You are on page 1of 208

Cabin Equipment and Furnishing

Day One

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Table of Content
Day One :
Cockpit and Cabin Layout .
Aircraft Emergency Equipment .
Cabin Lighting and Emergency Lighting.
Electrical and Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirement .
In Flight Entertainment Approval Requirement .
Day Two :
In Flight Entertainment Approval Requirement ( Continue ).
Passenger Visual Information system .
Cabin Management System .
ACARS System/Link
Avionics Equipment and Cargo ventilation system .
Wrap Up/Test/Review

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 2


Cockpit and Cabin Layout

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 3


Equipment Furnishings Component Location

System Overview
The equipment and furnishings are installed in different compartments:
- the cockpit,
- the passenger compartment,
- the cargo compartments.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 4


Equipment Furnishings Component Location

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 5


Equipment Furnishings Component Location
System Overview (continued)
Cabin Panel Layout
The cabin interior has removable panels. The lining design can be
adapted to the cabin layout.
The lower side wall panels are installed between the cabin floor and the
upper side wall panels. The upper side wall panels are installed on the
side of the cabin.
They include the window contour. Inner window panels and sun visors are
installed on the upper side wall panel.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 6


Equipment Furnishings Component Location

Cabin Panel Layout ( Continue )

The cove light panels are in the space between the upper side wall
panels and the overhead stowage compartments.
The cove light panels are removable to replace cabin lights.
The overhead stowage compartments are installed above the cabin
seat rows.
Removable ceiling panels are installed in the cabin.
They are installed along the full length of the cabin and the utility areas.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 7


Equipment Furnishings Component Location

Cabin Panel Layout ( Continue )


The passenger service information units include the Passenger Service
Units (PSUs) and the Passenger Information Units (PIUs).
They are installed in the service channel, above the seat rows.
These units are:
- information panel,
- attendant call panel,
- emergency oxygen mask and generator container,
- reading light panel,
- individual air outlet panel.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 8


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 9
Equipment Furnishings Component Location

System Overview (continued)


Passenger Door Escape Slide
The forward and aft cabin doors have a single-lane escape slide (as
shown on the picture) or a slide raft.
The inflation and deployment start automatically when the cabin door
opens in the armed mode.
If the escape slide does not inflate automatically, the red manual
inflation handle installed on the right hand side of the gird bar must be
pulled.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 10


Passenger Door Escape Slide

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 11


Equipment Furnishings Component Location
System Overview (continued)
Emergency Exit Escape Slide ( A320 )
Emergency exits have a dual-lane escape slide, which will deploy
automatically when the left hand or right hand overwing exit opens.
If the automatic inflation does not occur, a red handle installed in each
exit frame must be pulled to start the manual inflation.
The containers of the emergency exit escape slides are in the wing root
fairing and the inflation reservoirs are in the aft cargo compartment.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 12


A320 Emergency Exit Slides

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 13


Equipment Furnishings Component Location

Emergency Exit Escape Slide ( A321 )


The emergency exit escape slides are in a container in the fuselage
below each door.
The inflation reservoirs are installed above each door in the overhead
stowage compartment.
The escape slide is of single-lane type.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


A321 Emergency Exit Escape Slides

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 15


Equipment Furnishings Component Location

Cargo Compartments And Cargo Loading (A319, A320 & A321)


The lower deck is divided into three cargo compartments:
- the forward cargo compartment,
- the aft cargo compartment,
- the bulk cargo compartment.
The forward and aft cargo compartments can have an optional semi-
automatic cargo loading system.
There are also tie-down and attachment points for divider nets used as a
separation between the bulk cargo and the aft cargo compartment.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 16


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 17
20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 18
Cockpit Emergency Equipment

Emergency Equipment
The emergency equipment for a 4-seat cockpit consists of:
- two escape ropes,
- one fire extinguisher,
- two smoke hoods,
- one pair of fire protective gloves,
- one crash axe,
- four life vests,
- one medical kit,
- four oxygen masks,
- three flash lights,
- one portable oxygen bottle.
As an option, two flashlights can be installed under sliding window.
These flashlights replace the two flashlights installed under the sidesticks.
They can be used by crew members in case of bad lights occurring during an on-board
emergency.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 19


Emergency Equipment

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 20


Emergency Equipment

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 21


Typical Lavatory Installation

Door Operation
During normal door operation, when the indicator reads VACANT, the
door can be opened from the outside by rotating the latch.
To open the door from inside, push the locking device to unlock the door
and then rotate the knob .
In case of emergency, the door can be unlocked from outside without
using a special tool.
Lift the lavatory cover-plate and push the unlocking pin.
Then rotate the latch to open the door.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 22


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 23
Typical Lavatory Installation

Door Operation (continued)


Bi-folding Door Operation (Option)
A bi-folding door that opens inwards, can be installed as an option on
specific lavatories.
During normal opening door operation, when the indicator reads
VACANT, the door can be pushed from the outside.
Once opened, the door closes automatically thanks to the damper.
To open the door from inside, push the locking device to unlock the door
and then grab the pull handle to open the door.
In case of emergency, the door can be unlocked from outside without
using a special tool : lift the lavatory cover-plate and push the unlocking
pin, then push the door to open it.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 24


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 25
Passenger Seats
PAX Seat
Passenger seats are designed for the comfort and safety of the passengers.
They are located in the cabin, from the cockpit partition to the aft pressure
bulkhead.
PAX Seat Description
The passenger seat consists of a framework assembly with:
- an upholstered seat pan,
- an upholstered backrest assembly,
- a folding table,
- seat belts,
- an upholstered armrest,
- a pocket.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 26


Passenger Seats

Framework
The seat framework holds the seatpan, backrest, armrest and table.
A luggage bar is fitted to the front framework legs. Holders for life vests
are found below each seatpan.
The Seat Electronic Box (SEB), which serves the Passenger Service Units
(PSUs) is installed between the front and rear legs.
Seatpan
The upholstered seatpan is installed on the seat framework. It is not
foldable or adjustable.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Passenger Seats

Backrest
The upholstered backrest assembly of each seat can be hydraulically reclined
backwards until it hits an adjustable mechanical stop.
The backrest can be mechanically folded FWD.
Table
A folding table is installed in the rear of each backrest.
When not in use, it is kept in a recess in the backrest by means of a latch.
Two hinged arms hold the table when it is folded down. In-armrest tables are
installed in the seats, located just behind partitions, galleys or lavatories.
.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 28


