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NASA Daily News Summary

For Release: Sept. 17, 1999


Media Advisory m99-191

Summary:

PRESS ACCREDITATION PROCEDURES FOR RUSSIAN ZVEZDA (STAR)


SERVICE
MODULE LAUNCH

Video File for Sept. 17, 1999

ITEM 1 - KENNEDY SPACE CENTER HURRICANE FLOYD DAMAGE


ITEM 2 - TURBULENT EFFECTS OF HURRICANE FLOYD
ITEM 3 - GIANT STAR CLUSTERS (replay)
ITEM 4 - 1999 ANTARCTIC OZONE "HOLE" EMERGES (replay)

*NOTE: THE DIABETES TECHNOLOGY LIVE SHOTS ORIGINALLY


SCHEDULED
FOR TODAY WERE POSTPONED DUE TO HURRICANE FLOYD.
THEY HAVE BEEN RESCHEDULED FOR SEPTEMBER 24, 1999. See
http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/breaking.html for full information.
Contact at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA: Ivelisse
Gilman 757/864-5036.

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PRESS ACCREDITATION PROCEDURES FOR RUSSIAN ZVEZDA (STAR)


SERVICE
MODULE LAUNCH

The Zvezda Service Module, the cornerstone of Russia's


contribution to the International Space Station, is currently
scheduled for launch no earlier than Nov. 12, 1999, from the
Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. News media wishing to cover
the Zvezda launch must request press accreditation no later than
Sept. 23, 1999.

Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Debra Rahn 202/358-


1638.
For full text, see:
ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/note2edt/1999/99-050.txt

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If NASA issues additional news releases later today, we will e-


mail summaries and Internet URLs to this list.
Index of 1999 NASA News Releases:
http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html

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Video File for Sept. 17, 1999

ITEM 1 - KENNEDY SPACE CENTER HURRICANE FLOYD DAMAGE TRT


- 1:35

Images show the minor damage sustained at Kennedy Space Center due
to Hurricane Floyd. Most damage from the storm is institutional in
nature. Images show Vehicle Assembly Building siding panels blown
off of the east and west sides of the building, a guard sentry
post blown askew, washout of train track where the dune was lost
between Pads A and B, some signs blown over, and damage to the
sand dunes on the beach. KSC employees returned to work today.
The Space Shuttle vehicles were unaffected and there was no damage
to any flight hardware. This includes International Space Station
elements, the SRTM payload, and the Hubble Space Telescope
components. The highest wind recorded was 91 mph from the NNW at
4:50 a.m. on Wednesday. This was recorded at a weather tower
located between Pad 39-A and Launch Complex 41. The maximum
sustained wind was 66 mph. The highest amount of rain recorded at
KSC was 2.82 inches. The eye of Hurricane Floyd passed 121
statute miles east of Cape Canaveral at 4 a.m.

Contact at NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL: George Diller 407/867-


2468.

ITEM 2 -TURBULENT EFFECTS OF HURRICANE FLOYD TRT - 1:29

This comparison shows the coastline of Florida, Georgia and South


Carolina, before and after Hurricane Floyd. The first image was
taken in April 1998, and the second was taken on September 16,
1999. The second image shows a band turgid blue waters churned up
giving evidence to the ferocious waves and dynamic conditions
produced by Hurricane Floyd. These images were captured by the
Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) onboard the Sea
Star spacecraft. The images were enhanced and rendered at the
Scientific and Visualization Studio (SVS) at NASA's Goddard Space
Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.

Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD:


Deanna Corridon 301/286-0041.

ITEM 3 - GIANT STAR CLUSTERS (replay) TRT: - 3:20

Synopsis: Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and


myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the
clearest view yet of a pair of the largest young clusters of
stars inside our Milky Way galaxy.

Contact at the Space Telescope Science Institute: Ray Villard


410/338-4514

Item 3a - Giant Clusters


Video sequence of still images going deep into the Milky Way
Galaxy to the Arches Cluster. Hubble, penetrating through dust
and clouds, peered into the core where two giant clusters shine
more brightly than any other clusters in the galaxy.

Item 3b - Various Images


Images from the preceding sequence. Listed as follows:
1 - Wide view of Sagittarius constellation
2 - Palomar Observatory Sky Survey
3 - Two Micron All Sky Survey
4 - Hubble Space Telescope image of Arches Cluster

Item 3c - Interview excerpts

Dr. Don Figer, Principal Investigator, The Space Telescope Science


Institute
ITEM 4 - 1999 ANTARCTIC OZONE "HOLE" EMERGES (replay) TRT 4:20

New images from NASA show the depleted region of ozone commonly
known as the "ozone hole" is again emerging over Antarctica.
Scientists are closely monitoring ozone levels in Antarctica after
observing record low levels of ozone in 1998. The Antarctic
"ozone hole" develops each year between late August and early
October.

Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade


Sisler 301/286-6256.
Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz
202/358-1730.

ITEM 4a - 1999 ANTARCTIC OZONE "HOLE" EMERGES

New images from NASA show the depleted region of ozone commonly
known as the "ozone hole" is again emerging over Antarctica. The
latest images show that region of depleted ozone exceeds 9 million
square miles (23 million square kilometers). Lower concentrations
of ozone are shown in purple. Higher concentrations are in yellow
and red. The Antarctic "ozone hole" develops each year between
late August and early October.

ITEM 4b - 1998 OZONE "HOLE"

The 1998 Antarctic ozone "hole" was the largest ever observed.
Data from the satellites show that ozone depletion reached a
record size of 10.5 million square miles (27.3 million square
kilometers) on Sept. 19, 1998. Scientists believe the unusually
cold stratospheric temperatures contributed to the record size of
the "hole."

ITEM 4c - OZONE TRENDS

This shows yearly comparison of ozone levels in Antarctic. NASA


and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels
since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to
develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Though "ozone holes"
of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form
during the next few years, scientists expect to see a reduction in
ozone losses as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs are gradually
reduced.

ITEM 4d - TOMS SATELLITE

The measurements were obtained this year using the Total Ozone
Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument aboard NASA's Earth Probe
(TOMS-EP) satellite.

ITEM 4e - OZONE SCIENTISTS - B-ROLL

Scientists and others have a keen interest in ozone depletion,


given that the increased amounts of ultraviolet radiation that
reach the Earth's surface because of ozone loss have the potential
to increase the incidence of skin cancer and cataracts in humans,
harm some crops, and interfere with marine life.

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end of daily news summary