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College of Education

The College that Prepares Teachers as Facilitators of Active Learning


Department of Special Education

ECSE 413.001: Instructional Technology for Young Students

Fall 2017

Instructor: Jennifer L. Kouo, Ph.D.


Contact Information:
Electronic Mail: jkouo@towson.edu
Office Phone: (410) 704-6001
Office Location: Towson University Main Campus Psychology Building Room 305
Mailbox Location: Towson University Main Campus Hawkins Hall Room 304
Office Hours: Mondays 10:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
Tuesdays 3:30 5:00 P.M.
By appointment
*Available for individual/group conferencing following each class session.

Class Sessions: Tuesdays 12:30 P.M. 3:15 P.M.


Class Location: Towson University Main Campus HH0112

Towson University College of Educations Mission: To inspire, educate and prepare educators as
facilitators of active learning for diverse and inclusive communities of learners in environments that are
technologically advanced.

Conceptual Framework: All students should be able to identify and discuss the Conceptual Framework.
It is our mission statement that is operationalized by required content, professional and pedagogical
national, state, and institutional standards. To review the entire document, visit the web site at:
http://www.new.towson.edu/coe/cf2006/index.asp

Required Readings:
Gierach, J. (Ed.). (2009). Assessing students needs for assistive technology (ASNAT): A resource manual
for school district teams (5th ed.). Milton, WI: Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative (WATI)
Retrieved online at http://www.wati.org/?pageLoad=content/supports/free/index.php
Meyer, A., Rose, D. H., & Gordon, D. T. (2014). Universal design for learning: Theory and practice.
Wakefield, MA: CAST Professional Publishing, an imprint of CAST, Inc.. (Accessible here:
http://udltheorypractice.cast.org/login)

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Other Highly Recommended Texts:
Dell, A. G., Newton, D.A., & Petroff, J. G. (2017). Assistive technology in the classroom: Enhancing the
school experiences of students with disabilities (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson.
Nelson, L. (2014). Design and deliver: Planning and teaching using universal design for learning.
Baltimore: Brookes Publishing Co.
Ralabate, P. (2016). Your UDL lesson planner: The step-by-step guide for teaching all learners. Baltimore:
Brookes Publishing Co.

Tk20 Syllabus Statement: TUs College of Education uses Tk20 Higher Ed as a comprehensive
online data management system for all activities in programs leading to certification for teachers or
other school personnel. All signature assessment assignments, internship evaluations and other
identified documentation must be submitted through the students Tk20 account.
A subscription to Tk20 can be purchased online at https://towson.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/shib-
login or in the TU Bookstore. The cost online is $110 and provides 7 years of access.

Supplemental Readings: Additional readings may be assigned to supplement the text and class
discussions. These readings will be accessible through the course Blackboard site.

Catalog Description: Practical application of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), using instructional
and assistive technologies to support learner variability and enhance student achievement. In addition,
this course will highlight strategies for increasing the access of students with disabilities to the general
education curriculum under IDEA. Prerequisites: Consent of department.

Course Objectives: The course objectives are aligned with the current professional knowledge and
skills as defined by the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) and the
Council for Exceptional Children (CEC).

Listed below are the specific course objectives and the specific alignment to the professional standards
that are addressed by the course. An asterisk (*) indicates mastery of the specific standard that will be
addressed by the course assessment.

CEC Preparation Standards* InTASC Teacher Standards*


A. Learners and Learning A. Learner and Learning
1. Learner Development and Individual Learning 1. Learner Development
Differences* 2. Learning Differences*
2. Learning Environments 3. Learning Environments
B. Content B. Content
4. Content Knowledge*
3. Curricular Content Knowledge*
5. Applications of Content*
C. Instructional Pedagogy C. Instructional Pedagogy
6. Assessment
4. Assessment
7. Planning for Instruction*
5. Instructional Planning and Strategies*
8. Instructional Strategies*
D. Professionalism and Collaboration D. Professionalism and Collaboration
6. Professional Learning and Ethical Practice 9. Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
7. Collaboration 10. Leadership and Collaboration

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CEC Preparation Standards*, InTASC Teacher Standards*, and College of Education Standards*
11. CEC Technology Standard: Technology*
Teachers are expected to routinely use technology to support student learning and assessment. Use of
technology has been embedded within the CEC and the InTASC standards. To ensure a clear
connection between courses taught within the College of Education and the use of technology, the
College of Education developed a standard specifically addressing technology within education (i.e.,
COE Standard 11). COE 11 also aligns with the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards
http://www.towson.edu/coe/ncate/preparation/documents/MDTchrTechStdsMTTS.PDF

Course Objectives Continued:

1. Recognize the impact of learner variability and apply this knowledge to create lessons that
integrate instructional technology and support implementation of the Maryland College and
Career Readiness Standards (CEC 1, 3, 4, 5; InTASC 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; TU COE 11).
2. Apply the Universal Design for Learning guidelines as an instructional framework to support all
learners (CEC 1, 5; InTASC 2, 6, 8).
3. Understand, develop and apply the SETT framework in order to evaluate student strengths,
needs, and learning environment to facilitate appropriate selection of assistive technologies
across the AT continuum (CEC 1, 2, 4, 7; InTASC 1, 2, 6, 10; TU COE 11).
4. Justify the selection of appropriate augmentative and alternative communication systems and
assistive technologies to support the communication and learning of individuals with
exceptionalities (CEC 5, InTASC 7, 8).
5. Share and disseminate information and technology resources with students, staff and families
(CEC 3, 6, 7; InTASC 3, 9, 10).

High Leverage Practices:

What are high level practices (HLPs)?

High-Leverage Practices (HLPs) focus on the teacher-candidate practicing important clinical skills and
receiving specific feedback of these practices during the completion of both education courses and the
internship experience. HLPs are the basic and most essential components of teaching. The nature of
high-leverage refers to their importance for students learning and the focus on these allows a teacher
to advance his or her teaching skills. The HLPs listed below are the skills, specific to special education,
which will be practiced most directly in this course. The instructor will incorporate these in instruction,
offer students an opportunity to practice them, and will provide feedback to students as they
implement them over the course of the semester.

CEC HLP #12 (Instructional Domain):


Systematically design instruction toward a specific learning goal.

CEC HLP #19 (Instructional Domain):


Use assistive and instructional technologies.

Essential Dispositions for Educators: At Towson University, we recognize the importance of


preparing candidates who are worthy to join the education profession. All students enrolled in the
Professional Education Unit programs are expected to develop a professional conscience by
demonstrating important human characteristics and dispositions necessary to work with diverse and

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inclusive communities of learners. Following is a list of dispositions, including important diversity
proficiencies, which have been identified as core behaviors expected of all graduates of all Unit
programs. As candidates progress through coursework and field experiences, they are expected to
demonstrate increased understanding and eventual mastery of these dispositions.

Commitment to Professional Practice


The successful candidate:
Respects and models high academic standards, and demonstrates proficiency in
academic writing and professional oral presentation.
Demonstrates a repertoire of pedagogical skills that develop all students critical and
independent thinking, and performance capabilities.
Uses ongoing assessment as an integral part of the instructional process.
Reflects on practice regularly in order to improve student learning.
Makes decisions based on ethical and legal principles, including respect for
confidentiality.

Caring for the Success and Well-being of All Students


The successful candidate:
Believes that all students can learn and persists in facilitating their success.
Accepts and demonstrates responsibility for improving learning for all students.
Values cooperation with colleagues, students, and families by respecting their views on
improving student achievement.
Models the virtues of an educated person, including the drive to work hard and become
flexible.
Demonstrates culturally responsive teaching and celebrates cultural differences.

