Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 376

Census of India 2011

KERALA

SERIES-33 PART XII-A

DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK

THRISSUR

VILLAGE AND TOWN DIRECTORY

DIRECTORATE OF CENSUS OPERATIONS


KERALA
2
CENSUS OF INDIA 2011

KERALA

SERIES-33 PART XII-A

DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK


Village and Town Directory

THRISSUR

Directorate of Census Operations, Kerala

3
MOTIF

Thrissur Pooram

Thrissur/ Thrissivaperoor pooram commonly called the pooram of all poorams is one of the
mammoth pooram festival in Kerala. Thrissur pooram started two centuries back the then ruler of Cochin,
Sakthan Thampuran or Raja Rama Varma, in 1798. Sakthan Thampuran, so known for his firm and decisive
administration, decided to break tradition and started to celebrate the pooram festival belonging to his
region. Before the initiation of Thrissur pooram, Arattupuzha festival was the largest temple festival,
which is around 12 Km from the city. Temples near the Thrissur were the regular participants of the
Arattupuzha pooram untile they were denied by the chief of Peruvanam Gramam due to the delayed entry
of the Thrissur and Kuttanellur termple. This caused the Thrissur Naduvazhi, the chief poojari of
Vadakkunnathan, known as Yogadiripad and the Kuttanellur Naduvazhi started the pooram in Thrissur.This
pooram started as an act of reprisal quickly lost its charm, after infighting between the two main Naduvazhis.
It required the intervention of the ruler to get this right. Sakthan Thampuran unified the 10 temples
situated around Vadakkunnathan temple and organized the celebration of Thrissur Pooram as a mass
festival. He ordained these temples into two groups, Western group and Eastern group. The Western group
as Thiruvambady consisting of Kanimangalam, Laloor, Ayyanthole, Nethilakkavu and the Thiruvambady
temple, as the main one. The Eastern group called as Paramekkavu, consisting in addition to Paramekkavu
temple, Karamukku, Chembukavu, Choorakottukavu and Panamukkamppilly. The pooram was to be centered
around the Vadakkunnathan temple, with all these temples sending their poorams (the whole procession),
to pay obeisance to the Shiva, the presiding deity. The Thampuran is believed to have chalked out the
program and the main events of the Thrissur pooram festival. It is this historical background that determines
the course of the pooram program and it is specifically the rulers antipathy to the Brahmin aristocracy to
open Thrissur pooram for the common man.

4
CONTENTS

Pages
1. Foreword 7
2. Preface 9
3. Acknowledgements 11
4. History and scope of the District Census Handbook 13
5. Brief history of the district 15
6. Analytical Note 18
Village and Town Directory 207
Brief Note on Village and Town Directory
7. Section I - Village Directory
(a) List of Villages merged in towns and outgrowths at 2011 Census
(b) Taluk Maps
(c) Alphabetical list of Villages along with location code 2001 and 2011
(d) Taluk wise Village Directory
(e) Appendices to Village Directory
Appendix I : Summary showing total number of villages having Educational, 268
Medical and other amenities in villages - Taluk level
Appendix I A : Villages by number of Primary Schools 271
Appendix I B : Villages by Primary, Middle and Secondary Schools 271
Appendix I C : Villages with different sources of drinking water facilities 271
available
Appendix II : Villages with 5,000 and above population which do not have 272
one or more amenities available
Appendix III : Land utilization data in respect of Census towns 274
Appendix IV : Taluk wise list of inhabited villages where no amenity other 274
than drinking water facility is available
Appendix V : Summary showing number of Villages not having Scheduled 274
Caste population
Appendix VI : Summary showing number of Villages not having Scheduled 275
Tribe population
Appendix VII A : List of villages according to the proportion of the Scheduled 275
Castes to the total population by range

5
Pages
Appendix VII B : List of villages according to the proportion of the Scheduled 279
Tribes to the total population by ranges
Appendix VIII : Number of villages under each Gram Panchayat (Taluk wise) 283
8. Section II - Town Directory
(a) Town Directory Statement I - Status and Growth History 298
(b) Town Directory Statement II - Physical aspects and location of 310
towns, 2009
(c) Town Directory Statement III - Civic and other amenities, 2009 318
(d) Town Directory Statement IV - Medical Facilities, 2009 330
(e) Town Directory Statement V - Educational, Recreational and cultural 340
facilities,2009
(f) Town Directory Statement VI - Industry and banking, 2009 364
(g) Town Directory Statement VII - Civic and other amenities in 368
slums, 2009
(h) Appendix to Town Directory - Towns showing their outgrowth with 372
population

6
FOREWORD

The District Census Handbook (DCHB) is an important publication of the Census Organization
since 1951. It contains both Census and non Census data of urban and rural areas for each District. The
Census data provide information on demographic and socio-economic characteristics of population at the
lowest administrative unit i.e. of each Village and Town and ward of the District. The Primary Census
Abstract (PCA) part of this publication contains Census data including data on household amenities collected
during 1st.phase of the Census i.e. House Listing and Housing Census. The non Census data presented in the
DCHB is in the form of Village Directory and Town Directory contain information on various infrastructure
facilities available in the village and town viz; education, medical, drinking water, communication and
transport, post and telegraph, electricity, banking, and other miscellaneous facilities. Later on, the Telegraph
Services were closed by the Government of India on 15th July, 2013. The data of DCHB are of considerable
importance in the context of planning and development at the grass-root level.

2. In the 1961 Census, DCHB provided a descriptive account of the District, administrative statistics,
Census tables and Village and Town Directory including Primary Census Abstract. This pattern was changed
in 1971 Census and the DCHB was published in three parts: Part-A related to Village and Town Directory,
Part-B to Village and Town PCA and Part-C comprised analytical report, administrative statistics, District
Census tables and certain analytical tables based on PCA and amenity data in respect of Villages. The 1981
Census DCHB was published in two parts: Part-A contained Village and Town Directory and Part-B the PCA
of Village and Town including the SCs and STs PCA up to Tahsil/Town levels. New features along with
restructuring of the formats of Village and Town Directory were added. In Village Directory, all amenities
except electricity were brought together and if any amenity was not available in the referent Village, the
distance in broad ranges from the nearest place having such an amenity, was given.
3. The pattern of 1981 Census was followed by and large for the DCHB of 1991 Census except the format
of PCA. It was restructured. Nine-fold industrial classification of main workers was given against the four-
fold industrial classification presented in the 1981 Census. In addition, sex wise population in 0-6 age
group was included in the PCA for the first time with a view to enable the data users to compile more
realistic literacy rate as all children below 7 years of age had been treated as illiterate at the time of 1991
Census. One of the important innovations in the 1991 Census was the Community Development Block (CD
Block) level presentation of Village Directory and PCA data instead of the traditional Tahsil/Taluk/PS level
presentation.
4. As regards DCHB of 2001 Census, the scope of Village Directory was improved by including some
other amenities like banking, recreational and cultural facilities, newspapers & magazines and most
important commodity manufactured in a Village in addition to prescribed facilities of earlier Censuses. In
Town Directory, the statement on Slums was modified and its coverage was enlarged by including details
on all slums instead of notified slums.
5. The scope and coverage of Village Directory of 2011 DCHB has been widened by including a number
of new amenities in addition to those of 2001. These newly added amenities are: Pre-Primary School,
Engineering College, Medical College, Management Institute, Polytechnic, Non-formal Training Centre,
Special School for Disabled, Community Health Centre, Veterinary Hospital, Mobile Health Clinic, Medical
Practitioner with MBBS Degree, Medical Practitioner with no degree, Traditional Practitioner and faith
Healer, Medicine Shop, Community Toilet, Rural Sanitary Mart or Sanitary Hardware Outlet in the Village,

7
Community Bio- gas, Sub Post Office, Village Pin Code, Public Call Office, Mobile Phone Coverage, Internet
Cafes/ Common Service Centre, Private Courier Facility, Auto/Modified Autos, Taxis and Vans, Tractors,
Cycle-pulled Rickshaws, Carts driven by Animals, Village connected to National Highway, State Highway,
Major District Road, and Other District Road, Availability of Water Bounded Macadam Roads in Village,
ATM, Self-Help Group, Public Distribution System(PDS) Shop, Mandis/Regular Market, Weekly Haat,
Agricultural Marketing Society, Nutritional Centers (ICDS), Anganwadi Centre, ASHA (Accredited Social
Health Activist), Sports Field, Public Library, Public Reading Room, Assembly Polling station, Birth & Death
Registration Office. In the Town Directory, seven Statements containing the details and the data of each
Town have been presented viz.; (i)-Status and Growth History of Towns,(ii)- Physical Aspects and Location
of Towns, (iii)-Civic and other Amenities, (iv)-Medical Facilities, (v)-Educational, Recreational & Cultural
Facilities, (vi)- Industry & Banking, and (vii)- Civic & other amenities in Slums respectively. Taluk wise data
of Village Directory and Village PCA have been presented in DCHB of 2011 Census as presented in earlier
Census.
6. The data of DCHB 2011 Census have been presented in two parts, Part-A contains Village and Town
Directory and Part-B contains Village and Town wise Primary Census Abstract. Both the Parts have been
published in separate volumes in 2011 Census.
7. The Village and Town level amenities data have been collected, compiled and computerized
under the supervision of Dr.V.M. Gopala Menon, IAS, Director of Census Operations, Kerala. The task of
Planning, Designing and Co-ordination of this publication was carried out by Dr. Pratibha Kumari, Assistant
Registrar General (SS) under the guidance & supervision of Dr. R.C.Sethi, Ex-Addl. RGI and Shri Deepak
Rastogi present Addl.RGI. Shri A.P. Singh, Deputy Registrar General, (Map) provided the technical guidance
in the preparation of maps. Shri A.K. Arora, Joint Director of Data Processing Division under the overall
supervision of Shri M.S.Thapa, Addl. Director (EDP) provided full cooperation in preparation of record
structure for digitization and validity checking of Village and Town Directory data and the programme for
the generation of Village Directory and Town Directory including various analytical inset tables as well as
Primary Census Abstract (PCA). The work of preparation of DCHB, 2011 Census has been monitored in the
Social Studies Division. I am thankful to all of them and others who have contributed to bring out this
publication in time.

New Delhi (Dr. C.Chandramouli)


Dated: - 16-06-2014. Registrar General &
Census Commissioner, India.

8
PREFACE

District Census Hand Book is a unique publication brought out un-interruptedly by the Census
Organization since 1951 Census. The publication is widely used by Administrators, Planners, Demographers,
Research Scholars and other data users. It contains village-wise and town-wise demographic and socio-
economic characteristics of the district along with the status of availability of civic amenities, infrastructural
facilities etc.
In earlier censuses, District Census Handbooks were published in single volume with two parts.
Part-A of DCHB contained Village and Town Directory and Part -B contained Village and Town Primary
Census Abstract data for each district. But this time, it is published in two volumes separately for Part-A
and Part-B of each district without changing the nomenclature of DCHB of 2001. This volume contains the
Village and Town Directory .

From 2001 Census onwards, the software designed/created by the Data Processing Division of the
Office of the Registrar General, India has been used for generation of tables. It reduced considerably the
time taken for preparation of the District Census Handbooks. District Census Handbooks are published in
Electronic form (pdf files) for the first time during the current Census.

I express my deep gratitude to Dr. C. Chandramouli, Registrar General and Census Commissioner,
India, for his encouragement and valuable guidance for completion of this volume within the timeframe.
I thank Shri Deepak Rastogi, Additional Registrar General (C&T), Shri A.P. Singh, Deputy Registrar General
(Map), Dr. Pratibha Kumari, Assistant Registrar General (SS) of Office of the Registrar General, India for
their guidance at each step in the preparation of DCHB. Special thanks are due to Shri M.S. Thapa, Additional
Director (EDP), Shri Anil Kumar Arora, Joint Director (EDP) and Shri Anurag Gupta, DPA (EDP). Without
their untiring efforts and support, we could not have completed the District Census Handbooks within this
time. They were always willing to listen to our requests and find solution for the problems we faced.

All Departments of the State Government co-operated in giving data for inclusion in the
publication. I thank the District Collectors, Tahsildars of every Taluk and Secretaries of Municipal
Corporations and Municipalities in the State who painstakingly collected and furnished all the information
needed by us. I also thank all the Departments of the State Government who co-operated with us in giving
the data, especially, Directorate of Public Instruction, Forest Department, Rural Development
Commissionerate, Industries Department, Economics & Statistics Department, Tourism Department and
State Planning Board.
I am very much thankful to Dr. V. M. Gopala Menon, Ex. Director of Census Operations, Kerala for
his support and valuable guidance for drafting this volume. In the beginning, non census data for District
Census Handbook were collected under the guidance of Smt. P. Girija, then Joint Director of Census
Operations. Information for preparation of analytical notes and all data other than Census data were
prepared and scrutinized under the guidance of Shri Francis. K. Manuel, Deputy Director, Shri P. P. Joy,
Deputy Director and Smt. L. Ajitha, Asst. Director. Shri A.K. Raman, Statistical Investigator, Gr.I (Retd.) and
Smt. Biji.C.R., Statistical Investigator, Gr.I did a great job of putting all the details together and checking
them. My sincere thanks are due to them also. The Statistical Investigators Gr. I & II and Compilers who
assisted in the work also did a tremendous job. Digitized maps were used in the District Census Handbooks.
This has improved the quality of the maps. I thank Shri K. Selvam, Senior Geographer and Shri K.
Shasikanth, Senior Draughtsman who helped in expediting the work. I am thankful to Shri A. N. Rajeev,

9
Deputy Director, Shri A. Sri Raghu, Asst. Director and Smt. P. Lakshmikutty, Asst. Director and their team in
Census Section for the efforts taken for finalization of the Primary Census Abstract (PCA). My thanks are
due to Smt. L. Ajitha, Shri K. Gireesh Kumar, Smt. P. Lakshmikutty, Shri Aswani Kumar. P. M., Shri
Shailendra . A. and Shri K. Gnanaprakasam, Assistant Directors for preparation of DCHB Volumes.
My sincere thanks are also due to Shri Francis. K. Manuel, Deputy Director who was in charge of Data
Centre, under whose guidance and supervision, the data entry of Village Directory and Town Directory
could be completed timely. I am grateful to Shri Jose. T. Varghese, Deputy Director under whose guidance
and supervision this publication has been finalised. The effort of many persons have gone into the
preparation and publishing of this volume. I take this opportunity to record my gratitude to all of them.

Thiruvananthapuram N.RAVICHANDRAN
14.12.2015 Joint Director of Census Operations, Kerala

10
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Name of Officers engaged

Shri Francis K Manuel Deputy Director

Shri Jose T. Varghese Deputy Director

Shri P.P. Joy Deputy Director

Smt. L. Ajitha Assistant Director

Compilation , checking of Data and Preparation of CRC

Smt. Saritha Jalal Statistical Investigator Gr.I

Smt. Anumol.M. Statistical Investigator Gr.I

Smt. Biji. C.R. Statistical Investigator Gr.I

Smt. Jane Jos Statistical Investigator Gr.II

Smt.S.Geethamony Compiler

Smt. Rajni Jose Compiler

Smt.Rihana.M. Compiler

Smt.Divya Reshmi . S. Compiler

Shri. A.K. Raman Statistical Investigator Gr.I (Retd.)

Shri.R.Chandrachoodan Statistical Investigator Gr.I (Retd.)

Smt. B. Valsala Kumari Statistical Investigator Gr.II(Retd.)

Smt. B. Prasanna Kumari Statistical Investigator Gr.II(Retd.)

Data Processing

Shri N.Jayakumar(Late) Data Processing Assistant

Shri B.Madhu Kumar Data Processing Assistant

Smt.Kumary.K.K Senior Supervisor

Shri Sajithraj.K Data Entry Operator, Grade B

Mapping

Shri K. Selvam Senior Geographer

Shri N.Venu Nair Senior Draughtsman

Shri Shashikanth Senior Draughtsman

Shri S.K.Sajeesh Senior Draughtsman

11
ORGI- Data Processing Division

Shri Jaspal SIngh Lamba Deputy Director

Ms. Usha Assistant Director

Shri Anurag Gupta DPA Grade A

Shri Mukesh Kumar Mahawar DPA Grade A

Ms. Shagufta Nasreen Bhat DPA Grade A

Ms. Shashi Seth Sr. Supervisor

Shri Khem Verma Jadon Sr. Consultant

Shri Yashwant Singh Jr. Consultant

12
HISTORY AND SCOPE OF THE DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK

The need of data at the grass root level for the administrative and planning purposes at
sub micro level as well as academic studies prompted the innovation of District Census Handbook.
District Census Handbook is a unique publication from the Census organization which provides
most authentic details of census and non-census information from village and town level to district
level. The District Census Handbook was firstly introduced during the 1951 Census. It contains
both census and non census data of urban as well as rural areas for each district. The census data
contain several demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the lowest administrative
unit i.e. of each village and town and ward of the district. The non census data comprise of data
on availability of various civic amenities and infrastructural facilities etc. at the town and village
level which constitute Village Directory and Town Directory part of the DCHB. The data of DCHB
are of considerable importance in the context of planning and development at grass-root level.
In 1961 census DCHB provided a descriptive account of the district, administrative statistics,
census tables and village and town directory including Primary Census Abstract. This pattern was
changed in 1971 Census and the DCHB was published in three parts: Part-A related to village and
town direct ory, Pa rt-B to vi llage and to wn PCA and Pa rt-C co mprised analyti cal rep ort,
administrative statistics, district census tables and certain analytical tables based on PCA and
amenity data in respect of villages. The 1981 census DCHB was published in two parts: Part-A
contained village and town directory and Part-B the PCA of village and town including the SCs and
STs PCA up to tahsil/town levels. New features along with restructuring of the formats of village
and town directory were added into it. In V illage Directory, all amenities except electricity were
brought together and if any amenity was not available in the referent village, the distance in
broad ranges from the nearest place having such an amenity, was given.
The pattern of 1981 census was followed by and large for the DCHB of 1991 Census except
the format of PCA. It was restructured. Nine-fold industrial classification of main workers was
given against the four-fold industrial classification presented in the 1981 census. In addition, sex
wise population in 0-6 age group was included in the PCA for the first time with a view to enable
the data users to compile more realistic literacy rate as all children below 7 years of age had been
treated as illiterate at the time of 1991 census. One of the important innovations in the 1991
Census was the Community Development Block (CD Block) level presentation of village directory
and PCA data instead of the traditional tahsil/taluk/PS level presentation.
As regards DCHB of 2001 Census, the scope of V illage Directory was improved by including
some other amenities like banking, recreational and cultural facilities, newspapers & magazines
and most important commodity manufactured in a village in addition to prescribed facilities of
earlier censuses. In Town Directory, the statement on Slums was modified and its coverage was
enlarged by including details on all slums instead of notified slums.
The scope and coverage of Village Directory of 2011 DCHB has been widened by including a number
of new amenities in addition to those of 2001. In the Town Directory, seven Statements containing the
details and the data of each town have been presented viz.; (i)-Status and Growth History of towns, (ii)-
Physical Aspects and Location of Towns, (iii)-Civic and other Amenities, (iv)-Medical Facilities, (v)-Educational,

13
Recreational & Cultural Facilities, (vi)- Industry & Banking, and (vii)- Civic & other amenities in Slums
respectively. Taluk wise data of Village Directory and Village PCA have been presented in DCHB of 2011
Census as presented in earlier Censuses. The data of DCHB 2011 Census have been presented in two parts,
Part-A contains Village and Town Directory and Part-B contains Village and Town wise Primary Census Abstract.
Both the Parts have been published in separate volumes in 2011 Census.

14
BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DISTRICT

Thrissur with its rich history, cultural heritage and archaeological wealth is called the cultural
capital of Kerala. From ancient times, this district has played a significant role in the political history of
South India. Many rulers and dynasties beginning with the Zamorins of Kozhikode, Tipu Sultan of Mysore
and Europeans including the Dutch and the British have had a hand in moulding the destiny of this region.
Raja Rama Varma, popularly known as Sakthan Thampuran was the architect of the present Thrissur Town.
The word TRICHUR is the anglicised version of Thrissur which again is the abbreviated form of
Thrissivaperur meaning the abode of Lord Siva. The district got its name from the headquarters town. It
has recently shed its anglicised name and is now known as Thrissur.
Thrissur District has played a significant role in the history of South India from the pre-historic
period to the modern times. Scholars assign the age of the megalithic monuments found in various parts of
the district to a period ranging from the third century B.C to the first century A.D or even earlier.
The district played a very important role in fostering trade relations between Kerala and outside
world in the ancient and medieval periods. The district also helped to pave the foundation for a composite
culture in this part of the country. The sea port of Muziris of the Sangam age is the modern Kodungallur of
Thrissur district. It had the unique distinction of being Primum Emporium India. It played host to the three
communities of Christains, Jews and the Muslims who contributed to the prosperity of Malabar. It attracted
traders from all over the world viz. Assyrians, Babylonians, Phoenicians, Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese
and Arabs.
During the Sangam age (the first four or five centuries of the Christian era) the whole of the
present Thrissur district came under the early Chera Empire. After the Sangam age till the beginning of the
9th century A.D hardly anything is known about the history of Kerala or that of the district. The history of the
district from the 9th to the 12th centuries is the history of Kulasekhara of Mahodayapuram and the history
since the 12th century is synonymous with the history of the rise and growth of Perumpadappu Swarupam.
The Cheras had established their capital at Mahodayapuram which was later moved to Kollam (Quilon) by
Rama Varma Kulasekhara Perumal, the last ruler of the second Chera Empire.
But Mahodayapuram continued to enjoy its importance as the seat of Perumpadappu Swarupam
for three more centuries from the 13th to the 15th century. Though the early history of the Perumpadappu
Swarupam prior to 1500 A.D is not available, the view is that the Perumpadappu Moopil or the ruler of
Cochin was the son of a sister of the last Kulasekhara and was hence considered as the direct heir under
matrilineal system. This linkage of the Perumpadappu Swaraupam with the Kulasekharas of Mahodayapuram
had won it the respect and allegiance of the chieftains and of the people, though it was not a major political
power till the advent of the Portuguese.
As result of the heavy floods of 1341 A.D the harbour at Kodungallur got completely silted and the
port became unfit for trade. In the very same flood the narrow sand banks which separated Cochin from
the backwaters were washed off and the present Cochin harbour emerged. And in course of time the
traders at Kodungallur migrated to Cochin and the importance of Kodungallur started dwindling.
One of the landmarks in the history of Perumpadappu Swarupam is the commencement of a new
era called Pudu Vaipu Era which commemorates the formation of Vaipin islands consequent on the great
deluge.
The 14th and the 15th centuries constituted periods of aggressive wars. During this period the Zamorin
of Calicut (belonging to Nediyiruppa Swarupam) was aiming at the political suzerainty of the region, which
led to war between the Perumpadappu and the Nediyiruppa Swarupams. In the wars fought in the 14th and
the 15th centuries, the Zamorin occupied large parts of the present Thrissur district. Taking advantage of the
dissensions in the Perumpadappu Swarupam, the Zamorin defeated the then ruler of Cochin and took
possession of the palace at Thrissur and had a ruler of his choice was installed on the throne of Cochin.

15
When Pedro Alvarez Cabral, the Portuguese Captain came to Cochin on the 24th December, 1500,
the ruler of Cochin who had enmity with Zamorin, welcomed him warmly and gave him all trading facilities.
This distressed the Zamorin who demanded the expulsion of the Portuguese from Cochin territory. When
this was not conceded to, war broke out between the forces of Zamorin and the forces of Cochin assisted
by the Portuguese. But in 1513 and again in 1540 the Portuguese entered into treaties with the Zamorins
against the wishes of the ruler of Cochin.
The Portuguese continued to dominate the scene till the beginning of the 17th century when its
power in Kerala started declining. Internal dissension in the Perumpadappu Swarupam around this period
helped the Dutch in getting a footing on the Kerala coast. Kerala Chieftains had aware of the impending
doom of the Portuguese and so they looked upon the Dutch as the rising power and welcome them whole
heartedly.
The Dutch conquered the port of Cranganore (Kodungallur) and installed Prince Vira Kerala Varma
Mootha Thavazhy on the throne of Cochin and entered into a treaty with him. The treaties of 1673 to 1674
gave the Dutch more powers and this triggered off internal dissension in the royal house. The Zamorin
along with the Dutch fought against Portuguese and conquered them from places like Mapranam,
Arattupuzha, Urakam, Korattikara, Kadavallur etc. These places were not, however, initially handed over to
the Raja of Cochin as the Zamorin insisted on the war expenses being met by the former. But later when the
Zamorin invaded Irinjalakuda, the Dutch was forced to drive him back and Cochin territories occupied by
the Zamorin were handed over to Cochin ruler in 1710. Some more territories of Cochin still remained with
the Zamorin which the Dutch took over from him and handed over to Raja Rama Varma after defeating the
Zamorin in 1718 with the help of the Raja of Cochin. But the Zamorin again attacked Cochin during 1755-57
and by 1758 the whole of present Thrissur district except a small portion of Thrissur taluk came under the
possession of the Zamorin. But King Kerala Varma (1760-75) entered into a treaty with Travancore and
defeated Zamorin and took back from him the entire Cochin territory except Perumpadappu and a few
other villages in Vanneri before 1763.
From 1769 to 1805 Raja Rama Varma popularly known as Sakthan Thampuram, was at the helm of
affairs of Cochin state, though he actually ascended the throne in 1790. He cut the chieftains to size and
revamped the administration. However, during his period, Haider Ali of Mysore invaded Cochin and it
became a vassalage of Mysore. After Haider Alis death Tippu Sultan ascended the throne of Mysore. As the
king of Cochin declined to co-operate with Mysore in attacking Travancore, Tippu got sore with Cochin and
attacked internally the state from Coimbatore side in 1789. The huge Mysore army devastated areas of the
present Thrissur district. Tippu made Thrissur as the headquarters of the areas conquered by him in Kerala.
But when Tippu had to make retreat on account of the Srirangapattanam war, the Raja of Cochin entered
into a treaty with the East Indian Company. In 1809, the then ruler of Cochin who succeeded Sakthan
Thampuran was forced to sign a new treaty with the East India Company, which obliged Cochin to be a
subsidiary ally of the British. The period from 1812 in which year Munro was made the Devan of Cochin
marked the beginning of a new era of administrative progress.
Thrissur district was in the forefront of the freedom struggle also. In 1919 a Committee of the
Indian National Congress had started functioning at Thrissur. In the Civil Disobedience Movement of 1921
several persons courted arrest in Thrissur town and elsewhere in the district. The famous Guruvayoor
Satyagraha (1931-32) under the leadership of Sri. K. Kelappan and Sri. A.K. Gopalan roused all round
awareness against untouchability and helped the Temple Entry Movement gain momentum in the district.
In 1937 a political conference was held at Thrissur under the presidentship of Pattabhi Seetharamayya.
The state experimented on a type of diarchal system of government in which the administration of
certain departments was entrusted with an elected member of the legislature to be nominated by Maharaja.
Accordingly, Ambat Sivarama Menon of Cochin Congress party became Minister in 1938. But the people
were not satisfied with the system and there were agitations for full responsible government based on
adult franchise. On the 26th January 1941 a new political organisation called Cochin State Praja Mandalam
which subscribed to the aims and objects of Indian National Congress, was formed under the leadership of

16
Sri. V. R. Krishnan Ezhuthassan. The first session of Praja Mandalam was held at Irinjalakuda in January 1942
in the face of measures by the government to prevent it from taking place.
The district was active in the Quit India Movement also. On the 15th August 1942 a public meeting
was held at Thrissur to protest against the arrest of Mahatma Gandhi.
Following the decision of the Maharaja of Cochin to transfer all departments of the state
government except Law and Order and Finance to the control of Ministers responsible to the state legislature
the first popular government of Cochin, consisting of Panampally Govinda Menon, C.R. Iyyunni, K. Ayyappan
and T.K. Nair assumed office. Cochin achieved full responsible government after Indian attained
Independence in August 1947.
Thrissur District fostered very close link with Aikya Kerala (United Kerala) Movement. The concept
of Aikya Kerala was conceived as early as 1928 at the State Peoples Conference held at Ernakulam. The
Cochin Legislative Council which met on the 29th July 1946 under Sri. Kerala Varma, the Maharaja of Cochin,
favoured the formation of Kerala State. A sub-committee under the Presidentship of Sri. K.P. Kesava Menon
constituted for the purpose met at Cheruthuruthy in late 1946 and resolved to convene an Aikya Kerala
Conference. The conference was accordingly held at Thrissur in April 1947. The then Maharaja of Cochin
participated in the conference and declared himself in favour of the formation of United Kerala comprising
of three administrative units of Malabar, Cochin and Travancore.
The amalgamation of Travancore and Cochin states was done on the 1st July 1949 and the formation
of Aikya Kerala later on the 1st November, 1956.
The present Thrissur district is a part of erstwhile Cochin state. Cochin state had formerly been
divided into Nadus. Each Nadu was under a chief. This position continued till the regaining of territories
from Zamorin in 1763. These Nadus were subsequently divided into Kovilakathumvathukkals or Taluks.
Each Taluk was under the control of Karyakkar exercising both judicial and executive powers. The Taluks
were further divided into Pravarthis. This lowest unit of administration was managed by Pravarthiars
assisted by Menons or Accountants and Chandrakkars or cash-keepers. The taluks were grouped into
two divisions Vadakkemugham and Thekkemugham. Each division was under the control of a
Sarvadhikaryakkar. The Cochin areas in the present Thrissur district formed part of the Vakakkemugham
or the northern sub-division. Valiya Sarvadhikaryakkar or Prime Minister was the head of the administration.
The then Cochin state comprised of 10 Kovilakathumvathukkals (or taluks) viz. Cochin, Kanayannur,
Cranganore (Kodungallur), Mukundapuram, Kodasseri, Talappilly, Chelakkara, Enamakkal, Thrissur and
Chittoor. In 1860 the number of taluks was reduced. With effect from the 1st July 1949 a new district named
Thrissur was formed with 6 taluks of the erstwhile Cochin State viz. Talappilly, Chittoor, Thrissur,
Mukundapuram, Cranganore and Cochin-Kanayannur and taluks of erstwhile Travancore areas, namely,
Kunnathunad and Parur.

17
ANALYTICAL NOTE

(i) PHYSICAL FEATURES


Natural region
The Natural Regions of the State is based on the regional classifications designed by the Census
Organisation. According to the classification, the whole country is divided into 4 Macro Regions viz., (i)
the northern mountains, (ii) The Great Plains, (iii) The Deccan Plateau and (iv) The Coastal Plains and
Islands. Kerala belongs to the 4th Macro Region The Costal Plains and Islands, which is again divided
into 4 Meso Regions. Of the 4 Meso Regions, Kerala falls under the Western Coastal Region which covers
the coastal tract from Maharashtra to Kerala State. The Meso Region is further divided into 6 Micro
Regions. The entire Kerala falls into such three Micro Regions viz., (i) North Kerala Coast, (ii) Central
Kerala Coast and (iii) South Kerala Coast. Thrissur District falls in the Central Kerala Coast. Each Micro
Region is further divided into Sub-Micro Regions on the basis of topography, geology, soils, climate and
natural vegetation. Thus Thrissur District consists of 4 such Sub-Micro Regions viz. (i) Thrissur Coast (ii)
Thrissur Plain (iii) Wadakkancherry Upland and (iv) Kodassery Forested Hills.The regional divisions
constituting Thrissur district is depicted in the chart given in next page.

18
REGIONAL DIVISIONS OF KERALA
THRISSUR DISTRICT
INDIA

Macro Region

1 2 3 4

i. The Northern ii. The Great Plains iii. The Deccan Plateau iv. The Coastal
Mountains Plains & Islands

Meso Region

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4

Gujarath Coastal Western Coastal Eastern Coastal Region The Islands


planes Region

Micro Region

4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.6

Maharashtra Goa Karnataka North Central South


Littoral Coast Coast Kerala Kerala Kerala
Coast Coast Coast

Thrissur
District

4.2.5.1 4.2.5.2 4.2.5.3 4.2.5.4

Thrissur Thrissur Wadakkancherry Kodasserry


Coast Plain Upland Forested Hills

19
Location and size
Thrissur District is in the central region of Kerala State lying between 1010' and 1046' north lati-
tude and 7557' and 76 54 east longitudes. It has Ponnani taluk of Malappuram district and Ottappalam
taluk of Palakkad district on the north and Devikulam taluk of Idukki district and Kunnathunad, Aluva and
Paravur taluks of Ernakulam district on the south. Alathur taluk of Palakkad district and Pollachi taluk of
Coimbatore district of Tamil Nadu are on its eastern boundary while the Lakshadweep sea is on the west.
Thrissur district slopes down from the Western Ghats in the east to the Lakshadweep sea to the
west forming three distinct natural divisions the highlands, the plains and the sea board. The highland
goes to heights of over 1220 metres above the mean sea level. The plains lay in gentle slopes upto the
backwaters. This region contains extensive paddy fields inter-spersed by rivers and canals. The sea board
lies as a narrow stretch bordering the sea. This sandy area is low and swamps and get flooded during heavy
monsoon.
Area
The area of the district is 3032.00sq.km and it constitutes 7.8 percent of the total area of the state
(38862.87 sq.km). It ranks the 5th among the districts in area.
Physiography
i) Thrissur Coast
This region lies all along the coast of Thrissur district. It has its boundaries with Malappuram coast
in the north, Thrissur plain in the east, Cochin coast in the south and the Lakshadweep sea in the west.
This coastal plain is drained by rivers like the Bharathapuzha, the Wadakkanchery, the Manali, the
Kurumali and the Chalakudy, besides a network of canals and backwaters. This plain slopes very gently
towards the west. The maximum height (55 m.) is found in the central-east portion i.e., at Kodannur village
of Thrissur taluk. The low-lying land, known as Koleland, lies as a continous belt from the central portion
towards the coast where the spot heights are 3 m, 10 m and 11 m etc. Paddy and coconut are the important
vegetation in the region.
ii) Thrissur Plain
This region is bounded by Pattambi undulating plain in the north, Wadakkancherry Uplands and
Kodassery Forested Hills in the east, Periyaar-Muvattupuzha Rolling Plain in the south and Thrissur Coast in
the west.