Passenger Seats

Seat Belt
Each seat is equipped with a seat belt. It is attached to the seat
framework and has a buckle to lock and to adjust the seat belt length.
Armrest
Each seat has armrests. The outer armrests of a seat unit are notfoldable.
The armrests between the seats can be folded up.
The reclining control P/B for the backrest and an ashtray are installed in
the armrest.
Pocket
A pocket is installed on the back of each seat backrest.
A safety instruction card and an air-sickness bag are kept in this pocket

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 30
Passenger And Attendant Seats

Portable Electronic Device


The in-seat power supply system supplies the electrical outlets of the
passenger seats for the connection of Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs)
or music players
The master control unit controls the supply of the In-Seat Power Supply
(ISPSU) in 115V AC/400Hz.
The ISPSU converts the electrical power into 110V AC/60Hz and provides
the Outlet Unit (OU).
The OU and the indication light are located in the passenger seat
armrest.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 31


Passenger And Attendant Seats

Portable Electronic Device ( Continue )

Operation
The passenger PED Power P/BSW on the FAP enables or disables the
portable electronic device power.
The power supply for the portable electronic device has to be
deactivated during critical flight phases.
There is no electric power supply to the PED power outlets during take-off
and landing.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 33
Passenger And Attendant Seats

PAX Seat Attachment


A quick release fitting in each rear leg and a retainer in each front leg
attach the seat unit to the seat tracks.
By placing the quick release device in the UP position, the seat can be
moved on the tracks or removed completely.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 34


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 35
Passenger And Attendant Seats

Cabin Attendant Seat


Cabin attendant seats are installed in the FWD and aft utility areas or in
the passenger seating area.
The different types of cabin attendant seats are free standing, swivel and
wall-mounted attendant seats.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 36


Cabin Attendant Seat

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 37


Passenger And Attendant Seats

Cabin Attendant Seat Description


Cabin attendant seats consist of:
- an aluminum framework,
- a backrest with cushion,
- a seatpan with cushion,
- a headrest with cushion,
- a stowage container,
- seat belts.
.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 38


Passenger And Attendant Seats

Framework
The seat frame of the cabin attendant seat is assembled out of two
aluminum side frames and a backrest framework.
Headrest
The headrest cushion is upholstered with foam and seat fabric.
The headrest is attached to the seat frame.
Backrest
The backrest cushion is upholstered with foam and seat fabric

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Passenger And Attendant Seats

Seatpan
The seatpan is made of an aluminum pan.
The seatpan cushion is upholstered with foam and seat fabric.
Hinges attach the seatpan to the seat frame.
The seatpan is spring-loaded to retract when not in use.
Safety Harness
Each cabin attendant seat has a seat belt and a shoulder harness with a
center buckle.
The shoulder harness is pulled in automatically on inertia reels when not in
use.
Stowage Container
A stowage container with a latch door is located below the seatpan.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 40


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 41
Passenger And Attendant Seats

Cabin Attendant Seat Attachment


Cabin attendant seats are attached to walls or to the cabin floor.
Wall-mounted
The three sections of the wall-mounted cabin attendant seat are
attached with six bolts to:
- partitions,
- lavatory walls.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 42


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 43
Passenger And Attendant Seats

Cabin Attendant Seat Attachment (continued)


Free-standing
Free-standing cabin attendant seats can be mounted on seat rails with
inch-by inch-flexibility, or by hardpoints.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 44


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 45
Passenger And Attendant Seats

Cabin Attendant Seat Attachment (continued)


Swivel
Swivel attendant seats are always attached to the cabin floor structure
by hardpoints.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 46


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 47
Emergency Equipment in Passenger Cabin

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 48


PAX Door Escape Slide Deployment

Description
A slide deployment can be initiated whenever the door is opened in the
emergency configuration.
When the slide is armed it can be checked on a red indicator, located
on the button of the slide decorative cover.
As soon as the door handle is lifted the door opens and the escape slide
is ejected from its container and the inflation system is activated.
The deployment and inflation sequence is automatically initiated when
the cabin door is opened.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 49


PAX Door Escape Slide Deployment

Description ( Continue )

The slide deploys into its final usable position within 3 seconds.
The escape slide is connected to the cabin floor by a girt extension
which is attached to the girt bar at the door sill.
Should the escape slide not inflate automatically a red manual inflation
handle must be pulled.
This handle is located on the girt extension.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Passenger Door Escape Slide

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 51


PAX Door Escape Slide Deployment

Passenger Door Escape Slide Components


This graphic shows the main components of the passenger door escape
slide.
The Flapper valve is closed.
The Pressure from the Inflation Reservoir flows into the nozzle array.
Due to the high flow the flapper valve opens against the spring force.
When the slide inflation pressure reaches its nominal value, the flapper
valve closes by spring force.
The remaining reservoir pressure is used to maintain the slide pressure for
a given time.
After inflation the maintenance will deflate the slide by manually
opening the flapper valve.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 52


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 53
Offwing Escape Slide Deployment
The offwing escape slide is packed in a container assembly, which in turn
is mounted into the center fuselage belly fairing.
Two type 3 exits installed over each wing, are always in armed
configuration.
The opening of one wing exit will start the deployment sequence.
The escape slide inflates automatically and is ejected out of its
containers and deploys in approximately four seconds.
The inflation system is composed of an inflation cylinder, which is installed
in the aft cargo compartment.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 54


Offwing Escape Slide Deployment

Activation of the release mechanism starts the inflation sequence.


The gas stored in the cylinder is discharged to the inflatable through
flexible hoses and an aspirator.
The aspirator flaps open and ambient air is drawn into the slide.
A red manual inflation handle, installed on each exit frame, must be
pulled to manually activate the inflation and deployment sequence, in
case of automatic release failure.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Offwing Slide Deployment

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 56


Offwing Escape Slide Deployment

Offwing Escape Slide Facilities


The offwing escape slides are composed of directional guidance lights.
These lights are attached to the longitudinal supports and across the
bottom of the inflatable assembly.
The lights come on automatically during the inflation sequence. In
addition, there are two offwing emergency lights installed just below the
emergency exit door to get easier evacuation in case of emergency.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 57


Offwing Escape Slide Deployment

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 58


Emergency Exit Escape Slide Deployment ( A321 )
Description/Deployment
The escape slide for the type "C" doors, is stored underneath the door
inside the fuselage.
The inflation cylinder is located in the overhead bin, over the door.
The pressure can be checked on the pressure level indicator.
For correct pressure the needle must be in the green section.
To initiate the slide deployment, the door must be opened in the armed
configuration.
To open the door, uncover the control handle, lift the handle fully up,
and release it.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 59


Emergency Exit Escape Slide Deployment ( A321 )

Description/Deployment ( Continue )

CAUTION: Door opening pneumatically assisted when opened in armed


mode.
The door opens outwards and then opens quickly.
The escape slide in the meantime inflates and deploys completely.
The escape slide is ready for use when the door is locked in the fully open
position.
Should the door open but the escape slide not inflate, a red handle for
manual inflation is located in the door upper right hand frame.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 61
20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 62
Doors Operation and Emergency Equipment Video

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Cabin lighting and Emergency Lighting

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 65


General

The lighting system includes:


- cockpit lighting,
- cabin lighting and signs,
- emergency lighting,
- cargo and service compartment lighting,
- exterior lighting.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 66


Lighting System

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 67


Cockpit and Cabin Lights System

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Cockpit Lights System
The cockpit lighting system include:
- panel and instrument lighting,
- general cockpit lighting (dome light),
- ambient lighting.
Cockpit Lights Control
The cockpit panels and instrument lighting controls are located:
- on three different panels,
- and underneath the glareshield..