Collaboration with Colleagues and Stakeholders


The successful candidate:
Establishes and contributes to a positive learning climate for all students.
Engages in continual learning and discussion with other professionals.
Recognizes families, colleagues, and supervisors as partners in teaching and learning by
creating opportunities to involve them in instructional decisions.
Seeks expert knowledge in order to improve teaching and learning.
Accepts suggestions and implements changes to improve professional practice.

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Course Policies

Attendance: Per the 2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalog, students are expected to attend all classes and
actively participate in all class sessions. Prior notification of intended absence to the instructor is
required. Punctuality is also expected, and the student is expected to remain for the entire class period.
Habitual tardiness or excessive early departures of 30 minutes or more will result in loss of grade points.
Please adhere to the instructors attendance policies stated below:
Excused absences 0 points deducted from final grade requires documentation and must be
related to one of the following circumstances: illness or injury in which the student cannot
attend class, religious observance, participation in university activities at the request of
university authorities, or compelling verifiable circumstances beyond the control of the student.

First unexcused absence 0 points deducted from final grade


Second unexcused absence 3 points deducted from final grade
Third unexcused absence 6 points deducted from final grade
More than three unexcused absences a minimum of 10 points deducted from final grade

If the student is absent when an assignment is due, the student is still responsible for submitting
the assignment on time, unless prior arrangements are made.

In the event of an absence, the student is responsible for all material covered during the period of
their absence and should make arrangements with a peer to access information (i.e., obtaining all
notes, handouts, and quizzes and assignments)

Class Cancellation: In the event of inclement weather, please listen for announcements of Towson
University closings, which are made by WBAL (1090 AM), on TV, on the TU web, and through TU text
messaging. In the event of a cancellation, you will be provided with an applicable on-line or other
alternative assignment that requires comparable instruction and time to complete.

Participation: The student is expected to actively participate in class discussions and group work.
Reading the assigned text book chapters and supplemental reading is mandatory. The text was
carefully chosen by the instructor and will be utilized as a tool to facilitate learning in this course.

Due Dates/Late Assignments: Students are responsible for submitting all assignments on time.
Assignments must be submitted on the due date, unless otherwise specified. If you cannot access
Blackboard or will be absent from class, email the assignment to the instructor from your Towson email
account. Students who are struggling to complete any assignment by the required due date must
contact the instructor in advance to discuss concerns. Assignments submitted late without prior
consultation with the instructor will lead to a 10% deduction (full letter grade) with each day the
assignment is late.

Any changes to due dates, as posted on the tentative course schedule, will be discussed throughout the
semester.

Professionalism: It is expected that all students in this course will conduct themselves in a professional
manner. This includes interpersonal dealings, conflict resolution, and managing responsibilities with
college staff, fellow students, and field placement personnel. The final grade may be lowered by one

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full letter grade for inappropriate behavior and/or failure to demonstrate the characteristics described
in the essential dispositions.

Email Communication: All electronic communication regarding this course will be through the
students Towson University email account only. All email communication to the instructor will be
written in a professional format. Emails will contain a professional greeting and complete sentences
which will be free of spelling errors and grammatical mistakes. Unprofessional emails will not be
addressed by the instructor.

Web-Enhanced Course: Routine access to electronic mail and Blackboard is crucial to participation in
this class. All students will be required to log on to the Blackboard website to access the syllabus and
frequently throughout the course to obtain updates, handouts and resources. Supplemental readings,
internet links, and other resources for completing assignments may be accessed through the
Blackboard website. Course handouts or other materials to be discussed during each class session will
be posted on Blackboard for students. Students should either have electronic access to all Blackboard
handouts or bring a copy with them to class. Hard copies of all handouts and other related materials
may not be provided during class sessions; therefore students must make arrangements to access
them electronically in advance.

Use of Electronic Devices: Personal use of cellular phones, iPads and iPods are prohibited during the
duration of class, unless they are incorporated through the use of the instructor to compliment
instruction. The use of a laptop during class will be for coursework only. Inappropriate use of electronic
devices during class will be addressed by the instructor.

Concentration Statement: When completing projects and/or assignments in this course, TU students
should select or will be assigned topics/observations which focus on the educational level of PreK-12
students in their declared area of special education concentration, e.g., infant/primary,
elementary/middle or secondary/adult.

Group Projects: Group projects require equal participation among ALL members of the group. Upon
the discretion of the instructor, individual assignments or one group assignment may be required for
submission. In both cases, individual grades will be assigned to each member of the group and the
grade assigned may vary among members of the same group. The instructor has the discretion to
assign different grades among the group based on participation, quality of work, and critique of other
group members.

Meetings: The instructor is available for meetings during office hours and by appointment. It is
recommended that students who feel they are having difficulty with the course or may need
clarification meet with the instructor as early as possible.

Assignment Standards: All assignments are to be of publication quality and adhere to the standard
APA format (see APA 6th Edition Publication Manual). There are NO make-up assignments for a low
performance on any of the requirements. The instructor reserves the right to make copies of your
papers at her discretion. Please use PERSON FIRST LANGUAGE when writing about children/people
with disabilities.

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American Psychological Association (APA) Formatting and Style: The standard format for any
written work in the College of Education is APA, unless otherwise indicated by the instructor. If you are
unfamiliar with APA, it would benefit you to purchase the Publication Manual of the APA (6th ed.).
Additional resources for APA formatting are:
1. Towson University Cook Library website
http://cooklibrary.towson.edu/styleGuides.cfm#APA
2. Special Education library liaison (Claire Holmes) is also available to assist you with applying
professional writing standards. Her contact information is located at
http://pages.towson.edu/cholmes.
3. APA tutorials at http://apastyle.apa.org/learn/ The tutorial for new users takes less than 22
minutes to complete.
4. A highly recommend resource is the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
While the additional resources may be helpful, they should not be considered a substitute for directly
consulting the APA manual (6th ed.).

Student Academic Integrity Policy: Honesty & Behavior Policy: All students are expected to adhere
to the Student Code of Conduct as outlined in the student Policy Book and summarized in the Student
Handbook. Plagiarism and cheating are not acceptable behaviors. Academic Integrity: Students in this
course are expected to exhibit academic integrity at all times. Be aware plagiarism is presenting
someone else's work as your own, whether the act is deliberate or unintentional is irrelevant. You
must take great care to give credit to an author when you borrow either exact words or ideas.
Generally, if you use 4 or more words consecutive words from a document, you should use quotation
marks and a proper citation. Academic dishonesty will be reported to the appropriate authorities and
handled as outlined in your student handbook. Students are encouraged to consult the following
website for specific details: http://www.towson.edu/provost/resources/ studentacademic.asp

Diversity: Diversity is a broad, dynamic term that includes, but is not limited to, ethnicity, race, gender,
socioeconomic status, exceptionality, language, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, and
geographical location. Our values, beliefs, customs, and behaviors are shaped by any one or any
combination of these attributes. The lens through which our perceptions of diversity are constructed
continuously change as a result of not only the context within which diversity is examined, but also the
evolving of our individual sense of self.

The Department of Special Education at Towson University recognizes the importance of diversity in
the development of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required of professional educators. Each
course within the department provides students in teacher preparation programs with various
information, activities, and assignments to guide them in developing the knowledge, skills, and
dispositions that will enable them to work within diverse communities.

