime Claremont resident Janice Marie Christenson Davis died peacefully on September 23, 2017 in Claremont. She was 74. Jan was born on June 17, 1943 to par- ents George and Mable Christenson in Los Angeles. She grew up and attended school in South Gate, where she met her high school sweetheart and future husband, Wesley Davis. The couple married in 1963, just a few years after her high school graduation, and spent their early married years in Los Angeles.

After the birth of their two children— a son, Scott, and a daughter, Siri—the cou- ple headed east to Claremont in 1976. Jan was a great family matriarch and a loving mother, her family shared. Mrs. Davis was involved with Mason- ic organizations Job’s Daughters and Eastern Star. She had tremendous interest in genealogy and took courses and be- longed to several local genealogy groups. Mrs. Davis is survived by her husband Wesley Davis of Claremont; her son Scott Davis and his wife Angelica of Fres-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 11

OBITUARIES
OBITUARIES

no; her daughter Siri Neas and her husband Jim of Chino Hills; her three grandchil- dren, Zachary, Heather and Rae-lyn; and her grand dog, Abby. She was preceded in death by her parents George and Mable Christensen and her sister Danette Thomas. A memorial service took place Wednes- day, September 27 at St Paul’s Episcopal Church in Pomona, with a graveside service at Rose Hills in Whittier. Donations in her memory may be sent to March of Dimes a marchofdimes.org.

her memory may be sent to March of Dimes a marchofdimes.org. Greta A. Fryxell Noted oceanographer,

Greta A. Fryxell

Noted oceanographer, female pioneer in academia, great grandmother

Greta Albrecht Fryxell died from con- gestive heart failure on September 24, 2017 at her home in Claremont at the age of 90. She was born November 21, 1926 in Princeton, Illinois to Esther Andreen Al- brecht and Arthur Joseph (“Ham”) Al- brecht. She enjoyed growing up on the family farm near Tiskilwa, Illinois, where she attended public schools. She graduated summa cum laude from Au- gustana College in Rock Island, Illinois in 1948. After college, she taught math and science for several years at junior high schools in Davenport and Ames, Iowa. She married Paul Arnold Fryxell on August 23, 1947, when they were both just 20 years old. Family moves took the Fryxells to Las Cruces, New Mexico, Wichita, Kansas, and Tempe, Arizona before they settled for nearly three decades in Col- lege Station, Texas. It was there that Ms. Fryxell began her postgraduate studies at Texas A&M University, where she was among the first classes of women to enroll at the formerly all-male university. In 1969 she earned a master’s degree in education, with a major in earth sciences. A PhD in oceanography followed in 1975. After postdoctoral studies in Oslo, Norway, she continued her research and taught at Texas A&M, becoming a pro- fessor of oceanography, and again blaz- ing a trail as one of the school’s first fe- male professors. Professor Fryxell was a specialist in marine phytoplankton and took part in research oceanographic cruises in the North Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and in the waters around Antarctica, working with living cultures as well as with pre- served samples from the open ocean. She published widely on her findings in professional journals. Samples were also collected for her project from the equa- torial Pacific. Many of these samples are now archived at the University of Texas, Austin, where she and Mr. Fryxell lived in their early retirement years. The cou- ple moved to Claremont in 2005. Most of her professional career was devoted to open ocean phytoplankton, particularly diatoms, including variation in abundance, life histories and patterns

variation in abundance, life histories and patterns of species succession. In her later career, she became

of species succession. In her later career, she became concerned with studies of the sometimes neurotoxic diatoms in the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. This genus is often found in ocean waters near the sea coast, apparently stimulated in part by the pollution resulting from increasing populations of people living near coast- lines. Professor Fryxell received many hon- ors, including the Outstanding Doctoral Candidate Award from the Former Stu- dents’ Association at Texas A&M in 1975. She was recognized as the Out- standing Woman of Brazos County in 1979 by 13 cooperating community or- ganizations and received the Outstand- ing Achievement Award from Augustana College Alumni Association in 1980. An American Association of University Women fellowship named in her honor was contributed by the Bryan/College Station branch of the AAUW. In 1988, she shared the Provasoli Award of the Phycological Society of America for a paper published in the Journal of Phycology that year with two colleagues, A.M. Wood and R.S. Lande. She also received the 1991 Faculty Dis- tinguished Achievement Award in Re- search from Texas A&M’s Former Stu- dents’ Association, followed by a gold medal from the Geosciences and Earth Resources Advisory Council in 1992. She received the Lifetime Award of Excellence in Psychology in 1996 from the Psychological Society of America, and was selected as a Fellow of the

American Association for the Advance- ment of Science in 1997. She is listed in American Men and Women in Science, Who’s Who of Pro- fessional and Business Women, Person- alities of the South, Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who of American Women, Who’s Who in the Frontiers of Science and Technology, Who’s Who in the South and Southwest, and Who’s Who in the World. Professor Fryxell felt blessed with ex- cellent students and laboratory assis- tants, her family shared, and their lives and achievements continued to be of in- terest and great personal satisfaction to her, as were the many achievements of her family members. She was an active Unitarian Universalist for five decades, serving in many roles in her churches, from religious education to administra- tion. She especially enjoyed and felt supported by the church music in that liberal religion, her family added. “My mother tended to focus on one thing at a time, and do it whole-hearted- ly,” her family said. “And yet she also had a remarkable capacity for change.” As a mother, she baked cakes and sewed clothes from scratch, and created what was then an entirely novel con- cept—a formal certificate program for babysitters. These activities seemed to be her entire focus. But one day, after her youngest child had finished elemen- tary school, she simply decided to move on to scientific research. After that, she devoted her energies to her second career in oceanography, “where she accomplished more in half a career than most people do in their entire lives.” She was constrained by her family ties to pursue her second career at a uni- versity where women were not accepted as students, let alone as faculty, when she began. But she reached full profes- sor at this same university and won all of their faculty awards. That certainly seemed to be her vocation, and her pro- fessional momentum would have been sufficient to carry her career into her

late-70s.

While she was in her late 60s, her husband was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer, prompting a move to the next stage of her life. She abruptly re-

Tim

Greenman

Longtime Claremont resident Tim Greenman unexpectedly died in his sleep at his Claremont home on Sat- urday, September 23. It was his 57th birthday. Services for Mr. Greenman are pending. A full obituary will appear in a future edition of the COURIER.

tired, and her energies were hereafter de- voted to driving many miles to take her husband to endless doctor’s appoint- ments, while simultaneously handling the full-time care of her elderly mother, plus taking them both to the family beach house on the south Texas coast two weeks per month. “That was truly her third career,” her family shared. After her mother died in 2001, and then her husband in 2011, Ms. Fryxell moved on to her fourth career—writing many volumes of family histories. She was still writing new histories in the last year of her life. She was predeceased by her sisters Julia Lorraine Albrecht and Miriam Jean Brigida, and her husband of more than 63 years, Paul Arnold Fryxell. She is survived by her sons Karl Joseph Fryxell and his wife Peggy Kraft Fryxell and Glen Edward Fryxell and his wife, Lenita Ann Fryxell, and daugh- ter Joan Esther Fryxell and her husband, Timothy Michael Ross; five grandchil- dren and six great-grandchildren; and six nephews. A memorial service will be held De- cember 2. More information will be published in a future edition of the COURIER. In lieu of flowers, the fami- ly asks that honorary donations in Ms. Fryxell’s name be made to the American Macular Degeneration Foundation at macular.org/how-donate, the American Cancer Society at cancer.org, or the Na- tional Multiple Sclerosis Society at na- tionalmssociety.org/donate.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 12

Claremont Community Foundation welcomes new executive director

T he Claremont Community Foundation

(CCF), a philanthropic group that pro-

vides grants to local arts, education

and social programs, has a new leader.

Aurelia Brogan, formerly the arts coordinator for the city of Claremont, began her job as the foundation’s executive director in July. She said CCF had been without a direc- tor for some time, and sees the start of her tenure as a “good time to hit refresh.” “Right now we’re in ‘let’s catch up a little bit’ mode,” Ms. Brogan said. She said the foundation, established in 1989, used to be squarely focused on giving to the arts, but has strayed from that purpose over time. Ms. Brogan wants to go back to the organization’s roots. “I think there’s so much opportunity here and so much room for growth,” Ms. Brogan said. The foundation accepts donations big and small from Claremont individuals, businesses and groups, and parcels out more than $15,000 each year to organizations like the Claremont Museum of Art, the Foothill Family Shelter and Shoes That Fit. Grant applications are due November 2. The foundation hosts monthly public art shows and oth- er events several times a year, but Ms. Brogan plans to make the group even more visible in the community. “I’m going to use that marketing background, hopefully, to really get the word out there,” she said. For instance, Ms. Brogan said, the foundation is redesigning its website and putting a donation box at its art shows. She also wants to reach out to “the next generation of families,” since she thinks younger Claremont residents could be eager donors to the arts. “One thing that’s important to me is just making sure that our giving process is easier than it’s ever been,” she said.

giving process is easier than it’s ever been,” she said. COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Aurelia Brogan was

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Aurelia Brogan was recently hired as the executive director of the Claremont Community Foundation. Ms. Brogan, who has been a Claremont resident for three years, was formerly the public arts coordinator for the city of Claremont. Her new position will enable her to keep working with art—she has a studio art degree— while reaching a broader audience.

new position will enable her to keep working with art—she has a studio art degree— while
CALENDAR To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com. Your week in 9

CALENDAR

To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.

To have an event listed,

To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.
To have an event listed, email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.

email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.

email Mick Rhodes at calendar@claremont-courier.com.

Your week in

9

days

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 13

Mick Rhodes covers the calendar, arts and enter- tainment. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday, one week before publication. Please include date, time, address, phone, web address, email address and cover charge (if applicable).