This region which is parallel to Thrissur coast has the maximum height of 118 m. at Amballur village
of Mukundapuram taluk and has the minimum height of 43 m. at Muringur Thekkummuri village of
Mukundapuram taluk. The central portion is an elevated area while the southern portion is low in height.
The average height of this region is 75 m. and sloping gently towards the west. This region is drained by the
tributaries of the Bharathapuzha, the Wadakkancherry, the Manali, the Kurumali and the Chalakudy rivers.
Paddy, coconut and cashew are the important vegetation of this region.

iii) Wadakkancherry Uplands

This region has its boundaries with the Palakkad Gap on the north and the east, Kodassery Forested
Hills in the south and Thrissur Plain in the west.

It is not a high mountainous tract but only uplands having outlying hills in the eastern extreme of
this region. Some knolls and hillocks are found here and there. The maximum height of this region is 208 m.
in Kondazhy village of Talappilly Taluk and the minimum height is 52 m. in its southern portion. Vazham
irrigtion project is located on a labb-land in the southern portion of this region which is sloping on all
sides.However, towards south its slop is gentle and through this spur NH-47 runs connecting Thrissur with

20
Palakkad. Arecanut, cashew, rubber, teak etc. are the main vegetation of this region. Coconut and paddy are
also cultivated here. .
iv) Kodasserry Forested Hills
This region lies in the south-eastern portion of the district forming its boundaries with
Wadakkancherry Uplands in the north, Chittur Forested Hills and Tamil Nadu in the east, Malayattur Forested
Hills and Anamalai Forested Hills in the south and Thrissur Plains in the west.
This forested hill has wet semi-ever-green forest. In its northern and southern ends Peechi and
Peringalkuthu reservoirs are located. This forest highland which is a part of the Western Ghats forms the
catchment areas of the Manali, the Karuvannur and the Chalakudy rivers. River terrraces are seen in the
middle portion. Numerous V shaped valleys are located in this tract which determines the course of
various streams. Scarp slope, waterfalls and rapids which structurally control and regulate the river directions
are found mostly in the middle and southern portion of this region. The region in totality is highly erosion
prone. The maximum height (1439 m.) is found in the southern end of the reserve forest and the minimum
height (416 m.) is found in the northern end at the Attur village of Talappilly taluk. It slopes towards the
north. Rubber and teak plantation are the vegetation cover of the area especially in the western end of this
region.
v) Mountains
The mountains of the district form an irregular outline along the Western Ghats with ridges and
conical peaks. The Machad hills in Talappilly taluk, the Paravattani hills in Thrissur taluk and Palappilly,
Kodassery and Athirappally hills in Mukundapuram taluk are worth mentioning. There are about 30 peaks
in the district with height ranging between 330 metres and 1439 metres. Karimalagopuram, the highest
peak in the district (1439 metres) lies at the boundary of Chittur taluk of Palakkad district and Mukundapuram
taluk of Thrissur district.

Drainage
Rivers
The main river system of the district are the Bharathapuzha, the Kecheri (Wadakkancherry), the
Karuvannur and Chalakudy.

21
The Bharathapuzha

The Bharathapuzha (209 kms.) originates from the Anaimalai hills. The 4 tributaries of this river are
(1) Gayathripuzha (2) Kannadipuzha (3) Kalpathipuzha and (4) Thuthapuzha. It flows as northern boundary
of Thrissur district for about 40 kms. Many streams rising on the forests of Palakkad and Thrissur districts
join this river. Cheerakuzhy (also known as the Pazhayannur or Gayathri river) is a tributary of the
Bharathapuzha. The Killimangalam thodu also joins the river. The Bharathapuzha has a catchment area of
about 440 sq.km. within Kerala.
The Kecheri river
The Kecheri river otherwise known as Wadakkancherry river originates from the Machad hills flowing
westwards and touch Wadakkancherry, Nelluvayi and Kecheri before joining the backwaters of Chettuvai.
It has a length of 51 km. Vazhani dam is constructed on this river basin.
The Manali
The Manali river (originating from Paravattani hills) and Karumali river (formed by the union of
Chimoni rising from Palappilly hills and Muppili rising from Kodassery hills) combines at Palakkadavu near
Arattupuzha and assumes the name Karuvannur river (48 kms.) This river branches into two one emptying
into the Manakodi lake and the other into the Chettuvai backwaters. This river has a length of about 65 kms.
Peechi dam constructed across Manali river and Chimmoni dam across Karumali river help to control floods
and to irrigate land.
The Chalakudy
The Chalakudy river (130 km.) is the longest river in the district with 4 main tributaries namely
Sholayur, Parambikulam, Kuriar (or Thekkadi) and Karappara. Rising on the Western Ghat the river flows
through the forest lands for most part for a distance of about 80 km. and then through fertile tracts for
about 32 km. It then joins the right arm of Periyar river at Elanthikara about 10 km. east of Kodungallur. The
Hydro-electric projects at Peringalkuthu and Sholayur are the two main projects of the river. This river has
a drainage area of about 1704 sq.km.
Besides the above major rivers a rivulet namely Viyyur river rises from Paravattani hills and empties
into Enamakal lake.

22
Sea Coast

The district has a long sea coast of about 54 km. lying between Punnayurkulam in the north and
Azhikode in the south. It is 9.2 per cent of the total length of coastline in the State. Azhikkal is the only
minor port on this coast. Chettuvai, a coastal village of the district has recently been developed into a
fishing centre with facilities for mechanised fishing.

Backwaters and Lakes

The backwaters locally known as kayals lie parallel to the sea coast inter connected by canals.
Forming part of a continuous water way from Vadakara to Thiruvananthapuram, the inland navigation
system of the district provides facilities for all types of country boats throughout the year. The water of
these backwaters is saltish for most part of the year except during rainy season. Kattakampal in Talappilly
Taluk, Enamakal and Manakkody in Thrissur Taluk are the important fresh water lakes in the district.

Climate

The large forest reserves favourably affect the climate and induce more rain in the district.
December, January and February are the coolest months of the year. March, April and May are generally
very hot. During the months of April and May the mean daily temperature rises upto 35C and in the days
of December-January, it may go down to 20C. In the mountain ranges, chilling cold is experienced whereas
lower down, the climate is bracing and in the plains, it is generally hot. Extreme hot and cold climate is not
experienced in any part of the district.

The district has a tropical climate with an oppressive hot season and plentiful and seasonal rainfall.
The hot season from March to May is followed by the south-west monsoon from June to September. The
period from December to February is the north-east monsoon season although the rain stops by the end of
December and the rest of the period is generally dry. The District has an average annual rainfall of 3109mm.
The following tables give a clear picture of the rainfall in the District and the State.

Actual and Normal Rainfall (mm) with percentage departures from normal rainfall from July to June of each year
State/District 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011
% departure

% departure

% departure

% departure
Normal

Normal

Normal

Normal
Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Kerala State 3428.4 3097.1 10.7 2333.3 3097.1 -24.7 3068.7 3097.1 -0.9 3259.8 3016.8 8.1

Thrissur District 3698.2 3073.6 20.3 2371.5 3073.6 -22.8 3187.2 3073.6 3.7 3177.1 3010.1 5.5

Source: Agricultural Statistics for the years 2007-08, 08-09, 09-10 and 10-11 published by Department of Economics&Statistics,
Govt. of Kerala

The above table shows that the actual rainfall received for Thrissur District was more than the
normal rainfall during the periods 2007-08, 2009-10 and 2010-11. During the year 2008-09 the District received
22.8 percent less than the normal rainfall. At the same time, it may be noted that during the period from
2007-2011, Thrissur District has received more rainfall than the State average.

23
Monthly Rainfall of the District (in mm) during 2007-2011
Month/ Annual 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
1 2 3 4 5
January 0 0 18.4 0
February 21 0 0 30.6
March 218.1 0 9.3 12.4
April 45.7 53.9 74.7 85.7
May 59.8 289.4 197.4 162
June 523.4 586.1 775.8 825.6
July 1170.2 437.7 972 601.5
August 533.3 260.2 385.1 236.6
September 660.3 345.5 361.3 308
October 413.3 384.7 156.9 561.6
November 48.6 9 206.3 332.6
December 4.5 5 30 20.5
Annual 3698.2 2371.5 3187.2 3177.1
Source : Agricultural Statistics for the years 2007-08,2008-09,2009-10 and 2010-11 published by Economics & Statistics
Govt. of Kerala.

A cursory glance of the above table shows that Thrissur District has been receiving maximum
rainfall either during June or July. In the period under reference (2008-09, 2009-10, 2010-11), the month of
January,February,March were almost dry except in the year 2007-08 when the district received 218.1mm
rainfall during March.
Forests
The entire forest area of the district is covered by Thrissur Forest Division, Peechi Wild Life Division,
Chalakudy Forest Division and Vazhachal Forest Division. Only a portion of Vazhachal Forest Division lies in
the district. Peechi-Vazhani Wild Life Sanctuary is located in the district. It was formed in 1958 and it covers
an area of 125 sq.km.
Thus the total forest area in the district is 1036.19 sq.km. which forms 32.12 per cent of the total
area of the district. It shows that one-third of the district is under reserve/vested forest. Vested forest in
the district is located in Thrissur Forest Division and it covers 4.3137 sq.km. area. Forest area of the district
is confined to Talappilly, Thrissur and Mukundapuram taluks.
The district has moist deciduous evergreen and semi-evergreen forests. The tropical evergreen
forests or shola with its luxuriant vegetation with lofty trees are found in the Sholayur valley. The semi-
evergreen forests which lie between the moist deciduous and evergreen forest occur in the Athirappally
reserve of Vazhachal Division. A unique venture under the Social Forestry Scheme came up at Kuthiran.
This is known as Vanavignana Kendra with a tree park and facilities to conduct studies on trees and
forestry.
The Kerala Forest Research Institute at Peechi is an institution which conducts ecological and
forest development research studies. The institute has a very good nursery of medical plants. The forests
with valuable trees like Teak, Ebony etc. give shelter to different species of animals and birds. The main
forest product is timber. High girth rose wood is exported to foreign countries. Other hardwood species
which command steady market are Irul, Pullamaruthu, Koramaruthu, Venga, Venteak, Pongu, Akil etc.
Minor forest products like Mattipal, Karuvelampatta, Marotti, Poovam, Zamalporia, Kanjiram, Elevangam
are abundant in these forests. There are also rubber, tea and coffee plantations in these forest tracts.
The Integrated Afforestation and Eco Development Project (IAEDP) supported by the National
Afforestation and Eco-Development Board under the Ministry of Environmental and Forest is under

24
implementation in Kerala from 1998-99 onwards. Eco preservation and sustainable management in selected
watershed is the ultimate aim of the scheme. Palakkad-Chelakkara watershed in Thrissur district is covered
by this scheme.
Flora and Fauna
The district with vast stretches of evergreen forests provides the natural habitat for a variety of
flora and fauna. Valuable medicinal plants, costly trees, diverse groups of mammals, birds and reptiles etc.
in these forests have the necessary ecological background to grow.
The low lands of the extreme west bordering coast line are dotted with backwaters and estuaries
of rivers. Its waters are abound in fish and afford feeding ground for many water birds, local and migrant,
while the plains have a rich fauna representing all groups. Among the mammals the primates are
represented by the langurs and monkeys.
Valuable trees like teak, rosewood, ebony, irul etc. are some of the forest trees. In the lowlands
paddy, coconut trees, arecanut trees, banana etc. are the main cultivations.
Minerals and mining
Thrissur coast falls under the alluvium bed and the only soil which occurs in this region is coastal-
alluvium. It is technically known as Psamments-Orthents. The geological bed of Thrissur plain is alluvial.
Major portion of Wadakkancherry Upland is coming under Charnockite bed. In its northern portion it is
having alluvium bed and basic dykes. The geological bed of Kodasserry Forested Hills is Charnockite,
unclassified granite, basic dykes.
Soil and cropping pattern
Sandy, alluvial, laterite and forest soil are found in the district. The coastal taluks of Kodungallur
and Chavakkad have sandy soil deficient in plant nutrients and limes.
Thrissur coast falls under the alluvium bed and the only soil which occurs in this region is coastal-
alluvium. Alluvial soil rich in organic matter, nitrogen and pottash but are deficient in phosphorous and
calcium is found on the low lying areas in the western region of Thrissur and Mukundapuram taluks and
stretches of Chavakkad taluk. It is technically known as Psamments-Orthents. The soil has originated from
recent deposits predominantly marine with some fluvial sediments along the coast line. Paddy and coconut
are the important vegetation in this region.
Thrissur plain has recently formed alluvial soil and coastal alluvium soil. Technically soils are
classified as orthents-tropepts, fluvents-tropepts-orthents and psamments-orthents. Paddy, coconut and
cashew are the important vegetation of this region.
Central regions of Thrissur, Talappilly and Mukundapuram taluks have laterite soil with hydrated
oxides of iron and aluminium. The eastern regions of Talappilly, Thrissur and Mukundapuram taluks have
forest soil.
Major portion of Wadakkancherry upland is coming under charnockite bed. In its northern portion
it is having alluvium bed and basic dykes. The soils are recently formed shallow, black, brown and alluvial
soils.
The soils of Kodasserry Forested Hills are laterite and shallow, black, brown and alluvial soils,
technically classified as orthents-tropepts, udults-tropepts. Rubber and teak plantations are the vegetation
cover of this region especially in the western end of this region.
Land and land-use pattern
According to agricultural statistics for 2009-10, the data on land use pattern of the District reveals
that forest occupies around 34.2 per cent. The pressure for non-agricultural use is increasing. The land
under non-agricultural use has increased to 12.12 per cent in 2009-10 from 11.27 per cent in 2000-01. The
net cropped area was 1271.85 sq.km and the area under current fallow (131.39 sq.km), fallow other than

25
current fallow (63.64 sq.km) and cultivable waste 6766 sq.km. The composition of the geographical area
classification is given below.

Classification of Area on the basis of Land Utilisation


Sl.No. Type of Land Area in sq kms

1 Total Geographical Area 3029.19


2 Forest 1036.19
3 Land put to non agricultural use 367.07
4 Barren & Uncultivable Land 2.47
5 Permanent Pastures & other Grazing land 0.05
6 Land Under misc.tree crops 3.5
7 Cultivable waste 67.66
8 Fallow ther than current fallow 63.64
9 Current fallow 131.39
10 Marshy Land 0.04
11 Still Water 80.82
12 Water Logged Area 2.8
13 Social Forestry 1.71
14 Net area sown 1271.85
15 Area sown more than once 340.31
16 Total cropped Area 1612.16
Source: Report on Agricultural Statistics,Department of Economics& StatisticsGovt. of Kerala
Tenancy
The important land tenures prevailing in the District before the enactment of the Kerala Land
Reform Act, 1963, were Jenmom, Inams, Anubhogam, Adima, Kanom, Kuzhikanom, Customary Verumpattam,
Kudiyiruppu, Cultivating Verumpattam, Ulkudi, Protected Ulkudi, Mulgeni, Chalgeni, Arwar, Illidarwar,
Vaidegeni, Netticut and Kumri, etc. The Land Reforms Act which was a landmark in the history of agrarian
reforms of the Country and the State and the subsequent amendments in 1966, 1969, 1971 and 1972 helped
the tenants to become owners of tenancy land. A number of landless agricultural labourers became holders
of land. Based on the Land Reforms Act and subsequent amendments, the implementation of Ceiling on
Holding and Distribution of Surplus Land came into force from early 1970. The ceiling area was fixed as 5
standard acres in the case of an adult unmarried person or a family consisting of a single surviving member
and 10 acres for a family consisting of two or more members. A family was not allowed to hold more than
20 acres in any case. Certain plantations were exempted from ceiling limits. Surplus lands were taken over
by the Government and distributed to landless poor, preference being given to Scheduled Castes and
Scheduled Tribes. A notable impact of these reforms was the reduction in the number of landless agricultural
households and the elimination of absentee landlordism.
Agriculture and Horticulture
The main cultivated crops of the district are coconut, rice, rubber, arecanut, tapioca, cashew, banana
and pepper. Paddy is however the most widely cultivated crop. During 1990-91, 74038 hectares of area was
under paddy. It had declined to 39215 hectares during 1998-99. There is a decline of 47.03 per cent in the
area under paddy cultivation during 1990-99. During 2009-10 it has further declined to 25439 ha. Kole
cultivation in the water-logged areas of Thrissur, Mukundapuram and Chavakkad taluks is a speciality of
the agricultural profile of the district. Thrissur district has been included in the Special Foodgrain Production
Programme for Rice launched by the Government of India.

26
Coconut is the main crop of the district in respect of area under cultivation. The coastal region and
the lower slopes of the laterite hills of the interior parts of the district account for the major portion of area
under cultivation of this crop. During 2009-10, 77509 hectares of area was under coconut cultivation in the
District.
Arecanut, another perennial crop grown in almost all taluks is intensively cultivated in
Mukundapuram and Talappilly taluks, the major centres being Pazhanji, Wadakkancherry, Kunnamkulam,
Irinjalakuda and Thrissur.
Rubber is planted in Talappilly, Thrissur and Mukundapuram taluks. There was only 6861 hectares
of area under this crop during 1990-91. The area under this crop had almost doubled to 13290 hectares
during 1990-99. During 2009-10 there was 15017 ha of area under this crop. Cashew is grown in almost all
parts of the district especially in dry lands, and lands not suited for any other crop. Mango, Jack fruit,
Banana, Pineapple etc. are some of the main fruit crops intensively grown in the district. Banana cultivation
is done in almost all areas where irrigation facility is available. In the district 2464 hectares of area was
under banana cultivation during 2009-10 and cashew accounted for 2290 ha during the same period and
pepper is also cultivated in the district. Spices like ginger, turmeric etc. are also grown in small areas in
some places.
The headquarters of Command Area Development Authority is at Thrissur. The Authority is mainly
concerned with the formation and improvement of on-farm development works for scientific water
management.
There are seed farms and coconut nurseries in the district. There is an Oil Grading Laboratory at
Irinjalakuda working under AGMARK grading system.
The important crops raised their extent in area, production and yield per kg/hectares during 2010-
11 are given below.
Important Crops with Area during 2010-2011
Crops Area covered ( in hectares)
1 2
Paddy 20259
Pulses 29
Sugar Crops 127
Pepper 4094
Ginger 53
Turmeric 66
Arecanut 6311
Tamarind 1316
Vanilla 5
Cloves 17
Nutmeg 5564
Jack 4067
Mango 5534
Banana 2283
Plantain 4696
Pineapple 49
Pappaya 984
Other Fresh Fruits 1220

27
Important Crops with Area during 2010-2011 (Contd..)
Crops Area covered ( in hectares)
1 2
Cashew 1953
Coconut 75364
Tapioca 1362
Sweet Potatoes 3
Vegetables 2442
Rubber 15410
Total 153208
Source: Report on Agricultural statistics, 2010-11, Department
of Economics & Statistics, Kerala

During the period 2010-11 paddy is cultivated in 20259 hectares of land .Coconut is cultivated in
75364 hectares of land. Rubber is cultivated in 15410 hectares of land.Another perennial crop arecanut is
cultivated in 6311 hectares of land Cashew is cultivated in an extent of 1953 hectares of land.
The following table gives the extent of area in hectares and seasonwise production of rice during
the period 2000-11.

Season-wise production of Rice during the period 2000-2011

Year Autumn Winter Summer Total


Area (in Production Area (in Production Area (in Production Area (in Production
ha.) (in tonnes) ha.) (in tonnes) ha.) (in tonnes) ha.) (in tonnes)

2000-01 10878 21416 22178 45021 6328 15668 39384 82105


2001-02 9809 19830 21074 48590 6129 15861 37012 84281
2002-03 9740 20021 19836 44167 7698 23084 37274 87272
2003-04 8016 18023 19825 42925 6317 18894 34158 79842
2004-05 9641 19964 18052 40613 8658 26886 36351 87463
2005-06 7421 14563 17776 38899 5877 19489 31074 72951
2006-07 5389 9847 16028 34788 5894 20401 27311 65036
2007-08 4149 7378 11552 25629 8721 26374 24422 59381
2008-09 4768 9439 14326 33583 8834 28887 27928 71909
2009-10 3901 6922 12549 28603 8989 28329 25439 63854
2010-11 3033 6012 10864 26843 6362 20224 20259 53079
Source: Satistics for Planning, 2005 & 2009 and Agricultural Statistics for the years 2007-08, 08-09, 09-10 and 10-11 published
by Department of Economics & Statistics, Govt. of Kerala

The above table reveals the production of Rice during last ten years. Actually there was a sharp
decline from 2000-01 to 2009-10. The production of rice in the district during 2000-01 is 82105 tonnes as
against the state production 751328 tonnes.But in 2004-05, the production of rice is 87463 tonnes, which
is the maximum production among these 10 years. In 2010-11 the production of rice comes down 53079
tonnes as against the State production 522738 tonnes.The contribution of district towards the rice
production is 10.15 percent.
The season-wise data relating to production of rice during the last decade reveals that the maximum

28
production of rice is in the winter season while the minimum is in the autumn season.
The government has taken several measures for improving production of rice such as distribution
of improved seeds, integrated control management ,etc. As an incentive for sustaining rice cultivation, a
production subsidy has been extended to all the rice growing areas in the State. The electricity charges in
respect of irrigation and drainage for rice cultivation have been fully subsidized.
With the introduction of decentralized planning, there is increasing awareness about the need for
effective conservation measures. With the substantial assistance rendered by NABARD under RIDF and the
inclusion of a good number of projects as part of local plans, soil and water conservation activities in the
watersheds of the state have been started. The district is also covered under this project.
Irrigation
Optimum utilization of the water resources through appropriate conservation and management
measures assumes critical importance in sustaining the life support systems. The demand for water is
mainly for domestic, agriculture, prevention of salt water intrusion and for the generation of electricity.
Besides the conventional sources of irrigation like tanks and wells and private canals, the district
has five major irrigation schemes namely Peechi, Chalakudy, Vazhani, Chimmoni-Mupli and Cheerakuzhy
projects.
The Peechi dam across the Manali River is situated 24 km. east of Thrissur. The right bank and the
left bank canals of this project are 37.3 km. and 44.9 km. long respectively.The Peechi Irrigation Project in
Thrissur district envisages construction of a dam built across the Manali River one of the tributaries of
Karuvannur river. The project is intended for irrigating 17555 Ha land in Mukundapuram, Thalappally, Thrissur
and Chavakkad Taluk, through the left and right bank main canal and Branch canals. In addition to this,
drinking water is supplied to Thrissur Corporation and eight near by Panchayats from this reservoir.
The weir of 3.66 metres high and 185 metres long constructed at Thumburmuzhi across the
Chalakudy river forms the Chalakudy irrigation scheme with 37 km. long right bank canal and 19.3 km. long
left bank canal. The earthen dam across the Wadakkancherry River at Vazhani has a left bank canal of 39.2
long.
There are Chimmoni dam across the Chimmonipuzha and the Mupli dam across the Muplipuzha.
Under the Cheerakuzhi project a regulator across Gayathri River (Cheerakuzhi) at Kuzhipillipra has
been constructed to divert water through a main canal of 40.90 km. length on the left bank and disributaries
of length 9.80 km. This Project now irrigates 1620 ha of land in Talappilly Taluk in Thrissur District.
During 1995-96, 93299 hectares of gross area was under irrigation in the district. There was only
marginal increase in the gross area under irrigation in the district during 1999-2000. During 1999-2000,
94827 hectares of gross area was under irrigation.
The main activities of Command Area Development Authority include construction of channels,
field drains, and enforcement of Warabandhi and reclamation of water-logged areas. The Command Area
Development Activities were carried out in the completed irrigation projects namely Cheerakuzhy, Vazhani,
Peechi and Chalakudy. Agricultural activities like large-scale demonstration, adaptive trials, training to
farmers, soil conservation, land levelling and shaping and formation of beneficiary activities have been
completed. Participatory Irrigation management is being popularised under the auspices of CADA, which
is intended to create awareness among farmers. The Vazhani Project has an ayacut area of 3560 ha .
Animal Husbandry
Animal husbandry activities play a crucial role in socio-economic transformation of rural areas
especially in generating employment and income to the weaker sections of the population. The preservation
and development of the cattle wealth and poultry are also significant to production of major livestock
product of nutritional standard. Generally rearing cattle and poultry farming are the allied occupations of
agricultural workers. The animal power also constitutes the principle source of manure for agriculture.

29
Animal husbandry department is vested with the animal health programme in the district by making
available timely veterinary assistance and attends to the welfare of the animals in the district. Animal
health has been well taken care of by the department by establishing a network of veterinary institutions
at different levels to provide veterinary aid in the district. There is a Central Veterinary Store at Thrissur to
supply medicines and other equipments required by veterinary institutions. Besides this, there is a
veterinary hospital at Kokkalai, a Livestock Farm, Poultry Farm and a Pig Breeding Farm at Mannuthy and a
Cattle Breeding Farm at Thumburmuzhy under Kerala Agricultural University. The only Veterinary College
of Kerala at Mannuthy is in this district.
The details of veterinary institutions in Thrissur district as on 31.3.11 are given below.
Institutions under Animal Husbandry Department in Thrissur district as on 31.3.2011
Sl .No. Institutions Numbers
1 District Veterinary Centre 1
2 Veterinary Hospital 22
3 Veterinary Dispensary 89
4 Veterinary Poly Clinic 6
5 Regional Artificial Insementation Centre 4
Total 122
Source: "Report on Integrated Sample Survey, 2010-11" published by the Directorate of Animal Husbandry

According to the livestock census of 2003, the district had a cattle population of 1.58 lakhs, 0.10 lakh
buffaloes, 1.04 lakh goats, 11.92 lakh fowls, and 0.49 lakh ducks. The livestock census in 2007 showed that
the district had a cattle population of 1.34 lakhs only. The figure shows decline in the number of cattle
population in the district during 2003-2007. The buffaloe population had decreased sharply to 0.08 lakh
during 2003-2007. Goat population had witnessed increase during the corresponding period.

As against a fowl population of 11.92 lakhs in 2003, the district had 11.46 lakh fowls according to
2007 Livestock Census. It showed a decrease of 3.85 percentages during 2003-2007. The following table
gives the livestock population in district as per 2007 livestock census.

Live stock population of the district in the year 2007


Sl .No. Category Numbers

1 2 3
Livestock
1 Cattle 134669
2 Bufalo 8102
3 Sheep 6
4 Goat 170263
5 Pig 7615
6 Others 20
Total 320675
Poultry
7 Fowl 1146088
8 Duck 57370
9 Others 64380
Total 1267838
Source: Livestock Census 2007 published by Directorate of Animal Husbandry.

30
The livestock rearing which has a very long tradition in Kerala is assuming increasing importance as
a subsidiary occupation along with agriculture.
The homestead settlement pattern, the relatively high level of literacy particularly among women,
the highly favourable agro-climatic conditions which the Kerala economy possesses is in favour of livestock
rearing. However some of the recent developments in the Kerala farm pose serious threat for sustaining
the activity on a firm-footing.
Thrissur Dairy is located at Ramavarmapuram in Thrissur. It has a milk handling capacity of 0.60 lakh
ltrs/day. Thrissur dairy was selected best amount medium industries by Kerala State Pollution Control
Board and also won district energy conservation award in the category of medium scale industries from
Energy Conservation Society this year. There are 213 APCOS (Anand Pattern Cooperative Societies) and 69
Traditional Diary Cooperative Societies in the District. The following table gives the performance of Diary
under Kerala Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation from 2007-10.

Year Procurement (Lakh litres) Sales (Lakh litres)


1 2 3
2007 97.35 144.2
2008 94 133.87
2009 88.09 154.48
2010 86 155
Total 365.44 587.55

Fisheries
Main fishing centres in the district are Chavakkad, Nattika and Kodungallur. Mechanised boats are
also engaged for fishing in the District. Azhikode, Nattika, Vadanapally, Kadapuram, Chettuvai, Blangad and
Puthankadapuram offer facilities for harbouring the mechanised. During 2009-10, the district had 851
motorised non mechanical, 69 motorised mechnical and 39 non-motorised vessels registered in Thrissur.
Thus there were a total of 959 fishing vessels regisered in the District. The Fish Farmers Development
Agency started in Thrissur in 1979 is an important step towards the development of inland fishing.The
district has 18 coastal fisheries villages and 8 inland fisheries villages. There is Shrimp Hatchery at Azhikode.
As a first step towards modernisation of fishing industry, Government has successfully implemented
the Fishermen Co-operative Societies. Long term loans are sanctioned to the existing Fishermens Co-
operative societies for the purchase of boats and nets. Fishermens Marketing Co-operative Societies have
also started functioning.
Species-wise composition of marine fish landing in the district for the period 2007-10 is given
below. Species Wise Composition of Marine Fish Landing
in Thrissur District during 2007-08, 2008-09, 2009-10 (in tonnes)
Sl .No Species 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10
1 2 3 4 5
1 Elasmobranchs 187 186 178
2 Chirocentrius 7 7 7
3 Oilsardines 22964 22872 22525
4 Lesser Sardines 3625 3616 3511
5 Anchovilla 1039 1034 1015
6 Trisocles 801 792 777
7 Other Culpeids 173 172 167
8 Hemirhamphus&Belone 4 4 4

31
Species Wise Composition of Marine Fish Landing
in Thrissur District during 2007-08, 2008-09, 2009-10 (in tonnes) (Contd..)
Sl .No Species 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10
1 2 3 4 5
9 Perches 4250 4225 4081
10 Sciniaenids 1966 1955 1868
11 Ribbon Fish 322 321 308
12 Caranx 3117 3098 3077
13 Other Carangids 1038 1032 994
14 Leiognathus 349 346 341
15 Lactrious 253 253 279
16 Pomfrets 42 42 43
17 Mackerel 8748 8691 8681
18 Seerfish 306 305 299
19 Tunnis 58 58 58
20 Sphyraena 213 211 207
21 Mugil 220 219 59
22 Soles 2785 2768 2734
23 Penaid Prawn 10131 10065 9871
24 Lobsters 38 38 37
25 Crabs 148 146 150
26 Cephalopodes 1758 1747 1705
27 Miscellaneous 300 297 294
Total 63912 64500 63270
Source:Kerala Marine Fisheries Statistics 2009,2010 published by Department of
Fisheries, Govt.of Kerala.

Species wise composition of fish landing in Thrissur District in the Marine sector shows that the
major landings during 2009-2010 were the common varieties of fish such as Oil Sadrine, Mackerel,Penaid
Prawn ,etc. The landing of Oil Sadrine was 22525 tonnes in the district which is 14.61 percent of the State
landing (154136 tonnes) while the landing of Mackerel (8681tonnes) which is 19.11 percent of the State
landing (45405 tonnes). In case of prawn, the landing was 9871 tonnes which is 20.39 percent of the State
(48401 tonnes). The fish landing contribution of the district during 2009-10 is (63270 tonnes) ie, 11.09
percent of the State landing (570013 tonnes). The landing of Marine fish is more or less uniform during the
period 2008-2010.
Industry
Industrial development is a major factor in accelerating the growth of the economy. There are 68
large and medium scale industrial units in the district at present. The important among them are Sitaram
Textiles Ltd. at Thrissur, Alagappa Textiles at Alagappanagar, Vanaja Textiles Ltd. at Kurchikara, Keltron
Power Devices Ltd. at Mulamkunnathukavu, Appolo Tyres Ltd. at Perambra, Kodakara; Chalakudy Refractories
Ltd. at Chalakudy, Kerala Solvent Extractions Ltd. at Irinjalakuda and Eddy Current Controls (India) Ltd. at
Chalakudy, Kerala Chemicals and Proteins, Koratty, Microwave Products (India) Ltd., Puthenchira, Wood
House Ltd., East Koraty, Steel and Industrial Forgings Ltd., Athani, Kerala Lakshmi Mills at Pullazhi, Rajagopal
Textiles Ltd. at Athani, Jyothi Laborataries Pharmaceutical Co-operation at Kuttanellur, SDF Industries,
Thrissur Cooperative Spinning Mill, etc.
There are two industrial development plots, one at Athani and the other at Kunnamkulam.
Manufacturing of bricks and tiles is one of the oldest industries in the district employing a very

32
large number of workers. This industry is clustered in and around Ollur, Puthukkad, Karuvannur, Amballur,
etc. Kunnamkulam is well known for printing and binding industry. The canning industry and oil mills
absorb a good number of workers. Traditional industries like handloom weaving, oil crushing, pottery, mat
weaving, basket making, furniture manufacturing, toddy tapping, fish curing, bel metal, curing of arecanut
etc. employ a large number of working force. Kora grass mats are produced at Killimangalam in Talappily
Taluk. Wood Carving at Cherpu, Metal Industry at Irinjalakuda and Nadavaramba area, Khus-khus mats and
products at Valappad are other important cottage industries in the district. There are also beedi making
units and umbrella manufacturing centres in the district.
The manufacture of chappals, shoes, suit cases and hand bags out of leather is an important industry
of the district.
The foot wear service centre in Thrissur under the Ministry of Industries, Government of India
imparts training in shoe making.
Thrissur, Ollur and Puthukkad are the main centres of polishing of imitation stones. After being
polished and processed, the stones are exported to foreign countries.
Wood carving is an important handicraft of the district. Wood carvers of Cherpu, 7 miles away from
Thrissur, are well known for the figures of elephants made by them. The carving of Kathakali dance dolls is
also a special feature of this district. Another important handicraft is the manufacturing of Alavattom
(Peacock feather fan).
Coir manufacturing is one of the important cottage industries of the district. The main centres of
production are Chittattukara, Kottapuram and Kodungallur.
Kerala Khadi and Village Industries Board is running several Khadi units in the district. There are 15
Khadi Bhavans in the district.
Bee-keeping is an important village industry. There is a Model Apiary at Cherpu in Thrissur Taluk
which is the biggest in the State.
Village pottery units are located at Ramavarmapuram and Kandassankadavu in Thrissur Taluk,
Nenmenikara and Vellangallur in Mukundapuram Taluk and Patramangalam in Talappilly Taluk.
Some of the other important village industries in the district are soap making, screw pine, mat
weaving, handmade paper, hand pounded rice and palm gur.
Thrissur District occupies the pride of place in the country in the manufacture of gold ornaments
and jewelleries. There are hundreds of jewellery shops in the district.
The city is also emerging as the largest hub for Ayurvedic drug manufacturing industry in India. Out
of the 850 ayurvedic drug-manufacturing units in Kerala, about 150 units, including some of the major
ayurvedic drug manufacturers in the Kerala State are located in and around the city. Of these, some of the
companies like the Oushadhi,Vaidyaratnam Oushadhasala, KP Namboodiris, Sitaram Ayurvedic Pharmacy
Ltd, Kandamkulathy Vaidyasala, SNA Oushadhasala etc. are among the leading ayurvedic drug manufacturers
in the State. Thrissur Ayurveda Cluster, anonther initiative by a group of Ayurvedic manufacturers of
Thrissur, has developed a cluster in KINFRA Park in Koratty in Thrissur District.
There are 26189 small scale industrial units in the District during 2010. The total employment in
these factories is 99604. Small-scale Industries Service Institute (SIST), Thrissur under the Ministry of Govt.
of India provides for setting up of small-scale industries in the State. There were 1041 registered working
with an employement of 16093 factories in the district in 2008. In 2010, their number has grown to 1082.
Thus Thrissur District stands at the 2nd in the number of registered working factories in the State. Besides
these units another 5762 units are run by women.
Software Technology Park of India(STPI) centres have been set up at Thrissur following the
recommendation of the State Planning Board.