MSDE Institutional Performance Criteria for Diversity: Programs prepare professional educators to
teach a diverse student population (ethnicity, socio-economic status, English Language Learners [ELL],
giftedness and inclusion of students with special needs in regular classrooms).
A. The program provides instruction to - and assesses proficiency of - teacher candidates in
developing and implementing integrated learning experiences for diverse student needs

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B. The program provides instruction to - and to assesses proficiency of - teacher candidates in
planning instruction, adapting materials, implementing differentiated instruction, and to
provide positive behavior support for students with disabilities in an inclusive classroom
C. The program provides instruction to - and assesses proficiency of - teacher candidates in how
to differentiate instruction for English Language Learners (ELL)
D. The program provides instruction to - and assesses proficiency of - teacher candidates in how
to differentiate instruction for gifted and talented students
E. The program provides instruction to - and assesses proficiency of - teacher candidates in how
to collaboratively plan and teach with specialized resource personnel

Within SPED 413, ways of developing the necessary knowledge, skills, and dispositions are reflected in
the signature course assignment that requires students to develop a universally designed lesson plan
that models flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs. This lesson
includes a focus on meeting the needs of all learners, including those identified as having special needs,
ELLs, and/or Gifted and Talented.

Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance: Towson University is committed to providing equal
access to its programs and services for students with disabilities, in accordance with Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Disability Support Services
is the office designated to provide reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities. If you are
a student with a disability and believe you may need accommodations for this course, please notify
me with a memo from Disability Support Services (DSS). Since accommodations are not
retroactive, it is strongly recommended that you provide me with notification as early as possible
in the term. To register with DSS, or if you have questions about disability accommodations,
contact Disability Support Services at 410-704-2638, or visit the DSS office in the Administration
Building, Room 232. Students seeking accommodations must identify themselves to DSS, request
an appointment to discuss their needs, and provide DSS with up-to-date and complete
documentation of their disabilities. DSS determines what accommodations are reasonable on a case-
by-case basis, taking into account the students disabilities and needs, nature of their learning task,
course standards and essential requirements of the program of study, and educational
environment. Students are encouraged to register with DSS as soon as possible after admission to
the University to ensure timely provision of services. Please note: Towson Universitys DSS office is
willing to meet with students at the TUNE building. An appointment is necessary.

Incomplete (I): Please note that the grade of (I) is assigned at the end of the term because of verifiable
medical reasons or other documented circumstances beyond the control of the student. Unless the
course is completed within the 180 days, the grade becomes an (F) unless changed to another letter
grade. It is the responsibility of the student to make arrangements to complete course requirements to
change the grade of (I). Please refer to the Towson University Graduate Catalog or Towson University
Undergraduate Catalog for additional information.

Repeating a Course: Students may not repeat the course more than once without prior permission
from the Academic Standards Committee.

Withdrawals: Withdrawals must be completed by the date designated in the Towson University
Graduate Catalog or Towson University Undergraduate Catalog. Failure to withdraw by the designated
date will results in a grade of W on your permanent record.

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Course/Instructor Evaluation Procedures: Student evaluations play a crucial role in the delivery of this
course. All course evaluations will be administered online during the last two weeks of the course. You
will receive an email with a link to the website with directions on how to access the survey. It is vitally
important that you complete the survey, as the results are used to modify the course and assess my
teaching, and the University uses the results to address technology and facility needs. You can be
assured that your responses will be confidential as the results will be transmitted to me after the
grading period and they will not include any identifying information.

Important Towson University Phone Numbers & Web Sites:


Academic Achievement Center: http://www.towson.edu/aac/
Blackboard: https://bbweb.towson.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp
Cook Library: 524, 410-704-2291 | http://cooklibrary.towson.edu/
Counseling Center: 410-704-2512 | http://www.towson.edu/counseling/
Disability Student Services: 410-704-2638 | http://www.towson.edu/dss/
Email: https://tiger.towson.edu/webmailgateway/
Writing Lab: Linthicum Hall Room 308 | 410-704-3426
Writing Support Center: Linthicum Hall Room 201-B | 410-704-2857

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Course Assignment Descriptions and Rubrics
Carefully read all sections below.

1. Graphic Organizer and Assessment: Using the Graphic Organizer Menu (i.e., On the G.O.
Menu), students (individually, pairs, or small groups) will be assigned each week to create a
graphic organizer based on the information covered in an assigned reading. The graphic
organizers should substantially summarize key information or essential takeaways from the
reading.

Based on the takeaways identified in the graphic organizer, student(s) will identify an
assessment tool using the Assessment Appetizer Menu and create a 5-10 question assessment to
administer to their peers at the beginning of that weeks class session. Peers assessment
results should be e-mailed to the professor by the end of the week (Friday at 5pm).

Following the lecture, student(s) will add to their graphic organizer to include lecture
information and class activities. Completed graphic organizers should be submitted on the
course Padlet by the end of the week (Friday at 5pm).

Access ECSE 413 Padlet Here: https://padlet.com/jkouo/hoi1l7qshh7y

Points
1 Readings & Lecture Graphic Organizers Possible Points
Received
The fully completed graphic organizer have been No Evidence Evidence
submitted on Padlet and identifies the week number, 0 5
assigned reading, and student name(s). Comments: 0
The graphic organizer substantially summarizes No Evidence Evidence
information and connects important issues raised in the 0 5
reading, lectures, and class activities. Comments: 0
No Evidence Evidence
The 5-10 question assessment administered to peers 0 5
emphasizes key information from the assigned reading. Comments: 0
No Evidence Evidence
The fully completed graphic organizer and assessment 0 5
results have been submitted by the end of the week. Comments: 0

Total
Out of 20

2. Application Products Toolbox: Students will work with their mentor teacher to identify 5
application products from the choice menu below that will be integrated into their classroom
instruction or learning environment to support diverse learners. These products should be
authentic in nature and address a barrier, enhance instruction, or some type of instructional
demand that students have identified within their internship experience. These application
products will provide hands-on practice with technology skills that you can use with students to
meet their academic and behavioral goals, and to provide a local elementary school with high
quality, flexible resources that enhance a learner-centered environment. Students are also

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encouraged to think beyond the menu options below and bring other suggestions to the
professor.

At least 3 of the products must employ or require the use of technology (e.g., Promethean
Board, SMART Board, iPads) and all 3 UDL Principles below should be addressed with at least 1
product (i.e., engagement, representation, action and expression).

Students will create these materials and share them with their mentor teacher and on their
individual Weebly.

UDL Principle 2: UDL Principle 3: Action and


UDL Principle 1: Engagement
Representation Expression
Growth Mindset Visual/Bulletin QR code set related to a Classroom set of Brain Break
Board/Visual Schedule unit or lesson cards/sticks
Cooperative Learning Visuals-
Group roles and responsibilities Foldables related to a unit Set of low and high tech graphic
with corresponding role or lesson organizers for reading or writing
assignment cards
Adapted reading using
Noise Level Visual with color
Boardmaker, UDL Studio, Classroom set of Plickers cards
coding and moveable arrow
UDL Bookbuilder
Digital Formative assessment
Self-reflection desk sliders or Infogram related to class (host provides questions,
colored turn in folders content students enter on poll
everywhere, padlet etc)
Executive function
Visual supports for school PBIS Animoto or iMovie trailer
supports (goal setting sheets,
work to introduce content
strategy cards)
Other ideas (to be approved by Other ideas (to be approved Other ideas (to be approved by
professor) by professor) professor)

Points
2 Application Products Toolbox Possible Points
Received
No Evidence Evidence
5 Application Products were created and shared with the mentor 0 5
teacher.
Comments: 0

At least 3 of the Application Products employ or require the use of No Evidence Evidence
0 5
technology and all 3 UDL Principles have been addressed with at
least 1 product. Comments: 0
No Evidence Evidence
Students Weebly site includes the link or image of each 0 5
Application Product.
Comments: 0

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No Evidence Evidence
The specific UDL Principle, Guideline, and Checkpoint is identified 0 5
for each of the Application Products.
Comments: 0
Each Application Product includes a brief description on: No Evidence Evidence
how the product should be applied or used by teachers 0 10
and/or students
why the product represents the identified UDL Checkpoint
Comments: 0
No Evidence Evidence
Presentation of 2-3 Application Products 0 5

Total
Out of 35

3. Universally Designed Lesson Plan: The purpose of this signature assessment is to develop a
universally designed lesson plan that is accessible to all students, including students with
disabilities. Successful completion of this assessment will demonstrate your knowledge of the
UDL framework as well as your competence in the selection of appropriate technology based
on individual needs. This lesson plan contains multiple components that will be due at specific
times throughout the semester.