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

SCRIPPS’ NOONISH CONCERTS GET UNDERWAY This year’s Scripps College free Friday “Noon” Concert Se- ries kicks off at 12:15 p.m. with a per- formance at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Co- lumbia Ave., Claremont. The concert, Mozart, Piano Quartet in G minor, K. 478, features Jacqueline Suzuki, violin; Cynthia Fogg (Pomona), viola; Tom Flaherty (Pomona), cello; Susan Svrček, piano. Sponsored by the Departments of Music at Pomona and Scripps colleges, the weekly concerts are a joint production of Scripps and the Pomona College Music Department. Doors open at noon, and food is not permitted in the auditorium. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-3266. IT’S FRIDAY: LET’S ROCK Friday Nights Live features the rock, country, folk and blues of Claremont Voodoo Society at Laemmle plaza; Lee Powers at the cham- ber of commerce; Doug Brooks and Friends at Shelton Park; and Falls Like

Rain at city hall. Friday Nights Live runs from 6 to 9 p.m. through October 27. More info is at claremontchamber.org. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING MEAT The public is invited to a free and open to the public panel event at Claremont Graduate University focusing on cutting- edge research in the psychology of meat consumption. The talk takes place at 7 p.m. in Albrecht Auditorium, 925 N. Dartmouth Ave., Claremont. “Why is eating meat so essential to some people, and disgusting to others?” a press release asked. As part of a workshop about effective animal ad- vocacy, the panel event will feature schol- ars Julia Hormes, Shiva Pauer, Jared Pi- azza and Matthew Ruby exploring “con- flicted omnivores, the role of ambivalence, disgust and emotion regulation,” and more. For more information email nick.ow- char@cgu.edu.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

AUTHORS READ, TALK AT RHINO Authors Allen Callaci and Peter Church-

es will be reading from their respective lat- est books, Heart Like a Starfish and Au- tobiography Without Words, at 4 p.m. at Rhino Records, 235 Yale Ave., Clare- mont. More info is at pelekinesis.com. CHS CONCERT UNDER THE STARS Claremont High School’s In- strumental Music Program holds its annual free and open to the public Concert Under the Stars at 7 p.m., and this year attendees can brush up against television royalty while enjoying the show. The concert on the school’s football field will feature not only the El Roble Band and Orchestra, CHS String Orchestra, CHS Symphony Strings and the CHS Marching Band, but also the KIIT Car from the 1980s televi- sion show Knight Rider. The super ad- vanced (for 1982) Pontiac Trans Am will be parked at the event for pictures while the CHS Band plays the show’s theme song. There might even be a special guest from the original show. Hasselhoff, any- body?!? Food and drink will be available for purchase. More info is at the Wolfpack Music Facebook page. GRAMMY-NOMINATED PIANIST

IN CONCERT Pomona College’s Bridges Hall of Music, at 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont, hosts a free 8 p.m. show with Grammy-nominated pianist, Genevieve Feiwen Lee. Ms. Lee will offer a program of music for piano and harpsichord by Claude Debussy and Sofia Gubaidulina, Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de La Guerre and Antoine Forqueray. Selections will include preludes from Debussy Book 1 and Gubaidulina’s Musical Toys. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1

LOST IN THE SUPER MARKET Sunday morning means the fabulous and free ClaremontArtisans’and Farmers’Mar- ket is happening on from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. along Second Street between Indian Hill Blvd. and YaleAve. The market offers fresh flowers, living and cut, fruits, vegetables and herbs, artisan juices, cheeses and nuts, as well as art, jewelry, clothing, books, antiques and live music. Grab a coffee at

NINE DAY/continues on the next page

as well as art, jewelry, clothing, books, antiques and live music. Grab a coffee at NINE
NINE-DAY/ from the previous page Some Crust, Starbucks or Coffee Bean and take a stroll

NINE-DAY/from the previous page

Some Crust, Starbucks or Coffee Bean and take a stroll through the colorful and aro-

matic display. You won’t regret it. COMIC BOOKS & COLLECTIBLES SHOW The Packing House, at 532 W. First St., Claremont, is the site of the bi- monthly free comic book and collectibles show from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This event fea- tures comic book art demonstrations, comic books, collectibles, new and vintage comics, graphic novels and more. NOTED ORGANIST Claremont Unit- ed Church of Christ, 233 West Harrison Ave., presents a 3 p.m. concert with or- ganist David Baskeyfield. Tickets, which are $15 for general admission and $12 for students and seniors, will be available at the door. Mr. Baskeyfield, who has won several major competitions, will perform works by Bach, Mozart, Dupré, Dukas and Tournemire and will improvise on a sug- gested theme. He will be playing Clare- mont UCC’s Glatter Goetz/Rosales Organ, one of the premier pipe organs on the west coast. Childcare is provided. For more in- formation call (909) 626-1201 or email of- ficemanager@claremontucc.org. HEARTBEATS FOR BETH BENEFIT Musicians, artists and friends are part of “Heartbeats for Beth,” a benefit for long- time Claremont resident, piano teacher and music supporter Beth Michowski Boos, who was recently diagnosed with severe secondary pulmonary hypertension, car- dio myopathy and chronic congenital heart failure, and is facing a possible heart and lung transplant. The free show

at the Press, 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont,

gets underway at 5 p.m. and goes until 10 p.m It will include raffles, drink specials and performances from Claremont Voodoo Society, Mick Rhodes and the Hard Eight, Black Tongued Bells, 40 Amp Fuse, Adri- enne Selina, Pride of Cucamonga, the Liars Club, the J Birds, Jazz Doctors, Jen Rosen and Mary Beth Fletcher and the San

Gabriel Valley Punk Collective. More info is at youcaring.com/bethboos-914338.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 2

A CHAT WITH FATHER OF MOD- ERN PORTFOLIO THEORY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Clare- mont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “Progress Towards a Game of Life Decision Support System,” with guest speaker Harry Max Markowitz. Mr. Markowitz, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1990 for his work on portfolio theory, will discuss why household financial decisions for indi- viduals and/or families should be consid- ered part of the “Game of Life” that indi- viduals and families play out. More in- formation is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open- events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu. HOW DID THE BLIND POET SEE WHAT HE SAW? The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKen-

na College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “Blind Faith: The Hin-

di Poet Surdas and his Visual Legacy” with

John “Jack” Stratton Hawley. The 16th- century poet Hindi Surdas, a great devo- tee of Krishna, is said to have been blind. Mr. Hawley, professor of religion at

Barnard College and Columbia Universi- ty, wonders and explains how the poet could have seen what he saw and also ad- dresses why he is seen so frequently in il- lustrated manuscripts. Mr. Hawley’s most recent books on India’s bhakti traditions are A Storm of Songs: India and the Idea of the Bhakti Movement, Sur’s Ocean (with Kenneth Bryant) and a poem-by- poem commentary called Into Sur’s Ocean. A Storm of Songs received the Coomaraswamy Book Prize of the Asso- ciation for Asian Studies in 2017. More in- formation is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open- events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu. SUSTAINABLE CLAREMONT AN- NUAL MEETING Sustainable Clare- mont’s annual meeting takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Padua Hills Theatre, 4467 Padua Ave., Claremont. The free and open to the public event, “Plant Seeds of Hope,” is sponsored by Pick My Solar, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, Clare- mont COURIER and Foothill Gold Line. It will feature a social hour with sustain- ability exhibits and light refreshments, fol- lowed by environmental leadership awards for local sustainability champions and re- flections on the progress and future of Sus- tainable Claremont. For more info email info@sustainableclaremont.org or call (909) 625-8767, extension 238.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3

LATINA/O MIGRATION, ROOTS, RESISTANCE Gilda Ochoa will speak about “Where the Past Meets the Present:

Latina/o Migration, Roots, and Resistance in LA.” at Scripps College’s Hampton Room at Malott Commons, 345 E. Ninth St., Claremont. The free and open to the public lecture gets underway at 12:15 p.m. Ms. Ochoa, Pomona College professor of Chicana/o-Latina/o studies and author of Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community, will talk about immigration and community organizing in the context of the Los Angeles County community of La Puente. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/scrippspresents or (909)

607-1870.

CITIZEN/SCIENCE ADVOCATE Caren Cooper from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences is the guest at Harvey Mudd College’s free and open Distinguished Speaker Series at 7 p.m. tonight at the Shanahan Center, 320 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. “Citizen science movements challenge the world to consider radical, new relationships among scientists and engineers and non-experts,” a press re- lease stated. A dessert reception follows each lecture. More info is at hmc.edu/cal- endar or (909) 607-0943.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4

PULITZER WINNER AT ULV The University of La Verne hosts Pulitzer Prize-winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen in a free lecture at 3:30 p.m. The talk will be held at Morgan Auditorium, Founders Hall, 1950 Third St., La Verne. Mr. Nguyen will discuss his latest book, The Refugees, the 2017 selection for the uni- versity’s One Book, One University pro- gram, which provides all new students

copies of the same book so they can gain a common learning experience. For more information dial (909) 448-4408 or email lrojo@laverne.edu. EUROPE/US RELATIONS EXPERT AT ATH The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna Col- lege, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “Can Europe come back in the age of Trump, Merkel, and Macron?” with guest speaker Patrick A. Chamorel. Mr. Chamorel, senior resident at Stanford in Washington College, will address whether the new political landscape forged by Brexit, Trump, Merkel and Marcon can reshape—for better or worse—Europe and transatlantic relations. Mr. Chamorel was a senior advisor to the French prime minister among other advisory roles in the government. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5

THE SCIENCE OF LEADERSHIP The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “What We Know about Leadership from Science,” with David V. Day. More in- formation is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open- events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu. FILM ON BUDDHIST MONK, AC- TIVIST, AUTHOR A one-time screen-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 14

ing of Walk With Me, a new film about the practice and life of Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, author and peace activist, is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. at the Laemmle Theatre, 450 W. Second St., Claremont. Tickets can be purchased online at gathr.us/screening/20776. More info is at walkwithmefilm.com.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6

SCRIPPS’ NOON CONCERT Scripps

College free Friday Noon Concert series continues today with music by Ives, Kohn, and Schubert from Sarah Thorn- blade (Pomona), violin, and Genevieve Fei- wen Lee (Pomona), on piano. The show is at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave. Doors open at noon, and food is not permitted in the auditorium. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-

3266.