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 69


Cockpit Lighting System

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 70


Cockpit Lights System

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 71


FAP Showing Cabin Lighting

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 72


Emergency Lights

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Emergency Lights

Emergency Lights
Emergency lights are installed in the cabin and on the exterior fuselage
for overwing emergency exits.
The cabin emergency lights are lamps located on the cabin ceiling
panels.
In order to provide sufficient lighting of the aisle, exits and emergency
exits, lights are installed on the left aisle seats and near the passenger
doors and wing exits.
The exterior emergency lights come on automatically whenever the
escape slide is deployed.
The lights are supplied from the cabin emergency power supply units.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 74


Emergency Lights

Control And Indicating


The emergency - lighting system can be controlled by
the EMER EXIT LT installed on the overhead cockpit control panel.
The red LIGHT EMER (EMERGENCY LIGHT) pushbutton on the FAP.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Emergency Lights

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 76


Emergency Lights

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 77


Emergency Lights

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 78


Emergency Lights

Component Location
Emergency lights in the cabin include EMERGENCY EXIT signs, Ceiling
EMERGENCY lights, ESCAPE PATH lighting,
The emergency lights are supplied by several Emergency Power Supply
Units (EPSUs).
Housed in the fuselage, there are 4 exterior emergency lights.
These lights are automatically activated when an overwing emergency
exit door is opened in the armed configuration.
The lights come on all along the escape route leading to the aft wing
slide.
Each escape slide has integrated lighting strips.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 79


Emergency Lights

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 80


Emergency Lights

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 81


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights
General
The emergency lighting system supplies lighting in case of failure of the
main lighting system or during emergency conditions.
The Emergency Power Supply Units (EPSUs) supply all these different lights.
The emergency lights have 6V DC Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), except for
lavatory auxiliary lights (28V DC LEDs).
The external emergency lights such as over-wing and escape slide use
bulbs technology.
Electrical Supply
The EPSUs are supplied with 28V DC from the ESSential SHEDdable BUS for
operation and 115V AC from the NORMal BUS voltage sensing.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 82


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights
EPSU
The EPSUs supply the following lights:
- exit signs lights,
- cabin emergency lights,
- seat mounted emergency lights and exit location lights,
- wall mounted emergency exit location light,
- wall mounted exit marking sign,
- wall mounted emergency exit,
- wall mounted emergency light,
- escape slide lights,
- over-wing emergency lights,
- lavatory auxiliary lights,
- and escape hatch-handle lights.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 83


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights

EPSU ( Continue )

The EPSUs also monitor the correct voltage of the AC and DC buses.
The EPSUs convert 28V DC into 6V DC to operate their associated lights.
An internal 6V DC battery in each EPSU is charged continuously when the
ESS SHED BUS is energized and the system is not activated.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 85
Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights
Operation
The EMERgency EXIT LighT switch on the overhead panel controls the
emergency lighting system.
The EMER EXIT LT switch has three positions: OFF, ARMed and ON.
Each of these positions sends a discrete ground signal to the EPSUs.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 86


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights

OFF Position
With the EMER EXIT LT switch and the EMER pushbutton switch on the FAP
in the OFF positions, all lights and signs are off and the battery in each
power supply unit is on charge.
The EMER EXIT LT OFF annunciator lights come on.
NOTE: Note: The EXIT signs and the emergency escape hatch-handle
lights come on with EMER EXIT LT switch OFF, when the NO SMOKING
switch is in the ON position or in AUTO position with landing gear
extended,

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights
ARM Position
In the ARM position the EMER EXIT LT OFF annunciator light goes off.
When the 115V AC NORM BUS voltage is not available, the cabin
emergency lighting comes on.
The batteries of all EPSUs supply the emergency lighting system for at
least 10 minutes.
The batteries are no longer charged.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 88


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights

ON Position
In the ON position the emergency lighting system comes on, as if the
EMERgency P/B on the Flight Attendant Panel (FAP) was pushed.
The cabin emergency lights, the exit signs, the escape hatch-handle
lights and the seat mounted lights come on.
The 28V DC/6V DC converters of the EPSUs supply these loads as long as
the 28V DC ESS SHED BUS is available. If the 28V DC SHED ESS BUS voltage
falls below 16V, the EPSUs internal batteries continue to supply the loads
for at least 10 minutes. The batteries are no longer charged.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights
Other Cases
Independently of the switch positions, the integral lights in the respective escape
slides come on when the passenger/crew doors or the emergency exit doors are
opened with the escape slides armed.
When the emergency exit hatches are open and the slides are released, the
respective over-wing emergency lights and the integral lights in the respective
escape slide come on.
In the event of excessive cabin depressurization, the exit marking signs and the exit
location signs automatically come on.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 90


Seat & Floor Mounted Emer Lights

Test
Each EPSU has a test circuit which tests the condition of the battery unit,
the logic unit and the related loads.
If a fault is detected it is reported to CIDS.
An EPSU SYStem TEST can be triggered from MCDU or CFDS Emulation on
FAP.
The EPSU BATtery CAPacity TEST can only be triggered from MCDU.
The duration of this test is around 3 hours.
An individual test on each EPSU must be carried out when the tests
through MCDU or CFDS Emulation on FAP fail. This isolated test starts
when you push the TEST P/B on the EPSU

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 92
Cabin Video

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Electrical and Electronic
Emergency Equipment Requirement

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 95


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Equipment in the cabin can include:


Automatic emergency warnings on pre-recorded audio equipment.
Floor path lighting (in the floor or fitted to seats close to floor level}.
Emergency exit lighting.
Battery powered megaphones :
1 for aircraft with > 19 and < 100 passengers
2 for aircraft with > 99 - < 200
3 for aircraft with > 199.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 96