Components of the UDL Lesson Plan include:


Class description
Assistive Technology (must use SETT framework)
Lesson Plan (must use UDL Exchange and specific template)
Synthesis and Reflection

Students will load their final version of the UDL Lesson Plan to Tk20 for grading. Please see the
beginning of the syllabus for more information on the system.

Please review the following pages for more information about the signature assessment and
rubric

Early Childhood Special Education ECSE Signature Assessment #7 Undergraduate

Universally Designed Lesson Plan

Outcomes: The teacher candidate will develop a lesson plan using the Universal Design for
Learning (UDL) framework to support ALL learners, including those with disabilities, English
Language Learners, and students identified as Gifted and Talented. This plan should also
demonstrate the teacher candidates competence in the selection of appropriate assistive
technology tools based on individual needs.

InTASC/CEC Standards Addressed: Although this assessment requires teacher candidates to


consider all CEC, NAEYC, and InTASC Standards during planning, the following standards are
assessed for mastery: CEC Standards 1, 3, and 5; NAEYC 1, 4, 5 Standards InTASC Standards 2,

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4, 5, 7, and 8. To ensure a clear connection between courses taught within the College of
Education and the use of technology, the College of Education developed a standard
specifically addressing technology within education (i.e., COE Standard 11). COE 11 also aligns
with the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. TU COE 11 is also addressed by the
Signature Assessment.
CEC Preparation Standards (2012) InTASC Teacher Standards (2011) NAEYC Preparation Standards (2010)
A. Learners and Learning
1. Learner Development and Individual 1. Learner Development 1. Promoting child development and
Learning Differences 2. Learning Differences learning
2. Learning Environments 3. Learning Environments
B. Content
3. Curricular Content Knowledge 4. Content Knowledge 5. Using content knowledge to build
5. Applications of Content meaningful curriculum
C. Instructional pedagogy
4. Assessment 6. Assessment 3. Observing, documenting, and
5. Instructional Planning and Strategies 7. Planning for Instruction assessing to support young children and
8. Instructional Strategies families
4. Using developmentally effective
approaches
D. Professionalism and collaboration
6. Professional Learning and Ethical 9. Professional Learning and Ethical 2. Building family and community
Practice Practice relationships
7. Collaboration 10. Leadership and Collaboration 6. Becoming a professional

*Primary Focus Standards: CEC 1, 3, 5 / InTASC 2, 4, 5, 7, 8/NAEYC 1, 4, 5/COE 11


Teacher Candidate Directions for the Completion of the Universally Designed Lesson Plan

The teacher candidate should use these directions as well as the rubric to complete the
assignment.
Class Description and About the Lesson (5 Points):
o Provide a class description with age, grade level, content area and a brief
description of the technology (hardware and software) available in the
classroom.
o Describe any prerequisite information, skills, or resources students
would need in place in order to successfully approach the lesson.
o Identify the appropriate Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards
that serve as the basis for the lesson
o Using the provided case studies, choose and describe two students from
the class who have assistive technology needs. One student must have a
high incidence disability and one student must have a low incidence
disability that includes communication needs. Describe the strengths
and needs of each of these students.
o In addition to the two students with identified disabilities, briefly
describe a student who is an English Language Learner (ELL).
o In addition to the two students with identified disabilities, briefly
describe a student who has been identified as Gifted and Talented (GT)
or, for younger students, Primary Talent Development (PTD)

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Lesson Plan (30 Points): (use UDL Exchange:
http://udlexchange.cast.org/home)
The following sections will be included:
o Goals
o Assessments
o Instructional Methods
o Materials (be sure to include all tools suggested in your SETT framework)

Assistive Technology (10 Points): (use SETT template provided)


o Complete a SETT framework for the two students from the class
description who have assistive technology needs.
o **A minimum of one low and one high tech tool for each of the two
students identified as having disabilities should be embedded in the
lesson plan.

Synthesis and Reflection (10 Points): (use template provided)


o The synthesis is clear, accurate and professional and fully explains how
the teacher candidate has demonstrated mastery of:
o Learner Development and Individual Learning Differences (CEC 1;
InTASC 2, 4; NAEYC 1)
o Knowledge of technology to support variability
o e.g. English Language Learners, students
identified as GT/PTD
o Selection of appropriate assistive technologies to support
students with IEPs
o Identification of student communication needs

o Instructional Planning and Strategies (CEC 3, 5; InTASC 4, 5, 7, 8;


NAEYC 4, 5)
o Knowledge and application of the UDL Framework
o Application of lesson planning strategies
o Knowledge of instructional technologies

Professionalism (5 Points):
o All components of the project are free from errors in grammar, spelling,
punctuation, APA formatting, and mechanics, and should reflect person-
first language.
o All components of the project are well-organized and use provided
templates where indicated.

14
Towson University
College of Education
Department of Special Education: ECSE
Universally Designed Lesson Plan
Universally Designed Lesson Plan
Develop a lesson plan demonstrating your competence in using universal design for learning. The plan should include:

Distinguished/
Components & Proficient Satisfactory Basic/Needs Improvement Unsatisfactory
Exceptional Your score
Requirements (4 points) (3 points) (2 points) (1 point)
(5 points)
Includes a description of the Includes a description of the
Includes a description of the Includes a description of the Includes a description of the
classroom and lesson, but is classroom and lesson, but is
classroom and lesson that classroom and lesson, but is classroom and lesson, but is
missing three of the following missing four of the following
includes all of the following missing two of the following missing more than four of the
components: components:
components: components: following components:
- age and grade level - age and grade level
- age and grade level - age and grade level - - age and grade level
- available technology - available technology
- available technology - available technology - available technology
- descriptions of students: 1) - descriptions of students: 1)
- descriptions of students: 1) - descriptions of students: 1) - descriptions of students: 1)
high incidence disability with AT high incidence disability with AT
high incidence disability with AT high incidence disability with AT high incidence disability with AT
needs, 2) low incidence disability needs, 2) low incidence disability
Class needs, 2) low incidence disability needs, 2) low incidence disability needs, 2) low incidence disability
(including communication) AT (including communication) AT
Description (including communication) AT (including communication) AT (including communication) AT
needs, 3) an ELL, 4) and a needs, 3) an ELL, 4) and a
& About the needs, 3) an ELL, 4) and a needs, 3) an ELL, 4) and a needs, 3) an ELL, 4) and a
student identified as GT student identified as GT
Lesson student identified as GT student identified as GT student identified as GT
- what the lesson is about and - what the lesson is about and
- what the lesson is about and - what the lesson is about and - what the lesson is about and
the content area(s) being the content area(s) being
the content area(s) being the content area(s) being the content area(s) being
addressed addressed
(CEC 3; addressed addressed addressed
- prerequisites that describe the - prerequisites that describe the
InTASC 4, 5; - prerequisites that describe the - prerequisites that describe the - prerequisites that describe the
information, skills, or resources information, skills, or resources
NAEYC 5) information, skills, or resources information, skills, or resources information, skills, or resources
students would need in place in students would need in place in
students would need in place in students would need in place in students would need in place in
order to successfully approach order to successfully approach
order to successfully approach order to successfully approach order to successfully approach
the lesson. the lesson.
the lesson. the lesson. the lesson.
- appropriate Maryland College - appropriate Maryland College
- appropriate Maryland College - appropriate Maryland College - appropriate Maryland College
and Career-Ready Standards and Career-Ready Standards
and Career-Ready Standards and Career-Ready Standards and Career-Ready Standards
that serve as the basis for the that serve as the basis for the
that serve as the basis for the that serve as the basis for the that serve as the basis for the
lesson lesson
lesson lesson lesson