TAKE A CHOCOLATE WALK Clare- mont Educational Foundation’s first annual Chocolate Walk takes place from 4 to 7 p.m. in the Village. Participants can browse 24 chocolate stops among Village merchants, listen to live music and see a Claremont student art exhibit. Tickets are $20 or four for $60, and are available at supportcef.com/chocolate. The Claremont Educational Foundation is a nonprofit organization that raises money to support art, music, technology and teacher inno- vation grants for in Claremont.

organization that raises money to support art, music, technology and teacher inno- vation grants for in
NIGHT LIFE THE BLACK WATCH PUB : 497 N. Central Ave., #B, Upland. Live music
NIGHT LIFE THE BLACK WATCH PUB : 497 N. Central Ave., #B, Upland. Live music

NIGHT LIFE

THE BLACK WATCH PUB: 497 N. Central Ave., #B, Upland. Live music at

9 p.m. Friday, Saturday and occasional

Sundays. No cover. Info: theblackwatch- pub.com or (909) 981-6069. —Friday, September 29: 4 the People.

—Saturday, September 30: Crosby Tyler. —Saturday, October 7: Los Olivas. —Friday, October 13: Rock Circus Revival, Interpretation Disorder. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont. Info: folkmusic- center.com or (909) 624-2928. —Open mic night, last Sunday of every month. Sign-up at 6 p.m., performances 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. $2. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont. 18 and over. Info: flapper- scomedy.com or (818) 845-9721. —Friday, September 29: Michael Rayner,

8 and 10 p.m., $20.

—Saturday, September 30: Michael Rayn- er, 7 and 9 p.m., $20. —Sunday, October 1: L. J. Brown I’m Just Sayin’ Show, 7 p.m., $20. —Thursday, October 5: William Ran- dolph, 8 p.m., $20; open mic auditions, 10 p.m. —Friday, October 6: John Wynn, 8 and 10 p.m., $20. —Saturday, October 7: John Wynn, 7 and 9:30 p.m., $20. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. Info: fox-

pomona.com or (909) 784-3677. —Monday, October 9: The Flaming Lips, Mac DeMarco, 8:30 p.m., tickets on sale at a future date. —Saturday, October 14: Father John Misty, Weyes Blood, 8 p.m., all ages, tick- ets on sale at a future date. GELENCSER HOUSE CONCERTS:

Directions given upon reservation. Info:

(909) 596-1266, gelencserhousecon- certs.com or email singfolk@yahoo.com —Saturday, October 14: John York, 7:30 p.m., all ages, $15 donation. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. Info: glasshouse.us or (909)

865-3802.

—Friday, September 29: The Buttertones, Hot Flash Heat Wave, Pity Party, Pinky Pinky, 8 p.m., all ages, $12-$15. —Saturday, September 30: GBH, The Casualties, Spider, 8 p.m., all ages, $25. —Thursday, October 5: Saint Etienne, 8 p.m., all ages, $20. —Sunday, October 8: Between the Buried and Me, The Contortionist, Polyphia, Toothgrinder, HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Live music Wednesdays 6 to 8:30 p.m., Saturdays 7 to 10 p.m. Info:

casa425.com or (909) 624-2272. LAST NAME BREWING: 2120 Porter- field Way, Upland. Live music Saturdays from 6 to 9 p.m. unless otherwise noted. No cover. Info: lastnamebrewing.com or (909) 579-0032. LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural Center Dr., Rancho Cucamonga. Info: lewisfamilyplayhouse.com or (909)

Rancho Cucamonga. Info: lewisfamilyplayhouse.com or (909) 477-2752. —Saturday, November 4: Fortunate Son: Tribute to

477-2752.

—Saturday, November 4: Fortunate Son:

Tribute to CCR, 7 p.m., all ages, $27-$34. —Sunday, November 5: Steep Canyon Rangers, 2 p.m., all ages, $38-$45. PACIFIC WINE MERCHANTS: 210 East A St., Upland, at the Old Upland De- pot Station. Beer garden, cigar lounge. Open Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m.

to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to

10 p.m. Live music some Fridays and Sat-

urdays, 6 to 10 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Har-

vard Ave., Claremont. Live music Thurs- day through Saturday, no cover, open un- til 2 a.m. Info: thepressrestaurant.com or (909) 625-4808. —Friday, September 29: Big Screen Porno,

10 p.m.

—Saturday, September 30: Eva and the Vagabond Tales, 10 p.m. —Sunday, October 1: “Heartbeats for Beth” benefit show, 5 to 9 p.m., Claremont Voodoo Society, Mick Rhodes and the Hard Eight, Black Tongued Bells, 40 Amp Fuse, Adrienne Selina, Pride of Cuca- monga, the Liars Club, the J Birds, Jazz Doctors, Jen Rosen and Mary Beth Fletch- er and the San Gabriel Valley Punk Col- lective. —Monday, October 2: Mixtape Mon- days with DJ Rydell, 9 p.m. —Tuesday, October 3: Trivia Night, 9:30 p.m.Vagabond Tales, 10 p.m. TUTTI MANGIA: 102 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Late-night happy hour Friday and Saturday from 9 to 11 p.m. Bar menu available until 10:30 p.m. featuring $2 oys-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 16

$2 oys- Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 16 CINEMA LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE : 450 W.
$2 oys- Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 16 CINEMA LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE : 450 W.

CINEMA

LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Clare- mont. Info: laemmle.com or (909) 621- 5500. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; sen- iors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: American Made; Bat- tle of the Sexes; Brad’s Status; King- man: The Golden Circle; The LEGO Ninjago Movie. —Weekend morning only: Dolores. —Sunday “One Day Only:” The Seag- ull [subtitled]. —Monday night: Hans Zimmer: Live in Prague.

ter shooters and $3 caprese sliders. Info:

tuttimangia.com or (909) 625-4669. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. Happy hour specials. Info: waltersrestaurant.com or (909) 767-

2255.

—Thursdays: Michael Ryan, Ken Soder-

lund, Hai Muradian.

Mick Rhodes covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Please include date, time, address, phone, web address, email address and cover charge (if applicable). Email:

calendar@claremont-courier.com.

time, address, phone, web address, email address and cover charge (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 17

Chorale celebrates the past, moves to the future

C laremont Chorale has a

lot to celebrate these

days. The all-volunteer

community choir is beginning its 50th season and its elder statesman is being feted for an amazing run of 49 years with the group. Additionally, Greg Norton, it’s longtime creative director, is stepping down next spring.

To celebrate the milestones, the Chorale is throwing itself a fundraising party. The choir’s 50th anniversary din- ner and silent auction, which is open to the public, will take place Saturday, Oc- tober 14 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. at Taylor Hall, 1775 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Clare- mont. The event will include a buffet din- ner, a cash bar, a host of recordings of notable past performances, a commem- orative program, and a sing-along for seasoned vocalists and amateurs alike. The apex of the evening will be 87- year-old Stuart Oskamp sharing his unique narrative to a presentation of photos from the Chorale’s beginnings as the Lincoln Twenty in 1968 through to- day. Mr. Oskamp has been with the Chorale since 1969. “I was hoping that I’d be able to sing for 50 years,” Mr. Oskamp said. “If my voice holds out I’ll keep on.” Tickets are $60 and are available at claremontchorale.org through October

4. The group boasts several other singers who have been with choir for more than 30 years. What is it that keeps all these musicians coming back? “I can’t really explain it,” said Suzanne Snijder van Wissenkerke, who was recently elected president of the Chorale’s board of directors. “But, singing in a choir turns out to be a super wonderful health booster. And, of course another big factor would be lead- ership from the director.” That would be Greg Norton, who will be leaving at the end of the 2017-18 season after 25 years as the Chorale’s artistic director. His last day on the job will be May 19, 2018 at the choir’s 50th anniversary celebration concert. He’s on board as a consultant for the job search, which has just begun. Candidates will be interviewed in the first part of next year, and the new director’s debut will take place next summer, he said. As a nonprofit, the Chorale survives through tax-deductible donations and volunteerism. The pianist and the direc- tor draw a salary, but the rest of the peo- ple who make the group go are unpaid. Ticket sales cover less than half of over- all expenses. “A group like this, running on a shoe- string budget, with anything like that, that it can find a way to survive for fifty years is kind of exciting,” Mr. Norton said. “I’m proud of them from that standpoint.”

Norton said. “I’m proud of them from that standpoint.” COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Artistic Director Greg

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Artistic Director Greg Norton leads the Claremont Chorale this week as they rehearse songs for their December Christ- mas concert. Mr. Norton will be retiring soon and a search for new artistic director is about to begin.

and a search for new artistic director is about to begin. Marcyn Clements is all smiles

Marcyn Clements is all smiles as she rehearses with the Claremont Chorale.