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Emergency lighting inside (including floor path) and outside the aircraft
to facilitate passenger evacuation in an emergency .
Hand held torches .
Water proof torches as part of life raft equipment .
Survival beacon radio transmitters - scales . Must meet the requirements
of TS0-C91 and be positioned near an exit.
Underwater sonar device .
A crew intercommunication system . On all flights where the aircraft
carries a flight crew of more than one person

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

If there is a lower deck that may be occupied during taxiing or flight (but
not take-off or landing) a two way voice communication system must be
provided, also an aural emergency alarm must be fitted together with a
PA system (if one is fitted to the aircraft).
Emergency illuminated exit markings.
Public address system. For aircraft with more than 19 passengers. Must
have at least one microphone for cabin crew use (to be accessible by a
flight attendant whilst seated in any seat next to the door) at each
passenger door.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 98


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Specifications in JAR25 on electrical/ electronic equipment include the


following:
Lightning Protection
Metal components/LRUs must be bonded and non metal units must be
so designed so the strike current goes round the unit and/ or the effect of
strike current is minimal.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 99


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Electrical Bonding
Must be fitted to equipment to:* Protect the aircraft from lightning strikes.
Prevent the dangerous accumulation of electro static charge within
parts of the aircraft.
Minimise the risk of electric shock to personnel.
Provide a current return path for aircraft having an earth electrical
system.
Reduce interference to systems such as radios etc.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Passenger Signs
At least one no smoking sign and one seat belt fasten sign (using letters
or symbols) when illuminated to be legible to each person seated in the
passenger cabin under all probable conditions of cabin lighting.
These signs must be operable at either pilot's seat position.
Passenger Emergency Exit Markings
All Type A and Type I emergency exit handles must be self illuminated
with an initial brightness of 160 microlamberts or be well illuminated by
the emergency lighting - even in conditions of severe passenger over-
crowding. Type III emergency exit handles must be self illuminated with
an initial brightness of 160 microlamberts.
If the handles are covered the cover must be self illuminated to the same
brightness.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 101


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Emergency Exit Markings


Each emergency exit must be clearly marked to show means of
operation, location and means of access.
For aircraft with a passenger seating configuration of 10 or more
(excluding the pilot) the emergency exits must have a locator sign and a
marking sign which must have red letters at least 1 Y2 inches high
(31.1mm) on an illuminated white background with an area at least 21
square inches (135.48cm squared) excluding letters.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 102


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Floor Path Lighting


Floor proximity emergency escape path lighting must provide the
passenger with the shortest route fore or aft of his/her seat to an escape
exit where all light sources above 4ft (1.2m) from cabin floor level are
totally obscured (by smoke for example).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Exterior Emergency Lighting


Exterior emergency lighting is required at each over-wing emergency
exit and each non over-wing emergency exit.
For over-wing exits an illuminated area is required where the passenger
makes his/her first step on the wing
Where the passenger first makes contact with the ground a 0.03 foot
candle power lighting is required.
This lighting to be available for a minimum period of 10 minutes.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 104


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Power Supplies
Power supplies may be common to both normal and emergency lighting
systems but the systems themselves must be independent.
The systems must be so designed that they will take the normal g loads of
the aircraft, maintain a supply for the minimum required times under any
foreseeable conditions and not cause a hazard when operated in
emergency conditions.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Switching
The emergency lighting system must be controlled from the flight deck plus
one cabin crew station.
The flight deck control switch must have ON, OFF and ARMED. When power
is on the aircraft a warning light is on if the system is not armed.
A warning light comes on if power is interrupted with the system switched
on or armed.
There must be means to safeguard against inadvertent operation from the
armed or on positions.
Any charging equipment used for charging the emergency batteries must
preclude the possibility of battery discharge back into the system and if the
fuselage breaks in two on crash landing then not more than 25% of all the
electrically operated emergency lights should be rendered inoperative -
other than those directly damaged by the event.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 106


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Equipment
This includes all equipment on the aircraft including emergency equipment and
Inflight Entertainment (IFE) equipment.
All equipment falls under one of two categories:*
Controlled equipment. Equipment on which the safe operation of the aircraft
depends.
Uncontrolled equipment. Normally not required to be approved because failure of
which would not adversely affect the safe operation Jof the aircraft.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 107


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Equipment
Any equipment fitted to an aircraft (IFE for example) needs to meet the
requirements as laid down in British Civil Airworthiness Requirements
(BCARs) section A.
This states that any equipment fitted to the aircraft as Uncontrolled items
must be fitted by an approved organisation who submits a certificate to
the CAA that the equipment will not effect the safe operation of the
aircraft and is so installed that its failure will not endanger the aircraft or
its occupants.
In general equipment must perform its intended function under all normal
foreseeable aircraft operating conditions (temperature, vibration, g
loads etc).
System mal function warnings must be provided and the controls etc so
designed as the minimise crew errors.-

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Equipment ( Continue )
Systems and their batteries must perform correctly over a period of time
to include the full duration of the longest flight at maximum regulated
voltage in the most adverse temperature conditions.
Any equipment whose functioning is required for aircraft certification
(controlled equipment) and that requires a power supply is an essential
load on the electrical supply system.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 109


Electrical/Electronic Emergency Equipment Requirements

Equipment ( Continue )

The power supply system must be capable of supplying the total load
over a period of time during a combination of load requirements.
These include:
After failure of any one engine on a two engined aircraft.
After failure of any two engines on a three or more engined aircraft.
After failure of any one prime mover, power converter or energy storage
device.
When operated electrical/ electronic equipment must not interfere with
any other systems.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


End of Day One

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval
Requirements

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 113


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Communications, information and entertainment systems are mostly provided


for the convenience of passengers.
This is not applicable for items of equipment carried on board the aircraft by
passengers.
The responsibility of establishing the suitability of use, control of use, and
security of use of passenger Portable Electronic Devices {PEDs) is with the
aircraft operator, as required by JAR-OPS 1.110. ( Now EU-OPS 1.110 )

EU OPS 1.110 :
The operator shall not permit any person to use, a portable electronic device
on board an aircraft that could adversely affect the performance of the
aircrafts systems and equipment, and shall take all reasonable measures to
prevent such use.