33
There were 166 Industrial Co-operative Societies in the District during 2007-08. Some of which
were dormant societies and some were under liquidation.There were 31 handloom weavers in 2007-08.
Industries Statistics in Thrissur District
Category Thrissur Kerala
No. of SSI/MSME promoted by SC 1184 7992
ST 113 1589
General 26168 196820
Total 27465 205987
Women 5525 52294
Total investements(in lakhs) 103230.86 1083169
Value of goods and service produced(in lakhs) 212052.81 3715570
Employment generated(nos) 106755 1021162

Industrial Co-operative Societies in Thrissur District


Category Thrissur Kerala
Industrial Co-operative Societies registered (No.s) SC 7 449
ST 0 93
General 119 1113
Total 166 2466
Women 40 811
Total No.of working societies(Nos) SC 6 134
ST 0 16
General 27 265
Total 45 582
Women 12 167
Source:Panchayath level statistics,Dept.of Economics & Statistics

Banks in Thrissur
Thrissur District is the headquarters of major banks like South Indian Bank, Catholic Syrian
Bank,Dhanalakshmi Bank, Lord Krishna Bank and non-banking institutions like Manappuram General Finance
and Leasing Ltd, Kerala State Financial Enterprise and ESAF Microfinance and Investments.The citys financial
capabilities also saw the rise of Chit fund. According to All Kerala Kuri Foremans Association, Kerala have
around 5,000 chit companies, with Thrissur District accounting for the maximum of 3,000. These chit
companies provide employment to about 35,000 persons directly and an equal number indirectly.
Transport
Roads
Thrissur District is well connected with almost all the major towns and cities of India. The district is
covered by a network of National Highways, District roads and Village roads. The National Highway NH-47
in Thrissur District consists of the following two roads.
Thrissur-Vaniampara road starts from Thrissur town and runs eastward to the district limit at
Vaniampara and enters Palakkad district via Alathur.
Thrissur and Chalakudy road starts from Thrissur town and goes southward to the district limit at
Anchal and enters Ernakulam district via Angamali enroute to Thiruvananthapuram. The formation of
Thrissur and Chalakudy by-pass has helped to some extent to limit the heavy traffic into the respective
towns.

34
The National Highway NH-17 runs from Puthuponnani to Kottapuram in the district. Besides the
two National Highways (NH-47 & NH-17), there are about 374 kms. of State Highways and 1292 kms. of
Major District Roads under the control of Public Works Department during the period 2000-10.The length of
PWD roads in Thrissur district during the period 2009-10 is given in the following table.
From PWD data the length of cement concrete roads was 3.391 kms. and of Water Bound Mecadam
roads was 15 kms in 2010. Out of the total length of the road maintained by PWD in the district, 98.98 per
cent had Black Topped surface.
The category-wise distribution of motor vehicle in the district during the period 2007-2010 is as
follows.
Motor Vehicles in the District during the period 2007-2010
Sl.No Category 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10
1 2 3 4 5
1 Goods vehicles 33309 35562 37644
2 Buses 20232 20597 21039
3 Cars & Station wagons including Taxis and Jeeps 74546 85899 99002
4 Three wheelers 35511 38507 42059
5 Two wheelers 305821 336734 367656
6 Other 2793 3114 4122
Total 472212 520413 571522
Source: Economic Review, State Planning Board.

The total number of vehicles in the State was 4880059 during 2009-10, as against 571522 in the
District during the corresponding period. This constituted 11.7 per cent of the total number of vehicles in
the state. The percentage increase of vehicles during the period 2007-2010 was 21.03 per cent in the
District. The District has the 3rd rank in the number of vehicles.
Railways
Thrissur is an important rail head of Southern Railways. The district is well served by railways. The
broad gauge rail line running north to south enters the district near Vallathole Nagar Station and runs
through the district for about 69 km. touching Vettikkattiri, Mullurkkara, Wadakkancherry,
Mulamkunnathukavu, Poonkunnam, Thrissur, Ollur, Puthukkad, Nellai, Irijalakkuda, Chalakudy, Koratty,
Angamali and Karukutty. The length of the railway line connecting Thrissur and Guruvayoor is 23.5 km.
Air Port
There are no airports in Thrissur District and the nearest airport is Cochin International
Airport at Nedumbassery which is located 50 km. Direct domestic flights are available to major Indian
cities like Chennai, New Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore and Kolkata. International flights to Middle East cities
like Bahrain, Muscat, Sharja, Jeddah, Riyadh, Doha and to Southeast Asian cities Singapore and Kuala
Lumpur are available here. It has a dedicated heli-taxi service and chartered flights. Calicut International
Airport at Karipur in the Malappuram district, which is 80 km from city and Coimbatore Airport, which is
114 kilometers from the city also can be used by travellers.
Electricity and Power
Peringalkuth and Sholayur are the two major hydroelectric projects of the district. The Peringalkuth
project across the Chalakudy River has a storage capacity of 33.98 million cubic metres. The total installed
capacity is 280.32 million KWh. Sholayur is connected with Chalakudy sub-station by the 110 KV transmission
lines.
Sholayur hydroelectric project has three dams viz. first one at a height of 57.61 metres, above the

35
bed across the main Sholayur river, second at a height of 25.91 metres across the valley on the left bank of
the river and the third with a composite structure with rubble masonry face wall and earthen dam. The
reservoir has a capacity of 153.48 million cubic metres. The total installed capacity is 473.04 million kw h.
Besides the 110 Kv sub-station at Chalakudy, 66 Kv sub-stations at V iyyur, Kunnamkulam,
Wadakkancherry and Ollur have been upgraded to 110 Kv Substations. The only 400 Kv Substation in Kerala
is at Madakkathara 10 Km away from Thrissur. The 110 Kv substation at Kandassankadavu is proposed to be
enhanced.
Grama Panchayat
As per the recommendations of Shri Belavantha Rai Mehta committee and the administrative
implementation committee headed by Shri. E.M.S. Namboothiripad, the Kerala Panchayat Act 1960 was
passed with a view to promote development of democratic institutions and to secure greater measure of
participation by the people in development plans and in local government affairs by decentralization of
power and functions. The Act came into effect on 1-1-1962. Accordingly, 922 Panchayats were formed
comprising the entire rural areas of the State.
Panchayati Raj in Kerala works on the basis of the three- tier system and comprises of the Grama
Panchayats, Block Panchayats and District Panchayats.In Kerala, there are 992 Grama Panchayats, 152 Block
Panchayats and 14 District Panchayats.On the basis of 73rd and 74th amendments acts of the Constitution,
The Panchayat Raj and the Municipality Act came into effect on the 23rd of April and 30th of May 1994
respectively. This led to the decentralization of powers, responsibilities and projects of the Government
as they were transferred to the local self-government on 2nd October, 1995.The provisions for Gram Sabha
in a single village or a cluster of village were made by the Kerala Panchayat Raj Act of 1994. It laid the
provision of a three tier system of Panchayat for the first time in the village, block and district level.
Panchayats were vested with the powers and responsibilities of the economic development and social
justice of the State. The Panchyats were also responsible for the implementation of developmental schemes
and setting up of a Finance Commission for reviewing the financial status of the Panchayats.
In course of time certain Panchayats were converted into Municipalities and big Panchayats were
divided into smaller ones. The Kerala Panchayat Act 1994 is enacted for planned rural development and to
ensure peoples participation in the increased development of local area based on 73rd amendments of
Indian Constitution. This Act was amended in 1995 and in 1999 and based on recommendations of
decentralization committee, First Finance Committee and Election Commission; basic changes were
incorporated in 105 departments out of total of 285 departments. The special feature of these amendments
is that almost all administrative control of the state on local administration was done away with. In 2000 it
was amended again and power for division of wards and reservation of wards etc. were given to Election
Commission. In 2001 the OMBUDSMAN Act was amended providing for only a single member.
As per the Act, three tiers of administration namely Gram Panchayat, Block Panchayat and District
Panchayat are formed in each district of the state. A special feature of the Panchayat Raj is the formation
of Gramasabha where the common people can participate in the decision making.
Jurisdiction of Grama Panchayats is usually a village. However in certain cases more than one
village constitute the area of the Panchayat. The Panchayat is divided into wards. Elections in the Panchayat
are democratically conducted by the State Election Commission. Each ward of the Panchayat has an elected
member. The tenure of the elected member is five years. From the members of the wards the President
and Vice-President are elected. President is the head of the Grama Panchayat. For administrative purposes
a Grama Panchayat Secretary is appointed. He is a Government employee.
Gram Panchayats plays a very important role in the developmental activities of the village. The
gramasabha is held at least four times in a year and developmental plans are discussed, finalized and
implemented in the gramsabha meet was by the participation of people. Overall progress of the rural
population has considerably increased especially in sphere of economical, educational, cultural and social
activities in the last few years. In Kerala the 9th Five Year Plan was introduced through a special scheme

36
called Janakeeya asuthranam, which means grass root level planning by the people themselves. Through
this scheme, power was decentralized up to the grass root level.
In order to give a meaningful direction to the progress of decentralization; a decision was taken by
the state government vide G.O (MS) No 10/96 plg. dated 30-7-1996 that the plan programmes should
consist of schemes formulated and implemented by the local bodies within their area of responsibilities.
Accordingly the funds, which the state government received from Central Government for implementation
of various schemes under the five-year plan, are earmarked for Corporations, Municipalities, District
Panchayats, Block Panchayats and Grama Panchayats. The funds are transferred to the local bodies in two
components - The State sponsored schemes and Grant-in-Aid to Local Bodies. The former schemes are
formulated by the Head of the Department at the state level and they will be implemented by the Local
Bodies. The second scheme is for various plans formulated by the Local Bodies themselves under the
peoples grass root level Planning Programme (Janakeeya Asoothranam).At the time of 2011 Census there
were 39 Panchayats in the District.
The Grant-in-Aid to Local Bodies is given in three components: (i) General Sector, (ii) SCP (Special
Component Plan) and (iii) TSP (Tribal Sub Plan).
The General Sector outlay is allocated to the Urban Local Bodies and Three tier Panchayats on the
basis of urban - rural population in the respective areas. The provision for Urban Local Bodies is distributed
among the Corporations and Municipalities according to their population. The allotment for the Three tier
Panchayats was distributed to Grama Panchayats, Block Panchayats and District Panchayats in the ratio of
75 : 17 : 8 in the budget for 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10. The Plan Outlay is again distributed on the basis of
population in each Local Body.
The provision under Special Component Plan (SCP) is distributed among Corporations,
Municipalities and Three tier Panchayats on the basis of Scheduled Caste population in each area. The
share for each tier i.e., Grama Panchayats, Block Panchayats and District Panchayats was distributed in the
ratio of 60 : 20 : 20 in the budget for 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10.
The share under TSP (Tribal Sub Plan) has also been divided among the Three tier Panchayats on
the basis of urban and rural Scheduled Tribe population. The share for the Three tier Panchayats i.e., Grama
Panchayats, Block Panchayats and District Panchayats is in the ratio of 50 : 20 : 30 in the budget for 2007-08,
2008-09 and 2009-10 .

Below table gives an account of Plan Assistance as Grant-in-Aid to Local Bodies during the years
2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10.
Plan Assistance as Grant-in-Aid to Local Bodies for development expenditure in Thrissur District
during 2007-08,2008-09 and 2009-10
Year Name of Local Body Grant-in Aid (Rs.in thousands)
General Sector SCP TSP Total
1 2 3 4 5 6
2007-08 Grama Panchayat 493527 269778 3946 767251
Block Panchayat 102616 88956 1621 193193
District Panchayat 99329 88956 2638 190923
Municipality/Corporation 168191 64482 0 232673
Total 863663 512172 8205 1384040
2008-09 Grama Panchayat 543074 296770 4339 1384040
Block Panchayat 112918 97852 1783 212553
District Panchayat 109263 97852 2902 210017
Municipality/Corporation 185050 70930 0 255980
Total 863663 512172 8205 2062590

37
Plan Assistance as Grant-in-Aid to Local Bodies for development expenditure in Thrissur District
during 2007-08,2008-09 and 2009-10 (Contd..)
Year Name of Local Body Grant-in Aid (Rs.in thousands)
General Sector SCP TSP Total
1 2 3 4 5 6
2009-10 Grama Panchayat 597576 326442 4710 928728
Block Panchayat 124251 107637 1961 233849
District Panchayat 120190 107637 3192 231019
Municipality/Corporation 203594 77470 0 281064
Total 1045611 619186 9863 1674660
Source: Department of Finance, Govt. of Kerala

Each District receives Plan Assistance for General sector, Special Component Pan (SCP) and Tribal
Sub Plan (TSP). Of these the major allotment is for General Sector. Grama Panchayats receive the maximum
assistance. During 2007-08, the total assistance received by the District Panchayats,Block Panchayats,Muncipal
Corporation and Grama Panchayats in Thrissur District amounted to Rs.13840.40 lakhs. By 2009-10,the total
assistance has gone up to 16746.60 lakhs ie, an increase of 20.99%.Muncipal Corporation have received
considerable increase in assistance under General sector.In the TSP ,there was a fall in allotment from
Rs.8205lakhs in 2007-08 to 9863lakhs 2009-10.Similarly fall in allotment was noticed in SCP also from
5121.72 lakhs in 2007-08 to 6191.86 lakhs in 2009-10. These figures clearly show the increase in importance
of the role of Local bodies in the implementation of IXth plan programme.
Kudumbashree
Kudumbashree was conceived as a joint programme of the Government of Kerala and NABARD
implemented through Community Development Societies (CDSs) of Poor Women, serving as the community
wing of Local Governments.Kudumbashree is formally registered as the State Poverty Eradication Mission
(SPEM), a society registered under the Travancore Kochi Literary, Scientific and Charitable Societies Act
1955. It has a governing body chaired by the State Minister of LSG. There is a state mission with a field
officer in each district. This official structure supports and facilitates the activities of the community network
across the State.Kudumbashree differs from conventional programmes in that it perceives poverty not just
as the deprivation of money, but also as the deprivation of basic rights. The poor need to find a collective
voice to help claim these rights.
The grassroots of Kudumbashree are Neighbourhood Groups (NHG in short) that send
representatives to the ward level Area Development Societies (ADS). The ADS sends its representatives to
the Community Development Society (CDS), which completes the unique three-tier structure of
Kudumbashree. Today, there are 1.94 lakhs NHGs, over 17,000 ADSs and 1061 CDSs in Kudumbashree.It is
this network that brings women to the Grama Sabhas and helps them bring the needs of the poor to the
attention of the local governments. The Community Development Societies are also very active in
Government programmes and play significant roles in development activities ranging from socio-economic
surveys and enterprise development to community management and social audit.Though its efforts to
engage women in civil society in development issues and opportunities, Kudumbashree in association
with the local self government of Kerala is charting out new meaning and possibilities for local economic
development and citizen centric governance.
An initiative for poverty alleviation, this model was launched on May 17th 1998. It is now one of
the largest women empowerment related movement in Asia, having a total participation of about 37.8
lakhs.This mission is a joint initiative of the Government of Kerala and NABARD. It defines poverty as the
deprivation of basic rights and money. By its attempt to bring poor women in the state within its range,
Kudumbasree is now present in each & every Gram Panchayat; every welfare and development activity is
related and dependent on Kudumbasree to provide the community interface. This mission is mainly

38
centred on providing enterpreneurial,marketing and management opportunities to poor women and thus
making them self dependent in financial terms through vegetable farming and selling/marketing of farm
products. There are 16777 NeighbourHood Groups (NHG) functioning in Thrissur District
ii) CENSUS CONCEPTS
Building: A Building is generally a single structure on the ground. Usually a structure will have
four walls and a roof. Sometimes it is made up of more than one component unit which are used or likely
to be used as dwellings (residences) or establishments such as shops, business houses, offices, factories,
workshops, work sheds, Schools, places of entertainment, places of worship, godowns, stores etc. It is also
possible that building which have component units may be used for a combination of purposes such as
shop-cum-residence, workshop-cum-residence, office-cum-residence etc. But in some areas the very
nature of construction of houses is such that there may not be any wall. Such is the case of conical structures
where entrance is also provided but they may not have any walls. Therefore, such of the conical structures
are also treated as separate buildings.
Pucca houses: Houses, the walls and roof of which are made of permanent materials. The material
of walls can be any one from the following, namely, Stones (duly packed with lime or cement mortar), G.I/
metal/ asbestos sheets, Burnt bricks, Cement bricks, Concrete. Roof may be made of from any one of the
following materials, namely, Machine-made tiles, Cement tiles, Burnt bricks, Cement bricks, Stone, Slate,
G.I/Metal/Asbestos sheets, Concrete. Such houses are treated as Pucca house.

Kutcha houses: Houses in which both walls and roof are made of materials, which have to be
replaced frequently. Walls may be made from any one of the following temporary materials, namely, grass,
unburnt bricks, bamboos, mud, grass, reeds, thatch, plastic /polythene, loosed packed stone, etc. Such
houses are treated as Kutcha house.

Dwelling Room: A room is treated as a dwelling room if it has walls with a doorway and a roof and
should be wide and long enough for a person to sleep in, i.e. it should have a length of not less than 2
meters and a breadth of at least 1.5 meters and a height of 2 meters. A dwelling room would include living
room, bedroom, dining room, drawing room, study room, servants room and other habitable rooms.
Kitchen, bathroom, latrine, store room, passageway and verandah which are not normally usable for living
are not considered as dwelling rooms. A room, used for multipurpose such as sleeping, sitting, dining,
storing, cooking, etc., is regarded as a dwelling room. In a situation where a census house is used as a shop
or office. etc., and the household also stays in it then the room is not considered as a dwelling room. But if
a garage or servant quarter is used by a servant and if she/ he also lives in it as a separate household then
this has been considered as a dwelling room available to the servants household. Tent or conical shaped
hut if used for living by any household is also considered as dwelling room. A dwelling room, which is
shared by more than one household, has not been counted for any of them. If two households have a
dwelling room each but in addition also share a common dwelling room, then the common room has not
been counted for either of the households.

Census House : A census house is a building or part of a building used or recognized as a separate
unit because of having a separate main entrance from the road or common courtyard or staircase, etc. It
may be occupied or vacant. It may be used for residential or non- residential purpose or both. If a building
has a number of Flats or Blocks/Wings, which are independent of one another having separate entrances
of their own from the road or a common staircase or a common courtyard leading to a main gate, these are
considered as a separate Census house.

Village: The basic unit for rural areas is the revenue village, which has definite surveyed boundaries.
The revenue village may comprise of one or more hamlets but the entire village is treated as one unit for
presentation of data. In unsurveyed areas, like villages within forest areas, each habitation area with
locally recognized boundaries is treated as one village.

39
Rural-Urban area: The data in the Census are presented separately for rural and urban areas. The unit
of classification in this regard is town for urban areas and village for rural areas. The urban area
comprises two types of towns viz; statutory towns and Census towns. In the Census of India 2011, the
definition of urban area adopted is as follows:
(a) Statutory Towns : All places with a municipality, corporation, cantonment board or notified town area
committee, etc .are known as statutory towns.
(b) Census Towns: All other places satisfying the following three criteria simultaneously are treated as
Census Towns.
i) A minimum population of 5,000;
ii) At least 75 per cent of male working population engaged in non-agricultural pursuits; and
iii) A density of population of at least 400 per sq. km. (1,000 per sq. mile)
For identification of places which would qualify to be classified as urban all villages, which, as per
the 2001 Census had a population of 4,000 and above, a population density of 400 persons per sq. km. and
having at least 75 per cent of male working population engaged in non-agricultural activity were considered.
To work out the proportion of male working population referred to above against b) (ii), the data relating
to main workers were taken into account. In addition the above stated towns, urban areas also constitutes
of OGs which are the parts of UAs.
Urban Agglomeration : An Urban Agglomeration is a continuous urban spread constituting a town
and its adjoining urban outgrowths (OGs) or two or more physically contiguous towns together with or
without urban outgrowths of such towns. In some cases, railway colonies, university campuses, port areas,
military camps ,etc; may come up near a statutory town outside its statutory limits but within the revenue
limits of a village or villages contiguous to the town. Each such individual area by itself may not satisfy the
minimum population limit to qualify it to be treated as an independent urban unit but may qualify to be
clubbed with the exiting town as their continuous urban spread (i.e., an Out Growth). Each such town
together with its outgrowth(s) is treated as an integrated urban area and is designated as an urban agglom-
eration. For the purpose of delineation of Urban Agglomerations during Census of India 2011, following
criteria has been adopted:
The core town or at least one of the constituent towns of an urban agglomeration should necessarily
be a statutory town; and
The total population of an Urban Agglomeration (i.e. all the constituents put together) should not
be less than 20,000 as per the 2001 Census. In varying local conditions, there were similar other combinations
which have been treated as urban agglomerations satisfying the basic condition of contiguity.

Out Growth (OG): The outgrowth is a viable unit such as a village or a hamlet or an enumeration
block and clearly identifiable in terms of its boundaries and location. While determining the outgrowth of
a town, it has been ensured that it possesses the urban features in terms of infrastructure and amenities
such as pucca roads, electricity, taps, drainage system for disposal of waste water etc., educational
institutions, post offices, medical facilities, banks ,etc and physically contiguous with the core town of the
UA.

City: Towns with population of 100,000 and above are called cities.

Household: A household is usually a group of persons who normally live together and take their
meals from a common kitchen unless the exigencies of work prevent any of them from doing so. Persons
in a household may be related or unrelated or a mix of both. However, if a group of unrelated persons live
in a census house but do not take their meals from the common kitchen, then they are not constituent of
a common household. Each such person was to be treated as a separate household. The important link in

40
finding out whether it was a household or not was a common kitchen/common cooking. There may be one
member households, two member households or multi-member households.
Institutional Household: A group of unrelated persons who live in an institution and take their meals
from a common kitchen is called an Institutional Household. Examples of Institutional Households are
boarding houses, messes, hostels, hotels, rescue homes, observation homes, beggars homes, jails, ashrams,
old age homes, children homes, orphanages, etc. To make the definition more clearly perceptible to the
enumerators at the Census 2011, it was specifically mentioned that this category or households would
cover only those households where a group of unrelated persons live in an institution and share a common
kitchen.
Houseless household : Households who do not live in buildings or census houses but live in the
open or roadside, pavements, in hume pipes, under flyovers and staircases, or in the open in places of
worship, mandaps, railway platforms, etc., are treated as Houseless Households.
Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe
Article 341 of the Constitution of India provides that the President may, with respect to any State or
Union Territory, specify the Castes, Races or Tribes or parts of or groups within Castes, Races or Tribes which
shall for the purposes of the Constitution be deemed to be Scheduled Castes in relation to that State or
Union Territory. Article 342 similarly provides for specification of Tribes or Tribal Communities or parts of or
groups within Tribes or Tribal Communities which are to be deemed for the purposes of the Constitution to
be Scheduled Tribes in relation to the various States and Union Territories. In pursuance of these provisions,
the list of Scheduled Castes and / or Scheduled Tribes are notified for each State and Union Territory and
are valid only within the jurisdiction of that State or Union Territory and not outside.
It is important to mention here that under the Constitution (Scheduled Castes) Order, 1950, no
person who professed a religion different from Hinduism was deemed to be a member of a Scheduled
Caste in addition to every member of the Ramdasi, Kabirpanthi, Majhabi or Sikligar Caste resident in
Punjab or Patiala and East Punjab States Union were in relation to that State whether they professed the
Hindu or the Sikh religion. Subsequently, in September 1956, by an amendment, the Presidential Order of
1950 and in all subsequent Presidential Orders relating to Scheduled Castes, the Hindu and the Sikh Religions
were placed on the same footing with regard to the specification of Scheduled Castes. Later on, as per the
amendment made in the Constitution (Scheduled Castes) Order 1990, the Hindu, the Sikh and the Buddhist
were placed on the same footing with regard to the recognition of the Scheduled Castes. A member of
Scheduled Tribe may belong to any religion. However a person will be reckoned as belonging to Scheduled
Tribe only if the name of the Tribe appears in the list of Scheduled Tribes applicable to the State.
The lists containing the names of the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes applicable for
Census of India 2011 in the State are given as follows:
Scheduled castes
1. Adi Andhra
2. Adi Dravida
3. Adi Karnataka
4. Ajila
5. Arunthathiyar
6. Ayyanavar
7. Baira
8. Bakuda

41
9. Bathada
10. Bharathar (other than Parathar),
Paravan
11. Chakkiliyan
12. Chamar, Muchi
13 Chandala
14. Cheruman
15. Domban
16. Gosangi
17. Hasla
18. Holeya
19. Kadaiyan
20. Kakkalan, Kakkan
21. Kalladi
22. Kanakkan, Padanna, Padannan
23. Kavara(other than Telugu speaking or Tamil speaking Balija, Kavarai, Gavara,
Gavarai, Gavara Naidu, Balija Naidu, Gajalu Balija or ValaiChetty)
24. Koosa
25. Kootan, Koodan
26. Kudumban
27. Kuravan, Sidhanar, Kuravar, Kurava, Sidhana
28. Maila
29. Malayan [in the areas comprising theMalabar district as specified by sub-
section(2) of section 5 of the States Reorganisation Act, 1956 (37 of 1956)]*
30. Mannan, Pathiyan, Perumannan, Vannan, Velan
31. Moger (other than Mogeyar)
32 Mundala
33. Nalakeyava
34. Nalkadaya
35. Nayadi
36. Pallan
37. Palluvan
38. Pambada
39. Panan
40. Paraiyan, Parayan, Sambavar, Sambavan, Sambava, Paraya, Paraiya, Parayar
41. Pulayan, Cheramar, Pulaya, Pulayar, Cherama, Cheraman, Wayanad
Pulayan,Wayanadan Pulayan, Matha, Matha Pulayan
42. Puthirai Vannan
43. Raneyar
44. Samagara
45. Samban
46. Semman, Chemman, Chemmar
47. Thandan (excluding Ezhuvas andThiyyas who are known as Thandan in the
erstwhile Cochin and Malabar areas) and (Carpenters who are knownas
Thachan, in the erstwhile Cochin and Travancore State)

42
48. Thoti
49. Vallon
50. Valluvan
51. Vetan
52. Vettuvan, Pulaya Vettuvan (in the areas of erstwhile Cochin State only)
53. Nerian

* Malabar district comprised of Kannur (earlier Cannanore), Kozhikode,


Malappuram, Kasargod, Wayanad, Thrissur districts and Palakkad (earlier Palaghat) district excluding
Chittur taluk
Scheduled Tribes

1. Adiyan
2. Arandan, Aranadan
3. Eravallan
4. Hill Pulaya, Mala Pulayan, Kurumba Pulayan, Karavazhi Pulayan, Pamba
Pulaya
5. Irular, Irulan
6. Kadar, Wayanad Kadar
7. Kanikaran, Kanikkar
8. Kattunayakan
9. Kochuvelan
10. Koraga
11. Kudiya, Melakudi
12. Kurichchan, Kurichiyan
13. Kurumans, Mullu Kuruman, Mulla Kuruman, Mala Kuruman
14. Kurumbas, Kurumbar, Kurumban
15 Maha Malasar
16. Malai Arayan, Mala Arayan
17 Malai Pandaram
18 Malai Vedan, Malavedan
19. Malakkuravan
20 Malasar
21. Malayan, Nattu Malayan, Konga Malayan (excluding the areas comprising
the Kasargode, Cannanore, Wayanad and Kozhikode districts)
22. Malayarayar
23. Mannan
24. Muthuvan, Mudugar, Muduvan
25. Palleyan, Palliyan, Palliyar, Paliyan
26. Paniyan
27. Ulladan, Ullatan
28 Uraly
29. Mala Vettuvan( in Kasargode and Kannur districts)
30. Ten Kurumban, Jenu Kurumban
31. Thachanadan, Thachanadan Moopan
32. Cholanaickan

43
33. Mavilan
34. Karimpalan
35. Vetta Kuruman
36 Mala Panickar
Language and Mother tongue

As per the census concept, each language is a group of mother tongues. The census questionnaire
collects information on the mother tongue of each person and mother tongue is defined as the language
spoken in childhood by the persons mother to the person. If the mother died in infancy, the language
mainly spoken in the persons home in childhood will be the mother tongue. In the case of infants and
deaf mutes, the language usually spoken by the mother is considered as mother tongue. It is not necessary
that the language spoken as mother tongue should have a script. The mother tongues returned by the
respondents in census are classified and grouped under appropriate languages according to their linguistic
characteristics.

Literate
A person age 7 years and above who can both read and write with understanding in any language is
taken as literate. A person who can only read but cannot write is not literate. It is not necessary that to be
considered as literate, a person should have received any formal education or passed any minimum
educational standard. Literacy could also have been achieved through adult literacy classes or through any
non-formal educational system. People who are blind and can read in Braille are treated as literates.
Literacy rate

Literacy rate of the population is defined as the percentage of literates in the age group seven
years and above. For different age groups, the percentage of literates in that age group gives the literacy
rate.
Educational level
The highest level of education a person has completed.
Work
Work is defined as participation in any economically productive activity with or without
compensation, wages or profit. Such participation may be physical and/or mental in nature. Work involves
not only actual work but also includes effective supervision and direction of work. It even includes part
time help or unpaid work on farm, family enterprise or in any other economic activity. All persons engaged
in work as defined above are workers. Persons who are engaged in cultivation or milk production even
solely for domestic consumption are also treated as workers.
Reference period for determining a person as worker and non-worker is one year preceding the
date of enumeration.

Main worker
A person who has worked for major part of the reference period (i.e. six months or more during the
last one year preceding the date of enumeration) in any economically productive activity is termed as
Main worker.
Marginal worker
A person who worked for less than six months of the reference period (i.e. in the last one year
preceding the date of enumeration) in any economic activity is termed as Marginal worker.

44
Non - worker
A person who has not worked at all in any economically productive activity during the reference
period (ie. last one year preceding the date of enumeration) is termed as Non worker.
Cultivator
For purposes of the Census ,a person is classified as cultivator if he or she is engaged in cultivation
on land owned or held from government or held from private persons or institutions for payment in
money, kind or share. Cultivation includes effective supervision or direction in cultivation.
A person who has given out her/his land to another person or persons or institution(s) for cultivation
for money, kind or share of crop and who does not even supervise or direct cultivation in exchange of land,
is not treated as cultivator. Similarly, a person working on another persons land for wages in cash or kind or
a combination of both (agricultural labourer) is not treated as cultivator.
Cultivation involves ploughing, sowing, harvesting and production of cereals and millet crops such
as wheat, paddy, jowar, bajra, ragi, etc., and other crops such as sugarcane, tobacco, ground-nuts, tapioca,
etc., and pulses, raw jute and kindred fiber crop, cotton, cinchona and other medicinal plants, fruit growing,
vegetable growing or keeping orchards or groves, etc. Cultivation does not include the following plantation
crops tea, coffee, rubber, coconut and betelnuts (areca).
Agricultural labourer
A person who works on another persons land for wages in money or kind or share is regarded as an
agricultural labourer. She/he has no risk in the cultivation, but merely works on another persons land for
wages. An agricultural labourer has no right of lease or contract on land on which she/he works.
Household industry worker
Household industry is defined as an industry conducted by the head of the household herself/
himself and or by the members of the household at home or within the village in rural areas and only within
the precincts of the house where the household lives in urban areas.
The larger proportion of workers in household industry should consist of members of the household
including the head. The industry should not be run on the scale of a registered factory which would qualify
or has to be registered under the Indian Factories Act and should be engaged in manufacturing, processing,
servicing and repairs of goods.
It does not include professions such as a pleader, Doctor, Musician, Dancer, Waterman, Astrologer,
Dhobi, Barber, etc. or merely trade or business, even if such professions, trade or services are run at home
by members of the household.
Other worker
A person who has been engaged in some economic activity during the reference period but not as
a cultivator or agricultural labourer or in Household Industry is termed as Other Worker (OW). The type of
workers that come under this category of OW include all government servants, municipal employees,
teachers, factory workers, plantation workers, those engaged in trade, commerce, business, transport,
banking, mining, construction, political or social work, priests, entertainment artists, etc. In effect, all
those workers other than cultivators or agricultural labourers or household industry workers, are Other
Workers.
Work participation rate
Percentage of workers (main + marginal) to total population
Population density
Population density is the number of persons inhabited per square kilometre of the area.