15
Distinguished/
Components & Proficient Satisfactory Basic/Needs Improvement Unsatisfactory
Exceptional Your score
Requirements (4 points) (3 points) (2 points) (1 point)
(5 points)

Includes none of the following:


Includes all of the following: Includes three of the following: Includes two of the following: Includes one of the following:
- goal(s) are aligned to the
- goal(s) are aligned to the - goal(s) are aligned to the - goal(s) are aligned to the - goal(s) are aligned to the
MCCRS standards and
MCCRS standards and MCCRS standards and MCCRS standards and MCCRS standards and
emphasize the outcomes, not
emphasize the outcomes, not emphasize the outcomes, not emphasize the outcomes, not emphasize the outcomes, not
the means of achieving them.
the means of achieving them. the means of achieving them. the means of achieving them. the means of achieving them.
- objectives are aligned with
- objectives are aligned with - objectives are aligned with - objectives are aligned with - objectives are aligned with
Goals the goal(s) and are written as
the goal(s) and are written as the goal(s) and are written as the goal(s) and are written as the goal(s) and are written as
concrete, specific,
concrete, specific, concrete, specific, concrete, specific, concrete, specific,
(CEC 1, 3; measurable steps that lead
measurable steps that lead measurable steps that lead measurable steps that lead measurable steps that lead
InTASC 2, 4, students toward
students toward students toward students toward students toward
5; NAEYC 4, accomplishing the
accomplishing the accomplishing the accomplishing the accomplishing the
5) instructional goals
instructional goals instructional goals instructional goals instructional goals
- objectives are designed to
- objectives are designed to - objectives are designed to - objectives are designed to - objectives are designed to
inform instruction and allow
inform instruction and allow inform instruction and allow inform instruction and allow inform instruction and allow
for adjustments
for adjustments for adjustments for adjustments for adjustments
- a plan for taking advantage
- a plan for taking advantage - a plan for taking advantage - a plan for taking advantage - a plan for taking advantage
of the variability throughout
of the variability throughout of the variability throughout of the variability throughout of the variability throughout
the classroom is evident
the classroom is evident the classroom is evident the classroom is evident the classroom is evident

Assessment
A clear assessment plan that A clear assessment plan that A clear assessment plan that A clear assessment plan that A clear assessment plan is not
Plan
includes all of the following is includes three of the following is includes two of the following is includes one of the following is provided and does not include
provided: provided: provided: provided: the following:
(CEC 1;
- formative assessments used - formative assessments used - formative assessments used - formative assessments used - formative assessments used
InTASC 2, 7;
as measurable opportunities as measurable opportunities as measurable opportunities as measurable opportunities as measurable opportunities
NAEYC 1, 5)
for learners to practice and for learners to practice and for learners to practice and for learners to practice and for learners to practice and
for the teacher to gauge for the teacher to gauge for the teacher to gauge for the teacher to gauge for the teacher to gauge
students levels of students levels of students levels of students levels of students levels of
engagement engagement engagement engagement engagement
- a plan for how the results will - a plan for how the results will - a plan for how the results will - a plan for how the results will - a plan for how the results will
be used to inform instruction be used to inform instruction be used to inform instruction be used to inform instruction be used to inform instruction
as well as to give learners as well as to give learners as well as to give learners as well as to give learners as well as to give learners
timely feedback on their timely feedback on their timely feedback on their timely feedback on their timely feedback on their
progress progress progress progress progress
- flexible summative - flexible summative - flexible summative - flexible summative - flexible summative
assessments that provide an assessments that provide an assessments that provide an assessments that provide an assessments that provide an
accurate picture of student accurate picture of student accurate picture of student accurate picture of student accurate picture of student
skills and understanding skills and understanding skills and understanding skills and understanding skills and understanding

16
Distinguished/
Components & Proficient Satisfactory Basic/Needs Improvement Unsatisfactory
Exceptional Your score
Requirements (4 points) (3 points) (2 points) (1 point)
(5 points)
- a plan for how to use the - a plan for how to use the - a plan for how to use the - a plan for how to use the - a plan for how to use the
summative assessment(s) to summative assessment(s) to summative assessment(s) to summative assessment(s) to summative assessment(s) to
gauge how successful the gauge how successful the gauge how successful the gauge how successful the gauge how successful the
lesson was at reaching the lesson was at reaching the lesson was at reaching the lesson was at reaching the lesson was at reaching the
wide range of students, and wide range of students, and wide range of students, and to wide range of students, and to wide range of students, and
to further inform refinements to further inform refinements further inform refinements to further inform refinements to to further inform refinements
to the next lesson as well as to the next lesson as well as the next lesson as well as the next lesson as well as to the next lesson as well as
overall teaching practice overall teaching practice overall teaching practice overall teaching practice overall teaching practice

Includes all of the following:


Includes a plan for instruction - Includes a plan for instruction
- a plan for instruction that is Includes a plan for instruction Includes a plan for instruction
that is engaging, has a clear that is engaging, has a clear
engaging, has a clear but the beginning, middle, that is engaging, has a clear
Instructional beginning, middle, and closing, beginning, middle, and
beginning, middle, and and/or closing, are unclear beginning, middle, and closing,
Methods and is aligned to the goal(s) and closing, and is aligned to the
closing, and is aligned to the and/or the alignment to the and is aligned to the goal(s) and
objectives of the lesson, goal(s) and objectives of the
goal(s) and objectives of the goals and objectives is unclear; objectives of the lesson,
(CEC 5; however, only some of the lesson, however, only
lesson many elements of the lesson are however, only elements of the
InTASC 7, 8; elements of the lesson elements of the lesson
- many elements of the lesson identified that correspond to lesson correspond to multiple
NAEYC 4, 5 correspond to multiple correspond to multiple
are identified that correspond multiple checkpoints from all checkpoints from only two of the
TU COE 11) checkpoints from all three of the checkpoints from only one of
to multiple checkpoints from three of the principles of UDL three of the principles of UDL
principles of UDL the three of the principles of
all three of the principles of (representation, expression, (representation, expression,
(representation, expression, UDL (representation,
UDL (representation, engagement). engagement).
engagement). expression, engagement).
expression, engagement).
Does not include varied
Includes varied materials and Includes varied materials and materials and flexible tools to
Includes varied materials and Includes varied materials and
flexible tools to address the flexible tools to address the address the variability of how
flexible tools to address the flexible tools to address the
Materials variability of how students take variability of how students act students take in, engage with,
variability of how students take variability of how students
in, engage with, and act on on information and/or does not and act on information and/or
in information, and includes all engage with information and
(InTASC 4f) information and includes all include all tools suggested in the does not include all tools
tools suggested in the SETT includes all tools suggested in
tools suggested in the SETT SETT framework suggested in the SETT
framework the SETT framework
framework framework

A SETT Framework is A SETT Framework is


Assistive A SETT Framework is
completed, at least one high A SETT Framework is completed, but only one high
Technology completed, at least one high
tech AT AND one low tech AT completed, but only one high tech AT or one low tech AT is
Student with tech AT AND one low tech AT
are identified and implemented tech AT or one low tech AT is identified and implemented and
high are identified and implemented,
throughout the lesson plan, identified and implemented. The it is unclear how the choice of
incidence but it is unclear how the choice A SETT Framework is not
and the choice of assistive choice of assistive technology is assistive technology is
disability of assistive technology is completed.
technology is appropriate for the appropriate for the students appropriate for the students
appropriate for the students
students stated strengths and stated strengths and needs as stated strengths and needs as
(CEC 5; stated strengths and needs
needs as well as the well as the requirements of the well as the requirements of the
InTASC 4g; and/or the requirements of the
requirements of the planned planned lesson planned lesson
TU COE 11) planned lesson
lesson.