EASA AMC 20 = General Means of Compliance for Airworthiness of Products


Parts and Appliances

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 114


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Passenger Service and IFE systems may include, for example:
a) Audio reproduction equipment; analogue or digital tape cassette,
solid state, compact disk and mini disk players.
b) Video reproduction equipment; DVD, video cassette players, monitors,
projectors and screens.
c) Terrestrial and satellite radio and television broadcast receivers.
d) Video cameras and distribution systems.
e) Film and video projectors and screens.
f) Personal computers, laptops, palm-tops, calculators and electronic
games.
g) Public fax, modems and telephones.
h) Aircraft cabin flight information displays.
i) Reading lights, crew call buttons, punkah louvers (fresh air vents).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 115


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Passenger oxygen system. Although this is not part of JFE, the oxygen
system is normally installed in, or connected with, the Passenger Service
Unit (PSU).
Therefore, consideration will need to be given to this system during
design and installation of the PSU's.
Fresh air vents are also usually installed as part of the PSU.
Systems now available offer an interactive capability and consist of
custom designed signal and power distribution systems.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 116


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

These passenger service and entertainment systems may consist of:


a) Seat electronic units.
b) Passenger handsets.
c) Distribution units and cable assemblies.
d) Cabin control centers.
e) Portable electronic devices such as 'game boy' and video 'walkman'
provided by operators to their passengers.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Aircraft cabin subsystems are becoming more extensive and complex.
Primarily, this is due to the passenger entertainment and service
improvements.
Passengers can communicate almost anywhere in the world via a
telephone fitted at their seat (which may be part of the IFE hand set).
To provide even greater choice of service ISPSSs provide electrical power
to passengers to operate passenger owned PEDs such as laptops..

ISPSSs=In Seat Power Supply System

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 118


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Centralising management and control of the various cabin subsystems


may include operation, maintenance and troubleshooting facilities.
Sometimes these systems comprise commercial equipment that has not
been designed for installation and use in an aircraft.
Such equipment will need to be subject to technical investigations and
possible modification to ensure the equipment is suitable for aircraft use.
In addition to its physical attachment to the aircraft, an installation may
include electrical power supplies, antennas, coupling to the aircraft
audio and/ or avionic systems.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Approval Consideration
Any installed IFE equipment should demonstrate compliance with the
aircraft certification process.
It would be required to demonstrate that the IFE system and equipment
in their correct installation should not interfere with the operation of any
aircraft system/ s, or cause any hazard to the aircraft, its systems and its
occupants, eg risk of fire, smoke, toxic fumes, electric shock and Electro-
Magnetic Interference (EMI).
Where passenger oxygen system equipment is installed (usually in the
PSUs), the relevant requirements for oxygen equipment will need to be
observed.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 120


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Where part of an IFE system is designed to replace the function of
required services, such as PRE-FLIGHT BRIEF, PASSENGER ADDRESS,
EMERGENCY EVACUATION ANNOUNCEMENTS etc, the replacement
system will need to meet the regulations and safety requirements for that
function.
IFE System will need to be approved by the CAA.(EASA ) In accordance
with EASA Regulations . it has to be demonstrated, in respect of all non-
essential equipment, (which includes IFE equipment) that the equipment
as installed is neither a source of danger in itself, nor a prejudice to the
proper functioning of an essential service and does not in any way
reduce the airworthiness of the aircraft to which it is fitted even in the
event of failure to perform its intended function.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 121


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Where the equipment has been approved or has been granted a Safety
Registration by the CAA (EASA ), an acceptable installation will be required to be
demonstrated by the installer showing that proper account has been taken of the
equipment manufacturer's Declaration of Design and Performance and
installation instructions. In other cases, demonstration may, in addition, involve
examination and testing of the equipment.
In accordance with JAR-OPS 1.110 'Portable electronic devices', the operators will
be required to demonstrate by assessment of the PED and control procedures that
the PED (supplied by the operator or carried on board by passengers) are safe
and suitable to be used on the aircraft.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 122


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Equipment and Installation
The following provides a summary of the subjects related to the safety of
the aircraft, its occupants and to maintenance personnel, which the
equipment manufacturer and the installer need to consider.
Compass Accuracy
Account will need to be taken of Compass Safe Distance in respect to
the Compass and Flux Detector/ s.
Interference - The levels of conducted and radiated interference
generated by the equipment via power supply feeders, system
interfacing or by EMI have to be such as not to cause an unacceptable
degradation of performance of other aircraft systems.
Where radio or telephone equipment forms part of a system and where
in a particular application, certain components are not used, these
sections will need to be rendered safe and inoperative.
Cumulative Interference Effect.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 123


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Power Supply
Where the equipment is supplied from the aircraft electrical system, the electrical
bus will need to be of the 'non-essential' category.
The circuit will need to be protected against overloads and short circuits by
suitable protective devices.
a) The power has to be such as to not affect adversely the reliability and integrity
of the electrical system or the Essential Services supplied from it.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 124


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Power Supply ( Continue )
The aircraft electrical system will need to be isolated from any
unacceptable conducted electromagnetic interference created by a
connected PED.
b) The cables and connectors used within the IFE system or for
interconnection with the aircraft electrical system have to be suitable for
the voltage, current and temperature conditions which the cables will
meet in service. Installation will need to be in accordance with the
manufacturer's standard practices for that particular aircraft type.
c) An electrical load analysis will need to be carried out to quantify the
effect of the complete installed system on the aircraft's electrical supply.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 125


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Power Supply ( Continue )

d) Where batteries are used, consideration will need to be given to


stored energy and provisions made for short circuit protection. If lithium
batteries are used, the battery specification will need to embrace the
requirements of BS2G239.
If spare batteries are to be carried onboard, they are required to be in
accordance with ICAO Technical Instruction
e) Where high voltage is connected to in-seat equipment, suitable
protective means will need to be provided to prevent electric shock to
personnel.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Electric Shock
The risk of electric shock will need to be reduced to a minimum.
Where voltages exceed 100V , the output will need to be electrically
isolated from the aircraft structure or means provided to prevent
inadvertent contact with live parts.
Where there may be a danger to personnel such as aircraft panels and
power outlets carrying voltages of above 50V AC these will need to be
marked with the voltage.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 127


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Bonding
The electrical bonding and protection against static discharge of the
installed system and equipment will need to be such as to:
a) Prevent dangerous accumulation of electrostatic charge.
b) Minimise the risk of electrical shock to personnel.
The system earthing arrangements will need to be in accordance with the
aircraft manufacturer's standard practices.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
The system design will need to take into account, earth connections,
such that loss of a single earth will not cause the loss of more than one
essential circuit or the dangerous inadvertent operation of any aircraft
system.
IFE designers will need to adhere to the recommendations for bonding,
grounding,shielding and other methods to eliminate or control
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD).
Bums
The risk of bums will need to be reduced to a minimum. Particular
attention will need to be directed to the lamp assembly of film projectors
and the heatsinks of electronic equipment packages (these can get very
hot).
Hot surfaces should be shielded where inadvertent contact may be a
hazard.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 129