45
Age
Age is measured in terms of the completed number of years.
Sex ratio
Number of females per 1000 males in a population.
iii) NON-CENSUS CONCEPTS
Concepts used in VD and TD of DCHB:
1. Educational Amenities:- The type of different educational facilities available in the village is given in
numbers. Both Government and private educational facilities / institutions are considered for this-
purpose. If there are composite schools like Middle schools with Primary classes, or Secondary schools
with middle classes, these are included in the number of Primary and Middle schools respectively. For
example, if in a village there are two Primary schools and one Middle school with primary classes, the
number of Primary schools in the village are given as three and that of Middle school as one even
though there may be only three educational institutions. So also in case of Secondary schools. For
better understanding, the distinctiveness of different types of schools is depicted hereunder:
1.1 Pre-primary (PP): Now-a-days, the children are sent to schools at a very early stage. Lot of pre-
primary schools, private schools in particular, have come up in villages and towns. These may or
may not be recognized by the competent authorities. Even many Secondary schools have classes
starting from preprimary level. Pre-primary classes include Nursery, K.G., Pre-basic, Play school,
etc.
1.2 Primary School (P): Schools providing education from Standard 1 and upward up to and inclusive
of Standard V are classified as Primary Schools.
1.3 Middle School (M): Schools providing education from Standard VI and upward up to and inclusive
of Standard VIII are classified as Middle Schools. A School with Class 1 to VIII is treated as two
units, i.e. one Primary School and one Middle School.
1.4 Secondary School (S): Schools providing education from Standard IX and upwards up to and
inclusive of Standard X are classified as Secondary Schools. A composite school with 1 to X standard
is treated as three separate units and counted separately under the categories of Primary School,
Middle School and Secondary School.
1.5 Senior Secondary School (SS): Schools and colleges that provide education for Standards XI and
XII and first and second year of the Pre-University Course fall under this category. There are
Senior Secondary Schools with Standard I and upwards up to Standard XII.

1.6. Degree College:


(i) Arts/Science/Commerce: These are all educational institutions that provide post-PUC level
education leading to University degree/diploma in any subject or combination of subjects and
also post-graduate levels of education. The college offering courses in Arts, Science or Commerce
either separately or in combination are covered under this category.
(ii) Engineering College (E):It is a graduate/post-graduate degree college providing Bachelor of
Engineering (BE) or Bachelor of Technology (B. Tech.) or post-graduate engineering degrees like
M.Tech.
(iii) Medical Colleges: These are graduate/post-graduate degree colleges providing MBBS or
equivalent degree in alternative medicine like Ayurveda, Unani, Homeopathy, etc. or post-
graduate medical degrees like M.D or equivalent in the above branches of medicine.

46
1.7. Management College/ Institute (MI): It offers courses like Diploma in Management, Post-Graduate
Diploma in Management, Masters of Business Administration (MBA) and specializations in
different disciplines of Management like Marketing, Human Resources Development (HRD), etc.
1.8. Polytechnic (Pt): An Institution providing certificate/diploma (not equivalent to degree) in any
technical subject like engineering, vocational courses like embroidery, fashion designing, etc. It
may be both Government and Private.
1.9. Vocational School/ITI: It is a vocational training institute imparting trainings in specific fields
acquiring necessary skill, which will make the trainees employable or create them opportunities
of self-employment. Trainings offered by Industrial Training Institutes (ITI) fall under this category.
1.10. Non-formal Education/Training Centre (NFTC): Non-vocational education centers, established by
the Central and State Governments provide educational facilities to the interested persons
irrespective of educational qualification, and age. These education centers are open to all.
1.11. Special School for Disabled: There are Government and Government recognized institutions/
organizations engaged for providing education to different groups of disabled persons.
2. Medical Facilities:
2.1 Hospital-Allopathic and Hospital-Alternative medicine: A hospital is an Institution, where sick or
injured are given medical or surgical care. Bed strength differs from hospital to hospital ranging
from 31 to 500 depending upon whether these are sub-district, sub-divisional or district hospitals.
If there is hospitals providing facilities under different systems of medicines such as, Allopathy,
Ayuveda, Unani and Homeopathy ,etc., these details are given separately.
(a) Allopathy: The system of medical practice, which treats disease by the use of remedies
which produce effects different from those produced by the disease under treatment.
(b) Ayurveda: Ayurveda means Science of life. The philosophy of Ayurveda is based on the
theory of Pancha Mahabhootas (Five elements) of which all the objects and living bodies are
composed of. The combination of these five elements are represented in the form of Tridosha:
Vata, Pitta and Kapha. These three doshas are physiological entities of living beings. Ayurveda
developed into eight distinct specialities, i.e., Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Eye and
ENT, Surgery, Toxicology, Geriatrics and Science of virility. Two types of treatments, Preventive
and Curative, are given in Ayurveda.
(c) Unani: Treatment of Unani consists of three components, namely, preventive, promotive and
curative. Unani system of medicine has been found to be efficacious in conditions like Rheumatic
Arthritis. Jaundice, Filarisis, Eczema, Sinusitis and Bronchial Asthma. For the prevention of the
disease and promotion of health, the Unani System emphasizes six essentials: pure air, food and
water, physical movement and rest, psychic movement and rest, sleep and wakefulness and
retention of useful materials and evacuation of waste materials from the body.
(d) Homoeopathy: Treatment in Homoeopathy, which is holistic in nature, focuses on an
individuals response to a specific environment. Homoeopathic medicines are prepared mainly
from natural substances such as plant products, minerals and animal sources. Homoeopathic
medicines do not have any toxic, poisonous or side effects. Homoeopathic treatment is
economical as well and has a very broad public acceptance.
2.2 Community Health Centre (CHC): Community Health Centres are designed to provide referral
health care for cases from PHC and those in need of specialist health care approaching the CHC
directly. 4 PHCs are included under each CHC thus catering approximately 80,000 populations in
tribal/hilly areas and 1, 20,000 populations for plain areas. CHC is a 30- bedded hospital providing
specialist care in Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Surgery and Paediatrics.

47
2.3 Primary Health Centre (PHC): A Primary Health Centre is the first contact point between a village
community and the Government medical officer. A PHC covers a population of 20,000 in hilly,
tribal or difficult areas and 30,000 populations in plain areas with 4-6 indoor/observation beds. It
acts as a referral unit for 6 sub-centres. It has a medical officer and para medical staff.
2.4 Primary Health Sub--Centre (PHS): A Primary Health Sub-centre is the first contact point between
the primary health care system and the community. As per the population norms, one PHS is
established for every 5,000 population in plain areas and 3,000 population in hilly/ tribal/ desert
areas. Each PHS has a sanctioned strength of one male and one female health worker.
2.5 Maternity and Child Welfare Centre (MCW): It provides pre-natal and post-natal services for
both mother and child. The services include regular check-up of pregnant women, giving folic
tablets, counseling, delivery, immunization of children with check-up etc.
2.6 TB Clinic (TBC): The diagnosis and treatment of TB are functions of the general health services
and hence it is a part and parcel of Primary Health Care. Specialized units such as the District
Tuberculosis Centre (DTC) act as referral centres. TB clinics are established by the Government of
India under the National Tuberculosis Control Programme and implemented through a network
of DTC. The DTC is the nodal point for TB control activities in the district and it also functions as a
specialized referral centre. The functions of sub-district level Tuberculosis Unit (TU) are
implementation, monitoring and supervision of TB control activities in its designated geographical
areas.
2.7 Health Centre: Clinic where medicine and medical supplies are dispensed. It has no in-patient
facility. A clinic (or an outpatient clinic) is a small private or public health facility that is devoted
to the care of outpatients, often in a community, in contrast to larger hospitals, which also treat
inpatients.
2.8 Dispensary: Place where patients are treated and medicines provided but with no in-patient
facility.Immunizations, MCH Services and sometimes pathological tests are carried out here. It
may be of allopathic or any alternative medicine.
2.9 Veterinary Hospital: Mostly run by the State Government or local body for treatment and
preventive measures against diseases of domestic animals like cows, buffaloes etc in rural areas.
2.10 Mobile Health Clinic: These are Mobile vans well equipped with a range of health services to
villages located far away from the CHCs, PHCs or any public health sources. The vans visit villages
on designated days to deliver the health care services. The services generally offered are OPD,
ante-natal and post-natal, B.P. examination, X-ray, ECG, Immunization, First Aid etc.
2.11 Family Welfare Centre: Check-up and counseling is provided to the pregnant and married women
regarding small family norm and devices for having a small family. Temporary and permanent
contraceptive devices are provided here.
2.12 Nursing Home: A nursing home is a long term care facility licensed by the State that offers 24-hour
room and board and health care services including basic and skilled nursing care, rehabilitation
and a full range of other therapies., treatments and programs to old and sick people. The difference
between a hospital and a nursing home is that a nursing home gives importance to convalescence
from a disease while a hospital gives medical treatment for the disease.
2.13 Medicine Shop: A shop which sells drugs and medicines of any system of medicine viz. allopathic,
homeopathic, ayurvedic or unani medicines, is considered as a medicine shop. Sometimes some
shops and Paan shops also keep ordinary medicines, like Crocin, Burnol etc. These shops are not
taken as medicine shops.

48
3. Drinking water: The following are the main source of drinking water facility (ies) available in the village.
3.1 Tap Water-treated: This source of drinking water refers to a source of drinking water which is
provided to the villagers through pipes within their premises or to the villagers through common
taps (public taps/community water points) by the Government departments, local bodies,
panchayats, public or private estate agencies, etc. after treatment. Such a source is treated as
Tap water from treated source.
3.2 Tap Water-un-treated: If the villagers are drawing drinking water through pipes either directly
from a well or bore well or after pumping the well or tube well water, or the water is supplied
through pipes to the households of the village or through public taps without treatment.Such a
source is treated as Tap water from un-treated source.
3.3 Covered Well (CW): A well that is (1) covered on sides from run-off water (i.e., excess water
from rain, snowmelt or other sources flows over the land) through a wall lining or casting that is
raised above ground level on a platform that diverts spilled water away from the well and (2)
covered so that bird droppings and animals cannot fall down the hole. It is considered as covered
well.
3.4 Un-covered Well (UW): A well which is (1) un-covered on sides from runoff water, (2) un-covered
from bird droppings and animals; or (3) both.
3.5 Hand Pump (HP): Hand pump means where ground water is taken out manually by operating a
hand pump.
3.6 Tube Well / Borehole (TW): Tube well denotes the ground water source from where ground
water is taken out through electrical or diesel pump. Spring, River/Canal, Tank/Pond/Lark are self
explanatory.
4. Community Toilet Complex : Community Toilet may be constructed and maintained by Gram Panchayats
or Private NGOs like Sulabh Sauchalaya or likes.
5. Rural Sanitary Mart or Sanitary Hardware Outlet (RSM): It is an outlet dealing with the materials,
hardware and designs required for the construction of not only sanitary latrines but other sanitary
facilities such as compost pit, washing platform and other sanitation and hygiene accessories required
for individuals, households and the environment in the rural areas.
6. Community bio-gas or recycle of waste for productive use: Many of the solid wastes having economic
values but put for disposal can be recycled for reuse. For example, food, cow dung, leaves, vegetable,
paper, wood, plastics, old cloth etc. However, some of the wastes are not recyclable. These are carbon
paper, thermo coal etc. When recyclable solid wastes is subjected to decomposition, bio-gas could be
produced under favourable conditions. These systems of recycling may be there at the village level
organized by Gram Panchayats with technical support from Governments or non-government organi-
zations.
7. Communication and Transport Facilities:
7.1 Post Office (PO): Self-explanatory.
7.2 Sub-Post Office (SPO): Sub-post office includes extra Departmental Post Offices and those
providing franchise postal services and also part time services in lieu of some honorarium. The
limited postal services include sale of stamps, receipt of letters and money orders and also
distribution of letters.
7.3 Post & Telegraph Office (PTO): Telegraph office is set up by the Government to enable people to
send or receive telegrams. If the phonogram facility is available (though the Telegraph office

49
may not be equipped with Morse Code Transmitters), the village is considered to be having
telegraph facility.
7.4 Telephones (landlines): If the village is having the Public Call Office (PCO) either run by the Post
Office or by individuals or by a private shop, then the village is considered to be having telephone
facility.
7.5 Public Call Office (PCO)/Mobile PCO: Self explanatory.
7.6 Mobile Phone Coverage: Mobile phones are now very common particularly in urban areas. Some
villages by virtue of being in close proximity to the urban areas also enjoy the benefits of the
mobile phone services. Even if a few villagers avail the services of mobile phones, then the
village is considered to be having access to mobile phone.
7.7 Internet Cafes/Common Service Centres (CSC): If the village is having the facility of Cyber Cafes
or shops owned by private individuals providing the facility of surfing of the internet, then the
village is considered to be having access to internet/cyber cafe facility. Government of India
formulated the scheme of CSC with the vision of providing all government services in an integrated
manner at the door step of the citizen at an affordable cost even in the remotest corners of the
country through a combination of IT based as well as non-IT based services.
7.8 National Highway (NH): These are main highways running through the length and breadth of the
country. Each NH is numbered like NH-1, NH-2 for easy identification.
7.9 State Highway (SH): These are roads of a state linking district headquarters and important cities
within a State and connecting them with NHs or Highways of the neighboring States.
7.10 Major District Roads (MDR): These are important roads within a district, serving areas of production
and markets and connecting these with each other or with the main Highways.
7.11 Other District Roads (ODR): These are roads serving rural areas of production and providing them
with outlet to market centres, taluk headquarters, block development head quarters or other
main roads.
7.12 Village Road:The approach to village refers to the state of road etc., leading to the village. This
is to see whether the village is approachable both in fair and foul weather, and whether it is
inaccessible only for some time in the year.
7.13. Black-Topped (Pucca) Road (BTR): A road provided with a bituminous surfacing.
7.14 Gravel (Kuchha) Road (GR): A road constructed using well compacted crushed rock or gravel
material (coarse sand, small stones), which is fairly resilient and does not become slippery when
wet.
7.15 Water Bound Macadam (WBM): This is the road layer made of crushed or broken mixture of sand
and rock fragments mechanically interlocked by rolling and voids filled with screening and binding
material with the assistance of water.
7.16 Foot Path (FP): A trodden path for the use by pedestrians and in some cases bicycles. The Foot
Paths are not suitable for vehicular traffic except bicycles in some cases. Most of the interior/
forest villages are connected by Foot Paths.
8. Banks and Credit Societies: Banking facility means a place where a person can operate a bank account.
8.1 Commercial Bank (CB): These may be banks wholly ownedby the Government of India or by
Indian or Foreign Companies.

50
8.2 Co-operative Banks (Co-op. B): A co-operative bank is a financial entity which belongs to its
members, who are at the same time the owners and the customers of their bank. Cooperative
banks are often created by persons belonging to the some local or professional community or
sharing a common interest. These banks are registered under the Cooperative Societies Act. The
cooperative banks are regulated by RBI and are covered by the Banking Regulations Act, 1949.
8.3 Agricultural Credit Society (ACS): Major objectives of the ACS are to supply agricultural credit to
meet the requirements of funds for agricultural production, the distribution of essential consumer
commodities, the provision of storage and marketing facilities and for light agricultural
implements and machinery.
8.4 Non-Agricultural Credit Society (NCS): These societies include consumer cooperative societies
and also credit cooperative societies of certain categories of persons like teachers, health workers,
etc.
9. Miscellaneous Facilities:
9.1 Self-help Group (SHG): Self-Help Groups are groups of between 10-25 women created by either
NGOs or under the SGSY (Swarnjayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana) for the purposes of meeting local
credit needs. They are sometimes called Mahila Mandals in villages.
9. 2. Public Distribution System (PDS) shop: The shops through which some essential commodities
are sold by the government at subsidized rates. They may also be known as ration shops and
control shops.
9.3. Mandis/Regular Market: These are those clusters of shops with or without fixed premises which
are open on at least six days a week and opens at least from morning hours to dusk.
9.4. Weekly Haat: These are those clusters of shops with or without fixed premises which are open
once a week.
9.5. Agricultural Marketing Society: It is a common platform to analyse the issues among all the
individuals and institutions in the field of agricultural marketing.
9.6. Nutrition Centre: Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS): The Integrated Child
Development Services (ICDS) Scheme set up by the Government of India with the objective of
providing following package of services to the children under 6 years and pregnant and lactating
mothers in villages such as; Immunization, Health Check-up, Referral Services, Pre-school Non-
formal Education and Nutrition & Health Education.
9.7. Anganwadi Centre: Each centre under the ICDS scheme is run by an Anganwadi Worker. One
Anganwadi worker is appointed for specified population of the village. They are basically local
women. They are assisted by Anganwadi helper. They provide pre-school non-formal education
at the Centre and provide food to the children.
9.8. Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA): ASHA is a health activist in the community who will
create awareness on health and its social determinants and mobilize the community towards
local health planning and increased utilization and accountability of the existing health services.
She would be a promoter of good health practices. She will also provide a minimum package of
curative care as appropriate and feasible for that level and make timely referrals. She will act as
a motivator of different types of health related activities. Unlike ANM, she will not be involved in
any clinical activities like immunization.
9.9. Sports Club/Recreation Centre: Indoor and out-door games are arranged by the Club and activities
like wrestling, Judo ,Karate, etc. are also done there.

51
9.10. Cinema/Video Hall (CV): If regular cinema houses licensed by Government is available, then the
town/village is considered to be having the facility of Cinema Hall. Video hall owners screen
films in their own or hired premises.
9.11. Public Library: Books are kept there which can be accessed by the public on loan basis. These may
be sponsored by Government or Local Body or Panchayat or any influential person. Free service
or nominal charges are made for using the facility.
9.12. Public Reading Room: Here the public may read newspapers and magazines. These may be
sponsored by Government or Local Body or Panchayat or any influential person.
9.13. Newspaper Supply: The availability of the Newspaper(s), both in English or vernacular, in the
village is considered to having the said facility.
10. Availability of Electricity/Power. If power is actually available, whatever may be the form of its use, it
is indicated affirmative.If the village is having electricity for domestic purposes and the residents are
using the same for domestic use, then it is considered that domestic power supply is available. If the
electricity authority has not given domestic supply to the households on their request and people are
using unauthorized electricity either by stealthily or misuse the supply meant for agricultural or indus-
trial purposes, then it is not considered as availability of electricity for domestic purposes. However, if
the village goes out of power due to temporary technical problems such as, transformer failures, theft
of electrical equipment, etc., it is considered that electricity is available. Supply of electricity is consid-
ered available even when there is a temporary ban on new domestic connections. Connections to
residential houses, bungalows, clubs, hostels and hospitals run on non-commercial basis, charitable,
educational and religious institutions are included in the domestic category.
10.1 Power Supply for domestic use:This category includes electricity used only for domestic
consumption.
10.2 Power supply for agricultural use: This category includes all electricity connections given to the
farmers for conducting various agricultural activities including irrigation.
10.3 Power supply for commercial use: This category includes electricity connections given for
workshops, industries etc. or for any commercial purposes.
10.4 Power supply for all uses: This category includes electricity connection is available for domestic
use, agricultural use, and for any commercial purposes.
11. Land Use Pattern: The land use area of the villages is given in hectares. The land use pattern in the
Village Directory conform to the pattern of classification of land use as recommended by the Ministry
of Agriculture, Government of India. The Ministry has recommended the maintenance of records of
land use pattern under the 9 categories as indicated in the Village Directory.
12. System of drainage : Generally, by drainage system, we mean the network of mains and branches of
underground conduits for the conveyance of sewerage to the point of disposal. Sewers that carry only
household and industrial wastage are called separate sewers; those that carry storm water from roofs,
streets and other surfaces are known as storm water drains, while those carrying both sewage and
storm water are called combined sewers. However, in towns, which are not provided with such under-
ground sewerage system, it is mentioned whether it has open drainage system. There may be possibil-
ity of the town having both closed as well as open drainage systems.

13. Type of latrines: The data on various types of latrines both public and private together are collected.
The three types of latrines considered here are, Pit Latrine, Flush/Pour Flush Latrine and Service
Latrine.

(i) Pit System: The latrines are attached to the pit that is dug into the ground for the reception of

52
night soil, are reckoned as pit latrine.
(ii) Flush/pour flush: A flush latrine uses a cistern or holding tank for flushing water and has a water
seal, which is a U-shaped pipe, below the seat or squatting pan that prevents the passage of flies
and odours. A pour flush latrine uses a water seal, but unlike a flush latrine, a pour flush latrine
uses water poured by hand for flushing (no cistern is used).
(iii) Service: Type of latrine from where night soil is removed manually by scavengers. All other types
of latrines are covered under Others category.
14. Protected Water Supply- Source and capacity of Storage system:There are various sources of water
supply and its storage system in the town.
14.1 Service Reservoir: A servicereservoir is a water storage container that holds clean water after it
has been treated in a water plant, and before it is piped to the end users. These containers are
covered, and are designed to keep the water safe from contamination. Their main purpose is to
provide a buffer within the water supply system so that water supplies can be maintained across
periods of varying demand.
14.2 River Infiltration Gallery: Infiltration Galleries are capable of supplying large quantities of water,
and are used where wells are unable to supply water needs, i.e. where an impermeable rock
barrier affects well efficiency, or where surface water sources are too shallow for intake screens.
Infiltration galleries are one or more horizontal screens placed adjacent to (on-shore), or directly
underneath (bed-mounted), a surface water source.
14.3 Bore Well Pumping System: A bore well is a well of 6" to 12" in diameter drilled into the earth for
retrieving water. The depth of a bore well can vary from 50 feet to 3000 feet. Water is pumped out
to surface through electricity/generator.
14.4 Pressure Tank: Tank that is used to ensure consistent water pressure and for storage of water.
Usually located in basement of house but sometimes (in older settings) located in well pit.
15. Road lighting (Points): Road lighting means the number of street lights that are maintained in the
town.
16. Home Orphanage: Orphanage is the name to describe a residential institution devoted to the care of
orphanschildren whose parents are deceased or otherwise unable to care for them. Parents, and
sometimes grandparents, are legally responsible for supporting children, but in the absence of these
or other relatives willing to care for the children, they become a ward of the state, and orphanages are
a way of providing for their care and housing.
17. Working womens hostel: These may be recognised or non-recognised by any public authority. The data
on number of working womens hostels available in the town are collected with number of seats.
18. Old Age Home: There are two types of Old Age Homes in India. One is the Free type which cares for
the destitute old people who have no one else to care for them. They are given shelter, food, clothing
and medical care. The second type is the Paid home where care is provided for a fee. Nowadays, such
Retirement homes have become very popular in India and they are well worth considering.
19. Stadium: A stadium is a place, or venue, for (mostly) outdoor sports, concertsor other events, consist-
ing of a field or stage partly or completely surrounded by a structure designed to allow spectators to
stand or sit and view the event.
20. Auditorium/Community Hall: These are the places wheremeetings, social functions etc. are organised.
Civic status of urban units: Civic Status of a town/city is determined on the basis of Civic Administrative
Authority of the town e.g., Municipal Corporation / Corporation, Municipal Committee / Municipal council,

53
Municipality etc.
Size class of U.A./town : Size-class of U.A./Town is based on the population size of the U.A./City/
Town.
U.A.s/Towns with 100,000 and above population are classified as Class I U.A.s/ Towns. Towns with
50,000 to 99,999 population are classified as Class II towns, 20,000 to 49,999 population are Class III towns,
population with 10,000- 19,999 are Class IV towns, population with 5,000 and 9,999 are Class V towns and
towns with less than 5,000 population are Class VI towns.
Slum area : The Slum Areas (Improvement and Clearance) Act, 1956, which was enacted by the
Central Government defined slums as (a) Areas where buildings are in any respect unfit for human habita-
tion; or (b) are by reasons of dilapidation, overcrowding, faulty arrangement and design of such buildings,
narrowness or faulty arrangement of streets, lack of ventilation, light or sanitation facilities, or any combi-
nation of these factors, are detrimental to safety, health or morals.

Mega city : The concept of Mega city is a recent phenomenon in the Urban Sociology and is defined
in term of metropolitan city in the form of large size, problem of management of civic amenities and
capacity to absorb the relatively high growth of population. Indian Census in 1991 treated the population
size of 5 million and above as the cutoff point to identify a place as the mega city. Whereas, for the purpose
of inclusion in Centrally Sponsored Scheme for Infrastructure Development in Mega cities the Ministry of
Urban Affairs and employment, Department of Urban Development adopted the criteria of 4 million and
above population as per 1991 Census for Mega Cities. In 2001 Census, cities with 10 millions and above
population have been treated as Mega cities and the same criteria of population have been adopted in 2011
census.

iv) 2011 CENSUS FINDINGS

The population of the District has increased from 2,974,232 in 2001 to 3,121,200 in 2011 with 1,480,763
males and 1,640,437 females. The district with 7.80 per cent of the total geographical area of the State
accommodates 9.34 per cent of the total population. The District is sub-divided into 5 taluks viz. Talappilly,
Chavakkad, Thrissur, Kodungallur and Mukundapuram. Thrissur Taluk has retained the position of the most
populous Taluk of the District both in 2001 and 2011 Censuses with 828,926 and 874,615 persons respec-
tively. From 27.87 per cent of the population of the District in 2001, it has marginally increased its share to
28.02 per cent in 2011. Mukundapuram Taluk has retained the position of the second populous taluk of the
District both in 2001 and 2011 Censuses with 797,156 and 831,363persons respectively. Talappilly is the third
populous taluk both in 2001 and 2011 Censuses with 592,120 persons in 2001 Census and 632,086persons in
2011 Census. Chavakkad Taluk comes to the 4th position. It had a population of 453,698 persons in 2001
Census. Its population in 2011 Census is 470,898 persons. Kodungallur is the least populous Taluk both in
2001 and 2011 Censuses with 302,332 persons in 2001 and 312,238 persons in 2011. The following Statement
-1 shows the percentage of population in each taluk to the population of the District for 2001 and 2011
Censuses.
Statement -1
Name of Taluk Percentage to total population of the District
2001 2011
Talappilly 19.9 20.3
Chavakkad 15.3 15.1
Thrissur 27.9 28
Kodungallur 10.2 10
Mukundapuram 26.8 26.6

54
a) Distribution of population in Rural and Urban areas
The rural-urban classification is necessary for understanding the process of urbanization in the
district. The population of the District is divided between the urban and the rural areas in the ratio of 2:1
in 2011. The rural-urban ratio was also 3:1 in 2001. This indicates that there is major urbanization in the
district during the period from 2001 to 2011. Factually the urban population has increased from 839,433 in
2001 to 2096,406 in 2011 with the simultaneous decrease of the rural population from 2,134,799 in 2001 to
1,024,794 in 2011. The urban population has increased from 28.22 per cent to 67.17per cent during the
period 2001 to 2011. Among the taluks, Thrissur taluk is the most urbanized taluk. The urban population of
the taluk was 424,387 in 2001. It was 51.20 per cent of the total population of the taluk and 50.55 per cent
of the urban population of the district. In 2011, the urban population of Thrissur Taluk has increased to
761,606 persons. It is 87.08 per cent of the total population of the taluk and 36.33 per cent of the urban
population of the District. There was a substantial increase in the percentage of urban population during
the period 2001 to 2011. In 2011, the urban population of the taluk exceeds its rural population. This shows
that Thrissur taluk has become better urbanized in 2011. Urbanization is at a rapid pace at Thrissur Taluk
Out of the 107 newly formed census towns in 2011 Census, 36 are from Thrissur Taluk.
The rural-urban distribution of population in 2011 is diagrammatically depicted below:

RURAL URBAN RURAL URBAN


COMPOSITION, 2001 COMPOSITION, 2011

28% 33%
Rural Rural
72% 67%
Urban Urban

In Chavakkad taluk, there were 2 statutory towns and 7 CTs in 2001. The urban population of the
taluk was 138681. It was 30.57 per cent of the total population of the taluk and 16.52 per cent of the total
urban population of the District. The rural-urban ratio in 2001 was 3:1. In 2011, its urban population has
increased to 470898. Its urban-rural ratio is 3:1. The percentage of the urban population of the taluk to its
total population has increased to 73.7 per cent in 2011. The percentage of urban population of the taluk to
the total urban population of the District has also slightly increased to 16.53 per cent in 2011. In 2011
Census, 13 census towns are newly formed.
Mukundapuram taluk contained 2 statutory towns and 3 census towns in 2001. The urban population
of the taluk was 124,616. It was 15.63 per cent of the total population of the taluk and 14.85 per cent of the
total urban population of the District. Its rural-urban ratio in 2001 was 5:1. In 2011, its urban population has
increased to 379,867. The percentage of urban population of the taluk to its total population has increased
to 45.69 per cent. The percentage of urban population of the taluk to the total urban population of the
district has also slightly increased to 18.12 per cent. There are 22 census towns and two statutory towns in
the taluk in 2011 Census. In 2011 census 19 new Census towns are formed.
Kodungallur Taluk is the least urbanized taluk in the District. There were one census town and one
statutory town in Kodungallur taluk in 2001 Census. The urban population of the taluk was 94,883. It was
31.38 per cent of the total population of the taluk and 11.30 per cent of the total urban population of the
district. The rural-urban ratio of the taluk in 2001 was 2:1. In 2011, its urban population has increased to
267,970. Its urban-rural ratio in 2011 is 6:1. The percentage of urban population of the taluk to its total

55
population has also decreased to 85.82 per cent. The percentage of urban population of the taluk to total
urban population of the District is 12.78in 2011 census. In 2011 Census, 11 census towns are newly formed.
In Talappilly taluk, there were one Census town and one statutory town in 2001 Census. The urban
population of the taluk was 56,866. It was 9.6 per cent of the total population of the taluk and 6.77 per cent
of the total urban population of the district. The rural-urban ratio was 9:1. In 2011, its urban population has
exceedingly increased to 3,40,041. The urban- rural ratio in 2011 is 1:1. The percentage of the urban population
of the taluk to its total population has also increased to 53.8 per cent. The percentage of urban population
of the taluk to the total urban population of the District has also increased to16.22 per cent. In 2011, there
are 28 newly formed census towns in this taluk.
The urban population of Thrissur District is distributed in 7 Statutory towns, 128 Census towns and
one outgrowth. Among the Statutory towns, Thrissur Municipal Corporation with 315,957 persons is the
most populous town in the District. Guruvayoor (M) with 20,510 persons is the least populous Statutory
town. All the Statutory towns in the District have 20,000 and above population. Among Census towns,
Methala Census Town is the most populous with 37,505 persons and Kurichikkara (CT) is the least populous
with 4,081 persons. All the Census Towns except 6 towns Madathumpady CT, Kurichikkara CT, Thangalur
CT , Kizhakkumuri CT, Eravu CT, Muringur Vadakkumuri CT in the District have 5000 and above population.
The average size of a town in the District works out to 15,529 (22,950).
The rural population of the District, accounting for 32.83 per cent of the total population, is
distributed in 98 villages of 5 taluks. Mukundapuram taluk with 33 villages (33.67 per cent) accommodates
rural population of 4,514,96 forming 44.06 per cent of the total rural population. Talappilly taluk with 42
villages (42.86 per cent) accommodates rural population of 292,045 forming 28.5 per cent of the total rural
population of the District. Chavakkad taluk with 7 villages (7.14 per cent) accommodates rural population
of 123,976 forming 12.1 per cent of total rural population of the District. Thrissur taluk with 13 villages
(13.27 per cent) accommodates rural population of 113,009 forming 11.03 per cent of the total rural
population of the District. Kodungallur taluk with 3 villages (3.06 per cent) accommodates rural population
of 44,268 forming 4.32 per cent of the total rural population of the District.
(b) Size ,Class and Status of Towns
The classification of towns in each Census is based on its population in the particular census. With
the growth/decline of population, the towns may change their size-classes. In addition to this, certain
towns cease to exist due to merger with other towns and declassification of towns as rural. New towns may
also be formed. In 2011 Census, there are 135 towns in Thrissur District. For classification of towns, six size-
classes have been formed. The size-classes are as follows:
Class I- Population 100,000 and above.
Class II- Population 50,000-99,999
Class III- Population 20,000-49,999
Class IV- 10,000-19,999
Class V- 5,000-9999
Class VI- < 5000.
In 2001 Census, of the 28 towns, there was one Class I town, two Class II towns, 13 Class III towns, 64
Class IV towns, 49 Class V towns and 6 Class VI towns. Thrissur Corp retained in size class as I and Kodungallur
(M+OG) and Kunnamkulam (M) retained its size class as II in 2011 Census. No class III towns of 2001 Census
has shifted its size class. Pookode (CT) which was an OG in 2001 Census has changed its size class from Class
IV to Class V and all other Census Towns of 2001 Census retained its size class. Iringaprom (CT), Kolazhy (CT)
and Puranattukara (CT) of 2001 Census have changed its size class from Class V to Class IV in 2011 Census.
Census Towns which coming under Class VI in 2011 Census are new towns.

56
Less
6 than
VI
5,000

49 5,000 9,999 V

64 10,000 19,999 IV

13 III
20,000 49,999

2 50,000 99,999 II

I
1 1,00,000+

Population Growth and Sex Ratio

In 1901, the District had a population of 683,266. The growth rate during 1901-1911 was 12.65 per
cent. It reduced to 5.72 per cent during 1911-1921. The growth rate had increased to 22.14 per cent during
1921-1931. Since 1961, the district is witnessing continuous decrease in growth rate. During 1961-1971, the
growth rate of the District was 26.09 per cent. It had further reduced to 14.60 per cent during 1971-1981, to
12.20 per cent during 1981-1991 and then to 8.66 per cent during 1991-2001. The present growth rate of the
District is 4.9 percent which is the lowest during the last 100 years. The following Statement -2 shows the
percentage decadal growth during 2001-2011.
Statement -2
State/District/ Taluk Population Percentage Decadal Growth
2001-2011
2001 2011
Kerala State 31841374 33406061 4.9
Thrissur District 2974232 3121200 4.94
Talappilly Taluk 592120 632086 6.75
Chavakkad Taluk 453698 470898 3.79
Thrissur Taluk 828926 874615 5.51
Kodungallur Taluk 302332 312238 3.28
Mukundapuram Taluk 797156 831363 4.29

All the taluks have positive growth rate during the decades 1991-2001 and 2001-2011. Thrissur taluk
had recorded the highest growth rate of 10.47 per cent during 1991-2001. The growth rate of Thrissur taluk
was also above the District average growth rate of 8.66 per cent. The growth rate of the other four taluks of
Thalapilly, Chavakkad, Kodungallur and Mukundapuram were 10.15 per cent, 6.26 per cent, 6.54 per cent
and 7.92 per cent respectively in 2001. The growth rate of Chavakkad taluk was the lowest. During 2001-
2011, the growth rate of all the taluks has declined. The growth rate of Talappilly, Chavakkad, Thrissur,
Kodungallur and Mukundapuram taluks are 6.75 per cent, 3.79 per cent, 5.51 per cent, 3.28 per cent, and
4.29 per cent respectively. Talappilly taluk has recorded the highest growth rate of 6.75 per cent. Thrissur
taluk holds the second rank (5.51%). The growth rate of Kodungallur Taluk is the lowest (3.28%).