There’s a certain modest dignity in what the Claremont Chorale does. It’s true that Los Angeles—with its Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and Walt Disney Concert Hall, among others—is just a 50-minute drive away (if the Traffic Gods are smiling). And those profes- sional musicians, with their tuxedoes and sparkling, state-of-the-art venues, they have their allure. But the Clare- mont Chorale offers something closer, both in proximity and in immediacy. “A community choir is different,” Mr. Norton said. “It’s your own friends and neighbors who are up there. And that’s the way most music has been performed through history: The people from the neighborhood and the community figur- ing out how to do it for each other. So, I think there is some gratification in that for the singers. I think that’s what keeps them coming back.” Mr. Oskamp agreed. “Singing has

been my main avocation,” He said. “Every week I enjoy a change of pace at Monday rehearsal.” Those Monday night rehearsals have been a constant for so many years, for so many local singers. “It becomes one of the things they do every week,” Mr. Norton said. “It’s one of their activities in life. Some people bowl, some people have card games. For the choir, this is the thing they do on Monday nights.” While appreciative of the support he’s received over the years, Mr. Norton is hopeful that the Chorale’s harmonies can reach new ears. One of his struggles has always been to somehow transfer his dedicated but humble audience’s en- thusiasm to the larger community. “It’s a musical resource for the people who live in Claremont to be served as far as hearing music and being exposed to art in a very local and nearby way.” After the work of the anniversary

local and nearby way.” After the work of the anniversary Longtime Claremont resident Stuart Oskamp has

Longtime Claremont resident Stuart Oskamp has been singing with the Chorale for 49 of the group’s 50 years.

fundraiser dinner is done, Ms. Snijder has her sights set on outreach. “There a lot of younger people who are interested in this kind of music, but it’s a matter of getting the music out there,” she said. “We’re continuing to work on more ef- fective ways to reach out to the commu- nity through student populations, people that have recently left college, and that sort of thing.” Claremont Chorale’s 50th anniver- sary dinner and silent auction is Satur- day, October 14 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. at Taylor Hall, 1775 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. Tickets are $60 and are available at claremontchorale.org through October 4. The Chorale’s next performance is “Christmas With the Chorale” on De- cember 2 at 7:30 p.m. and December 3 at 3 p.m. at Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 Harrison Ave.

—Mick Rhodes mickrhodes@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 18 THEATER CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Info:
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 29, 2017 18
THEATER
CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd.,
Claremont. Info: candlelightpavilion.com or (909)
626-1254.
Call Rachel at (909) 621-4761 to place your ad.
—Through Saturday, October 14: My Way: A Musi-
cal Tribute to Frank Sinatra. Admission (including din-
ner) is $58-$73.
—Friday, October 20: 9 to 5. Admission (including
dinner) is $58-$73. A $25 show only preview takes
place Friday, October 20.
CLAREMONT HIGH SCHOOL Fruechte Theatre:
1601 N. Indian Hill Blvd
Info: chstheatre.cusd.clare-
mont.edu or (909) 624-9053, ext. 30463.
—Friday, October 27: Comedysportz, 7:02 p.m.
—Friday, November 3: Comedysportz, 7:02 p.m.
—Tuesday, November 14: F.O.O.T. Auction, featuring
selections from A Chorus Line, 7 p.m. Repeats
Wednesday, November 15.
LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural Cen-
ter Dr., Rancho Cucamonga. Info: lewisfamilyplay-
house.com or (909) 477-2752.
—Saturday, October 14: Roald Dahl’s The Witches,
4 p.m., all ages, $16-$18. Repeats at various times
through Sunday, October 29.
OPHELIA’S JUMP: 2114 Porterfield Way, Upland.
Information: opheliasjump.org.
—Through October 7: The Complete Works of
William Shakespeare (Abridged), 8 p.m. September
29, 30, October 6 and 7; 4 p.m. October 1; 3 p.m. Oc-
tober 7, $26 general admission, $23 for students and
seniors.
—Saturday, October 21: The Blankety Blank presents
Paranormal High, 8 p.m.
COURIER CROSSWORD
Puzzle 438 by Myles Mellor
Across
64. In use
1.
911 responder
65. Mrs. sheep
4.
Fable maker
9.
Legal wrong
Down
13. Soapmaker’s need
1. Go by, as time
14. Part of biota
2. Decision is up to me!
15. Spoil
3. Units of magnetic flux density
16. Temperature controls, briefly
4. “Hair” hairstyles
17. More sparse
5. Spark
18. Eastern Church images
6. Pigeonhole
19. Claremont boasts the only museum
of this kind in America
7. Nabisco favorite
8. Charades, e.g.
22.
Eastern Europeans
9. World’s most populous city
23.
Black yellow and orange birds
10. Abbr. after a seller’s suggested
price
27.
“Or
!”
11.
Bled
28.
Cursed
12.
Results of some bombs: Abbr.
31.
“Yecch!”
15.
Shortest-titled film to win Best Pic-
32.
Rodeo event
ture
34.
Floor, in France
20.
“Thank you —- much!”
36.
With no delay
21.
Lode load
39.
High-hatter
24.
Hog roast
40.
In a bridled manner
25.
Sponge cake ingredient
41.
Sch. in Stillwater
26.
The car, affectionately
42.
Sitting Bull’s home
28.
Mineral spring site
Death Valley
43.
Leave off
29.
Most snowy?
45.
47.
On a higher level
30.
Available
46.
50.
Make up the damage
33.
Legendary Giant
48.
51.
Noted film editor born in Claremont
34.
Slippery character
49.
55.
Breathing blockage
35.
Yaris maker
50.
58.
Film star Flynn
36.
Clouseau, briefly
52.
59.
French painter, Jean
37.
French for we
53.
60.
Actor Errol
38.
Born name
54.
61.
Panorama
39.
Former coin of France
55.
62.
Remote setting
42.
Up to, informally
56.
63.
Bakery selections
44.
Southwest desert that includes
57.
Lined up
Congregation location
Young people
Thicke or Bates
“The Wizard of Oz” composer
Killer whale
Expedition
Eaten up
It borders the Atl.
Thickness
‘Science Guy’ Bill
Answers to last week’s puzzle #437
LEGAL TENDER
LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761

TENDER legalads@claremont-courier.com • 909.621.4761 County of Los Angeles Department of the Treasurer and Tax

County of Los Angeles Department of the Treasurer and Tax Collector

Notice of Divided Publication

Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code (R&TC) Sec- tions 3702, 3381, and 3382, the Los Angeles County Treasurer and Tax Collector is publishing in divided dis- tribution, the Notice of Sale of Tax-Defaulted Property Subject to the Tax Collector's Power to Sell in and for the County of Los Angeles, State of California, to various newspapers of general circulation published in the County. A portion of the list appears in each of such newspapers.

Notice of Public Auction of Tax-Defaulted Property Subject to the Tax Collector's Power to Sell (Sale No. 2017A)

Whereas, on Tuesday, August 8, 2017, the Board of Supervisors of the County of Los Angeles, State of California, directed me, JOSEPH KELLY, Treasurer and Tax Collector, to sell at public auction certain tax- defaulted properties.

I hereby give public notice, that unless said properties

are redeemed, prior to the close of business on the last

business day prior to the first day of the public auction, or Friday, October 20, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time),

I will offer for sale and sell said properties on Monday,

October 23, 2017, beginning at 9:00 a.m. (Pacific Time), to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check in law- ful money of the United States, for not less than the min-

imum bid, at the Fairplex, Los Angeles County Fairgrounds, 1101 West McKinley Avenue, Building 6, Pomona, California. I will re-offer any properties that did not sell, for a reduced minimum bid, on Tuesday, October 24, 2017.

The minimum bid for each parcel is the total amount necessary to redeem, plus costs, as required by R&TC Section 3698.5.

If a property does not sell at the public auction, the right

of redemption will revive and remain until Friday, De- cember 1, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time).

Beginning Saturday, December 2, 2017, at 3:00 p.m. (Pacific Time), through Tuesday, December 5, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. (Pacific Time), I will re-offer for sale any unimproved properties that did not sell or were not re- deemed prior to 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time), on Friday, De- cember 1, 2017, at online auction at www.bid4assests .com/losangeles.

Prospective bidders should obtain detailed information of this sale from the County of Los Angeles Treasurer and Tax Collector (TTC) at http://ttc.lacounty.gov/. Bid- ders are required to pre-register at 225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los Angeles, California and submit a re- fundable $5,000 deposit in the form of cash, cashier's check or bank-issued money order at the time of regis- tration. The TTC will not accept personal checks, two- party checks or business checks for the registration deposit. The TTC will apply the registration deposit to- wards the minimum bid. Registration will begin on Monday, September 18, 2017, at 8:00 a.m. and end on Friday, October 6, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time).

Pursuant to R&TC Section 3692.3, the TTC sells all property ``as is`` and the County and its employees are not liable for any known or unknown conditions of the property, including, but not limited to, errors in the records of the Office of the Assessor (Assessor) pertain- ing to improvement of the property.

If the TTC sells a property, parties of interest, as defined

by R&TC Section 4675, have a right to file a claim with the County for any proceeds from the sale, which are in excess of the liens and costs required to be paid from the proceeds. If there are any excess proceeds after the ap- plication of the minimum bid, the TTC will send notice to all parties of interest, pursuant to law.

Please direct requests for information concerning re- demption of tax-defaulted property to Joseph Kelly, Treasurer and Tax Collector, at 225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los Angeles, California 90012.

The Assessor's Identification Number (AIN) in this pub- lication refers to the Assessor's Map Book, the Map Page, and the individual Parcel Number on the Map Page. If a change in the AIN occurred, the publication will show both prior and current AINs. An explanation of the parcel numbering system and the referenced maps

are available at the Office of the Assessor located at 500 West Temple Street, Room 225, LosAngeles, California

90012.

Should you require a copy of the list explaining the ab- breviations used in this publication, please visit the TTC, at 225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los Angeles, Cali- fornia 90012, or call 1(213) 974-2045.

I certify under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is

true and correct. Executed at Los Angeles, California, on

September 15, 2017.