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
CRTs
Equipment containing cathode-ray tubes will need to be so designed and
installed that the risk of harmful exposure to X-rays and to injury as a result of
implosion is reduced to a minimum.
Attachment Strength
Equipment, attachments and supporting structure have to be constructed such
that the equipment and constituent parts do not break loose when subjected to
flight and emergency landing loads.
Commercial equipment may not comply with these requirements and may need
to be strengthened before being installed in an aircraft.
The equipment has, if it should break loose, it will be unlikely to cause injury or
affect escape facilities provided for use after an emergency ground landing or
alighting on water.
Equipment in which detachable items, such as CDs, DVDs, tape or film cassettes
are used, will need to be positioned such that these items would not constitute a
danger if ejected

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 130


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

The storage arrangements provided for CDs, DVDs, tape and film
cassettes will need to be similarly considered. A restraint attachment will
need to be attached to detachable covers and panels where these are
located above the heads of passengers.
If the system includes an in-seat IFE system and/ or in-seat power supply
equipment, the modified seat will need to be re-approved.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Equipment Location
- The equipment and its controls need to be positioned such that crew
operating procedures and normal passenger movement is not impeded.
Where, for example, on small aircraft, audio entertainment could be
heard by the pilot, means will need to be provided to enable control of
the sound level.
Visual entertainment equipment will need to be positioned where it
could not be a distraction to the flight crew.
Procedures will need to be stated in the Operations Manual to the effect
that screens and other deployable items of equipment will need to be
stowed during taxiing, take-off, landing and any emergency flight
conditions.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 132


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Equipment Location ( Continue )

Equipment will have to be located, and where necessary, protected so


as to minimise the risk of injury to the occupants of the aircraft during
normal flight and emergency landings.
Equipment, in particular screens, will not be allowed to obscure
mandatory notices such as 'Exit', 'No Smoking' and 'Fasten Seat Belt
signs.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Explosion, Fire, Fumes and Smoke


The risk of the equipment exploding, catching fire or producing
hazardous quantities of smoke must be minimised.
Minimise the risk of over-heating such as transformers, motors and
composite connectors.
In the event of a jammed tape or film, any resultant stalling of the drive
motor will not cause fumes or smoke,
Safety film and non-inflammable tapes, cassettes and cartridges must be
used.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 134


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Explosion, Fire, Fumes and Smoke ( Continue )

Materials used for screens have to meet the appropriate flammability


requirements.
Operators should also establish procedures to prevent inadvertent
blockage (passenger coats, luggage, papers or litter) of any in-seat
equipment cooling vents.
Adequate over-heat protection will need to be designed into each in-
seat system.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Cabin Depressurisation
No arcing will occur within the equipment when it is subjected to an
atmospheric pressure equivalent to the maximum operating altitude of
the aircraft.
Means would have to be provided to disconnect automatically the
electrical supply to equipment when the cabin pressure reduces.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 136


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Antennas
In the event of a breakage there will be no adverse effects to aircraft
systems and no danger to the aircraft.
The effects of a lightning strike on the antenna will have to be considered
to ensure that Essential Services will not be disrupted by electrical
transients conducted into the aircraft via the antenna lead.
Antennas for entertainment systems may not be located where an
unacceptable reduction in performance of a mandatory radio system
would result.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Interface with Aircraft Systems


Where a system is interfaced with other aircraft systems the aircraft
system/s performance and integrity must not be degraded.
Adequate means to isolate the system from the aircraft system will have
to be provided.
Where data is being read from the aircraft avionic systems, it should be
demonstrated that any malfunction will not affect the aircraft avionics
systems.
A safety analysis will need to be conducted to provide proof.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 138


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Where an IFE system is available for the flight crew, the operation of the
IFE system should not interfere with, or adversely affect the flight crew's
ability to operate the aircraft and systems.
The following features may be considered as an acceptable means of
compliance:
a) Exclude access by the flight crew at their work stations to any form of
visual entertainment equipment.
b) Automatic muting of the entertainment system when any cockpit aural
caution or warning is sounded.
c) Automatic muting of any entertainment system when an R/T
transmission or reception is in progress
d) Readily available controls such that the volume of the entertainment
system can be adjusted easily.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Fluid Exposure
Where the equipment is mounted in such a position where contamination by fluid
is possible (catering, cleaning agents etc), it will need to be established that fluid
spillage does not cause the equipment to become hazardous.
Installation Design
Where a system includes in-seat equipment, care should be taken to position wire
harnesses and electronic units to minimise induced damage (children playing,
wear and tear, passenger vandalism, contact with baggage, vibration damage,
maintenance, seat changing etc).
The quality of the protection (eg insulation, guards and covers) will need to be
robust enough to withstand this damage.
All sharp edges in close proximity to wiring will need to be eliminated.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 140


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Equipment Identification and Documentation


Adequate instructions/ manuals and documentation will need to be
provided to ensure that the correct replacement equipment and parts
are used, and correct maintenance is carried.
Documentation will need to be provided to establish the responsibilities
of the inseat system equipment manufacturer and the seat
manufacturer.
In particular, the design of the in-seat wire harnesses and their
installation.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Operational Procedures
The crew of the aircraft need to be conversant with the operation of the
system.
Procedures detailing the means by which the IFE system can be shut
down and/or electrically isolated will need to be specified in the
Operations Manual.
Crew Information - Procedures will need to be established and stated
clearly on how to control the operation of passenger services and IFE
systems.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 142


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Operational Procedures ( Continue)

As a minimum, these should include:


a) Procedures for normal operation of the IFE system and restrictions on
use - eg phases of flight (such as take-off and landing), for passenger or
flight crew.
These procedures will need to be approved by the certifying authority.
b) Procedures for monitoring usage of ISPSSs.
c) Procedures to terminate the operation of the system at any time.
The overall control of the system should be with the flight crew.
If the control is via cabin switch(es) only Operations Manual/Cabin Crew
operating procedures will need to include procedures for cockpitcabin
co-ordination.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Operational Procedures ( Continue)


d) Procedures for reporting instances of suspected and confirmed
interference with other aircraft systems.
e) Pre-departure briefings to be given to instruct passengers on their use.
f) Procedures to report system or equipment failure to maintenance
personnel, ie by means of the Aircraft Tech Log. Only trained and
approved personnel should carry out repairs.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 144


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements
Passenger Information
Where the equipment can be controlled or handled by passengers then
a set of instructions must be provided.
These instructions should include:
a) Warnings - to cover any possible dangers - from any missuse etc.
b) Limitations and restrictions on the system.
c) Normal operating procedures and advice.
d) Emergency operating procedures, ie crash or evacuation.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 145


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Passenger Information ( Continue )

Instructions should be presented in a clear and unambiguous manner.