17
Distinguished/
Components & Proficient Satisfactory Basic/Needs Improvement Unsatisfactory
Exceptional Your score
Requirements (4 points) (3 points) (2 points) (1 point)
(5 points)

A SETT Framework is
A SETT Framework is A SETT Framework is A SETT Framework is
completed, at least one high
Assistive completed, at least one high completed, but only one high completed, but only one high
tech AT AND one low tech AT
Technology tech AT AND one low tech AT tech AT or one low tech AT is tech AT or one low tech AT is
are identified and implemented
Student with are identified and implemented, identified and implemented. The identified and implemented and
throughout the lesson plan,
low incidence but it is unclear how the choice choice of assistive technology is it is unclear how the choice of
and the choice of assistive A SETT Framework is not
disability of assistive technology is appropriate for the students assistive technology is
technology is appropriate for the completed.
appropriate for the students stated strengths and needs as appropriate for the students
students stated strengths and
(CEC 5; stated strengths and needs well as the requirements of the stated strengths and needs as
needs as well as the
InTASC 4g; and/or the requirements of the planned lesson; AT to support well as the requirements of the
requirements of the planned
TU COE 11) planned lesson; AT to support communication is identified. planned lesson; AT to support
lesson; AT to support
communication is identified. communication is not identified.
communication is identified.
Diverse
Learners: GT Lesson plan successfully Lesson plan addresses some of Lesson plan addresses some of Lesson plan attempts to address
Lesson plan does not
addresses the needs of students the needs of students identified the needs students identified as the needs of students identified
successfully address the needs of
(CEC 1; identified as gifted and talented as gifted and talented, through gifted and talented, but the as gifted and talented, but the
students identified as gifted and
InTASC 2; through the use of the principles the use of the principles of UDL, integration of the UDL principles integration of UDL principles is
talented.
NAEYC 1) of UDL. but needs further development. is not evident. not evident.

Diverse
Learners:
Lesson plan successfully Lesson plan addresses some of Lesson plan addresses some of Lesson plan attempts to address
ELL Lesson plan does not
addresses the needs of ELLs the needs of ELLs, through the the needs ELLs, but the the needs of ELLs, but the
successfully address the needs of
through the use of the principles use of the principles of UDL, but integration of the UDL principles integration of UDL principles is
(CEC 1; ELLs.
of UDL. needs further development. is not evident. not evident.
InTASC 2;
NAEYC 1)
The synthesis and reflection is The synthesis and reflection
The synthesis and reflection is The synthesis and reflection is
stated clearly and fully explains unclear and does not fully
stated clearly and fully explains stated clearly and fully explains
all of the following: explain the following:
two of the following: one of the following:
- how applying the UDL - how applying the UDL
- how applying the UDL - how applying the UDL
Synthesis guidelines to lesson plans guidelines to lesson plans
guidelines to lesson plans guidelines to lesson plans
and allow teachers to meet the allow teachers to meet the
allow teachers to meet the allow teachers to meet the The synthesis and reflection is
Reflection needs of a diverse group of needs of a diverse group of
needs of a diverse group of needs of a diverse group of not provided.
students. students.
students. students.
(InTASC 7n; - why the two students - why the two students
- why the two students - why the two students
CEC 9) identified for the lesson identified for the lesson
identified for the lesson identified for the lesson
required additional supports required additional supports
required additional supports required additional supports
- why the specific low tech and - why the specific low tech and
- why the specific low tech and - why the specific low tech and
high tech tools were selected high tech tools were selected
high tech tools were selected high tech tools were selected

18
Distinguished/
Components & Proficient Satisfactory Basic/Needs Improvement Unsatisfactory
Exceptional Your score
Requirements (4 points) (3 points) (2 points) (1 point)
(5 points)
The synthesis and reflection The synthesis and reflection
The synthesis and reflection The synthesis and reflection
fully explains how the teacher fully explain how the teacher
fully explain how the teacher attempt to explain how the No connections to the
Connection candidate has demonstrated candidate has demonstrated
candidate has demonstrated teacher candidate has professional standards are made
to mastery of all indicated mastery of 75% of the
mastery of 50% of the demonstrated mastery of the and/or no specific references to
Professional professional standards with indicated professional
indicated professional indicated professional the standards provided.
Standards specific references to the standards with specific
standards with specific standards, but lacks specific
standards. references to the standards.
references to the standards. references to the standards.
Includes five to six errors in Includes seven to eight errors Includes more than eight
grammar, spelling, in grammar, spelling, errors in grammar, spelling,
Includes fewer than two Includes three to four errors
punctuation, APA formatting, punctuation, APA formatting, punctuation, APA formatting,
errors in grammar, spelling, in grammar, spelling,
Professional mechanics, or use of person- mechanics, or use of person- mechanics, or use of person-
punctuation, APA formatting, punctuation, APA formatting,
Presentation first language and/or parts of first language and/or the first language and/or the
mechanics, or use of person- mechanics, or use of person-
the document lack lack of organization impedes lack of organization impedes
first language. first language.
organization and detract the reader's ability to gain the the reader's ability to gain the
from the overall meaning. overall meaning. overall meaning.

19
4. 6 Hour Classroom Observation with Instructional Look Fors Sheet and Reflection: One of
the goals of the course is to learn about ways to integrate technology into classroom instruction
to support diverse learners. Candidates will have the opportunity to visit classrooms and
observe teachers at work to provide students with authentic, relevant observation experiences
in local schools. Students will be accompanied by the professor during the 6-hours of
observation (i.e., two 3-hour visits). Additionally, students will be holding discussions with one
another in real-time using TodaysMeet (https://todaysmeet.com/).

An Instructional Look Fors Sheet and Reflection will also be completed following the
observations. Reflecting the UDL focus of the course, your reflection is not restricted to a
traditional, written paper. You may use Vocaroo, a PowerPoint Presentation, Animaker,
Concept Web, or other options for action and expression. Please see the professor if you have
any other ideas for completing the reflection.

6 Hour Classroom Observation with Instructional Points


4 Possible Points
Look Fors Sheet and Reflection Received
Instructional Look Fors Sheet 0
No Evidence Evidence
All sections of the Instructional Look Fors Sheet has been 0 10
completed.
Comments: 0
Reflection 0
How did the physical space reflect student input and
No Evidence Evidence
facilitate a learner-centered environment in the 0 5
classroom(s) you visited?
How did the teacher(s) manage student behavior and No Evidence Evidence
implement effective classroom procedures? 0 5
What teacher behaviors contribute to a learner-centered No Evidence Evidence
environment? 0 5
How did students acquire, develop, use, and/or produce No Evidence Evidence
knowledge, information, and/or skills during instruction? 0 5
How did the teacher(s) enhance instruction with No Evidence Evidence
technology? 0 5
What specific strategies did the teacher(s) use during No Evidence Evidence
instruction? 0 5

No Evidence Evidence
How was the UDL framework implemented? 0 5

Comments: 0

Total
Out of 45

5. A.I. Technology Resource Guide: Students will build a Resource Guide on assistive technology
and instructional technology (A.I.) to post on their Weebly. The purpose of this guide is to share
resources with other teachers, related service providers, and parents. This project is designed
for students to become familiar with creating an online resource and to have a collection of

20
teacher- and parent-friendly technology tips that can be carried with students and updated
throughout students careers as an educator.