Executed at Los Angeles, California, on September 15, 2017. JOSEPH KELLY Treasurer and Tax Collector County

JOSEPH KELLY Treasurer and Tax Collector County of Los Angeles State of California

The real property that is subject to this notice is situated in the County of Los Angeles, State of California, and is described as follows:

PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF TAX-DE- FAULTED PROPERTY SUBJECT TO THE POWER OF SALE (SALE NO. 2017A) 3381 AIN 8381-003-022 RICKARDS,SUZANNE J LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

$52,991.00

CN941706 515 Sep 29, Oct 6,13, 2017

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-17- 770563-AB Order No.: 730-1704552-70 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED TO THE COPY PROVI DED TO THE MORTGAGOR OR TRUSTOR (Pursuant to Cal. Civ. Code 2923.3) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UN- DER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 5/22/2012. UN- LESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auc- tion sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or fed- eral credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or sav- ings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial C ode and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but with- out covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regard- ing title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication

of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth

below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BEN- EFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTALAMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): Jing Shin Chi, a

single woman Recorded: 6/11/2012 as Instrument No.

20120863019 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 10/12/2017 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: At the Dou- bletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, in the Vineyard Ballroom Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $416,417.22 The purported property address is: 1110 N SHORT CIR, WALNUT, CA 91789 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8709-052- 021 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are

considering bidding on this property lien, you should un- derstand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the proper- ty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does

not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien be- ing auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the high- est bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Sec- tion 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sa le date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the resched- uled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.quality- loan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-17-770563-AB. Information about post- ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be re- flected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee dis-

claims any liability for any incorrectness of the property

address or other common designation, if any, shown here- in. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this No- tice of Sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, includ- ing if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return o f the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further re- course against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note hold- ers right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR AT- TEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY IN- FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan Service Cor- poration 411 Ivy Street San Diego, CA 92101 619-645- 7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 800- 280-2832 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Re- instatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-17-770563-AB IDSPub #0131188 9/15/2017 9/22/2017 9/29/2017

T.S. No.: 2014-01098-CA A.P.N.:8113-007-009 Prop- erty Address: 1664 Fruitvale Avenue, South El Monte, CA 91733 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION RE- FERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT AT- TACHED IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 08/08/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO- CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON- TACT A LAWYER. Trustor: GUADALUPE GRISELDA INDAAND ALEJANDRO HERNAN- DEZ, WIFE AND HUSBAND AS JOINT TEN- ANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive,

LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 08/16/2007 as Instrument No. 20071921810 in book ---, page--- and further mod- ified by that certain Loan Modification Agreement recorded on 03/15/2013 as Instrument Number 20130392931 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 10/25/2017 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reason- ably estimated costs and other charges: $ 758,696.72 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Ad- dress or other common designation of real property: 1664 Fruitvale Avenue, South El Monte, CA 91733 A.P.N.:

8113-007-009 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any li-

ability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, ex- penses and advances at the time of the initial publication

of the Notice of Sale is: $ 758,696.72. Note: Because the

Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bid- der shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the un- dersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real prop- erty is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE NO- TICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should un- derstand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auc- tion does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that

the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be re- sponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or

a title insurance company, either of which may charge

you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender

may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed

one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and

to

If

poned, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)-960-8299

or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.
com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeSer-

vices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2014-01098-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx Date: Sep- tember 14, 2017

Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACT- ING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB- TAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. PUBLISH: Septembera 29 and October 6 and 13, 2017

the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale.

you wish to learn whether your sale date has been post-

T.S. No.: 2013-04278-CA A.P.N.:2079-020-028 Prop- erty Address: 22718 Liberty Bell Road, Calabasas, CA

91302

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST

DATED 09/17/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT

A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION

OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Trustor:

JAY LELAND WERNER AND ROSALINDA MON- TELLANO WERNER, TRUSTEES OF THE JAY LELAND WERNER AND ROSALINDA MON- TELLANO WERNER LIVING TRUST DATED

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 29, 2017 19

JULY 19, 2005. DulyAppointed Trustee: Western Pro- gressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 11/17/2005 as In- strument No. 05 2793002 in book ---, page--- and of Of- ficial Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 10/11/2017 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766 Estimated amount of un- paid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 349,911.08 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BYA STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCI- ATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHOR- IZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, ti- tle, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common des- ignation of real property: 22718 Liberty Bell Road, Cal- abasas, CA 91302 A.P.N.: 2079-020-028 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding ti- tle, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining prin- cipal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, un- der the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and ex- penses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the ob- ligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 349,911.08. Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less

than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the suc- cessful bidder shall have no further recourse. The ben- eficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence fore- closure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear own- ership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be re-

sponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the prop- erty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, pri- ority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you

a fee for this information. If you consult either of these re-

sources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this prop- erty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more

times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pur- suant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale post- ponements be made available to you and to the public, as

a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to

learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if

applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of

this property, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this In- ternet Web site http://www.altisource.com/Mortgage- Services/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2013-04278-CA. In- formation about postponements that are very short in du- ration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify post- ponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. West- ern Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.alti- source.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/Truste eServices.aspx Date: August 31, 2017

Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACT- ING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB- TAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. PUBLISH: September 15, 22 and 29, 2017

T.S. No.: 2016-03840-CA A.P.N.:8317-033-005 Prop- erty Address: 779 East La Verne Avenue, Pomona, CA

91767

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/07/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT

A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION

OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Trustor:

Adolfo Sotelo, a single man Duly Appointed Trustee:

Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 12/14/2005 as Instrument No. 05 3072449 in book ---, page-

-- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 10/12/2017

at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN

LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC

CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 81,658.56 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BYA STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCI- ATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHOR- IZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, ti- tle, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common des- ignation of real property: 779 East La Verne Avenue, Pomona, CA 91767 A.P.N.: 8317-033-005 The under- signed Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding ti- tle, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining prin- cipal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, un- der the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and ex- penses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the ob- ligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the

initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 81,658.56. Note:

Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the suc- cessful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the un- dersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real prop- erty is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE NO- TICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are con- sidering bidding on this property lien, you should under- stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the proper- ty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien be- ing auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the high- est bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Sec- tion 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires

that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the resched- uled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site

http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/Default-

Management/TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2016-03840-CA. Information about

postponements that are very short in duration or that oc- cur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immedi- ately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Western Pro- gressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Pal- ma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Infor- mation Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.

com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeSer-

vices.aspx Date: August 31, 2017

Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACT- ING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB- TAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. PUBLISH: September 15, 22 and 29, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2017239827 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as 1.) P&J DESIGNS, 2.) CLOVERS, 414 South Indian Hill Blvd., Apt#26, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): 1.) Paola A. Alvarado, 414 South Indian Hill Blvd., Apt#26, Claremont, CA 91711. 2.) Johanna G. Alvarado, 414 South Indian Hill Blvd., Apt#26, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fic- titious name or names listed above on 08/2017. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Johanna G. Alvarado Title: General Partner This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/ County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/29/17. NO- TICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdi- vision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days af- ter any change in the facts set forth in the statement pur- suant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Ef- fective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business Name State- ment must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form. The filing of this statement does not of itself au- thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and

Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 8, 15, 22 and 29, 2017

state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 8,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 8,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 8,
LEGAL TENDER
LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761

T.S. No.: 2015-03705-CA A.P.N.:8731-010-002 Prop-

erty Address: 2413 East Gloria Street, West Covina, CA

91792

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION RE- FERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 06/16/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE AC- TION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EX- PLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO- CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON- TACT A LAWYER. Trustor: BOBBY F. PAGDILAO AND CHRIS S. PAGDILAO, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee:

Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 06/28/2005 as Instrument No. 05 1519391 in book ---, page--- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale:

10/13/2017 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, rea- sonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 573,787.76 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described prop- erty under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as:

More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 2413 East Gloria Street, West Covina, CA 91792 A.P.N.: 8731- 010-002 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liabili- ty for any incorrectness of the street address or other com- mon designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or im- plied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the un- paid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and ad- vances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 573,787.76. Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to con- vey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be record- ed in the county where the real property is located. NO- TICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE NOTICE TO PO- TENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically en- title you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auc- tion, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can re- ceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to in- vestigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the coun- ty recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, ben- eficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)-960- 8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.alti- source.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/Truste eServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2015-03705-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.com/MortgageSer- vices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx Date:

August 30, 2017

Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACT- ING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB- TAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. PUBLISH: September 15, 22 and 29, 2017

T.S. No.: 2017-00946-CA A.P.N.:5088-001-008 Prop-

erty Address: 953 Schumacher Drive, Los Angeles, CA

90048

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION RE- FERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/22/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE AC- TION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EX- PLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO- CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON- TACT A LAWYER. Trustor: Alan F. Broidy And Heather B. Broidy, Husband And Wife As joint ten- ants DulyAppointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 10/29/2004 as Instrument No. 04 2801396 in book ---, page--- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, Cal- ifornia, Date of Sale: 10/20/2017 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other

charges: $ 683,885.02 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NA- TIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BYA STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and inter- est conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the here- inafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 953 Schumacher Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90048 A.P.N.: 5088-001-008 The undersigned Trustee dis- claims any liability for any incorrectness of the street ad- dress or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or war- ranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest there- on, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable esti- mated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the ini- tial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 683,885.02. Note:

Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the suc- cessful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the un- dersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real prop- erty is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE NO- TICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are con- sidering bidding on this property lien, you should un- derstand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the prop- erty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien be- ing auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the high- est bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title in-

surance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NO- TICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale post- ponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/Mortgage- Services/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx us- ing the file number assigned to this case 2017-00946-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone in- formation or on the Internet Web site. The best way to ver- ify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for ben- eficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299

http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/Default- CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other

Management/TrusteeServices.aspx Date: September 8,

of sale in lawful money of the United States), Double-

2017

of the property. You should also be aware that the lien be-

ing auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the high- est bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned

derstand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the prop- erty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership

Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the suc- cessful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The benefici- ary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Elec- tion to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are con- sidering bidding on this property lien, you should un-

mated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the ini- tial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 726,880.21. Note:

off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title in- surance company, either of which may charge you a fee

for this information. If you consult either of these resources,

you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NO- TICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code.