Printed material may be:
Hand held card.
Placard/s.
Engraving/ s.
Booklet, but not part of the operator's in-flight magazine.
Printed instructions may be supplemented by instructions presented on
an electronic display.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Passenger Information ( Continue )


Instructions may contain statements such as:
a) Seek cabin staffs help if any difficulties are experienced.
b) It is essential that the equipment is stowed when instructed to or when
it is not in use.
c) Use of the equipment is subject to cabin staff directions.
d) Cabin staff will need to be consulted prior to connection of any
equipment
It is essential that the equipment is stowed when instructed to or when it is
not in use passenger carry-on equipment.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 147


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Permitted Use
Take-off, landing and en-route restrictions (stowage, use etc) will need to
be defined and stated.
Instructions will need to be provided where passenger's carry-on
equipment PED) is to be connected to passenger services or
entertainment systems (eg On-Seat Power Supplies).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Maintenance
Maintenance checks will need to be scheduled where system
degradation may be a source of hazard, especially hazards such as
explosion, fire, fumes and smoke.
General procedural instructions for system testing should be provided.
Maintenance procedures will need to be specified and observed, eg
inspection of system wiring (especially systems including in-seat
equipment wiring which is vulnerable to damage induced by passengers
and cabin configuration changes), system equipment checks, battery
checks, fixtures and fittings.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 149


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Equipment Considerations
Passenger Address Systems
Means will have to be provided to automatically over-ride audio and
video equipment systems when the cabin address system is being used
for announcements. (CAA Specification 15 paragraph 5 refers).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Passenger Flight Information System


A passenger flight information system may provide informative and
entertaining flight related information to aircraft passengers.
For example, video pictures can include the following:
a) Geographical maps of the route being flown showing aircraft position,
intended track and previous flight path.
Places names may be shown on the map/s.
b) Text displays (in various languages) of current flight information such as
speed, altitude, ambient temperatures, estimated time-of-arrival, time of
departure etc.
c) Connecting gates/flights and arrival information, messages or other
data up-linked from ground stations..

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 151


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Passenger Flight Information System ( Continue )

Procedures or controls need to be practiced or provided to ensure that


information likely to unsettle or panic passengers is not presented.
However, in the case of a system replacing a required function, these will
need to be controlled and presented in a manner acceptable to the
CAA

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Pre-Recorded Announcements
A Pre-recorded Announcement and Boarding Music Reproducer may
play prerecorded announcements to the passengers through the aircraft
Passenger Address (PA) system.
This may be capable of reproducing automatic emergency
announcements and also be capable of reproducing recorded music
through the Public Address system as boarding music.
Information (including announcement messages, related address codes,
cue signals and music programmes) may be recorded on a memory unit,
eg solid state, tape or compact disc.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 153


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Projection Video (Overhead Monitor)


The function of the projection video overhead monitor system is to
display video images to the passengers.
The images displayed may be for passenger entertainment or
information.
They may originate from videotape, off-air, or other sources.
Sound accompanying the video images may be distributed via the PA
system.
The projection video/ overhead monitor should not obscure passenger
information signs or restrict the movement of passenger and crew within
the cabin.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


In-flight Entertainment Approval Requirements

Disk Drive Units


The system may have a mass storage device capable of storing data
and operational software.
These devices should not be used for the storage of required aircraft
operational data unless effective partitioning is provided.
Electronic Library services generated for flight crew use should not
normally share the mass storage space provided for passenger services
and entertainment systems.
Continued Airworthiness
Consideration should be given to the continued Airworthiness process,
especially for commercial equipment without a flight service history.
Operators should report any in-service difficulties to the CAA either
formally or informally.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 155


Passenger Visual Information system

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 157


PAX Visual Information System

Presentation
The Passenger Visual Information System (PVIS), provides continuously
updated flight and destination information to the passengers on the
video Display Units (DUs).
Information is given to the passengers either in text form or/and in
multicolored maps. Several modes can be selected:
- MAP mode: Map display,
- INFO mode: Flight information pages,
- LOGO mode: Logo display,
- AUTO mode: Automatic cycling of the modes.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 158


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 159
20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 160
PAX Visual Information System
DIU
The PVIS comprises the Digital Interface Unit (DIU) and the remote control unit.
The DIU is the main computer of the PVIS. It is connected to the aircraft avionics
systems and to the Passenger Entertainment System
(PES) video. The DIU interfaces with:
- the Air Data/Inertial Reference System (ADIRS),
- the Flight Management and Guidance System (FMGS),
- the PES video,
- the Centralized Fault Display System (CFDS).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 161


PAX Visual Information System

DIU (Continue )

The DIU processes all the information and selects the appropriate maps
and points of interest stored in its memory.
The DIU is also connected to other systems:
- the Air Traffic and Information Management System (ATIMS),
- the cabin management system.
The DIU is supplied with 28V DC and powered via the Video Control
Center (VCC) master switch.
The remote control unit front plate has four P/BSWs and a Liquid Crystal
Display (LCD) character control screen.
NOTE: The DIU brings digital data stored in its internal memory (CD-ROM).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


PAX Visual Information System

ADIRS
The Air Data/Inertial Reference Unit (ADIRU) 2 is connected to the DIU
through ARINC 429 data buses which provides the actual air data and
inertial reference data.
FMGs
The Flight Management and Guidance Computer (FMGC) 2 is
connected to the DIU through ARINC 429 data bus, destination, flight
time, Estimated arrival time .

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 163


PAX Visual Information System

CFDS
The Centralized Fault Display Interface Unit (CFDIU) is for fault messages.
ATIMS
The Air Traffic Service Unit (ATSU) is connected to the DIU through an
ARINC 429 for connecting gate, arrival information, messages and other
data to be up-linked from ground stations.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


PAX Visual Information System

Cabin Management System


The cabin management system controls and monitors the PVIS by means
of the lap top computer.
Operation
The DIU reads data from the FMGCs and the ADIRUs through ARINC 429
data buses.
These data are used for DIU memory access from where information is
processed, formatted and transmitted as a video signal to the PES video.
The video System Control Unit (SCU) transmits this information to the
Display Unitss to be shown.
BITE
A test is done automatically at power-up or manually from the control unit.
The result of this test is transmitted to the video SCU.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 165


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 166
Cabin Management System

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 167


Cabin Management System

The cabin management system provides a direct contact for the cabin
crew with the ground via the Air Traffic Service Unit (ATSU).
The cabin management system controls and monitors the Passenger
Visual Information System (PVIS) via the Digital Interface Unit (DIU).
The attendants use the system to send and receive real time data on for
example passenger and security information, maintenance reports.
Test
The cabin management system has a BITE.
The test is done when the system is powered-up.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 168


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 169
ACARS System (ATSU )

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 171


ATIMS Description/Operation
ATSU
The Air Traffic Service Unit (ATSU) is partitioned into two main parts:
1)Aircraft interface/Host platform
2) Data link applications.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 172


ATIMS Description/Operation

1) Aircraft Interface/Host Platform


Software
The S/W is composed of:
- air/ground communication,
- Human-Machine Interface (HMI),
- on-board peripherals communication such as :
Data Management Unit (DMU) part of the Flight Data Interface and
Management Unit (FDIMU),
Centralized Fault Display Interface Unit (CFDIU), Flight Management System
(FMS) and cabin terminal,

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


ATIMS Description/Operation

Software ( Continue )
2) Data Link Application
The data link applications include only Airline Operational Control (AOC)
The AOC applications are dedicated to data communication services
between the aircraft and the airline facility.
Note : The AOC software includes the triggers for OOOI movement
messages
O = Out of gate , O= Off take off , O = On on ground , I = In gate .