57
During 2011 Census growth rates for the rural and urban areas of the district are -52.00 per cent
and 149.74 per cent respectively. Compared to the decade 1991-2001, the rural population has shown a
nominal decrease in growth rate during 2001-2011. During 1991-2001 the rural growth rate was 5.84 per
cent. The growth rate of the urban population has increased from 16.55 per cent during 1991-2001 to
149.74 per cent during 2001-2011. All the taluks have urban area in 2001 and 2011 Censuses. The urban
growth rate was the highest in Talappilly taluk (105.83 per cent) and the lowest in Kodungallur taluk (-
7.33 per cent) during 1991-2001. In 2011, the highest urban growth rate is reported in Talappilly taluk
(497.97 per cent) and the lowest in Thrissur taluk (79.46 per cent). The decrease in rural rate of all the
taluks is on account of increase in the number of Census Towns in 2011.
Density
One of the important indices of population concentration is the density of population. It is defined
as the number of persons per square kilometre. The overall density of population per square kilometre in
Thrissur District is 1031 persons in 2011. It was 981 in 2001. The District had the 7th place in density of
population in 2001. In 2011 also, the District holds 7th the rank. Statement- 3 shows the density of popula-
tion of the State, District and various taluks during 2001 and 2011 Censuses.

Statement - 3
State/District/Taluk Density of Population
2001 2011
Kerala State 819 860
Trissur District 981 1031
Talappilly 872 930
Chavakkad 1933 2006
Thrissur 1316 1388
Kodungallur 2079 2148
Mukundapuram 600 625

Among the Taluks, there are considerable variations in density. Kodungallur Taluk has the highest
density of population i.e., 2148 persons per sq.km., which is much higher than the District density of 1031
persons. The next dense Taluk is Chavakkad (2006 persons per sq.km.), followed by Thrissur Taluk (1388
persons), Talappilly Taluk (930 persons) and Mukundapuram Taluk (625 persons) respectively. From the
above aspects, it can be concluded that Mukundapuram Taluk, the largest Taluk with an area of 1329.15
sq.km., has the lowest density of population. The reason is that sizeable portion of the Taluk includes the
forest area.
If the rural areas are considered , Kodungallur Taluk has the highest density of 2201 persons per
sq.km., followed by Chavakkad Taluk with 1706 persons, Talappily Taluk with 682 persons, Thrissur Taluk
with 442 persons and Mukundapuram Taluk with 418 persons. In rural density, Mukundapuram is at the
lowest ebb. In urban areas, the highest density of 2141 persons per sq.km. is witnessed in Chavakkad Taluk.
The next dense Taluk is Kodungallur with 2139 persons followed by Thrissur (2034 persons), Mukundapuram
(1530 persons) and Talappilly (1354 persons) Taluks.
The urban density is usually higher than the rural density. Thrissur District too shows higher urban
density of 1805 persons per sq.km. Among the statutory towns, Chavakkad Municipality has the highest
density of 3151 persons followed by Thrissur Municipal Corporation (3115 persons), Guruvayoor Municipality

58
(2742 persons), Irinjalakuda Municipality (2557 persons), Kodungallur Municipality (2244 persons), Chalakudy
Municipality (1963 persons) and Kunnamkulam Municipality (1582 persons). Kunnamkulam Muncipality
has the lowest density of population. Among the Statutory Towns, all towns except Kunnamkulam
Municipality have density higher than the urban density of the District (1805 persons). Among the 128
Census Towns, Nadathara (CT) has the highest density of 5029 persons per sq.km. Its density is nearly three
times the urban density of the District (1805 persons). Iringaprom, Methala and Nadathara Census Towns
have density higher than 3000 persons per sq.km. Parappukkara (CT) has the lowest density of 802 persons.
Parappukkara (CT) (802 persons), Adat (CT) (828 persons), Eravu (CT) (849 persons), Nelluwaya (CT) (872
persons), Thangalur (CT) (898 persons), Killannur (CT) (958 persons), Nedumpura (CT) (960 persons),
Edathirinji (CT) (967 persons) and Desamangalam (CT) (985 persons) have density less than 1000 persons
per sq.km.
In 2001, out of 204 villages, 189 villages, forming 92.64 per cent had density above 500 persons. In
2011, out of 98 villages, 81 villages, forming 82.65 per cent came under this category. There is a decrease in
the percentage of villages in this category. Except two villages Kuttichira and Pariyaram in Mukundapuram
Taluk, all the villages in the District have density above 100 in 2001 and 2011 Censuses. There are only two
villages in the density range of 101-200 persons per sq.km. in 2001 and 2011 Censuses. The number of
villages having density above 300 is 90 in 2011. It accounts for 91.84 per cent of the total number of villages.
The corresponding percentage was 95.59 in 200. The number of villages in the density range of 201-300 has
reduced from 5 in 2001 to 3 in 2011.
Sex-ratio
Sex-ratio is defined as the number of females per 1000 males in the population. In 2001 Census,
Thrissur district had a sex-ratio of 1092 females per 1000 males as against 1058 females per 1000 males for
the state during the corresponding period. Thrissur District had second position in the case of the sex-ratio
among the districts in 2001. In all censuses, right from 1901 to 2001, females outnumbered males in Thrissur
district. The sex-ratio of the District was the lowest in 1901 (1004). It had increased steadily up to 1951 till
it reached 1105 in 1951. In 1961 and 1971, the sex-ratio had shown a declining trend. In 1981, the sex-ratio
had again increased and declined again in 1991. Again in 2001 it had increased. The sex ratio of the District
in 2011 is 1108 and the District has fourth position among the Districts in respect of sex-ratio. The sex-ratio
at the State level has increased by 80 points while at the District level the increase is about 104 points
during 1901-2011.

The pattern of sex-ratio in rural and urban areas of the District in 2011 is graphically shown below.

59
In 2011, within the District, the sex-ratio varied from 1076 in Thrissur taluk to 1181 in Chavakkad
taluk. The highest sex-ratio is in Chavakkad taluk (1181), followed by Kodungallur (1139), Talappilly (1100),
Mukundapuram (1096) and Trissur taluks (1076). Generally urban areas have higher proportion of females
than rural areas. Thrissur district also confirms to this pattern.
Statement 4 shows the sex-ratio of the State, District and various Taluks during 2001 and 2011
Censuses.

Statement- 4
State/District/Taluk Total/ Sex-ratio
Rural/
2001 2011
Urban
Kerala State Total 1058 1084
Rural 1059 1078
Urban 1058 1091
Thrissur District Total 1092 1108
Rural 1096 1099
Urban 1079 1112
Talappilly Taluk Total 1104 1100
Rural 1103 1086
Urban 1116 1111
Chavakkad Taluk Total 1154 1181
Rural 1156 1186
Urban 1148 1180
Thrissur Taluk Total 1064 1076
Rural 1072 1067
Urban 1057 1078
Kodungallur Taluk Total 1116 1139
Rural 1127 1135
Urban 1094 1139
Mukundapuram Taluk Total 1068 1096
Rural 1070 1088
Urban 1054 1106

The sex-ratio figures for the rural and the urban areas of the District were 1096 and 1079 respectively
in 2001. The rural sex-ratio of Chavakkad taluk (1156) was the highest among all the taluks in the District in
2001. It was also higher than the rural and the urban sex-ratio of the district. The next rank was held by
Kodungallur taluk (1127), followed by Talappilly taluk (1103). Thrissur and Mukundapuram taluks had the
sex-ratio 1072 and 1070 respectively. In all the taluks, the rural sex-ratio was in favour of females. In 2011
Census, the sex-ratio of the district is 1108 females per 1000 males. Increase in sex-ratio is seen in both in
the rural and the urban areas of the District during 2001-2011. The rural and the urban sex-ratio are 1099 and
1112 respectively. In all the taluks, except Thrissur and Talappilly taluk, the rural sex-ratio has increased
during 2001-2011 i.e., from 1156 in 2001 to 1186 in 2011 in Chavakkad taluk, from 1127 in 2001 to 1135 in 2011

60
in Kodungallur taluk, from 1070 in 2001 to 1088 in 2011 in Mukundapuram taluk. In Thrissur taluk the rural
sex-ratio has declined from 1072 in 2001 to 1067 in 2011 and in Talappilly taluk the rural sex-ratio has
declined from 1103 in 2001 to 1086 in 2011.
In 2001, among the towns of Talappilly Taluk, Kunnamkulam (M) had the highest sex-ratio of 1117
females per 1000 males. Akathiyur Census Town had a sex-ratio of 1106. All the two towns of this taluk had
sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the district (1079). In Chavakkad Taluk, Pavaratty CT had the
highest sex-ratio of 1211 females per 1000 males and Venmanad CT had the lowest sex-ratio of 1089. Out
of 9 towns in the taluk, only five towns had sex-ratio higher than or equal to the urban sex-ratio of the taluk
(1148). All the towns of this Taluk have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the district. In Thrissur
taluk, Puranattikara CT had the highest sex-ratio of 1103 females per 1000 males and Avinissery CT had the
lowest sex-ratio of 1019. Out of total 10 towns in the taluk, only 2 towns had sex-ratio higher than the urban
sex-ratio of the district (1079). 4 towns had sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the taluk (1057). In
Kodungallur Taluk, out of the 2 towns, Kodungallur (M) had the highest sex-ratio of 1110 females per 1000
males and Methala (CT) had the lowest sex-ratio of 1068 females per 1000 males. The urban sex-ratio of
Kodungallur Taluk was 1094 females per 1000 males. In Mukundapuram taluk, Irinjalakuda (M) had the
highest sex-ratio of 1084 females per 1000 males and Koratty CT had the lowest sex-ratio of 1028. Out of 5
towns, 4 towns had sex-ratio lower than the urban sex-ratio of the District (1079). Only two towns Pudukkad
CT and Irinjalakuda (M) had sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the taluk (1054).
In 2011, the urban sex-ratio is in favour of females in all the towns except Choolissery(989) and
Adat(999). The highest sex-ratio is reported in Orumanayur CT (1253) and the lowest in Choolissery CT
(989). Chavakkad taluk has the highest urban sex-ratio of 1180 females per 1000 males, followed by
Kodungallur (1139),Talappilly (1111), Mukundapuram taluks (1106) and Thrissur (1078). Among the towns
of Talappilly, Kattakampal(CT) has the highest sex-ratio of 1184 females per 1000 males and Kaniyarkode
(CT) has the lowest sex-ratio of 1051. Thirteen towns of this taluk have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-
ratio of the district (1112) and the urban sex-ratio of the taluk (1111). In Chavakkad taluk, Orumanayur CT
has the highest sex-ratio of 1253 females per 1000 males. Punnayur CT has the lowest sex-ratio (1129).
However all the towns in this taluk have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the District. Out of 22
towns in this taluk, 11 towns have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the taluk (1180). Among the
towns of Thrissur Taluk, Vadakkummuri (CT) has the highest sex-ratio of 1239 females per 1000 males and
Choolissery CT has the lowest sex-ratio of 989 females per 1000 males. Out of a total of 46 towns in the
taluk, only 19 census towns have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the taluk (1078) and only 11
towns have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the district. Among the towns of Kodungallur taluk,
Edathuruthy CT has the highest sex-ratio of 1235 females per 1000 males and Madathumpady CT has the
lowest sex-ratio of 1032 females per 1000 males. Out of the 13 towns in this Taluk, 6 towns have sex-ratio
higher than the urban sex-ratio of the taluk (1139) and 9 towns have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-
ratio of the district. Among the towns of Mukundapuram taluk, Velloorkkara CT has the highest sex-ratio of
1203 females per 1000 males and Trikkur CT has the lowest sex-ratio of 1025 females per 1000 males. Out of
24 towns, 14 towns in the taluk have sex-ratio higher than the urban sex-ratio of the Taluk (1106) and urban
sex-ratio of the district.
Work Participation Rate
There was no conceptual change in the definition of work between 1981 and 1991 Census while
conceptional change in defining the workers was seen in the previous censuses of 1971 and 1961. In 1991
Census, in the definition of work, unpaid work on farm in family enterprise was included whereas in 2001,
work includes part time help or unpaid work in frame, family enterprises or in any other economic activity.
During 2011 marginal workers were further grouped into those having work for 0 to 3 months and 3 to 6
months.
The work participation rate for total workers is defined as the percentage of total workers to total
population. 2001 Census had recorded 32.1 per cent of the population of the District as workers. In 2001, the

61
male work participation rate in the District was 50.6 per cent and that of the females was 15.2 per cent. In
2011 Census, the total, male and female work participation rate have slightly increased to 35.1 per cent,
53.3 per cent and 18.7 per cent respectively. As far as the work participation rate of Thrissur District is
concerned, the District has the 9th rank both in 2001 and 2011.The work participation rate in the District for
2001and 2011 is diagramatically depicted below:

In comparison to 2001 Census, there is an increase of about 2.99 per cent in the work participation
rate for total workers (35.11 per cent) in 2011 Census. In the case of main workers, the work participation
rate has increased to 29.78 per cent. There is a nominal increase in the work participation rate (5.41 per cent)
in 2001 of marginal workers to (6.46 per cent) in 2011. The percentage of non-workers has marginally
declined to 64.89 per cent in 2011from 67.88 per cent during 2001. The corresponding proportions for the
State in 2011 are 34.8 per cent for total workers, 27.93 per cent for main workers and 6.85 per cent for
marginal workers and 65.22 per cent for non workers.
In 2001 Census, the work participation rate for the rural areas of the district is 32.21 per cent. It is
higher than the urban work participation rate (31.89 per cent). The work participation rates of main and
marginal workers are 26.80 per cent and 5.41 per cent respectively. In the rural areas of the district, the total
work participation rate was 37 per cent in 2011. It was more than the total work participation rate of 34.18
per cent in urban areas. In the rural areas of the District, the percentage of main workers, marginal workers
and non-workers to the total population were 30.54 per cent, 6.46 per cent and 63 per cent respectively.
Thrissur District had 9th among the Districts in 2011 in rural work participation rate. During 2011an increase
in total Work Participation Rate is seen in rural areas.
In 2001, the work participation rate for total workers was 31.89 per cent, in urban areas. The work
participation rate of main workers was 28.22 per cent and that of rate marginal workers (3.67 per cent)
during 2001. In urban work participation rate, the District has the 8th rank among the Districts in 2001. In the
urban areas of the district, the work participation rate for total workers, main workers and marginal workers

62
were 34.18 per cent, 29.41 per cent and 4.77 per cent respectively in 2011. An increase in main and
marginalworkers is seen in 2011. In urban work participation rate, the District had the 7th rank among the
Districts.
Statement-5 shows state/ district and taluks main, marginal and non workers 2001 and 2011.
Statement-5
State/District/Taluk Percentage to Total Population
Main worker Marginal worker Non worker
2001 2011 2001 2011 2001 2011

Kerala State 25.9 27.9 6.4 6.9 67.7 65.2

Thrissur District 27.2 29.8 4.9 5.3 67.9 64.9

Talappilly Taluk 28.3 30 5.3 5.2 66.4 64.8

Chavakkad Taluk 22.5 24.6 3.5 4.1 74 71.3

Thrissur Taluk 28.8 32.4 4.7 4.6 66.5 63

Kodungallur Taluk 26 26.8 5.6 7.2 68.4 66.1

Mukundapuram Taluk 27.8 30.9 5.5 6.2 66.8 62.8

In 2001, Talappilly taluk (33.63 per cent) had registered the highest work participation rate and
Chavakkad taluk (26.04 per cent) had registered the lowest work participation rate for total workers. In the
case of main workers, Thrissur taluk (28.84 per cent) had the highest work participation rate of main
workers and Chavakkad taluk (22.52 per cent) had the lowest rate. In the case of marginal workers,
Kodungallur taluk (5.58 per cent) had the highest and Chavakkad (3.52 per cent) had the lowest work
participation rate. Among the taluks, in the case of work participation rate for total workers, Mukundapuram
taluk (37.16 per cent) had registered the highest work participation rate, and Chavakkad taluk (28.71 per
cent) has registered the lowest work participation rate in 2011. In the case of main workers also, the Work
Participation Rate is the highest in Thrissur taluk (32.4 per cent) and Chavakkad taluk (24.61per cent) has
registered the lowest work participation rate. In the case of marginal workers, Kodungallur taluk has
registered the highest percentage (7.16 per cent). Chavakkad taluk (4.1%) was in the lowest position.

In 2001 in the rural areas of the taluk, Thrissur had the highest Work Participation Rate for total
workers (33.94 per cent) and in the case of main workers Talappilly Taluk (28.13 per cent) had the highest
Work Participation Rate. Chavakkad Taluk had the lowest Work Participation Rate for total workers and
main workers.During 2011 Work Participation Rate for total workers has increased in all Taluks. In Thrissur
Taluk it had increased from 33.94 per cent to 40.34 per cent, Mukundapuram Taluk 33.54 per cent to 38.52
per cent, Talappilly from 33.55 in 2001 to 37 per cent in 2011 Kodungallur from 31.1 per cent to 34.64 per cent
and Chavakkad Taluk from 25.60 in 2001 to 29.88 per cent in 2011.In the case of main workers Work
Participation Rate has also increased in rural areas of all Taluks. The rate increased to 33.56 per cent in
Thrissur Taluk, to 31.54 per cent in Mukundapuram Taluk, to 30.74 per cent in Thalappilly Taluk, to 25.38 in
Chavakkad Taluk and to 25.72 per cent in Kodungallur Taluk. A substantial increase is alo witnessed in work
participation rate of Marginal workers in rural areas of all the taluks in 2011. Kodugallur taluk (8.92 per cent)
has the highest work participation rate of marginal workers. Chavakkad Taluk has registered lowest work
participation rate (4.50 per cent) in respect of marginal workers.

In the urban areas of the Taluks, Talappilly taluk (34.35 per cent) had the highest work participation
rate for total workers in 2001. As in rural areas, urban areas also Chavakkad Taluk (27.04 per cent) had the
lowest work participation rate. Talappilly taluk (30.21 per cent) had recorded the highest work participation

63
rate for main workers and Chavakkad Taluk (23.98) with the lowest work particiaprtion rate.The work
participation rate for marginal workers was the highest in Kodungallur Taluk (5.58 per cent). Chavakkad
Taluk( 3.07 per cent) had registered the lowest work participation rate for marginal workers. In 2011, it is
observed that the work participation rate for total workers in the urban areas are considerably increased in
all taluks except in Thalappilly Taluk. It has decreased to 33.63 percent in Thalappilly Taluk , increased to
28.29 per cent in Chavakkad Taluk, to 36.46 per cent in Thrissur Taluk, 33.80 per cent in Kodungallur Taluk
and to 35.74 per cent in Mukundapuram Taluk.In the urban areas of the taluks, Thrissur taluk (36.46 per
cent) has the highest work participation rate for total workers in 2011. As in rural area, in urban area also,
Chavakkad taluk (28.29 per cent) has the lowest work participation rate. In 2011 the urban work participation
rate for main workers varies to 29.36 per cent in Talappilly Taluk, 24.34 per cent in Chavakkad Taluk, 32.23
per cent in Thrissur Taluk, 26.93 per cent in Kodungallur Taluk and 30.18 per cent in Mukundapuram Taluk.
Thrissur taluk has recorded the highest work participation rate for main workers (32.23 per cent) and
Chavakkad taluk (24.34 per cent) with the lowest work participation rate. A substantial increase is witnessed
in the work participation rate for marginal workers in all the taluks. The work participation rate for marginal
workers is the highest in Kodungallur taluk (6.87 per cent). Chavakkad taluk (3.95 per cent) has registered
the lowest work participation for marginal workers.

Both in 2001 and 2011 the female Work Participation Rate is substancially less than the main work
participation rate in the case of total workers. In 2001 the male work participation rate for total workers
was 50.58 per cent for males that of females was 15.21 per cent. The corresponding figures for 2011 are
53.32 percent for males and 18.67 per cent for females. In 2001 among the main workers the male work
participation in the district was 44.36 percent while that of females was 11.47 percent. The corresponding
figures for 2011 are 47.7 per cent for males and 13.61 per cent for females .Both in 2001and 2011, the work
participation rate for male is substantially higher than that of females in the case of main workers. In the
case of marginal workers, males (6.21per cent) had higher proportion than females (3.74 per cent) in the
District in 2001. In 2011 also males are reported to have higher work participation rate (5.62 per cent) than
females (5.06 per cent) in the case of marginal workers.
Among the taluks, the male work participation rate for total workers was substantially higher than
the female work participation rate in 2001 in the rural as well as urban areas of all the taluks. The same
trend is seen in the case of main workers and marginal workers. In 2011 Census also, the male work
participation rates for total workers and main workers are substantially higher than the female work
participation rates in the rural as well as urban areas of all the taluks. In 2011 Census, the male work
participation rate for marginal workers is higher than the female work participation rate in the urban areas
of all taluks. But in rural areas the the male work participation rate for marginal workers is higher than the
female work participation rate in all the taluks except Kodungallur and Thrissur.

In 2011 Census, among the four categories of workers, the other workers account for the highest
percentage of workers 86.89 per cent with a break up of 87.84 per cent for males and 84.46 per cent for
females. Females among the other workers have registered a lower percentage than males. The first

64
category in which the highest percentages of workers are engaged is Agricultural Labouror (6.75 per cent).
Household Industry accounts for 2.54 per cent of the total workers. Females (3.2 per cent) are found to be
engaged in household industry in substantial number. The percentage of males engaged in household
industry is 2.29. 6.75 per cent are agricultural labourers. In this category also, there is a higher percentage
of females (9.35 per cent) as compared to males (5.74 per cent). Only 3.81 per cent of workers are engaged
in cultivation. The percentage of male cultivators (4.13 per cent) is more than the percentage of female
cultivators (2.99 per cent). In short, the areas where the percentage of female workers exceeds the male
workers are household industry and agricultural labour. In the other two categories of other work and
cultivation, the male workers are predominant. Statement -6 shows the workers in different category of
State, District and Taluk for 2001 and 2011 Censuses.
Statement -6
District/Taluk Percentage to Total Workers

Cultivators Agricultural Household Industry Other Workers


Labourers Workers

2001 2011 2001 2011 2001 2011 2001 2011


Kerala State 7 5.8 15.8 11.4 3.6 2.3 73.6 80.5
Thrissur District 5.3 3.8 11.4 6.8 5.1 2.5 78.2 86.9
Talappilly 7.4 4.6 21.3 11.8 5.1 2.8 66.3 80.9
Chavakkad 2.4 1.6 5.3 3.8 5.8 2.3 86.5 92.3
Thrissur 3.9 2.6 8.4 4.7 4.4 2.7 83.3 89.9
Kodungallur 1.3 1.3 1.8 2.6 10.4 2.7 86.5 93.4
Mukundapuram 8 6.4 13.4 8 3.6 2.3 75.1 83.4

Literacy

Literacy was a Census question in the very first Census of the Country. The definition of literacy has
undergone changes from Census to Census. In 2011, the same definition as 2001 Census is followed. A
person who can both read and write with understanding in any language is taken as literate. A person who
can merely read but cannot write is not a literate. People who are blind and can read Braille are also
considered as literate in 2011 Census. It is not necessary that a person who is literate should have passed
any minimum educational standard. In 2001 and 2011 Censuses, all children of age 6 or less are treated as
illiterate though they may be going to school and can read and write a few odd words.Statement- 7 shows
Literacy rate of State, District and Taluks in the rural and urban areas during 2001 and 2011 Censuses.
Statement - 7
District/ Taluk Literacy Rate
Total Rural Urban
2001 2011 2001 2011 2001 2011
Kerala State 90.9 94 90 93 93.2 95.1
Thrissur District 92.27 95.08 91.5 93.68 94.23 95.76
Talappilly 89.57 93.07 89.1 91.53 93.98 94.39
Chavakkad 92.43 95.06 92.07 94.45 93.25 95.27
Thrissur 93.65 96.14 92.51 94.08 94.73 96.45
Kodungallur 92.35 95.3 92.07 94.12 92.96 95.49
Mukundapuram 92.7 95.38 92.33 94.71 94.67 96.18

65
In 2001, the total literacy rate of the District was 92.27 per cent. The District had the 6th rank in 2001
in literacy. The literacy rate for the rural and the urban areas of the Dstrict were 91.50 and 94.23 per cent
respectively. In 2011, the literacy rate of Thrissur District is 95.08 per cent. It is higher than the literacy rate
of the State (94 per cent). The rural literacy rate of the District is 93.68 per cent while the urban literacy rate
is 95.76 per cent. The urban literacy rate of the District is higher than the total and the rural literacy rate. In
total literacy rate, Thrissur District holds the 6th (statistically ranked as 6.5) among the districts. The total,
rural and urban literacy rate of the District for 2011 is diagramatically given below.

In 2001 Census, all the taluks except Talappilly taluk have literacy rate above 90 per cent and their
literacy rate is also higher than the District average in 2001 (92.3 per cent). Thrissur taluk has retained its
position as the taluk with the highest literacy rate in 2001. In 2011 Census, all taluks have literacy rate
greater than 95 per cent except Talappilly (93.07 per cent). Trissur taluk has retained its position as the taluk
with the highest literacy rate in 2011 Census also.

The rural literacy rate of the District in 2001 was 91.5 per cent. All taluks in the District had literacy
rate above 90 per cent. In 2001 Census, the rural literacy rate of the District has crossed 90 per cent (91.5 per
cent). In 2011 the rural literacy rate of the District was 93.68 percent. In 2011 Census all taluks except
Talappilly (91.53 per cent) have rural literacy rate above the District rural literacy rate. The rural literacy
rate of all taluks has increased during 2001-11.

The urban literacy rate of the District in 2001 was 94.23 per cent. This was higher than the total and
the rural literacy rates. Excepting Chavakkad (93.25 per cent) and Kodungallur (92.96 per cent) taluks, all
the taluks had literacy rate 94 per cent or above. Only Thrissur (96.45 per cent) and Mukundapuram (96.18
per cent) taluks had urban literacy rate higher than the District urban literacy (95.76 per cent).

The position in 2011 reveals that the urban literacy rate of the District has witnessed an increase
from 94.23 per cent in 2001 to 95.76 per cent in 2011. Corresponding increase is also seen in the urban areas
of all the taluks. Excepting Talappilly (94.39 per cent) all the taluks have literacy rate 95 per cent or above.
In Thrissur (96.45 per cent) and Mukundapuram (96.18 per cent) taluks, have higher urban literacy rate than
the District average for urban literacy rate (95.76 per cent) in 2011.

In 2001 Census, the number of towns has reduced to 28. None of the towns had literacy rate below
90 per cent. Only Chavakkad municipality had literacy rate marginally above 90 per cent (90.18 per cent).

66
Irinjalakuda municipality had attained the first position in 2001 with a literacy rate of 96.0 per cent. Eighteen
towns had literacy rate 94 per cent or above in 2001. They form 64 per cent of the towns in 2001. Among the
Statutory Towns, Chavakkad (M) (90.18 per cent), Kodungallur (M) (92.7 per cent) and Kunnamkulam (M)
(93.94 per cent) had literacy rate below 94 per cent. The Census Towns with literacy rate below 94 per cent
are Chevvoor CT (93.75 per cent), Paluvai CT (93.4 per cent), Pavaratty CT (93.66 per cent), Marathakkara CT
(91.85 per cent), Nenmenikkara CT (92.37 per cent), Nadathara CT (93.65 per cent) and Vallachira CT (93.16
per cent).
Out of the 128 Census Towns, four towns had literacy rate below 90 per cent in 2011. In 2011 Census,
all the towns except four Census Towns Kaniyarkode CT (86.92) , Nedumpura CT (89.95), Desamangalam CT
(87.86) and Mundathikade CT(89.18) has literacy rate less than 90. All others had literacy rate greater than
90. Among the Statutory Towns, the highest literacy rate was reported in Iringalakkuda (M) is 97.77 per
cent) and the lowest in Chavakad (M) is 94.36 per cent. Among the Census Towns, Manakkody CT with an
effective literacy rate of 97.71 percent has the highest literacy rate. The lowest positon was occupied by
Kaniyarkode CT (86.92 percent).
The District had a male literacy rate of 95.11 per cent in 2001. Females had a lower literacy rate than
males (89.71 per cent). The District had higher male literacy rate than that of the State. In 2011 Census,
there is increase in both male and female literacy rates. The male literacy rate has increased to 96.78 per
cent and the female literacy rate to 93.56 per cent in 2011.
In the rural areas of the District, males registered a literacy rate of 94.58 per cent and females
registered a literacy rate of 88.74 per cent in 2001. Both the rural male and the female literacy rates of the
District were lower than the corresponding male and female literacy rates for the District total. However,
the District had a higher rural male and female literacy rates than that of the State average. In 2011, the
rural male literacy rate of the district is 95.87 per cent as against the rural female literacy rate of 91.73 per
cent. Females have registered a higher rural literacy rate in 2011 as compared to 2001.
In 2001, the District had an urban male literacy rate of 96.44 per cent. The urban female literacy rate
stood at 92.21 per cent. The urban area had a higher literacy rate than the rural area. Besides, the urban
literacy rate of both males and females were above 92 per cent in 2001. In 2011 Census, both urban male
and female literacy rates have increased. It is 97.23 per cent for urban males and 94.45 per cent for urban
females.
In 2011 Census the rural areas of the taluks, the male literacy rate was above 95 per cent in all the
taluks except Talappilly taluk (94.3 per cent) whereas female literacy rate remained below 90 per cent in
one taluk named Talappilly (89.03 percent). Talappilly taluk had the lowest male and female literacy rates.
While Mukundapuram taluk had reported the highest rural male literacy rate (96.63 per cent), the first
position in respect of rural female literacy was held by Chavakkad taluk (93.07 per cent). Mukundapuram
taluk has retained the position as the taluk with the highest rural male literacy rate in 2011. Chavakad taluk
has retained the position of District with the highest percentage of rural female literates in 2011 Census.
In 2001, in the urban areas of all the taluks, both male and female literacy rates were above 90 per
cent. In the case of male literacy rate, it is even above 95 per cent. Thrissur taluk had the first position as the
taluk with the highest percentage of male literates in 2001. But Chavakkad taluk is relegated to the lowest
position with regard to the percentage of male literates in 2001. The urban area of Thrissur taluk had its
position as the taluk with the highest percentage of female literates in 2001 Census.
In 2011 Census urban areas of all the taluks, had males literacy rate of above 96 per cent and female
literacy rate is above 94 percent except Talappily Taluk where the literacy was 92.86 percent. Male and
female literacy rate in urban areas is higher in Thrissur Taluk with 97.7 percent and 95.3 per cent respectively.
Male-Female Literacy Gap
In 2001, the male- female gap in literacy in the District was 5.4. Among the taluks, Talappilly Taluk
had the highest male- female gap in literacy (6.32). The lowest male- female gap in literacy (4.55 ) was

67
recorded in Thrissur .
The Male Female Literacy Rate of the District for 2011 Census is diagrammatically depicted below:

In 2011 Census, the male- female gap in literacy has come down to 3.22 in the District. Among the
taluks also, the male- female gap in literacy has declined. Talappally Taluk is holding the 1st position in
both 2001 (6.32) and 2011 (4.18). Statement- 8 shows the male- female gap in literacy of the State, District
and Taluks during 2001 and 2011 Census.

Statement-8

State/District/ Taluk Gap in Literacy

2001 2011

Kerala State 6.5 4


Thrissur District 5.4 3.22
Talappilly 6.32 4.18
Chavakkad 5.26 2.87
Thrissur 4.55 2.64
Kodungallur 6.03 3.31
Mukundapuram 5.37 3.24

Availability of University Education


The main Universities in the district are Kerala University of Health and Allied Science,Kerala
Agricultural University,Vellanikkara,Kerala Kalamandalam Deemed University for Art and
Culture,Cheruthuruthy,Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan Deemed University,Puranattukara. Kerala Police

68
Academy,Kerala Institute of Local Administration. There are many Colleges for Engineering, Law, Veterinary,
Ayurveda, Science, Arts and Commerce degrees are typically affiliated with the University of Calicut.
Religion
The collection of data on religion has been a part of Census since 1872 as religious composition of
population is significant from socio-economic and demographic point of view. The data on religion is
collected in 2011 Census through Question No: 7 of Household schedule where names and codes of main
religion are shown to facilitate the enumeration to report the code of the concerned religion of the individual
in the box provided. In the case of other religions, space has been provided to record the actual name.
In the District, the three important predominant religious groups are Hindus, Muslims and Christians.
Other religious communities such as Sikhs, Buddists and Jains are insignificant, as their percentage to total
population is very negligible. In 2011 Census, 18.23 lakhs population of Thrissur district are Hindus, 5.33
lakhs are Muslims and 7.57 lakhs are Christians. Besides the above three major religious groups, there are
259 Sikhs, 278 Buddists and 62 Jains. The number of persons who has not stated their religion due to
reasons unknown are 6251. Hindus, Muslims and Christians constitute about 99.76 per cent of the total
population. More than half of the population is Hindus (58.42 per cent). Muslims (17.07 per cent) and
Christians (24.27 per cent) together account for 41.34 per cent of the total population.
Though all the three major religious groups have grown in numbers, the rate of growth among
Christians (5.18 per cent) is lower as compared to Hindus (3.50 per cent) and Muslims (9.03 per cent) during
2001-2011. There is an increase in the proportion of Muslims to the total population in 2011 (17.07 per cent)
as compared to 2001 (16.43 per cent).
c) Mother Tongue, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes
Mother Tongue of 2001 Census
Language data was collected in India in the Census of 1881 onwards. In 1881, information on mother
tongue, which was defined as the language ordinarily spoken in the parental home of each person was
collected. In 1891 also similar information was collected. In 1901, the language ordinarily used by the
person was collected. In 1911, the language ordinarily spoken by a person in his own home was collected.
In the later censuses, information on language was collected generally following the above definition. In
1961 Census, mother-tongue was defined as the language spoken in the childhood by the persons mother
to the person or mainly spoken in the household. The same definition was followed in 1971. Information
on bilingualism also had been collected in the Census since 1901. However there were changes in the
implication of the questions in this respect. In the Census of India 1981, a new question on the language
mainly spoken in the Household was asked in the Household schedule along with two usual language
questions on mother-tongue and other languages known in the Individual Slip. In the Census of India,
1981, if a person had a working knowledge to converse with understanding in any of the languages, Indian
or foreign, other than his mother-tongue, a maximum of two such languages were recorded in the order in
which he/she spoke and understood them the best. In 1981, a question on the languages mainly spoken in
the household was not canvassed in the case of institutional households which are linguistically
heterogeneous.
In 1991 Census, two questions on language were asked viz. mother-tongue and two other languages
known through question Nos.6 and 7 respectively. In the Individual Slip mother tongue was considered
as the language spoken in the childhood by the persons mother to the person. If the mother died in
infancy, the language mainly spoken in the persons home in childhood was considered as the mother
tongue. In the case of infants and deaf mutes, the language usually spoken by the mother was treated as
mother-tongue. In case of any doubt, language mainly spoken in the household was considered.
In 2001 Census, also two questions on language were asked viz. mother-tongue and two other
languages known through question Nos.10 and 11 respectively. Definition of Mother tongue was same as

69
that of Census 1991. It is also mentioned that for a Mother Tongue script is not necessary. In 2011 also the
concept of Mother Tongue is same as that of Census 2001. Statement 9 shows the number of speakers of
prominent languages in the District during 2001 Census.