The law requires that information about trustee sale post- ponements be made available to you and to the public,

as

a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish

to

learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and,

if

applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale

of this property, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this

Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/Mortgage- Services/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx us- ing the file number assigned to this case 2014-04153-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone in-

formation or on the Internet Web site. The best way to ver-

ify postponement information is to attend the scheduled

sale. Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for ben-

eficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299

http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/Default-

Management/TrusteeServices.aspx Date:August 28, 2017

Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACT- ING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB- TAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. PUBLISH: September 15, 22 and 29, 2017

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No.

124570 Title No. 150295855 NOTE: THERE IS A SUM- MARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCU- MENT ATTACHED. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER

A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/22/2006. UNLESS

YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROP- ERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 10/26/2017 at 9:00 AM, The Mortgage Law Firm, PLC, as duly ap- pointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust record- ed 10/02/2006, as Instrument No. 06 2187746, in book

xx, page xx, of Official Records in the office of the Coun-

ty Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California,

executed by Dina M. Kessler, A Married Woman as Her Sole and Separate Property, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH,

form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time

Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACT- ING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB- TAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. PUBLISH: September 22 and 29 and October 6, 2017

T.S. No.: 2014-04153-CA A.P.N.:5063-003-041 Prop-

erty Address: 2121 S Redondo Blvd, Los Angeles, CA

90016

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION RE- FERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/14/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE AC- TION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EX- PLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO- CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON- TACT A LAWYER. Trustor: Anita Henderson, a Married Woman as Her Sole and Separate Proper- ty Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 12/04/2006 as Instrument No. 20062681691 in book ---, page--- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles Coun- ty, California, Date of Sale: 10/11/2017 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 726,880.21 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NA- TIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BYA STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and inter- est conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the here- inafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 2121 S Redondo Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016 A.P.N.: 5063-003-041 The undersigned Trustee dis- claims any liability for any incorrectness of the street ad- dress or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or war- ranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest there- on, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable esti-

tree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 - Vineyard Ballroom. All right,

title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said Coun-

ty and State, described as: PARCEL 1: LOT 22 AND 23

OF TRACT NO. 1671, IN THE CITY OF CLARE-

MONT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIAAS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK

21, PAGES 182 AND 183 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUN- TY.EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF SAID LAND, AS SHOWN IN FINAL JUDGMENT RECORDED, 6/18/1953 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS NO.3359,AND IN FINAL ORDER OF CONDEM- NATION RECORDED 11/04/1953 NO. 2463 IN THE OFFICE OF SAID LOS ANGELES CO. CA. PARCEL

2: LOT 24 OF TRACT NO. 1671, IN THE COUNTY

OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 21, PAGES 182 AND 183 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY.EX- CEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF SAID LAND, AS SHOWN IN FINAL JUDGMENT RECORDED, 6/18/1953 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS NO.3359, AND IN FINAL ORDER OF CONDEM- NATION RECORDED 11/04/1953 NO. 2463 IN THE OFFICE OF SAID LOS ANGELES CO. CA. APN 8669-

011-007 and 8669-011-008. The street address and oth-

er common designation, if any, of the real property de-

scribed above is purported to be: 620 East Baseline Road, Claremont, CA 91711. The undersigned Trustee disclaims

any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed

or

implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances,

to

pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured

by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provid-

ed in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said

Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee

and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured

by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs,

expenses and advances at the time of the initial publica-

tion of the Notice of Sale is: $460,996.01. If the Trustee

is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bid-

der's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed

of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the under-

signed a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election

to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real prop-

erty is located. Dated: 9/11/2017 THE MORTGAGE LAW FIRM, PLC Adriana Durham/Authorized Signa- ture 41689 ENTERPRISE CIRCLE NORTH, STE. 228, TEMECULA, CA 92590 (619) 465-8200. FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (800) 280-2832. The Mortgage Law Firm, PLC. may be

attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained may

be used for that purpose. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-

DERS: If you are considering bidding on this property

lien, you should understand that there are risks involved

in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a

lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at

a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 29, 2017 20

and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear ti- tle to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult ei- ther of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civ- il Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed,

and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 for in- formation regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Inter- net Web site -www.Auction.com- for information re- garding the sale of this property, using the file number as- signed to this case: 124570. Information about post- ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be re- flected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web

site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. A-4632972 09/29/2017, 10/06/2017, 10/13/2017

as the Special Event street closure is of a short duration (approximately eight hours) and will not create long-term physical impacts to the City. Therefore, no further en- vironmental review is necessary.FOR MORE IN- FORMATION: Please contact Inland Valley Hope Part- ners at (909) 622-3806 x.105, or via email at kamig@in- landvalleyhopepartners.org INLAND VALLEY HOPE PARTNERS PUBLISH: SEPTEMBER 29, 2017

ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO: 2017206924 Current File No: 2017243289 The following person has abandoned the use of the fic- titious business name DASH DEVELOPMENT LLC, located at 101 Cornell Ave, Claremont, CA 91711. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on August 2, 2017 in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant(s): DASH DEVELOPMENT LLC, 101 Cornell Ave, Claremont, CA 91711. The business was con- ducted by a Limited Liability Company. This statement was filed with the Registrar- Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on

08/30/17.

I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kellysue M. Kaplan Title: Managing Member Publish: September 15, 22, 29 and October 6, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: KS021026

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:

Petitioner: LINDA JACQUELINE ZYCH on behalf

of JACK ADAM ZYCH

Filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names

as follows:

Present name:

JACK ADAM ZYCH

to Proposed name:

JACK ADAM KATANA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this

matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change

of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to

the name changes described above must file a written ob- jection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard

and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the pe-

tition should not be granted. If no written objection is time-

ly filed, the court may grant the petition without a hear-

ing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 7, 2017 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept.: J Room: Floor

Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles,

400 Civic Center Plaza,

Pomona, CA 91766,

Branch: Pomona

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2017222297 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as BE TAX AND BOOKKEEPING SOLUTIONS, 2353 Foothill Blvd, La Verne, CA 91750. Mailing ad- dress: 1534 Bridget Court, Upland, CA 91784. Regis- trant(s): BE PROPERTY SOLUTIONS LLC, 2106 Foothill Blvd., Suite B232, La Verne, CA 91750.

This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-

pany. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 08/2017.I

declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Bhavini Feldman Title: Partner This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/14/17. NOTICE- In Accor-

dance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section

17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form. The filing of this statement does not of itself au- thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and

A

copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published

Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 8, 15, 22 and

at

least once each week for four successive weeks prior

29, 2017.

to

the date set for hearing on the petition in the follow-

ing newspaper of general circulation, printed in this coun-

ty:

CLAREMONT COURIER,

114 Olive Street,

Claremont, CA 91711

/s/ Dan T. Oki Dated: September 13, 2017

Judge of the Superior Court

Petitioner:

Linda Jacqueline Zych on behalf of Jack Adam Zych,

615 Remuda Dr.,

Glendora, CA 91740,

Ph.# (626) 377-7443 PUBLISH: September 29, October 6, 13 and 20, 2017

SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 2017-06 INTRODUCED AT THE REGULAR CITY

COUNCIL MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 12, 2017

AND ADOPTED AT THE REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 27, 2017 (Full texts of these ordinances are on file in the office of the City Clerk) SUMMARY OF A PROPOSED ORDINANCE OF

THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CLARE- MONT, CALIFORNIA,ADDING CHAPTER 15.54 TO THE CLAREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE PROVIDING AN EXPEDITED, STREAMLINED PERMITTING PROCESS FOR ELECTRIC VE- HICLE CHARGING SYSTEMS The proposed ordinance adds Chapter 15.54 of the Clare- mont Municipal Code. The purpose of this Chapter is to promote and encourage the use of electric vehicles by cre-

ating an expedited, streamlined permitting process for elec- tric vehicle charging stations while promoting public health

and safety and preventing specific adverse impacts in the

installation and use of such charging stations. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES ) ss. CITY OF CLAREMONT )

I, Shelley Desautels, City Clerk of the City of Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of California, hereby cer- tify that the foregoing Ordinance No 2017-06 was in-

troduced th at a regular meeting of said council held on the

12

passed and adopted by said city council, signed by the may-

or, and attested by the city clerk of said city, all at a reg-

ular meeting of said council held on the 26 th day of Sep-

tember, 2017, and that the same was passed and adopt-

ed by the following vote:

day of September 2017, that it was regularly

AYES: Councilmembers: Calaycay, Lyons, Nasiali, Pedroza, Schroeder NOES: Councilmembers: None

ABSENT: Councilmembers: None

ABSTAINED: Councilmembers: None

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MORA MUNROE CELAYA

Case No. 17STPB08258 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors,

and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will

or estate, or both, of MORA MUNROE CELAYA

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Ann Re-

ichling in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS

ANGELES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE re- quests that Ann Reichling be appointed as personal rep- resentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate un- der the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Be- fore taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or con- sented to the proposed action.) The independent ad-

ministration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on Oct. 11, 2017

at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. 9 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los

Angeles, CA 90012. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting

of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state

your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a con- tingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal represen-

tative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to

a general personal representative, as defined in section

58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from

the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a no- tice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code.

Other California statutes and legal authority may affect

your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with

an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY

EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a per-

son interested in the estate, you may file with the court

a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the fil-

ing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from

the court clerk.Attorney for petitioner: PATRICIAA LOBELLO ESQ SBN 40231 LAMB MORRISAND LOBELLO LLP615 E FOOTHILL BLVD, STE C SAN DIMAS CA 91773-1255 CN941618 CELAYA Sep

15,22,29, 2017

SAN DIMAS CA 91773-1255 CN941618 CELAYA Sep 15,22,29, 2017 City Clerk of the City of Claremont

City Clerk of the City of Claremont

PUBLISH: September 29, 2017

NOTIFICATION OF SPECIAL EVENT October 14, 2017 Inland Valley Hope Partners 44 th Annual Walk for the Hungry and Homeless Location: Claremont University Consortium (101 S. Mills Ave.) Event Date and Time:

October 14, 2017, 9 a.m. to Noon Inland Valley Hope Partners will be holding its annual Walk

for the Hungry and Homeless at the Claremont Univer- sity Consortium parking lot, located on the south side of First Street at Mills Avenue (101 S. Mills Ave.). The event will take place between 9 a.m. and Noon. and will involve the closure of the cul-de-sac south of Mills Avenue. The

walking route for this event is limited to the sidewalks and does not include the closure of any other public streets.