The resource guide should include 20 resources that showcase a range of at least 6 of the 9 UDL
Guidelines and address reading, writing, and mathematics, as well as social-emotional,
communication, behavior, and/or organization. The guide may include resources explored
throughout the semester, various Web 2.0 tools and apps described and reviewed, as well as
technology resources utilized in your own experiences and field placements. Students will
organize their 25 resources into an A.I. Technology Resource Guide Organizer, which will also
be posted on their Weebly.

Students will be given an opportunity to share with their peers 2-5 resources from their A.I.
Technology Resource Guide Organizer at the end of the semester.

OR
Learning Environment Design Guide: Students will build a Learning Environment Design
Guide and post it on their Weebly. The purpose of this design guide is to assist you in
identifying flexible options or examples that represent the nine UDL Guidelines that you can
include in your learning environment. This project should showcase the range of options
explored throughout the semester and during your own experiences, observations, and field
placements.

The design guide will include an aerial classroom floor plan designed by the student (may be
drawn or can use sites such as: http://classroom.4teachers.org/). The floor plan will then include
labels of 15 flexible options or examples (should be numbered) that showcase a range of at least
6 of the 9 UDL Guidelines. Using the provided template, a short description will be written to
describe and provide information on how each option or example aligns with a specific UDL
guideline.

Students will be given an opportunity to share with their peers their Learning Environment
Design Guide at the end of the semester.

Points
5 A.I. Technology Resource Guide Possible Points
Received
The A.I. Technology Resource Guide Organizer
No Evidence Evidence
includes at least 20 resources and all links included in
0 5
the guide are functioning.
Resources appropriately showcase a range of at least No Evidence Evidence
6 of the 9 UDL guidelines. 0 5
Resources address reading, writing, and
No Evidence Evidence
mathematics, as well as social-emotional,
0 5
communication, behavior, and/or organization.
Each resource includes a brief description of its
None Some Most All
features and provides information on how the
0 15 30 45
resource aligns with the specific UDL guideline.

21
A.I. Technology Resource Guide Organizer has been No Evidence Evidence
placed on Weebly. 0 3
No Evidence Evidence
Participated in share-out of 2-5 resources.
0 2

Comments: 0

Total
Out of 65

Points
5 Learning Environment Design Guide Possible Points
Received
The Learning Environment Design Guide includes a
student-created classroom floor plan and a brief No Evidence Evidence
description about the classroom (e.g., age, grade 0 10
level, type of classroom, student types)
No Evidence Evidence
Design Guide floor plan includes 15 numbered labels. 0 5
Using the provided template, a short description has
been written to describe and provide information on None Some Most All
how each of the 15 options or examples aligns with at 0 15 30 45
least 6 of the 9 UDL guidelines.
Learning Environment Design Guide has been placed No Evidence Evidence
on Weebly. 0 3

No Evidence Evidence
Participated in share-out of 2-5 options. 0 2

Comments: 0

Total
Out of 65

22
Deadlines, Grading, and Course Schedule

Deadline**
(Assignment materials are to be Submission
Assignments Points
submitted before the start of Method
class)
Throughout the In Class and
1 Graphic Organizer & Assessment Padlet 20
semester
Application Products Toolbox
2 Products 1 and 2 October 3 Weebly 14
Products 3, 4, and 5 October 24 Weebly 21
Universal Design Lesson Plan
Draft Submission of Universal Design Lesson Plan Option A. Pieces
Class Description & About the Lesson September 26 Blackboard 0
Goal & Assessment Plan October 17 Blackboard 0
Instructional Methods AND Materials October 31 Blackboard 0
3 Assistive Technology Student with
high AND low incidence disability AND November 14 Blackboard 0
Diverse Learners: GT & ELL
Draft Submission of Universal Design Lesson Plan Option B. Whole
Entire Draft Lesson Plan November 14 Blackboard 0
Final Submission of Universal Design Lesson Tk20 and
December 5 Weebly 60
Plan
6 Hour Classroom Observation with Instructional TBA In School and
4 Blackboard 45
Look Fors Sheet and Reflection Final Exam Date

A.I. Technology Resource Guide OR Learning TBA


5 Weebly 65
Environment Design Guide Final Exam Date

Total Points 225


** All dates, including school observations, are tentative and subject to change.

A1, 9%
Undergraduate Level Grading Scale
A5, 29% Letter Percentage GPA Letter Percentage GPA
A2, 15%
95-100% 4.00 C+ 77-79% 2.33
A- 90-94% 3.67 C 70-76% 2.00
B+ 87-89% 3.33 D+ 67-69% 1.33
B 83-86% 3.00 D 60-66% 1.00
B- 80-82% 2.67 F 0-59% 0.00

A4, 20% A3, 27%

23
Readings & Assignments
WK Date Topics Covered
Due Before Start of Class*
Introductions
August
1 29 Review of Syllabus, Blackboard, and Class Weebly
Create Your Own Weebly
Essential Question(s) 1: What is UDL? How is the UDL framework used to design learning environments?
September
2 5
Full Week Internship Experience
Defining: Universal Design for Learning (UDL),
Assistive Technology (AT), and Response to UDL Chapters 1 and 2
September
3 12
Intervention (RTI) UDL Chapter 3 and 4
Designing Positive Learning Environments Sign Up for Draft Submission of UDL LP Option A or B
UDL Guidelines and Checkpoints
September
4 19
UDL Guidelines and Checkpoints (continued) UDL Chapter 3 and 4
Essential Question(s) 2: How do we apply UDL to the lesson planning process?
UDL Chapters 5 and 6
September
5 26 Applying UDL to Lesson Planning: Goals Draft Submission of UDL LP
Option A. Pieces Class Description & About the Lesson
October UDL Chapters 3 and 6
6 3
Applying UDL to Lesson Planning: Variability (Online)
Application Products Toolbox 1 and 2
October
7 10 Applying UDL to Lesson Planning: Assessments UDL Chapters 3 and 6
Essential Question(s) 3: What materials and media support a UDL environment?
Applying UDL to Lesson Planning: Methods and
UDL Chapter 6
October Materials
8 17
Draft Submission of UDL LP
The Substitution Augmentation Modification
Option A. Pieces Goal & Assessment Plan
Redefinition (SAMR) Model
Culturally Responsive Teaching
October English Using Technology to Support English Supplemental Reading 1
9 24 Language Learners (ELLs) Application Products Toolbox 3, 4, and 5 with Presentation
Supporting Students Identified as Gifted and Talented
Essential Question(s) 4: What is assistive technology (AT)? How do AT and UDL work together?
Tour Maryland Department of Disabilities
WATI Chapter 1 and 15
October Technology Assistance Program (MDTAP)
10 31
Draft Submission of UDL LP
with Denise Schuler, Assistive Technology Specialist
Option A. Pieces Instructional Methods & Materials
12:30 p.m. 2:00 p.m.
WATI Chapters 4, 5, 6, and 7
The SETT Framework
November Sign Up for A.I. Resource or Learning Environment Design
11 7
AT and the IEP Process
Guide
AT to Support Students: Reading and Writing
Sign Up for UDL LP Conferences
Draft Submission of UDL LP
Option A. Pieces Assistive Technology Student with
high & low incidence disability AND Diverse Learners: GT
November Classroom Observation I (3 hours)** & ELL
12 14 @ St. Elizabeth School OR
Draft Submission of UDL LP
Option B. Whole
UDL LP Conferences Begin (WK 12-14)
AT to Support Students: Reading and Writing
November
13 21
(continued) WATI Chapter 8
AT to Support Students: Math
November 22-26 Thanksgiving Holiday (TU Closed)
November Classroom Observation II (3 hours)**
14 28 @ Halstead Academy
AT to Support Students : Communication
December WATI Chapter 3
15 5
Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)
Final Submission of UDL LP on Tk20
(Online)

24
Thurs. Dec. Instructional Look Fors Sheet and Reflection
14 AND
@12:30
16 pm
A.I. Technology Resource Guide OR Learning Design Guide Share-Out
Final Exam AND
Week Extra Credit Opportunities
*Assignment submissions are to be submitted before the start of the class session.
** Tentative dates for school observations and are subject to change based on scheduling coordination.