Statement- 9

Name of Prominent Languages No. of speakers

Malayalam 29,43,407
Tamil 18772
Telugu 3562
Kannada 2767
Konkani 2170

In 2001 Census, out of 22 scheduled languages reported in the district, 5 languages had been
reported prominently as mother tongues in Thrissur district. Malayalam, the mother tongue of the most of
the Keralites had 2,943,407 speakers in the district constituting 98.96 per cent of the total population. The
four other mother tongues reported in the district were Tamil, Telugu, Kannada and Konkani with 18772,
3562, 2767 and 2170 speakers respectively. They constituted 0.63 per cent, 0.12 per cent, 0.09 and 0.07 per
cent respectively of the total population. Hindi, Urdu, Marathi, Bengali and Tulu were the other languages
spoken in the district with 894, 654, 643,414 and 287 speakers respectively. Mother tongues like Kashmiri,
Korwa, Simte, Manipuri, Anal and Assamese had negligible speakers in Thrissur district. There was one
person each in the district with Kashmiri, Korwa and Simte as mother tongue. There were 463 speakers
who reported non-scheduled languages as their mother tongues, which constituted 0.02 per cent of the
total population of the district.
Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes
According to 2011 Census, the population of the Scheduled Castes in the District was 324350 with
156480 males and 167870 females. This accounted for 10.67 per cent of the total Scheduled Caste population
in the State. In 2001 Census the population of the Scheduled Castes in the district was 354226 with 171443
males and 182,783 females. This accounted for 11.34 per cent of the Scheduled Caste population of the
State. The decadal increase among the Scheduled Caste population in the District was -8.43 per cent as
against -2.70 per cent in the State during 2001-2011.
The five major Scheduled Castes in the district as per 2001 Census were Pulayan (Cheramar),
Vettuvan, Kanakkan (Padanna), Paraiyan (Parayan, Sambavar) and Perumannan. In 2001 Census the
population of Pulayan (Cheramar) in the district was 141189 out of which 67808 were males and 73381 were
females. Of this, 83.77 per cent of Pulayan (Cheramar) was in the rural areas of the district. The population
of Vettuvan was 103640, consisting of 50807 males and 52833 females. Of this, 71.99 per cent lived in the
rural areas. 84.43 per cent of Kanakkan (Padanna) and 78.09 per cent of Paraiyan (Parayan, Sambavar) lived
in the rural areas while 39.51 per cent of Perummannan were found in the urban areas of the district.
As per 2011 Census also the five major Scheduled Castes in the district are Pulayan (Cheramar),
Vettuvan, Kanakkan (Padanna), Paraiyan (Parayan, Sambavar) and Perumannan. In 2011 Census the
population of Pulayan (Cheramar) in the district is 143422 out of which 68530 are males and 74892 are
females. Of this, only 46.14 per cent of Pulayan (Cheramar) is in the rural areas of the district. The population
of Vettuvan is 62474, consisting of 30450 males and 32024 females. Of this, 85.92 per cent lives in the urban
areas. 64.743 per cent of Kanakkan (Padanna) and 56.37 per cent of Paraiyan (Parayan, Sambavar) lives in
the urban areas. 67.66 per cent of Perummannan are found in the urban areas of the district.

70
The population of the Scheduled Tribes in the District in 2001 was 4826, consisting of 2293 males
and 2533 females. This accounted for 1.33 per cent of the Scheduled Tribe population in the State. In 2011
Census the population of Scheduled Tribes in the District is 9430 with 4362 males and 5068 females. This
accounted for 1.94 per cent of the Scheduled Tribe population of the State. The decadal growth of the
Scheduled Tribe population in the District during 2001-2011 is 95.40 per cent as against 33.13 per cent in the
State. The decadal growth of the Scheduled Tribe population in the District during 1991-2001 was 19.13 per
cent as against 13.47 per cent in the State. Statement 10 shows the percentage of Scheduled Castes and
Scheduled Tribes to total population of State, District and Taluks during 2011 Census.

Statement - 10
State/District/Taluk Percentage to total population
Scheduled castes Scheduled Tribes

Kerala State 8.78 1.29


Thrissur District 10.12 0.2
Talappilly 13.44 0.08
Chavakkad 4.56 0.04
Thrissur 9.67 0.26
Kodungallur 9.25 0.06
Mukundapuram 11.56 0.38

As per 2001 Census the major tribes in the District were Malayan, Kadar, Ulladan, Malai Arayan and
Malai Pandaram. There were 2415 Malayan, consisting of 1126 males and 1289 females. Of this, 96.81 per
cent were living in the rural areas. The population of Kadar was 846 396 males and 450 females. Of this,
98.97 per cent were living in the rural areas. The population of Ulladan, Malai Arayan and Malai Pandaram
were 845, 95 and 82 respectively. 91.01 per cent of Ulladan were lived in the rural areas where as only 58.95
per cent Malai Arayan lived in the rural areas.
As per 2011 Census the major tribes in the District were (Malayan, Nattu Malayan, Konga Malayan),
(Kadar, Wayanad Kadar), (Ulladan, Ullatan), (Malai Arayan, Mala Arayan) and (Irular, Irulan). There are 2415
(Malayan, Nattu Malayan, Konga Malayan), consisting of 1126 males and 1289 females. Of this, 96.81 per
cent are living in the rural areas. The population of (Kadar, Wayanad Kadar) is 1166 537 males and 629
females. Of this, 97.43 per cent are living in the rural areas. The population of (Ulladan, Ullatan), (Malai
Arayan, Mala Arayan) and (Irular, Irulan) are 977, 293 and 157 respectively. 69.19 per cent of (Ulladan,
Ullatan) are living in the rural areas whereas only 43.34 per cent of (Malai Arayan, Mala Arayan) are living in
the rural areas.
As per 2001 Census, there were 354226 Scheduled Castes with 171443 males and 182783 females in
the district. The sex-ratio of the Scheduled Caste population in the district was 1066, which was lower than
the general sex-ratio (1092) of the District but higher than that of the State (1058). In the District, the
highest sex-ratio (5500)*was recorded among Thoti while the lowest sex-ratio (333) was found among
Mundala. The sex-ratio among Pulayan, Vettuvan and Kanakkan were 1082, 1039 and 1087 respectively.
As per 2011 Census, there are 324350 Scheduled Castes with 156480 males and 167870 females in
the district. The sex-ratio of the Scheduled Caste population in the district is 1073, which is lower than the
general sex-ratio (1108) of the District and that of the State (1084). In the District, the highest sex-ratio

71
(2200)*was recorded among (Semman, Chemman, Chemmar) while the lowest sex-ratio 444 was found
among Ayyanavar. The sex-ratio among (Pulayan, Cheramar, Pulaya, Pulayar, Cherama, Cheraman, Wayanad
Pulayan, Wayanadan Pulayan, Matha, Matha Pulayan), (Vettuvan, Pulaya Vettuvan) and (Kanakkan, Padanna,
Padannan) are 1093, 1052 and 1064 respectively. Statement -11 shows the Sex Ratio of Scheduled Castes
and Scheduled Tribes of State, District and Taluks during 2011 Census.
Statement - 11
State/District/Taluk Total/ Sex-ratio
Rural/
Urban Scheduled Castes Scheduled Tribes

Kerala State Total 1057 1035


Rural 1057 1031
Urban 1056 1070
Thrissur District Total 1073 1215
Rural 1080 1174
Urban 1070 1378
Talappilly Taluk Total 1068 1208
Rural 1067 1153
Urban 1069 1696
Chavakkad Taluk Total 1077 1049
Rural 1094 865
Urban 1071 1235
Thrissur Taluk Total 1076 1207
Rural 1095 1111
Urban 1073 1434
Kodungallur Taluk Total 1057 1452
Rural 1046 1000
Urban 1059 1623
Mukundapuram Taluk Total 1080 1223
Rural 1087 1229
Urban 1071 1171

According to 2001 Census, the sex-ratio of the Scheduled Tribe population in the District was 1105
which was higher than the general sex-ratio (1092) of the District and that of the State (1058). As regards
the five major Scheduled Tribes in the District, Malayan tribes shared the highest sex-ratio (1145). Malai
Arayan had the lowest sex-ratio (610). The sex-ratio among Kadar, Ulladan and Malai Pandaram tribes were
1136, 1012 and 822 respectively.

According to 2011 Census, the sex-ratio of the Scheduled Tribe population in the District is 1162
which is higher than the general sex-ratio (1108) of the District and that of the State (1084). As regards the
five major Scheduled Tribes in the District, (Irular, Irulan) tribes shared the highest sex-ratio (16444).
(Malai Arayan, Mala Arayan) has the lowest sex-ratio (1021). The sex-ratio among (Malayan, Nattu Malayan,
Konga Malayan), (Kadar, Wayanad Kadar) and (Ulladan, Ullatan), tribes are 1188, 1171and 1088 respectively.
In Kerala the literacy rate of the Scheduled Castes in 2001 Census was 82.66 per cent and that of the
Scheduled Tribes was 64.35 per cent as against the literacy rate of 90.86 per cent for the State as a whole.
Except five districts of Kerala viz. Malappuram, Wayanad, Idukki, Palakkad and Kasaragod, the Scheduled

72
Caste literacy rate was above State average for SC. The highest literacy rate among the Scheduled Castes
was in Kottayam district with 91.33 per cent and the lowest in Kasaragod district with 68.07 per cent.
Among the Scheduled Caste population in Thrissur district, the male literacy rate was 88.37 per cent while
the female literacy rate was 78.94 per cent. Among the rural Scheduled Caste population, the male literacy
rate was 87.72 per cent and the female literacy rate was 78.02 per cent. The literacy rate among urban SC
male was 90.81 per cent and it was 82.37 per cent among urban SC females.
The literacy rate of the Scheduled Tribes in Kerala in 2001 was 64.35 per cent for total, 70.78 per cent
for males and 58.11 per cent for females. Among the districts, the highest ST literacy rate was in Kottayam
District with 90.68 per cent and the lowest in Palakkad district with 47.00 per cent. Among the Scheduled
Tribes in Thrissur district, the literacy rate was 67.15 per cent for total, 73.01 per cent for males and 61.87 per
cent for females. In the case of the rural Scheduled Tribes in the District, the literacy rate was 64.66 per
cent, 71.08 per cent and 58.86 per cent respectively for total, males and females. The urban literacy rates
among the Scheduled Tribes are 88.60 per cent for total, 90.00 per cent for males and 87.39 per cent for
females.

In Kerala the literacy rate of the Scheduled Castes as per 2011 Census is 88.73 per cent and that of
the Scheduled Tribes was 75.81 per cent as against the literacy rate of 94.00 per cent for the State as a
whole. Except six districts of Kerala viz. Kollam, Malappuram, Wayanad, Kasaragod, Idukki and Palakkad,
the Scheduled Caste literacy rate was above State average for SC. The highest literacy rate among the
Scheduled Castes was in Kottayam district with 94.61 per cent and the lowest in Palakkad district with 81.09
per cent. Among the Scheduled Caste population in Thrissur district, the male literacy rate was 92.81 per
cent while the female literacy rate was 85.75 per cent. Among the rural Scheduled Caste population, the
male literacy rate was 90.71 per cent and the female literacy rate was 82.43 per cent. The literacy rate
among urban SC male was 94.07 per cent and it was 87.76 per cent among urban SC females.

The literacy rate of the Scheduled Tribes in Kerala as per 2011 Census is 75.81 per cent for total,
80.76 per cent for males and 71.08 per cent for females. Among the districts, the highest ST literacy rate was
in Kottayam District with 94.34 per cent and the lowest in Palakkad district with 61.48 per cent. Among the
Scheduled Tribes in Thrissur district, the literacy rate was 83.57 per cent for total, 86.36 per cent for males
and 81.19 per cent for females. In the case of the rural Scheduled Tribes in the District, the literacy rate was
77.63 per cent, 82.00 per cent and 73.88 per cent respectively for total, males and females. The urban
literacy rates among the Scheduled Tribes are 93.00 per cent for total, 93.33 per cent for males and 92.69 per
cent for females. Statement -12 shows the Literacy Rate of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes of State
and District during 2011 Census.

Statement - 12
State/District/ Taluk Literacy rate (Persons)

Scheduled Castes Scheduled Tribes


Kerala State 88.8
75.8
Thrissur District 89.1 83.6

As per 2001 Census, among the Scheduled Castes in the district 40.68 per cent were workers and
59.32 per cent were non-workers. The main workers accounted for 31.93 per cent and the marginal workers
accounted for 8.75 per cent. There were 55.67 per cent male workers as against 26.63 per cent female
workers. Both in main work and marginal work, the female work participation was less than that of males.

73
7.73 per cent of females had engaged in marginal work as against 9.83 per cent males. Among the Scheduled
Caste main workers in the district, 0.85 per cent were cultivators, 23.65 per cent were agricultural labourers,
3.57 per cent were household industry workers and 71.93 per cent were other workers. Workers in forestry,
fishing, hunting, plantations, orchards, etc., constituted 1.21 per cent and workers in other services accounted
for 4.68 per cent of main workers. The lowest percentage of main workers was in mining and quarrying. In
Palakkad district, the majority of SC main workers were agricultural labourers.
As per 2011 Census, among the Scheduled Castes in the district 45.36 per cent are workers and 54.64
per cent are non-workers. The main workers accounted for 35.80 per cent and the marginal workers
accounted for 9.55 per cent. There are 60.07 per cent male workers as against 31.64 per cent female workers.
In marginal work, the female work participation is higher than that of males as against the main work. 9.92
per cent of females have engaged in marginal work as against 9.16 per cent males. Among the Scheduled
Caste main workers in the district, 0.85 per cent are cultivators, 15.24 per cent are agricultural labourers,
1.02 per cent are household industry workers and 82.89 per cent are other workers. Workers in forestry,
fishing, hunting, plantations, orchards, etc., constituted 1.21 per cent and workers in other services accounted
for 4.68 per cent of main workers. The lowest percentage of main workers was in mining and quarrying. In
all the districts, the majority of SC main workers are other workers.
As per 2001 Census, among the Scheduled Tribes in the district 43.60 per cent were workers and
56.40 per cent were non-workers. The main workers accounted for 30.83 per cent and the marginal workers
accounted for 12.76 per cent. There were 54.34 per cent male workers as against 33.87 per cent female
workers. Both in main work and marginal work, the female work participation was less than that of males.
12.00 per cent of females had engaged in marginal work as against 13.61 per cent males. Among the
Scheduled Tribe main workers in the district, 0.74 per cent were cultivators, 16.06 per cent were agricultural
labourers, 1.28 per cent were household industry workers and 81.92 per cent were other workers. Workers
in forestry, fishing, hunting, plantations, orchards, etc., constituted 1.21 per cent and workers in other
services accounted for 4.68 per cent of main workers. The lowest percentage of main workers was in
mining and quarrying.
As per 2011 Census, among the Scheduled Tribes in the district 40.50 per cent are workers and 59.50
per cent are non-workers. The main workers accounted for 28.80 per cent and the marginal workers
accounted for 11.70 per cent. There are 53.97 per cent male workers as against 28.91 per cent female
workers. Both in main work and marginal work, the female work participation is less than that of males.
11.25 per cent of females have engaged in marginal work as against 12.22 per cent males. Among the
Scheduled Tribe main workers in the district, 2.06 per cent are cultivators, 11.86 per cent are agricultural
labourers, 1.51 per cent are household industry workers and 84.57 per cent are other workers. Workers in
forestry, fishing, hunting, plantations, orchards, etc., constituted 1.21 per cent and workers in other services
accounted for 4.68 per cent of main workers. The lowest percentage of main workers was in mining and
quarrying.

74
v) BRIEF ANALYSIS OF PCA DATA BASED ON INSET TABLES 1 TO 35

During 2011 Census the Inset tables contained in District Census Hand Book are also generated
using computer software as done in 2011 Census.
Table 1: Decadal change in population of Tahsils by residence, 2001-2011
Sr. Tahsil Population Percentage decadal Percentage
No. variation 2001-2011 urban
population
2001 2011

Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban 2001 2011
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 T alappilly 592120 535254 56866 632086 292045 340041 6.75 -45.44 497.97 9.60 53.80

2 Chavakkad 453698 315017 138681 470898 123976 346922 3.79 -60.64 150.16 30.57 73.67

3 T hrissur 828926 404539 424387 874615 113009 761606 5.51 -72.06 79.46 51.20 87.08

4 Kodungallur 302332 207449 94883 312238 44268 267970 3.28 -78.66 182.42 31.38 85.82

5 Mukundapuram 797156 672540 124616 831363 451496 379867 4.29 -32.87 204.83 15.63 45.69

District T ot al: 2974232 2134799 839433 3121200 1024794 2096406 4.94 -52.00 149.74 28.22 67.17

The total population for 2001 and 2011 and the percentage decadal variation for 2001-2011 with
rural-urban break-up are given for the district and the taluks. The percentage of urban population to total
population for 2001 and 2011 are also shown.
The percentage decadal variation during 2001-2011 is 4.94 for total, -52.00 for rural and 149.74 for
urban. As compared to the decadal variation for 1991-2001, there is decline in the percentage decadal
variation during in total and rural areas while in urban area, the percentage decadal variation has
tremendously increased from 16.6 per cent during 1991-2001 to 149.74 per cent during 2001-2011. The
highest decline is seen in rural area, i.e., from 5.8 per cent during 1991-2001 to -52.00 per cent during 2001-
2011.
Among the taluks, the highest percentage of decadal variation is reported in Talappilly taluk (6.75
per cent) during 2001-2011 whereas the lowest percentage is reported in Kodungallur (3.28 per cent) taluk.
In all the taluks, the percentage decadal variation has declined during 2001-2011 as compared to 1991-
2001.In the rural areas of the taluks, the percentage of decadal variation has declined in the rural areas of
all taluks, i.e., from 5.0 per cent to -45.44 per cent in Talappilly taluk, 2.2 per cent to -60.64 per cent in
Chavakkad taluk, 6.5 per cent to -72.06 per cent in Thrissur taluk, 14.4 per cent to -78.66 per cent in
Kodungallur taluk and 5.5 per cent to -32.87 per cent in Mukundapuram taluk during 2001-2011 as compared
to 1991-2001.
In the urban areas of the taluks, exceedingly high increase in the percentage decadal variation is
seen in the urban areas of all taluks, i.e., from 105.8 per cent to 497.97 in Talappilly taluk, 16.9 per cent to
150.16 per cent in Chavakkad taluk, 14.5 per cent to 79.46 per cent in Thrissur taluk, -7.3 per cent to 182.42
per cent in Kodungallur taluk and 23.5 per cent to 204.83 per cent in Mukundapuram taluk during 2001-2011
as compared to 1991-2001

As regards the percentage of urban population to total population, significant difference is seen in
the percentages in 2001 and 2011. However, there is a steady increase in the percentage of urban population.
From 26.3 per cent in 1991, it has increased to 28.22 per cent in 2001 and then to 67.17 per cent in 2011.
However, the tempo of urbanization is on wane. During 2001-2011, 107 new census towns are newly formed.
In all the taluks, the percentage of urban population to total population has increased in 2011.

75
Table 2: Number and percentage of inhabited villages in specified population size ranges with the related
population, 2011 (Rural)
Sl. Name of Taluk Total Total rural population Number Population Number Population 200
No. numb and less than 200 and - 499
er of percentage percentag
inhabi of village e of
ted village
village Persons Males Females Males Females Males Females
s
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 05652-T alappilly 42 2,92,045 1,39,982 1,52,063 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
2 05653-Chavakkad 7 1,23,976 56,714 67,262 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
3 05654-T hrissur 13 1,13,009 54,669 58,340 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
4 05655-Kodungallur 3 44,268 20,734 23,534 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
5 05656-Mukundapuram 33 4,51,496 2,16,204 2,35,292 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
Tot al 98 10,24,794 4,88,303 5,36,491 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0

Table 2: Number and percentage of inhabited villages in specified population size ranges with the related population,
2011 (Rural) (Contd..)
Sr. Name of Taluk Number and Populat ion 500 - Number and Population 1000 - Number and Populat ion 2000 -
No. percent age 999 percent age 1999 percentage 4999
of village of village of village

Males Females Males Females Males Females


1 2 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
1 05652-T alappilly 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 16 ( 38 %) 27,440 30,198
2 05653-Chavakkad 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 1 ( 14 %) 1,406 1,794
3 05654-T hrissur 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 1 ( 8 %) 556 640 5 ( 38 %) 8,353 9,399
4 05655-Kodungallur 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
5 05656-Mukundapuram 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 3 ( 9 %) 5,678 6,126
T otal 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 1 ( 1 %) 556 640 25 ( 26 %) 42,877 47,517

Table 2: Number and percentage of inhabited villages in specified population size ranges with the related population,
2011 (Rural) (Contd..)
Sr. Name of Taluk Number and Population 5000 - 9999 Number and Population 10000 and
No. percentage percentage of above
of village village

Males Females Males Females


1 2 22 23 24 25 26 27
1 05652-T alappilly 18 ( 43 %) 64,204 70,248 8 ( 19 %) 48,338 51,617

2 05653-Chavakkad 1 ( 14 %) 4,536 4,975 5 ( 71 %) 50,772 60,493

3 05654-T hrissur 4 ( 31 %) 14,720 15,713 3 ( 23 %) 31,040 32,588

4 05655-Kodungallur 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 3 ( 100 %) 20,734 23,534

5 05656-Mukundapuram 12 ( 36 %) 45,435 49,919 18 ( 55 %) 1,65,091 1,79,247

T ot al 35 ( 36 %) 1,28,895 1,40,855 37 ( 38 %) 3,15,975 3,47,479

76
The total number of villages and the total rural population by sex are given for the district and the
taluks. The number and the percentage of villages and the related rural population by sex for each of the
specified population size-classes are also shown for the districts and the taluks.

In the district as a whole, there are 98 villages. Of the 98 Villages, 38 per cent of the Villages (37) fall
in the population Size-Class of 10000 and above. Of the remaining 61 Villages, 35 villages fall in the
population size-class of 5000-9999, 25 villages having population between 2000-4999 and 1 village lies in
the size class of 1000-1999. Pullu is the only village lies in the population size class of 1000-1999.

Table 3: New towns, de-notified, declassified and merged town in 2011 census
(a) New

(i) Statutory t own Nil

(ii) Census t own 107

1) Kaniyarkode(CT )

2) Cheruthuruthi(CT )

3) Nedumpura (CT )

4) Desamangalam (CT )

5) Kadavallur(CT )

6) Katt akampal(CT )

7) Pazhanji(CT)

8) Karikkad(CT )

9) Nelluwaya(CT )

10) Kot tappuram(CT )

11) Chit tanda(CT )

12) Kumaranellur(CT )

13) Chelakkara(CT )

14) Enkakkad(CT )

15) Wadakkanchery (CT )

16) Kariyannur(CT )

17) Eyyal(CT )

18) Chiramanangad (CT )

19) Porkulam(CT )

20) Choondal(CT )

21) Chiranellur(CT )

22) Velur(CT )

23) Mundat hikode(CT )

24) Peringandoor(CT )

77
Table 3: New towns, de-notified, declassified and merged town in 2011 census (Contd..)
(a) New

(i) Statutory t own Nil

(ii) Census t own 107

25) Minalur(CT )

26) Eranellur(CT )

27) Alur(CT )

28) Kandanassery(CT )

29) Kadikkad(CT )

30) Punnayurkulam(CT )

31) Vadakkekad(CT )

32) Punnayur(CT )

33) Edakkazhiyur(CT )

34) Vylathur(CT)

35) Pookode(CT )

36) Orumanayur(CT )

37) Elavally(CT )

38) Mullassery(CT )

39) Venkitangu(CT )

40) Vadanappally(CT )

41) T alikkulam(CT )

42) Killannur (CT )

43) T hangalur(CT )

44) Avanur(CT )

45) Anjur(CT )

46) Kaiparamba(CT )

47) T holur(CT )

48) Edakkalat hur(CT )

49) Peramangalam(CT )

50) Choolissery(CT )

51) Kurichikkara(CT )

52) Vellanikkara(CT )

53) Kutt oor(CT )

54) Puzhakkal(CT )

78
Table 3: New towns, de-notified, declassified and merged town in 2011 census (Contd..)
(a) New

(i) Statutory t own Nil

(ii) Census t own 107

55) Chit tilappilly(CT )

56) Adat(CT )

57) Kozhukkully(CT )

58) Kainoor(CT )

59) Parakkad(CT )

60) Karamuck(CT )

61) Manalur(CT )

62) Eravu(CT )

63) Veluthur(CT )

64) Manakkody(CT )

65) Puthur(CT )

66) Venginissery(CT )

67) Kodannur(CT )

68) Ant hicad(CT )

69) Padiyam(CT)

70) Vadakkummuri(CT )

71) Kizhakkummuri(CT )

72) Cherpu(CT )

73) Paralam(CT )

74) Oorakam(CT )

75) Kurumpilavu(CT )

76) Kizhuppillikkara(CT )

77) T hanniyam(CT )

78) Edat hirut hy(CT )

79) Chendrappini(CT )

80) Kaipamangalam(CT )

81) Perinjanam(CT )

82) Pappinivat tom(CT )

83) Panangad(CT )

84) Edavilangu(CT )

79
Table 3: New towns, de-notified, declassified and merged town in 2011 census (Contd..)
(a) New
(i) Statutory t own Nil
(ii) Census t own 107
85) Ala(CT )
86) Pallippuram(CT )

87) Poyya(CT )

88) Madat humpady(CT )


89) T rikkur(CT )

90) Amballur(CT )

91) Parappukkara(CT )
92) Katt ur(CT )

93) Porat hissery(CT )

94) Madayikonam(CT )
95) Kallet tumkara(CT )

96) Pullur(CT )

97) Manavalassery (CT )


98) Edat hirinji(CT )

99) Vellookkara(CT )

100) Vadakkumkara (CT )


101) Poomangalam(CT )

102) Padiyur(CT )

103) T hekkumkara(CT)
104) Muringur Vadakkummuri (CT )

105) Kallur Vadakkummuri (CT )

106) Vadama(CT )
107) Kallur T hekkummuri (CT )

(b) Denot ified


(i) Statutory t owns of 2001 census denot ified and also did not satisfy the crit eria t o be Nil
t reat ed as census towns.

(ii )Statut ory towns of 2001 census denotified but ident ified as census towns based on Nil
demographic and economic crit eria.

(iii) Census towns of 2001 census are not ified as statutiry t own in 2011 census. Nil
(c ) Declassified Nil
(d) Wholly merged wit h other t own(s). Nil
*Declassified means the census towns of 2001 census which failed to satisfy the demographic and economic criteria.

No new statutory towns are formed in the district in 2011 Census. Kunnamkulam Municipality,
Guruvayoor Municipality, Chavakkad Municipality, Thrissur Municipal Corporation, Kodungallur Municipality
and Irinjalakuda Municipality were the 6 Statutory Towns in the District in 2001 Census. They remained the
same during 2011 Census. However, 107 new census towns are formed during 2011 Census. No Towns in
the District have been denotified or declassified.

80
Table 4: Sex ratio of the State and District, 1901-2011
Census Kerala State Thrissur District
Year Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1901 1004 1008 953 1004 1004 997
1911 1008 1012 957 1009 1011 976

1921 1011 1016 958 1051 1052 1028

1931 1022 1028 964 1075 1079 1027


1941 1027 1033 979 1082 1087 1039

1951 1028 1033 992 1105 1111 1064

1961 1022 1027 991 1093 1097 1065


1971 1016 1020 997 1081 1083 1067

1981 1032 1034 1021 1100 1108 1070

1991 1036 1037 1034 1085 1091 1069


2001 1058 1059 1058 1092 1096 1079

2011 1084 1078 1091 1108 1099 1112


Not e :- Sex rat io has been defined here as the number of females per 1000 males

The sex-ratio of the State and the District with rural-urban break-up are given for the census years
from 1901 to 2011.
In the State, in the beginning of the 20th century, there were 1004 females per 1000 males. The sex-
ratio had shown an increasing trend upto 1951 and thereafter it had declined in 1961 and 1971 Censuses.
The sex-ratio is showing a steady increase from 1981 Census onwards. The sex-ratio (1084) recorded in 2011
Census is the highest sex-ratio ever recorded during 1901-2011. Twenty six percentage point increase in
the sex-ratio recorded during 1991-2011 is also the highest during 1901-2011.
In the district upto 1951 Census, there was a steady increase in the sex-ratio and thereafter upto
1971, the sex-ratio had shown a declining trend. In 1981, the district witnessed a sex-ratio of 1100 females
per 1000 males. It was perhaps the second highest sex-ratio during 1901-1981, the highest being in 1951
1105 females per 1000 males. In 1991 also, the sex-ratio had shown a declining trend. The sex-ratio (1108)
recorded in 2011 Census is the highest sex-ratio ever recorded during 1901-2011.
During 1901-2011, the rural sex-ratio of the district was also higher than its total and the urban sex-
ratio except in 2011. The urban sex-ratio was less than 1000 in 1901 and 1911. There was a steady increase
in urban sex-ratio during 1931-1981, while the rural sex-ratio witnessed a steady increase during 1901-1951
as in the case of total sex-ratio.

Table 5: Sex ratio by Taluk, 2011


Sr.No. Name of Taluk Sex ratio
Total Rural Urban
1 2 3 4 5
1 05652-T alappilly 1100 1086 1111
2 05653-Chavakkad 1181 1186 1180
3 05654-T hrissur 1076 1067 1078
4 05655-Kodungallur 1139 1135 1139
5 05656-Mukundapuram 1096 1088 1106
District : 594-T hrissur 1108 1099 1112

81
In the district, the sex-ratio is 1108 females per 1000 males in 2011 Census. This is much higher than
the sex-ratio of the State in 2011 (1084 females per 1000 males). The rural sex-ratio of the district (1099) is
lower than its total and the urban sex-ratio.
Among the taluks, in Chavakkad (1181) and Kodungallur (1139) taluks, the sex-ratio is above 1100
and also higher than the sex-ratio of the district (1108).The highest sex-ratio is reported in Chavakkad taluk
(1181). Among the rural and the urban areas of the taluks, Chavakkad and Kodungallur taluks have higher
sex-ratio than the corresponding rural and urban sex-ratio of the district. The lowest sex-ratio is recorded
in Thrissur taluk (1076 females per 1000 males) with rural (1067 females per 1000 males ) and urban (1078
females per 1000 males) break up.
Table 6: Sex ratio by CD Blocks, 2011

Sr.No. Name of CD block Sex ratio


1 2 3
1 0056-Chowwannur
1134
2 0057-Wadakkanchery
1082
3 0058-Pazhayannur
1079
4 0059-Chavakkad
1180
5 0060-T alikkulam
1189
6 0061-Mullassery
1180
7 0062-Puzhakkal
1067
8 0063-Ollukkara
1042
9 0064-Ant hicad
1199
10 0065-Cherpu
1094
11 0066-Mat hilakam
1173
12 0067-Kodungallur
1091
13 0068-Mala
1098
14 0069-Parakkadavu (Part )
0
15 0070-Irinjalakuda
1113
16 0071-Kodakara
1074
17 0072-Vellangallur
1152
18 0073-Chalakudy (Part)
1056
T otal 1099

This table presents the rural sex-ratio of the district and the CD blocks.
There are 18 CD blocks in the district of which two CD blocks viz. Chalakudy and Parakkadavu have
portions within the district.
The rural sex-ratio of the district is 1099. Out of 18 CD blocks, in 8 CD blocks, the rural sex-ratio is
above 1100 and is also higher than the corresponding rural sex-ratio of the district (1099). The highest rural
sex-ratio is reported in Talikkulam CD block (1189). Ollukkara CD block is reported to have the lowest rural
sex-ratio (1042). Chavakkad and Mullassery CD blocks have the same sex-ratio (1180).

82
Table 7: Sex ratio of rural population by ranges, 2011

Range of sex ratio for villages Number of inhabited Percentage of Population 2011 Percentage
villages villages in each distribution of
range population
1 2 3 4 5
Less t han 700 0 0.00 0 0.00
700 - 749 0 0.00 0 0.00
750 - 799 0 0.00 0 0.00
800 - 849 0 0.00 0 0.00
850 - 899 0 0.00 0 0.00
900 - 949 0 0.00 0 0.00
950 - 999 1 1.02 2261 0.22
1000 - 1099 56 57.14 620050 60.50
1100+ 41 41.84 402483 39.27
Dist rict : T hrissur (594) 98 100 1024794 100
Sex ratio Dist rict (Rural):1099

In this table, the villages are distributed in nine ranges of sex-ratio based on the sex-ratio of the
villages. For each sex-ratio range, the number of villages and their percentage to total number of villages
and the related rural population and their percentage to total rural population are given. For the district
rural, the total number of villages and the total rural population are also shown.