The 5K walk route takes participants around and st through

the Claremont Colleges including portions of 1

Harvard Avenue, 12 th St., 9 th St., and Claremont Blvd.

CEQA: The City has determined that this proposal is ex-

empt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) in accordance with Claremont’s List of Activ- ities Determined to be Exempt from CEQA (Activity #49),

Street,

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2017233242 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as NOVA CO, 549 ½ E. Pasadena St, Pomona, CA 91767. Registrant(s): Jose M. Juarez Alcantar, 549 ½ E. Pasadena St, Pomona, CA 91767. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 08/2017. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Jose M. Juarez Alcantar Title: Owner This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/ County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/23/17. NO- TICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as pro- vided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it ex- pires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed be- fore the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fic- titious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Sec- tion 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 22, 29, October 6 and 13, 2017

909.621.4761

Claremont COURIER Classifieds 21

Friday 09-29-2017 CONTACT US CLASSIFIEDS 114 Olive Street Claremont, California 91711 909.621.4761 •
Friday 09-29-2017
CONTACT US
CLASSIFIEDS
114 Olive Street Claremont, California 91711
909.621.4761 • classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Mon-Thurs 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. / Fri 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
For lease
Help wanted
Marketplace
Animal Shelters
employment
21
services
22
open houses
24
NORTH Claremont house,
three-bedroom, two-bath-
room, three-car attached
garage. Available in Septem-
ber. $2,600 monthly. Please
contact Talat 949-677-6736.
PART time bathing position
available, must be able to
work weekends, please apply
in person. Michelle’s Dog
Grooming, 909-398-1778.
Lost & found
The Orphanage /
Priceless Pets Rescue
909-203-3695
pricelesspetrescue.org
Inland Valley Humane Society
House cleaning
909-623-9777
Office space for rent
Upland Animal Shelter
909-931-4185
Rentals
HELP needed for cleaning
with Shirley's House Cleaning.
$10 hourly, 30 hours weekly.
Call Shirley, 909-730-8564.
Position available
Condo for rent
THERAPY/Psychiatry offices
to share in the Claremont Vil-
lage. Charming two-office cot-
tage with waiting room in
garden setting. Contact Dr.
Mark Welch, 951-966-5802.
REWARD for lost watch of
sentimental value, has a
Turquoise alpine rope wrist-
band. Last seen on Monday
afternoon, September 11, by
the First Street median and
curb between Harvard and
Yale. If found please call 909-
H.O.P.E Upland
519-5196.
1-800-811-4285
Claremont

CLAREMONT Village Walk. Prime end-unit. Three-bed- rooms, three-bathrooms. Com- munity pool and spa. $2,995 monthly. Nicholas Neece at 909-447-7706, AgentNeece@ gmail.com or Geoff Hamill at 909-621-0500, Geoff@Ge- offHamill.com.WSSIR.

Employment

Domestic help

LOOKING

helper. AngelikaToth@hot- mail.com.

day

for

nanny,

LOCAL private mental health group looking for licensed pro- fessional with PhD, LCSW, or LMFT. Prefer a candidate on insurance panels. Please call during regular business hours, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. 909-931-3388.

C ourier claremont-courier.com The Courier has MOVED! Our new address is: 114 Olive Street, Claremont,
C
ourier
claremont-courier.com
The Courier has MOVED!
Our new address is: 114 Olive Street, Claremont, California 91711
Our phone number is still: 621- 4761
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Business

OWN your own Dollar, Dollar Plus, Big Box, Mail/Pack/Ship, or Party Store. 100% financing. OAC from $65,900. 100% turnkey. Call 1-800-518-3064 or www.dollarstoreservices.com/start, www.partystoredevelopers.com/start, www.mailboxdevelopers.com/start. (Cal-SCAN)

A PLACE for mom. The nation's largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts to- day! Our service is free, no obliga- tion. Call 1-800-550-4822. (Cal- SCAN)

DISH TV. 190 channels. $49.99/ monthly for 24 months. Ask about exclusive Dish features like Sling and the Hopper. Plus high-speed inter- net, $14.95 monthly. (Availability and restrictions apply.) TV for less, not less TV! 1-855-734-1673. (Cal- SCAN)

WATER damage to your home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup and maintain the value of your home! Set an appointment today! Call 855- 401-7069. (Cal-SCAN)

Donations

DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free three- day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 800-731-5042. (Cal-SCAN)

GOT an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1-800-743-

1482. (Cal-SCAN)

Financial

SOCIAL Security Disability? Up to

$2,671 monthly (based on paid-in amount). FREE evaluation! Call Bill Gordon & Associates. 1-800-966-

1904. Mail: 2420 N St NW, Wash-

ington DC. Office: Broward Co. Florida, member TX/NM Bar. (Cal- SCAN)

DO you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or state in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely, fast. Call now 855- 993-5796. (Cal-SCAN)

For sale

SAWMILLS from only $4,397. Make and save money with your own band- mill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock and ready to ship! Free info/DVD: norwoodsawmills.com. 1- 800-578-1363 Ext. 300N. (Cal-SCAN)

NORTHERN Arizona Wilderness Ranch - $197 monthly. Quiet seclud- ed 37 acre off-grid ranch set amid sce- nic mountains and valleys at clear 6,200 ft. Near historic pioneer town and large fishing lake. No urban noise and dark sky nights amid pure air and Arizona's best year-round cli- mate. Evergreen trees/meadowland blend with sweeping views across un- inhabited wilderness mountains and valleys. Self-sufficiency quality garden loam soil, abundant groundwater and maintained road access. Camping and RV's OK. No homeowner's As- sociation or deed restrictions. $22,900, $2,290 down. Free brochure with additional property descriptions, photos/terrain map/weather, chart/ area info: 1st United Realty, 800- 966-6690. (Cal-SCAN)

Health

SAFE Step Walk-In Tub! Alert for seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than four-inch step-in. Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American-made. Installation included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 off. (Cal- SCAN)

GOT knee pain? Back pain? Shoul- der pain? Get a pain-relieving brace at little or no cost to you. Medicare patients call Health Hotline now! 1- 800-796-5091. (Cal-SCAN)

ELIMINATE cellulite and inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month sup- ply on select packages. Order now! 844-703-9774. (Cal-SCAN)

STOP overpaying for your prescrip- tions! SAVE! Call our licensed Cana- dian and International pharmacy, compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! Call 1-855- 397-6808. Promo Code:

CDC201725. (Cal-SCAN)

VIAGRA and Cialis users! Cut your drug costs! Save money! 50 pills for $99. Free shipping! 100 percent guaranteed and discreet. Call 1-800- 624-9105. (Cal-SCAN)

LOWEST prices on health and den- tal insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call now! 888- 989-4807. (Cal-SCAN)

OXYGEN. Anytime, anywhere! No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The all- new Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 1-844-359-3976. (Cal-SCAN)

Personals

MEET singles right now! No paid op- erators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange mes- sages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 855-412-1534. (Cal-SCAN)

Friday 09-29-17

SERVICES

Acoustical

QUALITY Interiors. Acousti- cal contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic. 602916. 909-624-8177.

AC/Heating

STEVE’S HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts.

Lic.744873

909-985-5254

Bathroom Remodeling

A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 909-945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Cabinetry

KEVIN'S

WOODSHOP

Kitchen • Bath • Office Closet • Garage Entertainment Centers Mantles • Crown Molding Can Lights

909-560-0956

Lic.#787647

Carpentry

SEMI-RETIRED rough to fin- ish remodeler. Kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting. Lots more! Paul, 909-919-3315.

Carpet Service

ANDERSON Carpet Serv- ice. Claremont resident serv- ing Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck-mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Sen- ior discounts. 24-hour emer- gency water damage service. Please call 909-621-1182.

Chimney Sweep

Gash Chimney Sweep Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, dryer vent cleaning, masonry and dampers. BBB accredited. Please call

909-467-9212.

Computers

Computer Helper Basic Troubleshooting Software Install/Update Email/Social Media Setup Call for Appointment

909-238-2405

Concrete

ADVANCED

DON DAVIES

Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways. Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years!

Lic.323243

Contractor

THE Wood Dr. Specializing in termite and dry-rot repairs. Fascia boards, eves, patios, decks. 909-262-8649.

WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Handy- man services. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381.

951-640-6616.

ADVANCED

DON DAVIES

Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530

Serving Claremont for 30 years!

Lic.323243

REX ROMANO

BUILDERS

Excellence in building and customer satisfaction. Kitchen and bath. Remodel. Best of Houzz 2015 and 2016.

Lic.763385

909-626-3019

KOGEMAN

CONSTRUCTION

OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE New Home Construction. Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial.

909-946-8664

Lic.B710309

Visit us on Facebook!

PPS General Contractor. Kitchen and bathroom re- modeling. Flooring, win- dows, electrical and plumb- ing. Serving Claremont for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951-

237-1547.