Supplemental Reading

1. Brown University. (n.d.). Principles for Culturally Responsive Teaching. Retrieved from
https://www.brown.edu/academics/education-alliance/teaching-diverse-learners/strategies-
0/culturally-responsive-teaching-0

Highly Recommended Readings

American Psychological Association (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological


Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.
Anderson, K. & Anderson, C. (2010). Science Access for ALL. Special Education Technology Practice,
November/December 2010.
Center for Applied Special Technology. (2010). UDL Pedagogical Considerations. Retrieved from
http://udlonline.cast.org/tdetails
Center for Applied Special Technology. (2011). Universal design for learning guidelines version 2.0.
Wakefield, MA: Author. from http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/english-language-
arts-standards
Edyburn, D. (2010). Would You Recognize Universal Design For Learning If You Saw It? Ten
Propositions for New
Directions For the Second Decade of UDL. Learning Disability Quarterly, (33) (1), 33-41. Retrieved from
http://www.cldinternational.org/Publications/LDQ.asp.
Hall, T., Strangman, N. & Meyer, A. (2003). Differentiated instruction and implications for UDL
implementation.
Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum.
High Incidence Assistive Technology Team (2011). Universal Design for Learning. Retrieved from:
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/departments/hiat/udl/
Higher Education Opportunity Act. United States Department of Education. Public Law 110-315. (2008).
King-Sears, M.E., & Evmenova, A.S. (2007). Premises, principles, and processes for integrating
TECHnology into instruction. Teaching Exceptional Children 40(1), 6-14.
Marino, M.T., Marino, & E.C.,Shaw, S.F. (2006). Making informed assistive technology decisions for
students with high incidence disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children 38(6), 18-25.
McGuire, J.M., Scott, S.S., & Shaw, S.F. (2006). Universal design and its applications in educational
environments. Remedial and Special Education 27(3), 166-175.
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Extra Credit Opportunity 1: The UDL Debate

This extra credit opportunity is only available if the student has attempted to complete all specified
requirements for the course (i.e., all course assignments and components).

The purpose of the opportunity is for student(s) to explore arguments for and against UDL. Oftentimes,
as educators, we will be confronted with opposing viewpoints, and it is important to be able to
respectfully and comprehensively communicate ones own knowledge and viewpoints, and advocate
for all students.

It is encouraged that this extra credit opportunity be completed by an even number of students, so that
students may be divided into two debate teams. Both teams will need to research arguments for and
against UDL. On the last class meeting of the semester, the professor will identify which team will
argue for UDL and which will argue against UDL. Visuals may be used (e.g., PowerPoint, Prezi) during
the debate.

If only one student chooses to complete this extra credit opportunity, that individual will argue both for
and against UDL. This can be done as a traditional, written paper, or be done using another method
(e.g., graphic organizer, presentation, podcast, infographic, animated video). The student will then
present both sides of the argument on the last class meeting of the semester.

Expectations of the UDL Debate include:


1. Team members must meet together in preparation for the debate, so they can work together
as an effective team.
2. All members of each side must participate in the debate.
3. One person speaks at a time. Side discussions are to be limited.
4. Use appropriate language and be polite in referring to your opposing team.
5. All arguments MUST address the previous student argument directly. You may not simply
ignore an argument and shift the debate to an unrelated point.
6. Each person will credit the source of any statistic, quotation, survey, or other research
information AT THE TIME that source is mentioned during the debate.

Structure of the UDL Debate:

Total Time Allowance: 10 minutes


Pro Point #1 Con Objection to Point #1 Pro Rebuttal to Point #1
Pro Point #2 Con Objection to Point #2 Pro Rebuttal to Point #2
Total Time Allowance: 2 minutes
Questions from Audience
Total Time Allowance: 10 minutes
Con Point #1 Pro Objection to Point #1 Con Rebuttal to Point #1
Con Point #2 Pro Objection to Point #2 Con Rebuttal to Point #2
Total Time Allowance: 2 minutes
Questions from Audience
Total Time Allowance: 2 minutes
Pro Concluding Remarks Con Concluding Remarks

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EC 1 The UDL Debate Possible Points
Arguments, whether it is for or against UDL, are
No Evidence Evidence
comprehensive and resources have been identified for
0 3
all arguments made.
Presentation of debate is respectful and adheres to the No Evidence Evidence
Expectations of the UDL Debate. 0 2

Comments:

Total ____ 0ut of 5

Extra Credit Opportunity 2: Website Accessibility

This extra credit opportunity is only available if the student has attempted to complete all specified
requirements for the course (i.e., all course assignments and components).

Using the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 (WCAG; https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag and
https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/), identify one website which meets the WCAG, and another website
which does not meet the WCAG. In a Word Document, include the website link, a screen shot of the
website, and a list of reasons why one website best represents the WCAG and WCAG recommendations
for the second website. Remember that list should directly address the WCAG 2.0 Guidelines (i.e.,
Perceivable, Operable, Understandable, Robust).

EC 2 Website Accessibility Possible Points


One website which meets the WCAG 2.0 Guidelines is
identified, along with the screen shot. No Evidence Evidence
A list of reasons why that directly align with the WCAG 0 2.5
2.0 Guidelines has been developed.
One website which does not meet the WCAG 2.0
Guidelines is identified, along with the screen shot. No Evidence Evidence
A list of recommendations that directly align with the 0 2.5
WCAG 2.0 Guidelines has been developed.
Comments:

Total ____ 0ut of 5

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Extra Credit Opportunity 3: Autism Internet Module (AIM)/Autism Focused Intervention
Resources and Modules (AFIRM)

This extra credit opportunity is only available if the student has attempted to complete all specified
requirements for the course (i.e., all course assignments and components).

Each student will select one of the AIM or AFIRM Modules below to complete in its entirety:
AFIRM Module: PECS http://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/picture-exchange-communication-system
AFIRM Module: Visual Supports http://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/visual-supports
AIM Module: Speech Generating Devices
http://www.autisminternetmodules.org/mod_intro.php?mod_id=35

Autism Internet Module (AIM)/Autism Focused


EC 3 Possible Points
Intervention Resources and Modules (AFIRM):
Complete and submit AIM/AFIRM Pre-Assessment
score. No Evidence Evidence
Complete ALL portions of the module. 0 2
Complete and submit AIM/AFIRM Post-Assessment
score.

A quick-reference-sheet (QRS), which outlines key


No Evidence Evidence
information about the module, has been created and
0 3
shared with the students peers.

Total ____ 0ut of 5

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