In all the villages, the rural sex-ratio is 950 or above. In more than 40 per cent of the villages
covering about 40 per cent of the rural population, the rural sex-ratio is 1100+. In 57.14 per cent of the
villages covering 60.50 per cent of the rural population, the rural sex-ratio is between 1000-1099. The
remaining one rural village lies in the sex-ratio of range 950-999 covering 0.22 per cent of the rural
population.

Table 8: Sex ratio of towns, 2011

Sr.No. Name of town Urban status of town Sex ratio

1 2 3 4
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) (M) 1129
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) (CT ) 1051
3 627757-Cherut huruthi (CT ) (CT ) 1099
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) (CT ) 1091
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) (CT ) 1075
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) (CT ) 1120
7 627761-Kat takampal (CT ) (CT ) 1184
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) (CT ) 1117
9 627763-Karikkad (CT) (CT ) 1102
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) (CT ) 1104
11 627765-Kot tappuram (CT ) (CT ) 1065
12 627766-Chitt anda (CT ) (CT ) 1104
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) (CT ) 1082

83
Table 8: Sex ratio of towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Urban status of town Sex ratio

1 2 3 4
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) (CT ) 1130
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) (CT ) 1116
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) (CT ) 1077
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) (CT ) 1076
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) (CT ) 1172
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) (CT ) 1090
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) (CT ) 1116
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) (CT ) 1082
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) (CT ) 1131
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) (CT ) 1124
24 627778-Velur (CT ) (CT ) 1087
25 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) (CT ) 1074
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) (CT ) 1108
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) (CT ) 1075
28 627782-Eranellur (CT) (CT ) 1143
29 627783-Alur (CT ) (CT ) 1127
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) (CT ) 1177
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) (M) 1133
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) (M) 1201
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) (CT ) 1192
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) (CT ) 1208
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) (CT ) 1218
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) (CT ) 1129
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) (CT ) 1142
38 627797-Vylat hur (CT ) (CT ) 1158
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) (CT ) 1208
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) (CT ) 1140
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) (CT ) 1160
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) (CT ) 1253
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) (CT ) 1182
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) (CT ) 1158
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) (CT ) 1133
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) (CT ) 1148
47 627806-Pavaratt y (CT ) (CT ) 1208
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) (CT ) 1147
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) (CT ) 1191
50 627809-Venkit angu (CT ) (CT ) 1178
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) (CT ) 1195
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) (CT ) 1216
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) (M Corp.) 1075

84
Table 8: Sex ratio of towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Urban status of town Sex ratio
1 2 3 4
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) (CT ) 1052
55 627826-T hangalur (CT ) (CT ) 1040
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) (CT ) 1065
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) (CT ) 1076
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) (CT ) 1043
59 627830-T holur (CT ) (CT ) 1104
60 627831-Edakkalathur (CT ) (CT ) 1116
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) (CT ) 1054
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) (CT ) 989
63 627834-Pot tore (CT ) (CT ) 1045
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) (CT ) 1060
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) (CT ) 1048
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT ) (CT ) 1058
67 627838-Kut toor (CT ) (CT ) 1044
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) (CT ) 1111
69 627840-Puranatt ukara (CT ) (CT ) 1092
70 627841-Chitt ilappilly (CT ) (CT ) 1092
71 627842-Adat (CT ) (CT ) 999
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) (CT ) 1037
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) (CT ) 1003
74 627845-Nadathara (CT ) (CT ) 1047
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) (CT ) 1056
76 627847-Karamuck (CT ) (CT ) 1144
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) (CT ) 1103
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) (CT ) 1129
79 627850-Velut hur (CT ) (CT ) 1059
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) (CT ) 1052
81 627852-Marathakkara (CT ) (CT ) 1014
82 627853-Put hur (CT ) (CT ) 1026
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) (CT ) 1046
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) (CT ) 1065
85 627856-Venginissery (CT ) (CT ) 1083
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) (CT ) 1065
87 627858-Ant hicad (CT) (CT ) 1119
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) (CT ) 1177
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 1239
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 1151
91 627862-Cherpu (CT ) (CT ) 1131
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) (CT ) 1042
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) (CT ) 1092
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) (CT ) 1041

85
Table 8: Sex ratio of towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Urban status of town Sex ratio
1 2 3 4
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) (CT ) 1111
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) (CT ) 1141
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) (CT ) 1217
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) (CT ) 1199
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) (M + OG) 1115
100 627873-Edathirut hy (CT ) (CT ) 1235
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) (CT ) 1210
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) (CT ) 1187
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) (CT ) 1174
104 627877-Pappinivat tom (CT ) (CT ) 1220
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) (CT ) 1114
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) (CT ) 1141
107 627880-Ala (CT ) (CT ) 1115
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) (CT ) 1036
109 627882-Methala (CT ) (CT ) 1087
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) (CT ) 1094
111 627884-Madathumpady (CT ) (CT ) 1032
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) (M) 1141
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) (M) 1086
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) (CT ) 1025
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) (CT ) 1032
116 627921-Amballur (CT) (CT ) 1051
117 627922-Put hukkad (CT ) (CT ) 1070
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) (CT ) 1085
119 627924-Kat tur (CT ) (CT ) 1167
120 627925-Porat hissery (CT ) (CT ) 1142
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) (CT ) 1138
122 627927-Kallett umkara (CT ) (CT ) 1086
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) (CT ) 1137
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) (CT ) 1195
125 627930-Edathirinji (CT ) (CT ) 1156
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) (CT ) 1203
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) (CT ) 1140
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) (CT ) 1191
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) (CT ) 1144
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) (CT ) 1146
131 627936-Muringur Vadakkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 1184
132 627937-Koratt y (CT ) (CT ) 1050
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri (CT) (CT ) 1076
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) (CT ) 1130
135 627940-Kallur Thekkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 1081
Sex rat io (Urban) dist rict : 1112

86
In this table, the sex-ratio of the district urban and the towns are given.
Among the towns, the highest sex-ratio is reported in Orumanayur census town (1253) and the
lowest in Choolissery census town (989). In 73 towns, the urban sex-ratio is above 1100 and in 69 towns, the
urban sex-ratio is above the district average (1112) for urban area. Among the statutory towns, Chavakkad
municipality has the highest sex-ratio of 1201 females per 1000 males and the lowest is in Kodungallur
(M+OG) (1115 females per 1000 males).

Table 9: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 for Taluk, 2011

Sr.No. Name of Taluk Total/ Total population in 0-6 age group Sex ratio for 0-6
Rural/ age group
Urban Persons Males Females
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 05652-T alappilly T ot al 66483 34227 32256 942

Rural 30882 15891 14991 943

Urban 35601 18336 17265 942

2 05653-Chavakkad T ot al 52537 27227 25310 930

Rural 12955 6778 6177 911

Urban 39582 20449 19133 936

3 05654-T hrissur T ot al 76372 38956 37416 960

Rural 9931 4990 4941 990

Urban 66441 33966 32475 956

4 05655-Kodungallur T ot al 31845 16303 15542 953

Rural 4906 2491 2415 969

Urban 26939 13812 13127 950

5 05656-Mukundapuram T ot al 76713 39149 37564 960

Rural 42303 21481 20822 969

Urban 34410 17668 16742 948

Dist rict : 594-T hrissur T ot al 303950 155862 148088 950

Rural 100977 51631 49346 956

Urban 202973 104231 98742 947

In this table, the total population in 0-6 age group by sex and the sex-ratio of the age-group are
given for the district and the taluks with rural-urban break-up.

The child sex-ratio of the district is 950 female children per 1000 male children. The rural-urban
break-up is 956 and 947 respectively. The urban area of the district (947) is showing a lower child sex-ratio
than the rural (956).

The child sex-ratio is less than 1000 in all the taluks. Thrissur (960), Kodungallur (953) and
Mukundapuram (960) taluks have child sex-ratio higher than the corresponding district average (950).
Thrissur and Mukundapuram taluks have the same child sex-ratio (960).

87
Table 10: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 for CD Blocks, 2011
Sr.No. Name of CD Block Total population in 0-6 age group Sex ratio for 0-6
Persons Males Females age group
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 0056-Chowwannur 3465 1787 1678 939
2 0057-Wadakkanchery 13416 6906 6510 943
3 0058-Pazhayannur 14001 7198 6803 945
4 0059-Chavakkad 2975 1553 1422 916
5 0060-T alikkulam 7336 3848 3488 906
6 0061-Mullassery 2644 1377 1267 920
7 0062-Puzhakkal 669 357 312 874
8 0063-Ollukkara 7114 3558 3556 999
9 0064-Anthicad 1326 644 682 1059
10 0065-Cherpu 822 431 391 907
11 0066-Mat hilakam 2577 1317 1260 957
12 0067-Kodungallur 2329 1174 1155 984
13 0068-Mala 8511 4338 4173 962
14 0069-Parakkadavu (Part ) 0 0 0 0
15 0070-Irinjalakuda 4506 2312 2194 949
16 0071-Kodakara 14421 7305 7116 974
17 0072-Vellangallur 5349 2705 2644 977
18 0073-Chalakudy (Part) 9516 4821 4695 974
T otal 100977 51631 49346 956

The total rural population in the 0-6 age group by sex and the sex-ratio of the 0-6 age group are
given for the rural areas of the district and the CD blocks.
Out of 18 CD blocks, in eight CD blocks viz. Ollukkara (999), Anthicad (1059), Mathilakam (957),
Kodungallur (984), Mala (962), Kodakara (974), Vellangallur (977) and Chalakudy (Part) (974), the rural child
sex-ratio is above the corresponding average for rural areas (956). It is seen that rural child sex-ratio is less
than 1000 in all the CD blocks except in Anthicad. The highest rural child sex-ratio is reported in Anthicad CD
block (1059) and the lowest in Puzhakkal CD block (874).
Table 11: Sex ratio of rural population in the age group 0-6 by ranges, 2011
Range of sex ratio for villages Number of inhabited Percentage Population Percentage distribution
villages distribution of villages 2011 of population
1 2 3 4 5
Less t han 700 0 0.00 0 0.00
700 - 749 0 0.00 0 0.00
750 - 799 1 1.02 713 0.71
800 - 849 4 4.08 1485 1.47
850 - 899 12 12.24 11583 11.47
900 - 949 27 27.55 32467 32.15
950 - 999 28 28.57 34040 33.71
1000 - 1099 23 23.47 18426 18.25
1100+ 3 3.06 2263 2.24
Dist rict : T hrissur (594) 98 100 100977 100
Sex ratio District (Rural):956

88
The villages are distributed in nine ranges of child sex-ratio based on the child sex-ratio of the
villages. For each child sex-ratio range, the number and the percentage of villages and the related rural
population and their percentage are given. For the district rural, the total number of villages and the total
rural population are also shown.
The rural child sex-ratio of the district is 956. There are no villages in the district having rural child
sex-ratio below 700. There is only one village having rural child sex-ratio between 750 and 799. In 98.97 per
cent villages, the rural child sex-ratio is 800 or above. In 26 villages, the rural child sex-ratio is 1000 or
above. In 55 villages, covering 66 per cent of the rural child population, the rural child sex-ratio is between
900 and 999.
Table 12: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 of towns, 2011
Sr.No. Name of town Urban Total population in 0-6 age group Sex ratio for 0-6
status of age group
Persons Males Females
town
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) (M) 5049 2639 2410 913
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) (CT ) 1168 601 567 943
3 627757-Cherut huruthi (CT ) (CT ) 1640 794 846 1065
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) (CT ) 1614 816 798 978
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) (CT ) 1081 578 503 870
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) (CT ) 1362 725 637 879
7 627761-Kat takampal (CT ) (CT ) 1309 654 655 1002
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) (CT ) 1512 772 740 959
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) (CT ) 1685 870 815 937
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) (CT ) 527 270 257 952
11 627765-Kott appuram (CT ) (CT ) 625 336 289 860
12 627766-Chitt anda (CT ) (CT ) 645 323 322 997
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) (CT ) 756 397 359 904
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) (CT ) 806 431 375 870
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) (CT ) 995 499 496 994
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) (CT ) 1536 804 732 910
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) (CT ) 702 370 332 897
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) (CT ) 776 383 393 1026
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) (CT ) 1266 650 616 948
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) (CT ) 526 271 255 941
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) (CT ) 567 318 249 783
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) (CT ) 1261 652 609 934
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) (CT ) 1269 639 630 986
24 627778-Velur (CT ) (CT ) 1413 763 650 852
25 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) (CT ) 728 366 362 989
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) (CT ) 518 255 263 1031
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) (CT ) 586 284 302 1063
28 627782-Eranellur (CT ) (CT ) 1144 572 572 1000
29 627783-Alur (CT ) (CT ) 964 498 466 936
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) (CT ) 1571 806 765 949
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) (M) 1878 972 906 932
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) (M) 4704 2436 2268 931

89
Table 12: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 of towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Urban Total population in 0-6 age group Sex ratio for 0-6
status of age group
town Persons Males Females
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) (CT ) 2448 1261 1187 941
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) (CT ) 1776 919 857 933
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) (CT ) 1918 992 926 933
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) (CT ) 2586 1360 1226 901
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) (CT ) 2239 1149 1090 949
38 627797-Vylat hur (CT ) (CT ) 1211 622 589 947
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) (CT ) 1108 565 543 961
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) (CT ) 1305 669 636 951
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) (CT ) 1222 620 602 971
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) (CT ) 1866 947 919 970
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) (CT ) 1068 588 480 816
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) (CT ) 752 389 363 933
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) (CT ) 1504 784 720 918
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) (CT ) 1305 676 629 930
47 627806-Pavaratt y (CT ) (CT ) 1383 706 677 959
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) (CT ) 1051 541 510 943
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) (CT ) 1204 617 587 951
50 627809-Venkit angu (CT ) (CT ) 1160 601 559 930
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) (CT ) 3160 1637 1523 930
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) (CT ) 2734 1398 1336 956
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) (M Corp.) 26389 13534 12855 950
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) (CT ) 1800 928 872 940
55 627826-T hangalur (CT ) (CT ) 391 206 185 898
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) (CT ) 692 346 346 1000
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) (CT ) 1059 539 520 965
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) (CT ) 692 365 327 896
59 627830-T holur (CT ) (CT ) 703 366 337 921
60 627831-Edakkalathur (CT ) (CT ) 819 408 411 1007
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) (CT ) 1087 530 557 1051
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) (CT ) 448 247 201 814
63 627834-Pot tore (CT ) (CT ) 640 325 315 969
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) (CT ) 908 446 462 1036
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) (CT ) 342 182 160 879
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT) (CT ) 512 252 260 1032
67 627838-Kut toor (CT ) (CT ) 1079 529 550 1040
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) (CT ) 673 350 323 923
69 627840-Puranatt ukara (CT ) (CT ) 842 438 404 922
70 627841-Chitt ilappilly (CT ) (CT ) 661 335 326 973
71 627842-Adat (CT ) (CT ) 438 223 215 964
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) (CT ) 935 466 469 1006

90
Table 12: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 of towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Urban Total population in 0-6 age group Sex ratio for 0-6
status of age group
Persons Males Females
town
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) (CT ) 651 322 329 1022
74 627845-Nadathara (CT ) (CT ) 1092 562 530 943
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) (CT ) 820 427 393 920
76 627847-Karamuck (CT ) (CT ) 1400 699 701 1003
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) (CT ) 1621 807 814 1009
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) (CT ) 400 189 211 1116
79 627850-Velut hur (CT ) (CT ) 1086 537 549 1022
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) (CT ) 731 388 343 884
81 627852-Marathakkara (CT ) (CT ) 1429 735 694 944
82 627853-Put hur (CT ) (CT ) 1612 833 779 935
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) (CT ) 1330 666 664 997
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) (CT ) 662 344 318 924
85 627856-Venginissery (CT) (CT ) 495 255 240 941
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) (CT ) 661 336 325 967
87 627858-Anthicad (CT ) (CT ) 848 439 409 932
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) (CT ) 1060 571 489 856
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 885 466 419 899
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 407 225 182 809
91 627862-Cherpu (CT) (CT ) 853 447 406 908
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) (CT ) 899 463 436 942
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) (CT ) 1298 632 666 1054
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) (CT ) 1120 582 538 924
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) (CT ) 1129 555 574 1034
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) (CT ) 1380 705 675 957
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) (CT ) 577 308 269 873
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) (CT ) 885 458 427 932
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) (M + OG) 5760 2942 2818 958
100 627873-Edathiruthy (CT ) (CT ) 1378 702 676 963
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) (CT ) 1797 947 850 898
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) (CT ) 4074 2075 1999 963
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) (CT ) 2040 1028 1012 984
104 627877-Pappinivattom (CT ) (CT ) 1681 851 830 975
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) (CT ) 1602 852 750 880
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) (CT ) 2102 1081 1021 944
107 627880-Ala (CT ) (CT ) 1076 559 517 925
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) (CT ) 722 371 351 946
109 627882-Methala (CT ) (CT ) 3382 1738 1644 946
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) (CT ) 937 461 476 1033
111 627884-Madathumpady (CT ) (CT ) 388 205 183 893
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) (M) 2291 1173 1118 953

91
Table 12: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 of towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Urban Total population in 0-6 age group Sex ratio for 0-6
status of age group
town Persons Males Females
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) (M) 4574 2382 2192 920
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) (CT ) 1189 621 568 915
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) (CT ) 1525 791 734 928
116 627921-Amballur (CT ) (CT ) 2526 1280 1246 973
117 627922-Put hukkad (CT ) (CT ) 1070 566 504 890
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) (CT ) 1001 520 481 925
119 627924-Kat tur (CT ) (CT ) 1757 891 866 972
120 627925-Porathissery (CT) (CT ) 1522 765 757 990
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) (CT ) 1288 674 614 911
122 627927-Kallett umkara (CT ) (CT ) 721 382 339 887
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) (CT ) 1145 563 582 1034
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) (CT ) 681 349 332 951
125 627930-Edathirinji (CT ) (CT ) 927 485 442 911
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) (CT ) 685 331 354 1069
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) (CT ) 1027 526 501 952
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) (CT ) 1063 556 507 912
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) (CT ) 823 423 400 946
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) (CT ) 1594 810 784 968
131 627936-Muringur Vadakkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 409 201 208 1035
132 627937-Koratt y (CT ) (CT ) 1565 790 775 981
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 2317 1185 1132 955
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) (CT ) 1051 554 497 897
135 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri (CT ) (CT ) 1659 850 809 952
District (Urban): 594-T hrissur 202973 104231 98742 947

The total urban population in the age group 0-6 by sex and the sex-ratio of the age-group 0-6 are
given for the district urban.
The urban child sex-ratio of the district is 947. Among the towns, twenty two towns have positive
child sex-ratio. Eranellur (CT) and Avanur (CT) have child sex-ratio 1000. In sixty four towns, the child sex-
ratio is above the corresponding district average. Vylathur (CT) has the same child sex-ratio with the
corresponding district average (947). The highest child sex-ratio is reported in Eravu (CT) (1116) and the
lowest in Porkulam (CT) (783).

92
Table 13: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes population in Taluk, 2011
Sr.No. Name of Taluk Total/ Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of
Rural/ population scheduled scheduled scheduled scheduled tribes
Urban castes tribes castes population to
population population population to total population
total population
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 05652-T alappilly T otal 632086 86886 1047 13.75 0.17
Rural 292045 44867 696 15.36 0.24
Urban 340041 42019 351 12.36 0.1
2 05653-Chavakkad T otal 470898 23016 670 4.89 0.14
Rural 123976 5924 182 4.78 0.15
Urban 346922 17092 488 4.93 0.14
3 05654-T hrissur T otal 874615 86696 3130 9.91 0.36
Rural 113009 12855 1652 11.38 1.46
Urban 761606 73841 1478 9.7 0.19
4 05655-Kodungallur T otal 312238 30055 690 9.63 0.22
Rural 44268 2905 84 6.56 0.19
Urban 267970 27150 606 10.13 0.23
5 05656-Mukundapuram T otal 831363 97697 3893 11.75 0.47
Rural 451496 55288 3245 12.25 0.72
Urban 379867 42409 648 11.16 0.17
594-T hrissur T otal 3121200 324350 9430 10.39 0.3
Rural 1024794 121839 5859 11.89 0.57
Urban 2096406 202511 3571 9.66 0.17

The total population, the total SC and ST population and the percentage of SC/ST population to the
total population for the district and the taluks with rural-urban break-up are given.
In the district, 10.39 per cent population constitutes SC and a negligible percentage (0.3 per cent)
constitutes ST in 2011 Census. As regards the SC/ST, they have a higher concentration in rural area as
compared to urban area.
In most of the taluks, the percentage of Scheduled Caste is not much high. Talappilly and
Mukundapuram taluks show a higher concentration of SC population. In the rural areas of Talappilly taluk,
it is as high as 15.36 per cent. The lowest percentage of Scheduled Caste population is in Chavakkad taluk
(4.89).
In the case of ST, they are numerically negligible in the district. Their number is fairly higher in
Thrissur (3130) and Mukundapuram (3893) taluks as compared to other taluks. The higher percentage of
Scheduled Tribe population is in Mukundapuram (0.47) taluk and the lowest is in Chavakkad (0.14) taluk.

93
Table 14: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes (rural) population in CD Blocks, 2011

Sr.No. Name of CD Block Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of


population scheduled scheduled scheduled castes scheduled tribes
castes tribes population to total population to total
population population population population

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 0056-Chowwannur 30575 3470 36 11.35 0.12
2 0057-Wadakkanchery 125557 17886 196 14.25 0.16
3 0058-Pazhayannur 135913 23511 464 17.3 0.34
4 0059-Chavakkad 22929 613 16 2.67 0.07
5 0060-T alikkulam 77753 2635 117 3.39 0.15
6 0061-Mullassery 23294 2676 49 11.49 0.21
7 0062-Puzhakkal 7513 1076 27 14.32 0.36
8 0063-Ollukkara 80971 6711 1604 8.29 1.98
9 0064-Anthicad 14812 2928 9 19.77 0.06
10 0065-Cherpu 9713 2140 12 22.03 0.12
11 0066-Mathilakam 24333 1965 56 8.08 0.23
12 0067-Kodungallur 19935 940 28 4.72 0.14
13 0068-Mala 91783 10585 75 11.53 0.08
14 0069-Parakkadavu (Part) 0 0 0 0 0
15 0070-Irinjalakuda 51631 9124 115 17.67 0.22
16 0071-Kodakara 150541 15654 1048 10.4 0.7
17 0072-Vellangallur 53885 7340 64 13.62 0.12
18 0073-Chalakudy (Part ) 103656 12585 1943 12.14 1.87
T ot al 1024794 121839 5859 11.89 0.57

The total rural population, the total rural SC/ST population and the percentage of SC/ST population
to total rural population for the rural areas of the district and 17 CD blocks are given.
The rural proportion of SC is 11.89 in the district, as against a negligible proportion of ST (0.57 per
cent). Among the CD blocks, the proportion of Scheduled Caste ranges from 2.67 per cent in Chavakkad CD
block to 22.03 per cent in Cherpu CD block. In five CD Blocks viz., Chavakkad (2.67 per cent), Talikkulam (3.39
per cent), Ollukkara (8.29 per cent ), Mathilakam (8.08 per cent) and Kodungallur (4.72 per cent) CD blocks,
the proportion of SC is even less than 10 per cent. In eight CD blocks viz. Wadakkanchery (14.25 per cent),
Pazhayannur (17.3 per cent), Puzhakkal (14.32 per cent), Anthicad (19.77 per cent), Cherpu (22.03 per cent),
Irinjalakuda (17.67 per cent), Vellangallur (13.62 per cent) and Chalakudy(Part) (12.14 per cent) the proportion
of Scheduled Caste is higher than the district average for SC (11.89 per cent).
The ST population is less than 1000 in most of the CD blocks. The three CD blocks having more than
1000 ST population are Ollukkara (1604), Kodakara (1048) and Chalakudy (Part) (1943). The proportion of ST
is negligible in all the CD blocks. Their proportion is above 1 per cent in Ollukkara (1.98 per cent) and
Chalakudy(Part) (1.87 per cent) CD blocks.

94
Table 15: Proportion of scheduled castes population to total population in villages, 2011
Percentage range of scheduled Number of villages Percentage Scheduled castes Percentage
castes population to total population
population
1 2 3 4 5
NIL 0 0.00 0 0.00
Less t han 5 8 8.16 3729 3.06
5 - 10 26 26.53 28064 23.03
11 - 20 55 56.12 78276 64.25
21 - 30 8 8.16 10616 8.71
31 - 40 1 1.02 1154 0.95
41 - 50 0 0.00 0 0.00
51 - 75 0 0.00 0 0.00
76 and above 0 0.00 0 0.00
Dist rict : T hrissur(594) 98 100.00 121839 100.00

The total number of villages and their percentages and the SC rural population and their percentage
for eight specified percentage ranges based on the proportion of rural SC population to the total rural
population in each village are given in this table.
All the villages of the district have Scheduled Caste population and their proportion to the total
rural population lies between 0 and 40. The most of the villages, forming more than 50 per cent, have
within them 11 to 20 per cent SC population. These villages cover 64.25 per cent of the rural SC population.
In twenty six villages, the proportion of SC is between 5 and 10 covering 23.03 per cent of the total rural SC
population.

Table 16: Proportion of scheduled tribes population to total population in villages, 2011
Percentage range of scheduled Number of villages Percentage Scheduled tribes Percentage
tribes population to total population
population
1 2 3 4 5
NIL 10 10.20 0 0.00
Less t han 5 88 89.80 5859 100.00
5 - 10 0 0.00 0 0.00
11 - 20 0 0.00 0 0.00
21 - 30 0 0.00 0 0.00
31 - 40 0 0.00 0 0.00
41 - 50 0 0.00 0 0.00
51 - 75 0 0.00 0 0.00
76 and above 0 0.00 0 0.00
Dist rict : T hrissur(594) 98 100.00 5859 100.00

95
The total number of villages and their percentage and the total rural ST population and their
percentage for eight specified percentage ranges based on the proportion of total rural ST population to
the total rural population in each village are shown here.
More than 10 per cent of the villages in the district have no ST population. All the remaining 88
villages have proportion of ST less than 5 per cent. These villages cover 100 per cent of the rural Scheduled
Tribe population.
Table 17: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes population in towns, 2011

Sr.No. Name of town Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of


Population scheduled scheduled scheduled castes scheduled tribes
castes tribes population to total population to
population population population total population

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 54071 6419 77 11.87 0.14
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) 13236 2444 7 18.46 0.05
3 627757-Cherut huruthi (CT ) 13828 1376 6 9.95 0.04
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) 12399 1196 8 9.65 0.06
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) 8355 948 9 11.35 0.11
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) 12912 2486 21 19.25 0.16
7 627761-Kat takampal (CT ) 11836 2178 21 18.4 0.18
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) 14067 1690 13 12.01 0.09
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) 13656 1698 10 12.43 0.07
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) 5994 1363 2 22.74 0.03
11 627765-Kott appuram (CT ) 6727 849 2 12.62 0.03
12 627766-Chitt anda (CT ) 5936 896 1 15.09 0.02
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) 7553 1270 3 16.81 0.04
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) 7528 412 1 5.47 0.01
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) 9584 1569 6 16.37 0.06
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) 15674 1563 8 9.97 0.05
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) 6363 971 4 15.26 0.06
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) 6727 906 4 13.47 0.06
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) 11060 964 20 8.72 0.18
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) 5847 980 1 16.76 0.02
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) 6503 1113 0 17.12 0
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) 12502 1398 15 11.18 0.12
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) 9789 798 18 8.15 0.18
24 627778-Velur (CT ) 13928 1507 16 10.82 0.11
25 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) 7672 1110 18 14.47 0.23
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) 5577 602 6 10.79 0.11
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) 6120 522 13 8.53 0.21
28 627782-Eranellur (CT ) 10145 957 6 9.43 0.06
29 627783-Alur (CT ) 9807 809 29 8.25 0.3
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) 14645 1025 6 7 0.04
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) 20510 438 52 2.14 0.25
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) 39098 825 58 2.11 0.15

96
Table 17: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes population in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of
Population scheduled scheduled scheduled castes scheduled tribes
castes tribes population to total population to
population population population total population
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) 19147 1303 28 6.81 0.15
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) 14221 788 22 5.54 0.15
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) 15811 444 9 2.81 0.06
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) 19387 1054 29 5.44 0.15
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) 17335 1287 37 7.42 0.21
38 627797-Vylat hur (CT ) 10298 747 14 7.25 0.14
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) 9366 484 11 5.17 0.12
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) 12343 641 13 5.19 0.11
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) 12072 664 9 5.5 0.07
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) 14064 1217 30 8.65 0.21
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) 9127 139 32 1.52 0.35
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) 6594 153 13 2.32 0.2
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) 14390 562 14 3.91 0.1
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) 12819 817 16 6.37 0.12
47 627806-Pavaratt y (CT ) 12299 521 11 4.24 0.09
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) 8377 248 10 2.96 0.12
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) 12165 1408 4 11.57 0.03
50 627809-Venkit angu (CT ) 11335 1303 36 11.5 0.32
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) 30657 802 10 2.62 0.03
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) 25507 1247 30 4.89 0.12
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 315957 24210 605 7.66 0.19
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) 20339 1908 33 9.38 0.16
55 627826-T hangalur (CT ) 4587 931 11 20.3 0.24
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) 7879 1176 7 14.93 0.09
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) 10860 962 7 8.86 0.06
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) 7179 607 11 8.46 0.15
59 627830-T holur (CT ) 7454 1102 3 14.78 0.04
60 627831-Edakkalathur (CT ) 8039 1094 6 13.61 0.07
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) 13260 1065 10 8.03 0.08
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) 5441 487 15 8.95 0.28
63 627834-Pot tore (CT ) 7848 777 4 9.9 0.05
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) 11540 674 39 5.84 0.34
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) 4081 245 1 6 0.02
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT) 6167 367 5 5.95 0.08
67 627838-Kut toor (CT ) 12179 885 16 7.27 0.13
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) 8609 981 17 11.4 0.2
69 627840-Puranatt ukara (CT ) 10655 1387 48 13.02 0.45
70 627841-Chitt ilappilly (CT ) 6988 614 10 8.79 0.14
71 627842-Adat (CT ) 5721 997 2 17.43 0.03

97
Table 17: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes population in towns, 2011 (Contd..)

Sr.No. Name of town Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of


Population scheduled scheduled scheduled castes scheduled tribes
castes tribes population to total population to
population population population total population
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) 9918 717 67 7.23 0.68
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) 7344 894 22 12.17 0.3
74 627845-Nadathara (CT ) 11969 683 19 5.71 0.16
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) 9093 1202 14 13.22 0.15
76 627847-Karamuck (CT ) 15129 1706 19 11.28 0.13
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) 17757 2359 6 13.28 0.03
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) 4447 532 0 11.96 0
79 627850-Velut hur (CT ) 11602 1402 11 12.08 0.09
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) 7150 620 2 8.67 0.03
81 627852-Marathakkara (CT ) 15817 1487 34 9.4 0.21
82 627853-Put hur (CT ) 17430 1892 108 10.85 0.62
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) 13983 1036 26 7.41 0.19
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) 7724 442 5 5.72 0.06
85 627856-Venginissery (CT) 5533 609 13 11.01 0.23
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) 7655 951 2 12.42 0.03
87 627858-Anthicad (CT ) 9826 1235 19 12.57 0.19
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) 11623 1129 36 9.71 0.31
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) 9585 1318 10 13.75 0.1
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) 4635 687 9 14.82 0.19
91 627862-Cherpu (CT) 7864 1227 1 15.6 0.01
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) 9187 1488 28 16.2 0.3
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) 16086 2035 116 12.65 0.72
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) 12970 1344 10 10.36 0.08
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) 13149 1857 13 14.12 0.1
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) 14329 2008 24 14.01 0.17
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) 5275 969 3 18.37 0.06
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) 9743 1543 11 15.84 0.11
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) 60190 4698 84 7.81 0.14
100 627873-Edathiruthy (CT ) 12921 2748 56 21.27 0.43
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) 16404 2108 25 12.85 0.15
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) 35626 3414 82 9.58 0.23
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) 21012 2714 75 12.92 0.36
104 627877-Pappinivattom (CT ) 15336 2005 41 13.07 0.27
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) 15630 1946 10 12.45 0.06
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) 20363 1294 68 6.35 0.33
107 627880-Ala (CT ) 10493 1429 8 13.62 0.08
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) 7718 622 4 8.06 0.05
109 627882-Methala (CT ) 37505 2338 117 6.23 0.31
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) 10478 1266 21 12.08 0.2

98
Table 17: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes population in towns, 2011 (Contd..)

Sr.No. Name of town Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of


Population scheduled scheduled scheduled castes scheduled tribes
castes tribes population to total population to
population population population total population
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
111 627884-Madathumpady (CT ) 4294 568 15 13.23 0.35
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) 28741 2834 46 9.86 0.16
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) 49525 3401 77 6.87 0.16
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) 13093 805 25 6.15 0.19
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) 18067 1938 37 10.73 0.2
116 627921-Amballur (CT ) 29341 2168 96 7.39 0.33
117 627922-Put hukkad (CT ) 12615 1705 0 13.52 0
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) 11893 1813 7 15.24 0.06
119 627924-Kat tur (CT ) 18017 2675 22 14.85 0.12
120 627925-Porathissery (CT) 16768 2256 17 13.45 0.1
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) 14155 1620 22 11.44 0.16
122 627927-Kallett umkara (CT ) 7097 1038 26 14.63 0.37
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) 12656 2146 12 16.96 0.09
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) 7364 1171 2 15.9 0.03
125 627930-Edathirinji (CT ) 9849 937 30 9.51 0.3
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) 8146 1850 46 22.71 0.56
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) 10407 1077 14 10.35 0.13
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) 11141 2088 3 18.74 0.03
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) 8823 1417 20 16.06 0.23
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) 15258 1629 28 10.68 0.18
131 627936-Muringur 4981 275 3 5.52 0.06
Vadakkummuri (CT )
132 627937-Koratt y (CT ) 17618 1925 39 10.93 0.22
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri 25259 2865 43 11.34 0.17
(CT )
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) 11573 1255 16 10.84 0.14
135 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri 17480 1521 17 8.7 0.1
(CT )
District (Urban) : 594-T hrissur 2096406 202511 3571 9.66 0.17

The total urban population, the total SC/ST urban population and the percentage of SC/ST urban
population to the total urban population for the district urban is given.
The urban proportion of Scheduled Caste is 9.66 and Scheduled Tribe is 0.17.
In seventy four towns, the proportion of SC is 10 per cent or above. Nelluwaya (CT) is reported
to have the highest proportion of SC (22.74 per cent). The lowest proportion of SC is observed in Paluvai
(CT) (1.52 per cent). Among the statutory towns, the proportion of Scheduled Caste is the highest in
Kunnamkulam (M) (11.87 per cent) and the lowest in Chavakkad (M) (2.11 per cent).
Three towns viz. Porkulam (CT), Eravu (CT) and Puthukkad (CT) have no Scheduled Tribe
population. In other towns, they form a negligible proportion. Four towns having more than hundred ST
population are Thrissur M.Corp. (605 persons), Puthur (CT) (108 persons), Chevvoor (CT) (116 persons)
and Methala (CT) (117 persons).