Crocheting

for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951- 237-1547. Crocheting DESIGNS BY KER Handmade Crochet Items and Artistic Services

DESIGNS BY KER Handmade Crochet Items and Artistic Services Blankets, Dolls, Baby Sets & Accessories for Humans and their Pets! No job to large or small, Flexible on color choices! Christina Garcia

www.Facebook.com/dbker20

909-643-3387

dbker20@yahoo.com

Claremont COURIER Classifieds 22

CONTACT US

114 Olive Street Claremont, California 91711 909.621.4761 • classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Mon-Thurs 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. / Fri 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Drywall

Mon-Thurs 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. / Fri 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Drywall THOR McAndrew

THOR McAndrew Con- struction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909- 816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

Educational Consulting

call 909- 816-8467. ThorDrywall.com . Educational Consulting Got questions about College? Call for a free 1

Got questions

about College?

Call for a free 1 hour meet and greet Find the Right Fit Located in the Claremont Village

909-973-4148

RandlesEducationalCon-

sulting.com

Electrician

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts.

909-989-3454

909-767-0062

Residential • Industrial • Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable.

Lic.400-990

30 years experience.

SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs!

909-946-8887

Lic.922000

for all your electrician needs! 909-946-8887 Lic.922000 Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial.

Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, troubleshooting, landscape lighting, rewires and LED lighting. Free estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

909-900-8930

909-626-2242

Lic.806149

Hayden’s Services Inc. Since 1978 Bonded • Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist.

24-hour

emergency service.

909-982-8910

909-767-0062

* Senior Discount *

Lic.359145

Fences & Gates

ADVANCED

DON DAVIES

Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

909-599-9530

Cell: 626-428-1691

Lic.323243

Gardening

Garden Maintenance Hand-pull weeding, mowing, trimming, sprinkler work, monthly service, cleanups and junk removal. Free estimates. David, 909-374-1583

and junk removal. Free estimates. David, 909-374-1583 Sunset Gardens Weekly service, mow, edge, weed control,

Sunset Gardens Weekly service, mow, edge, weed control, pruning, fertilization, clean-up, haul-away. Sprinkler Repair. John Cook

909-231-8305

G-27Lic.#373833

Girl Friday

I'M here to help! Housekeep- ing, shopping, errands. Sen- ior, pet, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, any- time!

Handyman

A-HANDYMAN

New and Repairs

Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

909-599-9530

Cell: 626-428-1691

Lic.323243

30 years experience!

Claremont area.

CLAREMONT HANDYMAN SERVICE Odd jobs welcome, free consultations! Carpentry, doors, locks, small painting projects. Repairs.

909-921-6334

HOME Repair by Ken. Elec-

trical, plumbing, lighting, irri- gation, tankless mainte- nance. Local and experi- enced. 12 years. 909-374-

0373.

Hauling

ADVANCED

DON DAVIES

Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530

House Cleaning

Shirley's Cleaning Service

28 years in business.

Office/residential. No job too small. Free estimates. We do spring cleaning!

909-730-8564

House Cleaning

ROSIE'S

Spic Span Cleaning Service.

Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed.

909-277-4215.

Jeanette's Cleaning Service Established, detailed, upbeat, licensed house keeping service. Organic cleaning supplies used upon request. 28 years of experience.

909-224-1180

909-803-0074

CAROUSEL Quality Clean- ing. Family owned for 26 years. Licensed, insured. Senior rates. Professional services including: Airbnb cleaning, windows, senior care, fire damage, move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College faculty. Check us out on Angie’s List. Robyn, 909-418-4388.

Irrigation

Hayden’s Services Inc. Since 1978 Bonded Insured No job too big or small! 24-hour emergency service.

909-982-8910

* Senior discount *

Lic.359145

Waterwise Irrigation Specialist Sprinkler System Repair or Replacement. Drip irrigation conversions. Timer checks or timer replacement. Affordable prices. Free diagnostics, call John for an estimate.

Thanks. 760-981-9926.

909-621-7770

ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs. Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Expert Repairs Retrofit Experts Ask us how to save water. Allen Cantrall Landscape

909-224-3327

Lic.861685

Serving the area since 1983.

909-224-3327 Lic.861685 Serving the area since 1983. Landscaping GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO. Landscaping

Landscaping

GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO. Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening.

Lic.520496

909-621-7770

DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought toler- ant landscaping, drip sys- tems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call:

909-225-8855, 909-982- 5965. Lic. 585007.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE Sprinklers/drip installed, repaired. Lawn removal. Cleanup, hauling. Drought landscapes, planting, sod, lighting, drainage. Insured. References. Since 1977.

Lic.508671.

Please call 909-989-1515.

Drought tolerant and California native design. Water conserving irrigation. Lighting and maintenance. Allen Cantrall Landscape

909-224-3327

Lic.861685

Serving the area since 1983.

909-224-3327 Lic.861685 Serving the area since 1983. Sustainable Landscape & Design • Zero emission

Sustainable Landscape & Design

• Zero emission maintenance

• QWEL-Certified personal specialized drip irrigation • Native plant specialists • Artistic hardscapes

• Award-winning landscapes • From the creators of the Pomona College Organic Farm

909-398-1235

www.naturalearthla.com Lic. 919825

ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite.

909-599-9530

Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years!

Lic.323243

Notable Quotables
Notable Quotables

Love is when the other

person's happiness is more important than your

own.

H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

Friday 09-29-17

SERVICES

Friday 09-29-17 S ERVICES 909-621-5626 Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly
909-621-5626

909-621-5626

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care serv- ice, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance.

Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

Learn Japanese

Painting

Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com Learn Japanese Painting TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday after- noons/evenings. All levels

welcome. Excellent brain ex- ercise for seniors! 909-626-

3066.

Masonry

Stone Age Masonry Brick, Block, Stone Concrete and Tile. Repairs and restoration. High-pressure wash and seal.

909-262-0472

Lic#919942

Music Lessons

Guitar, Vocals, Saxophone, Bass Guitar. Unlock your potential! 50% off first lesson. MusicTeacherParag @gmail.com http://MusicTeacher Parag.MyMusicStaff.com

909-727-7773

Painting

Parag.MyMusicStaff.com 909-727-7773 Painting RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Resi- dential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates.

909-982-8024.

COLLINS Painting & Con- struction Company, LLC. In-

terior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contrac- tors Lic.384597. 909-985-

8484.

ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience.

Lic.315050

Please call:

909-624-5080,

909-596-4095.

KPW PAINTING Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

909-615-4858

Lic.778506

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master.

Lic.542552

Please call

909-989-9786

Patio & Decks

ADVANCED DON DAVIES New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

909-599-9530

Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years!

Lic.323243

Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 SERVICE AD INFORMATION & RATES • Published weekly

SERVICE AD INFORMATION & RATES

• Published weekly for 3 months • Payment required prior to publication

Directory Listing

(additional charge for bold/centered type or logo/artwork)

Up to 15 words $75 Up to 20 words $85 Up to 25 words $95

Up to 30 words $105 Up to 35 words $115 Up to 40 words $125

Business Card Ad (includes free ad design)

$300 for 3 months

To place your ad, call Rachel Fagg at (909) 621-4761

Pet Servicess

CERTIFIED vet assistant. Pet sitting, dog walking, all basic pet needs. Refer- ences available. Clegg 909-

908-0507.

Plastering & Stucco

PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic. 614648. 909-984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Plumbing

RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service.

909-593-1175.

Hayden’s Services Inc. Since 1978 Bonded Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL!

24-hour

emergency service

909-982-8910

* Senior discount *

Lic.359145

STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service • Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters.Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured,

Lic.744873.

* 909-985-5254 *

Plumbing

EXCEL PLUMBING Family owned & operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.917874.

909-945-1995

Roofing

GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Qual- ity work. Lic.C39975540.

909-944-3884.

Solar Energy

THINKING of installing solar? Why not work with two Clare- mont locals with impeccable references and unbeatable prices? 909-293-0035 or to- bias@sigwayenergy.com.

Sprinklers & Repair

ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs. Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691

DURUSSEL Sprinklers. In- stall, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic. 540042. Call 909-982-1604.

Tile

MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Showers, tubs, back splashes and commer- cial. Lic.830249. Ray, 909-

731-3511.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds 23

HEATING • COOLING • PLUMBING $39 A/C Tune-Up • Senior Discount Free Estimates on replacement

HEATING • COOLING • PLUMBING

HEATING • COOLING • PLUMBING $39 A/C Tune-Up • Senior Discount Free Estimates on replacement (18

$39 A/C Tune-Up • Senior Discount Free Estimates on replacement

(18 months, no interest)

909-593-3353

on replacement (18 months, no interest) 909-593-3353 Tile GROUT GETTERS Regrout Clean Seal Color grout

Tile

GROUT GETTERS Regrout Clean Seal Color grout

909-880-9719

Tree Care

TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-

629-6960.

MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-239-3979.

Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call:

909-946-1123

951-522-0992

Dale's Tree Service Certified arborist. Pruning and removals. Drought tolerant planting and design. Maintenance specials. Over 30 years experience.

909-982-5794

Lic#753381

Tutoring

Online, phone, in-person tutoring for Math, Sciences, Spanish by Harvey Mudd College Junior Experience & references available. Leana Yearwood LYearwood@hmc.edu

858-699-5268

Wallpaper

Leana Yearwood LYearwood@hmc.edu 858-699-5268 Wallpaper WALLPAPER hanging and removal by Andrea. Envi- ronmentally

WALLPAPER hanging and removal by Andrea. Envi-

ronmentally friendly. 30 years local experience. Free esti- mates. Lic.844375. 951-990-

1053.

Weed Abatement

ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

909-599-9530

Cell: 626-428-1691

JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clear- ing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275.

TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the prob- lem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Window Washing

NACHOS Window Clean- ing. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Number One in LA County.

REAL ESTATE

Friday 09-29-17

909.621.4761

R EAL ESTATE Friday 09-29-17 909.621.4761 Claremont COURIER Classifieds 24 OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY — Sunday,

Claremont COURIER Classifieds 24

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY — Sunday, October 1 — 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. / 1244

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY

Sunday, October 1

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY — Sunday, October 1 — 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. / 1244 Hillcrest

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. /