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 174


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 175
ATIMS Description/Operation

ATSU Software Loading


The ATSU S/W is uploaded via the Multipurpose Disk Drive Unit (MDDU).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 176


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 177
ATIMS Interfaces

AFS/ATIMS Interface
The Air Traffic Service Unit (ATSU) is interfaced with the Flight
Management and Guidance Computers (FMGCs) and the MCDUs for
Automatic Flight System (AFS).
FMGC
The ATSU sends and receives data to both FMGCs
The ATSU/FMGCs interface is used for:
- Operational data: origin/destination airport, flight number, fuel on
board,

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 178


ATIMS Interfaces

MCDU
The ATSU/MCDUs interface is used for:
- the AOC application to select the AOC mode, parameter entry
(captain name, fuel units...), display of AOC specific information (AOC
received messages, scratchpad messages...), and print command,
- air-ground communication functions is used to show the router specific
information, crew requests for router modes of operation and parameter
entry, print command.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 179


ATIMS Interfaces

Communication Systems/ATIMS Interface


The ATSU is interfaced with the
VHF Data Radio (VDR) 3 configured in VHF DataLink (VDL) mode 2,
Satellite Data Unit (SDU), when no VHF coverage .
HFData Radio (HFDR) 1 (if installed) configured in HF DataLink (HFDL)
mode,
ATC Transponders, ICAO code (24 bit address) sent by the ATC
transponders.
Radio Management Panels (RMPs) for communication system.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 181
AVIONICS VENTILATION

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential 8/27/2017 183


AVIONICS VENTILATION
Two ventilation systems :
Avionics ventilation and lavatory / galley ventilation.
AVIONICS VENTILATION
This equipment includes
A blower fan and an extraction fan.
Two skin air valves.
Avionics Equipment Ventilation Computer (AEVC)
Note: the fans operate continuously.
The AEVC controls the fans and the skin valves based on flight/ground logic
and fuselage skin temperature.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

There are 3 configurations for the skin air inlet and outlet valves:
Open circuit: both valves open (on ground only),
Closed circuit: both valves closed (in flight or low outside air temperature
on ground below 4 C ). The air is cooled in the skin heater exchanger.
Intermediate circuit: inlet closed, outlet partially open (smoke removal in
flight or high ambient temperature ).

Note :The small flap (Auxiliary flap ) is opened in flight or on ground with
takeoff power selected, when the skin temperature is above 34C
(93,2F).and closes below 27C (80,6F).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

VENTILATION PANEL
BLOWER and EXTRACT switches in the AUTO position (lights out), the
avionics ventilation system is fully automatic and requires no pilot input.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

Both skin valves have a manual override and deactivation device

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Smoke Detection

SMOKE DETECTOR
The smoke detector signals smoke to the controller, to both VENTILATION
P/Bs and to the GEN 1 LINE P/B. The smoke detected is used for smoke
warning.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Smoke Detection

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


AVIONICS VENTILATION

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
When you work on A/C, make sure you obey all the Aircraft
Maintenance Manual (AMM) procedures. This will prevent injury to
personnel and/or damage to the A/C.
Do not use force to turn the manual handles of the valves. There are
shear pins in the handles.
Do not use your fingers to operate the deactivation switches. If the
system is energized, the valves could move.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


LAVATORY AND GALLEY VENTILATION

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


LAVATORY AND GALLEY VENTILATION

LAVATORY AND GALLEY VENTILATION


The lavatory and galley ventilation system is completely automatic.
Conditioned cabin air is supplied through the lavatory and galley areas
and is removed from these areas by an extraction fan.
The fan pulls air through the ceiling into an extraction duct.
The air is then discharged overboard through the outflow valve.
Note: the extraction fan runs continuously .

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


LAVATORY AND GALLEY VENTILATION

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

Cargo Ventilation :
The forward and aft cargo compartments ventilation consist of
Ventilation Controller ( one for each cargo compartment )
Inlet and Outlet Isolation valves ( one set for each cargo compartment )
Extraction Fan (one for each cargo compartment
Control Panel .

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

Cargo Ventilation
For each ventilated cargo compartment there is an ISOLATION VALVE
P/B switch that controls the isolation valves.
In the auto position the cargo VC will automatically open and close the
isolation valves.
In case of cargo smoke detected, the cargo ventilation controller will
automatically close the related isolation valves.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

The forward and aft cargo compartments can have a ventilation


and heating system.
Air from the main cabin is drawn down into the cargo
compartment by the extract fan or by differential pressure in
flight.
After circulating through the compartment, the air is discharged
overboard.
The operation of the two isolation valves and the extract fan is
controlled automatically by the cargo Ventilation Controller (VC).

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

Cargo Heating
The Cargo heating consist of
Forward and Aft Cargo Heating Controllers
Cargo Heat Control Panel
Forward and Aft air trim valves

For the heating of the cargo compartment, the pilots select the desired
compartment temp and hot bleed air is mixed with the air coming from
the main cabin to increase the temperature if necessary.
The supply of hot air is controlled by the Cargo Heating Controller.
Note that there is NO direct air conditioning supply to the cargo
compartments. The pilots cannot add "cold" air to the compartments.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

CONTROL PANELS
The forward cargo trim air system is fed from the cabin hot air valve but
the HOT AIR P/B switch controls the aft cargo compartment hot air valve.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM FORWARD

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM AFT

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
When you work on aircraft, make sure that you obey all the AMM
procedures. This will prevent injury to personnel and/or damage to the
aircraft.
When you are in contact with harmful products, use protective clothing,
rubber gloves and goggles.
Do not touch a component until it is sufficiently cool to prevent burns.

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


CARGO VENTILATION & HEATING SYSTEM

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


Ventilation Video

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential


End of Day Two

20 5 Panasonic Avionics Corporation. Proprietary and Confidential