99
Table 18: Sex ratio among scheduled castes and scheduled tribes (rural) in CD Blocks, 2011
Sr.No. Name of C.D.block Scheduled castes sex ratio Scheduled tribes sex ratio
1 2 3 4
1 0056-Chowwannur 1122 1400

2 0057-Wadakkanchery 1056 1130

3 0058-Pazhayannur 1066 1081

4 0059-Chavakkad 928 1667

5 0060-T alikkulam 1135 1250

6 0061-Mullassery 1084 815

7 0062-Puzhakkal 1085 1077

8 0063-Ollukkara 1084 1105

9 0064-Ant hicad 1134 1250

10 0065-Cherpu 1062 714

11 0066-Mat hilakam 1038 931

12 0067-Kodungallur 1066 1545

13 0068-Mala 1101 1027

14 0069-Parakkadavu (Part ) 0 0

15 0070-Irinjalakuda 1074 1130

16 0071-Kodakara 1081 1143

17 0072-Vellangallur 1076 1065

18 0073-Chalakudy (Part) 1097 1244


T otal 1079 1156

The sex-ratio of the Scheduled Caste and the Scheduled Tribe for the rural areas of the district and
18 CD blocks are shown here.
The rural sex-ratio of Scheduled Caste is 1079 and that of Scheduled Tribe is 1156. The Scheduled
Tribes have a higher rural sex-ratio than the Scheduled Castes.
Among the CD blocks, four CD blocks viz. Chowwannur (1122), Talikkulam (1135), Anthicad (1134)
and Mala (1101) are having a rural Scheduled Caste sex-ratio of above 1100. All the other CD blocks have
Scheduled Caste rural sex-ratio less than 1100. Nine CD Blocks viz., Chowwannur, Talikkulam, Mullassery,
Puzhakkal, Ollukkara, Anthicad, Mala, Kodakara and Chalakudy (Part) CD blocks have Scheduled Caste
rural sex-ratio higher than the corresponding average for district rural.
Among the CD blocks, Mullassery (815), Cherpu (714) and Mathilakam (931) CD blocks have Scheduled
Tribe rural sex-ratio less than 1000. Chavakkad (1667) CD Block has the highest Scheduled Tribe rural sex-
ratio and the lowest is in Cherpu (714) CD Block.

100
Table 19: Sex rati o am ong sche dule d caste s and schedule d tri be s i n towns, 2011

Sr.No. Name of town Scheduled cast es sex ratio Scheduled t ribes sex ratio

1 2 3 4

1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 1081 1333


2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) 1136 2500

3 627757-Cheruthuruthi (CT ) 1042 1000

4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) 1073 600


5 627759-Desamangalam (CT) 1000 800

6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) 1013 1100

7 627761-Kat takampal (CT ) 1176 1100


8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) 1041 1600

9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) 1051 667

10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) 1084 1000


11 627765-Kot tappuram (CT ) 1128 0

12 627766-Chit tanda (CT ) 1060 0

13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) 1149 500


14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) 1251 0

15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) 1019 5000

16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) 1006 1667


17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) 1084 1000

18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) 1045 3000


19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) 913 1500

20 627774-Akathiyoor (CT ) 1046 0

21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) 1046 0


22 627776-Choondal (CT) 1112 875

23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) 1020 636

24 627778-Velur (CT ) 1056 455


25 627779-Mundat hikode (CT ) 1083 1571

26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) 1127 1000

27 627781-Minalur (CT ) 1131 857


28 627782-Eranellur (CT ) 1058 500

29 627783-Alur (CT ) 1038 4800

30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) 1100 2000


31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) 1246 677

32 803279-Chavakkad (M) 1105 1148

33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) 1039 2111

101
Table 19: Sex rati o among sche dule d caste s and schedul ed tri bes i n towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr.No. Name of town Scheduled cast es sex ratio Scheduled t ribes sex ratio
1 2 3 4
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) 1005 1444
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) 1104 2000
36 627795-Punnayur (CT) 1004 933
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) 1062 1643
38 627797-Vylat hur (CT ) 1008 273
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) 1000 1750
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) 1022 1167
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) 1037 2000
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) 1135 1500
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) 1044 1000
44 627803-T haikkad (CT) 1040 2250
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) 1044 556
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) 1090 1286
47 627806-Pavarat ty (CT ) 1092 2667
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) 1175 1000
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) 1065 1000
50 627809-Venkitangu (CT ) 1095 2600
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) 1056 1000
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) 1089 765
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 1085 1010
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) 1101 833
55 627826-T hangalur (CT ) 1073 1750
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) 1038 2500
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) 1064 2500
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) 1037 1200
59 627830-T holur (CT ) 1178 2000
60 627831-Edakkalathur (CT ) 1088 500
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) 1029 4000
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) 964 0
63 627834-Pot tore (CT ) 1056 1000
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) 1030 950
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) 870 0
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT ) 995 250
67 627838-Kut toor (CT ) 1097 778
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) 1096 4667
69 627840-Puranat tukara (CT ) 1114 920
70 627841-Chit tilappilly (CT ) 1026 1000
71 627842-Adat (CT ) 1126 0
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) 1140 811
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) 1084 1444
74 627845-Nadat hara (CT ) 1168 1375
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) 1062 556

102
Table 19: Sex rati o among sche dule d caste s and schedul ed tri bes i n towns, 2011 (Contd..)

Sr.No. Name of town Scheduled cast es sex ratio Scheduled t ribes sex ratio
1 2 3 4
76 627847-Karamuck (CT ) 1096 1714
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) 1089 2000
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) 985 0
79 627850-Veluthur (CT ) 1068 833
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) 1095 1000
81 627852-Marat hakkara (CT ) 1037 889
82 627853-Puthur (CT ) 1011 1077
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) 1072 857
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) 991 1500
85 627856-Venginissery (CT ) 1093 2250
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) 1109 0
87 627858-Ant hicad (CT ) 1062 900
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) 1072 1250
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT) 1031 667
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) 1045 800
91 627862-Cherpu (CT ) 1045 0
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) 1075 750
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) 1167 15571
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) 1021 1500
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) 984 1600
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) 1030 1400
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) 1044 2000
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) 1028 1750
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) 1055 1154
100 627873-Edathirut hy (CT ) 1082 1947
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) 1011 1273
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) 1041 822
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) 1099 1344
104 627877-Pappinivat tom (CT ) 1025 1050
105 627878-Panangad (CT) 1029 1500
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) 1153 1061
107 627880-Ala (CT ) 1036 1667
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) 1123 3000
109 627882-Met hala (CT ) 1031 1053
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) 1209 1625
111 627884-Madathumpady (CT ) 965 1143
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) 1090 1300
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) 1088 925
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) 1012 1500
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) 1064 609
116 627921-Amballur (CT ) 1034 1133
117 627922-Puthukkad (CT ) 1100 0

103
Tabl e 19: Sex rati o among sche dule d caste s and schedul ed tri bes i n towns, 2011 (Contd..)

Sr.No. Name of town Scheduled cast es sex ratio Scheduled t ribes sex ratio
1 2 3 4
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) 956 750
119 627924-Kat tur (CT ) 1075 1444
120 627925-Porat hissery (CT ) 1057 700
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) 1066 6333
122 627927-Kallet tumkara (CT ) 1039 857
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) 1096 1400
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) 1095 1000
125 627930-Edathirinji (CT ) 1082 1000
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) 1086 1091
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) 1028 750
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) 1133 2000
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) 1066 1857
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) 1019 1333
131 627936-Muringur Vadakkummuri (CT ) 1007 2000
132 627937-Korat ty (CT ) 1104 857
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri (CT ) 1067 955
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) 1124 1667
135 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri (CT ) 1139 1125
District (Urban): 594-T hrissur 1069 1172

The sex-ratio of the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes are given for the district urban, and
the towns.
The urban Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes sex-ratio of the district are 1069 and 1172
respectively. The Scheduled Tribe sex-ratio (1172) is higher than the total sex-ratio of the district (1108).
Among the towns, Kurichikkara CT (870) is reported to have the lowest as well as negative Scheduled
Caste sex-ratio and the highest is in Chelakkara (CT) (1251). Twenty eight towns have the Scheduled Caste
sex-ratio of above 1100. In sixty one towns, the Scheduled Caste sex-ratio is above the corresponding
district average.
Among the towns, Porkulam (CT), Eravu (CT) and Puthukkad (CT) have no Scheduled Tribe
population. In fifty towns, the Scheduled Tribe sex-ratio are reported less than 1000.
Table 20: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in Taluk, 2011
Sr. Name of T aluk T otal/ Number of literates and illit erat es Literacy rate Gap in
No. Rural/ Number of lit erat es Number of illit erat es male-
Urban female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literac
y rat e
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 05652-T alappilly T otal 526409 254223 272186 105677 46827 58850 93.07 95.28 91.1 4.18
Rural 239047 117015 122032 52998 22967 30031 91.53 94.3 89.03 5.27
Urban 287362 137208 150154 52679 23860 28819 94.39 96.13 92.86 3.27
2 05653-Chavakkad T otal 397676 182285 215391 73222 33579 39643 95.06 96.63 93.76 2.87
Rural 104864 48014 56850 19112 8700 10412 94.45 96.15 93.07 3.08
Urban 292812 134271 158541 54110 24879 29231 95.27 96.81 94.01 2.8

104
Table 20: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in Taluk, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of T aluk T ot al/ Number of literat es and illiterat es Literacy rate Gap in
No. Rural/ Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
Urban female
literac
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females y rat e
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
3 05654-T hrissur T ot al 767438 372812 394626 107177 48447 58730 96.14 97.52 94.88 2.64
Rural 96979 47843 49136 16030 6826 9204 94.08 96.3 92.02 4.28
Urban 670459 324969 345490 91147 41621 49526 96.45 97.7 95.3 2.4
4 05655-Kodungallur T ot al 267214 125904 141310 45024 20094 24930 95.3 97.08 93.77 3.31
Rural 37047 17596 19451 7221 3138 4083 94.12 96.45 92.1 4.35
Urban 230167 108308 121859 37803 16956 20847 95.49 97.18 94.04 3.14
5 05656-Mukundapuram T ot al 719811 347037 372774 111552 49555 61997 95.38 97.09 93.85 3.24
Rural 387534 188152 199382 63962 28052 35910 94.71 96.63 92.96 3.67
Urban 332277 158885 173392 47590 21503 26087 96.18 97.64 94.89 2.75
Dist rict : T hrissur(594) T ot al 2678548 1282261 1396287 442652 198502 244150 95.08 96.78 93.56 3.22
Rural 865471 418620 446851 159323 69683 89640 93.68 95.87 91.73 4.14
Urban 1813077 863641 949436 283329 128819 154510 95.76 97.23 94.45 2.78

The number of literates and illiterates and the percentage of literates by sex and the gap in male-
female literacy rate are given for the district and the taluks with rural-urban break-up.
In the district, the percentage of literates is 95.08 with a break-up of 93.68 per cent for rural and
95.76 per cent for urban. The urban literacy rate is higher than the rural literacy rate. Similarly the male
literacy rate is also higher than the female literacy rate. In the rural and urban area both male and female
literacy rates are above 90 per cent.
All taluks have the literacy rate above 90 per cent and three taluks viz., Thrissur (96.14 per cent),
Kodungallur (95.3 per cent) and Mukundapuram (95.38 per cent) taluks are higher than the corresponding
district average (95.08 per cent). In the case of male and female literacy rate, all the taluks have literacy
rate above 90 per cent. However only three taluks viz. Thrissur, Kodungallur and Mukundapuram have male
literacy rate above the corresponding district average (96.78 per cent). In female literacy rate, Talappilly
taluk has literacy rate below the corresponding district average (93.56 per cent).
The gap in male-female literacy rate is 3.22 per cent. This gap is higher in rural area as compared to
urban area. In Talappilly taluk, the gap in male-female literacy rate is above 4 per cent. Among the taluks,
Chavakkad and Thrissur taluks have gap in male-female literacy rate lower than the corresponding district
average 3.22.
Table 21: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in CD Blocks (rural), 2011
Sr. Name of CD Block Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females lit eracy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 0056-Chowwannur 25932 12158 13774 4643 2168 2475 95.65 96.96 94.53 2.43
2 0057-Wadakkanchery 102989 50454 52535 22568 9840 12728 91.84 94.5 89.42 5.08
3 0058-Pazhayannur 110126 54403 55723 25787 10959 14828 90.33 93.53 87.41 6.12
4 0059-Chavakkad 18264 8431 9833 4665 2086 2579 91.53 94.05 89.47 4.58

105
Table 21: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in CD Blocks (rural), 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of CD Block Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterat es male-
female
lit eracy
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
5 0060-T alikkulam 67304 30689 36615 10449 4824 5625 95.58 96.92 94.49 2.43
6 0061-Mullassery 19296 8894 10402 3998 1790 2208 93.44 95.56 91.7 3.86
7 0062-Puzhakkal 6606 3207 3399 907 428 479 96.52 97.83 95.32 2.51
8 0063-Ollukkara 69046 34614 34432 11925 5045 6880 93.49 95.88 91.2 4.68
9 0064-Ant hicad 12915 5942 6973 1897 795 1102 95.77 97.52 94.32 3.2
10 0065-Cherpu 8412 4080 4332 1301 558 743 94.61 96.98 92.49 4.49
11 0066-Mat hilakam 20622 9575 11047 3711 1624 2087 94.79 96.89 93.04 3.85
12 0067-Kodungallur 16425 8021 8404 3510 1514 1996 93.29 95.93 90.9 5.03
13 0068-Mala 79399 38127 41272 12384 5612 6772 95.35 96.77 94.08 2.69
14 0069-Parakkadavu (Part ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
15 0070-Irinjalakuda 45005 21475 23530 6626 2957 3669 95.5 97.08 94.1 2.98
16 0071-Kodakara 128583 63108 65475 21958 9460 12498 94.46 96.7 92.4 4.3
17 0072-Vellangallur 46203 21607 24596 7682 3432 4250 95.19 96.74 93.87 2.87
18 0073-Chalakudy (Part) 88344 43835 44509 15312 6591 8721 93.84 96.12 91.7 4.42
T otal 865471 418620 446851 159323 69683 89640 93.68 95.87 91.73 4.14

The number of literates and illiterates and the percentage of literates by sex and the gap in male-
female literacy rate are given for the rural areas of the district and the CD blocks.
The rural literacy rate of the district is 93.68 per cent with a break-up of 95.87 per cent for males and
91.7 per cent for females. The male rural literacy rate is higher than female rural literacy rate in the district.
All CD blocks, the rural literacy rate is above 90 per cent. In six CD blocks viz. Wadakkanchery (91.84
per cent), Pazhayannur (90.33 per cent), Chavakkad (91.53 per cent), Mullassery (93.44 per cent), Ollukkara
(93.49 per cent) and Kodungallur (93.29 per cent), the rural literacy rate is below the corresponding district
average (93.68 per cent). Puzhakkal CD Block has the highest literacy rate (96.52 per cent) and Pazhayannur
CD Block has the lowest (90.33 per cent) among all the CD Blocks. As regards the male rural literacy rate, in
all the CD blocks this rate is above 90 per cent. It is as high as 97.83 per cent in Puzhakkal CD block and as low
as 93.53 per cent in Pazhayannur CD block. As regards the female rural literacy rate, it is below 90 per cent
in Wadakkanchery (89.4 per cent), Pahzayannur (87.4 per cent) and Chavakkad (89.5 per cent) CD blocks.
The gap in male-female rural literacy rate in the district is 4.14 per cent. In Pazhayannur CD block,
with the lowest male and female rural literacy rates among the CD blocks, the gap in male-female rural
literacy rate is 6.12 per cent.
Table 22: Distribution of villages by literacy rate range, 2011
Range of literacy rate for Number of inhabited Percentage distribution of Population Percentage distribution
villages villages villages of population
1 2 3 4 5
0 0 0.00 0 0.00
1 - 10 0 0.00 0 0.00
11 - 20 0 0.00 0 0.00
21 - 30 0 0.00 0 0.00

106
Table 22: Distribution of villages by literacy rate range, 2011 (Contd..)
Range of literacy rate for Number of inhabited Percentage distribution of Population Percentage distribution
villages villages villages of population
1 2 3 4 5
31 - 40 0 0.00 0 0.00
41 - 50 0 0.00 0 0.00
51 - 60 0 0.00 0 0.00
61 - 70 0 0.00 0 0.00
71 - 80 0 0.00 0 0.00
81 - 90 14 14.29 98986 9.66
91 - 99 84 85.71 925808 90.34
100 0 0.00 0 0.00
Dist rict : T hrissur(594) 98 100.00 1024794 100.00
Literacy rate for District: 93.68

All the villages of the district are distributed in twelve literacy ranges based on the literacy rate of
the villages. For each literacy range, the number and the percentage of villages, the related rural population
and the percentage of rural population are given. For the district rural, the total number of villages and the
total rural population are also shown.
The literacy rate for the district rural is 93.68 per cent. In the district none of the villages have
literacy rate below 80 per cent. In 84 villages, forming 85.71 per cent of the villages and covering 90.34 per
cent of the rural population, the rural literacy rate is above 90 per cent. In 14 villages, forming 14.29 per
cent of the villages and covering 9.66 per cent of the rural population, the literacy rate lies between 81 and
90 per cent.
Table 23: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011
Sr. Name of town Number of literates and illiterates Gap inLiteracy rate
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 47473 22233 25240 6598 3159 3439 96.84 97.71 96.08 1.63
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) 10489 5362 5127 2747 1093 1654 86.92 91.6 82.51 9.09
3 627757-Cherut hurut hi (CT ) 11330 5542 5788 2498 1046 1452 92.96 95.65 90.52 5.13
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) 9701 4781 4920 2698 1148 1550 89.95 93.51 86.74 6.77
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) 6391 3140 3251 1964 886 1078 87.86 91.07 84.97 6.1
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) 11066 5216 5850 1846 875 971 95.81 97.2 94.6 2.6
7 627761-Katt akampal (CT ) 10221 4694 5527 1615 725 890 97.09 98.51 95.92 2.59
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) 12096 5721 6375 1971 925 1046 96.34 97.4 95.42 1.98
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) 11434 5461 5973 2222 1037 1185 95.51 97.03 94.17 2.86
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT) 5090 2457 2633 904 392 512 93.1 95.27 91.17 4.1
11 627765-Kott appuram (CT ) 5752 2816 2936 975 442 533 94.26 96.37 92.33 4.04
12 627766-Chit tanda (CT ) 4837 2360 2477 1099 461 638 91.42 94.48 88.69 5.79
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) 6198 3049 3149 1355 578 777 91.19 94.4 88.28 6.12
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) 6293 2980 3313 1235 555 680 93.62 96.01 91.57 4.44

107
Table 23: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) 8064 3881 4183 1520 649 871 93.89 96.28 91.77 4.51
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) 13197 6457 6740 2477 1090 1387 93.34 95.76 91.14 4.62
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) 5310 2564 2746 1053 501 552 93.8 95.14 92.58 2.56
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) 5609 2612 2997 1118 485 633 94.25 96.24 92.59 3.65
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) 9348 4506 4842 1712 787 925 95.45 97.05 94 3.05
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) 5086 2398 2688 761 365 396 95.58 96.23 95.02 1.21
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) 5630 2693 2937 873 430 443 94.85 96.01 93.8 2.21
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) 10738 5067 5671 1764 799 965 95.53 97.18 94.09 3.09
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) 8082 3837 4245 1707 771 936 94.86 96.67 93.28 3.39
24 627778-Velur (CT ) 12084 5762 6322 1844 913 931 96.56 97.46 95.74 1.72
25 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) 6193 2997 3196 1479 703 776 89.18 89.89 88.53 1.36
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) 4572 2161 2411 1005 485 520 90.37 90.38 90.37 0.01
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) 5283 2587 2696 837 362 475 95.46 97.07 93.97 3.1
28 627782-Eranellur (CT ) 8652 4053 4599 1493 682 811 96.12 97.36 95.06 2.3
29 627783-Alur (CT ) 8493 4009 4484 1314 601 713 96.04 97.5 94.78 2.72
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) 12650 5812 6838 1995 915 1080 96.76 98.16 95.6 2.56
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) 17953 8384 9569 2557 1230 1327 96.36 97.01 95.79 1.22
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) 32454 14706 17748 6644 3056 3588 94.36 95.95 93.08 2.87
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) 15499 7112 8387 3648 1622 2026 92.81 95.17 90.91 4.26
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT) 11647 5271 6376 2574 1169 1405 93.59 95.47 92.09 3.38
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) 13366 5991 7375 2445 1136 1309 96.21 97.65 95.06 2.59
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) 15856 7464 8392 3531 1644 1887 94.38 96.33 92.7 3.63
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) 13979 6616 7363 3356 1477 1879 92.6 95.28 90.32 4.96
38 627797-Vylathur (CT ) 8779 4048 4731 1519 725 794 96.61 97.52 95.85 1.67
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) 7974 3608 4366 1392 634 758 96.56 98.12 95.31 2.81
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) 10689 4974 5715 1654 794 860 96.84 97.55 96.23 1.32
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) 10517 4875 5642 1555 713 842 96.93 98.13 95.92 2.21
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) 11662 5161 6501 2402 1082 1320 95.61 97.45 94.19 3.26
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) 7732 3501 4231 1395 682 713 95.94 97.39 94.78 2.61
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) 5668 2608 3060 926 447 479 97.02 97.82 96.35 1.47
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) 12483 5835 6648 1907 912 995 96.87 97.85 96.03 1.82
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) 11103 5180 5923 1716 789 927 96.43 97.87 95.21 2.66
47 627806-Pavarat ty (CT ) 10496 4752 5744 1803 818 985 96.15 97.7 94.91 2.79
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) 7041 3281 3760 1336 620 716 96.11 97.65 94.81 2.84
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) 10508 4816 5692 1657 735 922 95.87 97.61 94.44 3.17
50 627809-Venkit angu (CT ) 9753 4497 5256 1582 707 875 95.85 97.7 94.33 3.37
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) 26316 11953 14363 4341 2013 2328 95.7 96.95 94.69 2.26
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) 21337 9638 11699 4170 1874 2296 93.69 95.29 92.42 2.87

108
Table 23: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 281061 136148 144913 34896 16148 18748 97.06 98.12 96.09 2.03
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) 17656 8684 8972 2683 1226 1457 95.24 96.68 93.88 2.8
55 627826-T hangalur (CT) 3936 1901 2035 651 347 304 93.8 93.1 94.48 -1.38
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) 6807 3342 3465 1072 473 599 94.71 96.34 93.2 3.14
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) 9463 4577 4886 1397 655 742 96.55 97.53 95.65 1.88
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) 6212 3061 3151 967 453 514 95.76 97.21 94.4 2.81
59 627830-T holur (CT ) 6487 3098 3389 967 445 522 96.09 97.51 94.82 2.69
60 627831-Edakkalat hur (CT ) 6887 3291 3596 1152 508 644 95.39 97.05 93.91 3.14
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) 11772 5805 5967 1488 652 836 96.71 97.94 95.53 2.41
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) 4760 2407 2353 681 329 352 95.33 96.71 93.97 2.74
63 627834-Pott ore (CT ) 6981 3459 3522 867 378 489 96.85 98.49 95.29 3.2
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) 10265 5010 5255 1275 593 682 96.55 97.15 95.98 1.17
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) 3579 1764 1815 502 229 273 95.72 97.4 94.14 3.26
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT ) 5417 2676 2741 750 321 429 95.79 97.49 94.19 3.3
67 627838-Kutt oor (CT ) 10780 5344 5436 1399 613 786 97.12 98.45 95.84 2.61
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) 7622 3625 3997 987 453 534 96.04 97.24 94.99 2.25
69 627840-Puranat tukara (CT ) 9473 4561 4912 1182 531 651 96.54 98 95.21 2.79
70 627841-Chit tilappilly (CT ) 6083 2932 3151 905 408 497 96.14 97.57 94.85 2.72
71 627842-Adat (CT) 5057 2563 2494 664 299 365 95.72 97.12 94.33 2.79
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) 8505 4258 4247 1413 610 803 94.68 96.73 92.71 4.02
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) 6332 3241 3091 1012 425 587 94.61 96.92 92.3 4.62
74 627845-Nadathara (CT) 10338 5124 5214 1631 724 907 95.04 96.94 93.26 3.68
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) 7953 3899 4054 1140 523 617 96.13 97.6 94.76 2.84
76 627847-Karamuck (CT) 13349 6244 7105 1780 811 969 97.23 98.24 96.37 1.87
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) 15600 7480 8120 2157 962 1195 96.68 97.97 95.52 2.45
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) 3935 1871 2064 512 218 294 97.23 98.47 96.13 2.34
79 627850-Veluthur (CT ) 10122 4971 5151 1480 665 815 96.25 97.49 95.09 2.4
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) 6272 3056 3216 878 428 450 97.71 98.71 96.78 1.93
81 627852-Marat hakkara (CT ) 13774 6910 6864 2043 942 1101 95.73 97.09 94.4 2.69
82 627853-Puthur (CT ) 14859 7491 7368 2571 1114 1457 93.94 96.38 91.57 4.81
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) 12322 6073 6249 1661 760 901 97.38 98.48 96.35 2.13
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) 6834 3332 3502 890 409 481 96.77 98.09 95.55 2.54
85 627856-Venginissery (CT ) 4843 2341 2502 690 315 375 96.13 97.5 94.88 2.62
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) 6731 3288 3443 924 419 505 96.24 97.54 95.03 2.51
87 627858-Anthicad (CT ) 8694 4098 4596 1132 539 593 96.84 97.62 96.15 1.47
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) 10233 4685 5548 1390 654 736 96.88 98.26 95.74 2.52
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) 8446 3739 4707 1139 541 598 97.08 98.03 96.34 1.69
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) 4085 1887 2198 550 268 282 96.62 97.77 95.65 2.12

109
Table 23: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
91 627862-Cherpu (CT ) 6583 3107 3476 1281 584 697 93.9 95.78 92.28 3.5
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) 7874 3894 3980 1313 604 709 95 96.51 93.58 2.93
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) 14306 6908 7398 1780 783 997 96.74 97.86 95.72 2.14
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) 11359 5637 5722 1611 719 892 95.86 97.63 94.17 3.46
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) 11358 5483 5875 1791 746 1045 94.49 96.63 92.58 4.05
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) 12375 5783 6592 1954 909 1045 95.57 96.59 94.69 1.9
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) 4501 2020 2481 774 359 415 95.81 97.54 94.44 3.1
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT) 8578 3901 4677 1165 529 636 96.84 98.21 95.72 2.49
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) 51760 24791 26969 8430 3661 4769 95.09 97.18 93.25 3.93
100 627873-Edat hiruthy (CT ) 11118 4971 6147 1803 811 992 96.32 97.85 95.11 2.74
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) 13996 6282 7714 2408 1140 1268 95.82 97.02 94.86 2.16
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) 29969 13745 16224 5657 2545 3112 94.98 96.69 93.58 3.11
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) 18290 8391 9899 2722 1275 1447 96.41 97.14 95.79 1.35
104 627877-Pappinivatt om (CT ) 13089 5908 7181 2247 1001 1246 95.85 97.52 94.52 3
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) 13288 6293 6995 2342 1099 1243 94.72 96.22 93.42 2.8
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) 17214 8135 9079 3149 1375 1774 94.27 96.51 92.34 4.17
107 627880-Ala (CT ) 8914 4281 4633 1579 681 898 94.66 97.23 92.4 4.83
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) 6613 3321 3292 1105 469 636 94.53 97.13 92.03 5.1
109 627882-Met hala (CT ) 32950 15868 17082 4555 2105 2450 96.56 97.74 95.49 2.25
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) 9240 4464 4776 1238 539 699 96.85 98.28 95.54 2.74
111 627884-Madat humpady (CT ) 3726 1858 1868 568 255 313 95.39 97.38 93.49 3.89
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) 25861 12060 13801 2880 1365 1515 97.77 98.43 97.2 1.23
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) 43615 20954 22661 5910 2790 3120 97.03 98.09 96.07 2.02
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) 11358 5675 5683 1735 790 945 95.41 97.11 93.78 3.33
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) 15763 7892 7871 2304 999 1305 95.29 97.43 93.24 4.19
116 627921-Amballur (CT ) 25825 12729 13096 3516 1579 1937 96.31 97.7 94.99 2.71
117 627922-Puthukkad (CT ) 11048 5361 5687 1567 733 834 95.7 96.98 94.52 2.46
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) 10478 5076 5402 1415 627 788 96.2 97.94 94.62 3.32
119 627924-Katt ur (CT ) 15569 7244 8325 2448 1071 1377 95.75 97.58 94.22 3.36
120 627925-Porathissery (CT ) 14603 6893 7710 2165 936 1229 95.78 97.58 94.23 3.35
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) 12467 5825 6642 1688 797 891 96.89 97.93 96 1.93
122 627927-Kallet tumkara (CT ) 6113 2930 3183 984 472 512 95.88 97.02 94.85 2.17
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) 11074 5241 5833 1582 682 900 96.2 97.78 94.83 2.95
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) 6389 2940 3449 975 415 560 95.6 97.8 93.8 4
125 627930-Edat hirinji (CT ) 8632 4008 4624 1217 560 657 96.75 98.16 95.56 2.6
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) 7141 3262 3879 1005 435 570 95.71 96.91 94.73 2.18
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) 8978 4218 4760 1429 644 785 95.71 97.28 94.37 2.91
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) 9766 4445 5321 1375 641 734 96.9 98.12 95.91 2.21

110
Table 23: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Number of literates and illiterates Gap in Literacy rate
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females female
literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) 7737 3612 4125 1086 503 583 96.71 97.83 95.75 2.08
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) 12674 6047 6627 2584 1063 1521 92.75 95.98 89.99 5.99
131 627936-Muringur 4451 2050 2401 530 231 299 97.35 98.56 96.35 2.21
Vadakkummuri (CT )
132 627937-Korat ty (CT ) 15527 7642 7885 2091 951 1140 96.72 97.94 95.58 2.36
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri 21910 10631 11279 3349 1535 1814 95.5 96.81 94.3 2.51
(CT )
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) 10156 4790 5366 1417 643 774 96.52 98.18 95.09 3.09
135 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri 15142 7360 7782 2338 1041 1297 95.71 97.47 94.1 3.37
(CT )
Dist rict (Urban): T hrissur(594) 1813077 863641 949436 283329 128819 154510 95.76 97.23 94.45 2.78

The number of literates and illiterates and the percentage of literates by sex and the gap in male-
female literacy rate are given for the district urban.
The urban literacy rate of the district is 95.76 per cent with a break-up of 97.23 per cent for males
and 94.45 per cent for females. As is seen, the male urban literacy rate is higher than the female urban
literacy rate.
There are 135 towns in the district of which seven are statutory towns. Among the statutory towns,
Irinjalakuda municipality has the highest literacy rate of 97.77 per cent. The lowest literacy rate is reported
in Chavakkad (M) (94.36 per cent). However, in all the statutory towns, the literacy rate is above 90 per cent.
In all the 128 census towns in the district, the literacy rate is above 90 per cent except in Kaniyarkode
(CT), Nedumpura (CT), Desamangalam (CT) and Mundathikode (CT). Manakkody (CT) is reported to have
the highest literacy rate of 97.71 per cent and the lowest is in Kaniyarkode (CT ) (86.92) among the census
towns. As in the case of total literacy rate, the male literacy rate is also above 90 per cent in all the census
towns except in Mundathikode (CT). Among the 128 census towns, Kaniyarkode (CT), Nedumpura (CT),
Desamangalam (CT), Chittanda (CT), Kumaranellur (CT), Mundathikode (CT) and Thekkumkara (CT) are the
only seven census towns in the district reporting female literacy rate below 90 per cent.
The gap in male-female literacy rate is 2.78 per cent. The lowest gap is registered in Thangalur
(CT) (-1.4 per cent) and the highest is in Kaniyarkode (CT) (9.09 per cent).
Table 24: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in CD Blocks, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Block Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. Number of lit erates Number of illiterates male-
female
literacy
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 0056-Chowwannur 2883 1397 1486 587 238 349 91.52 94.7 88.72 5.99
2 0057-Wadakkanchery 13480 6880 6600 4406 1820 2586 83.33 87.9 79.01 8.92
3 0058-Pazhayannur 17096 8760 8336 6415 2622 3793 81.06 86.4 76.16 10.19
4 0059-Chavakkad 506 267 239 107 51 56 91.67 93 90.19 2.84
5 0060-T alikkulam 2259 1074 1185 376 160 216 93.97 96.6 91.72 4.86

111
Table 24: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in CD Blocks, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of CD Block Number of literates and illiterates Lit eracy rat e Gap in
No. Number of lit erat es Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

6 0061-Mullassery 2169 1068 1101 507 216 291 89.37 93.1 86.02 7.09

7 0062-Puzhakkal 890 442 448 186 74 112 89.99 93.6 86.65 6.99

8 0063-Ollukkara 5197 2622 2575 1514 598 916 84.81 89.7 80.37 9.3

9 0064-Ant hicad 2444 1190 1254 484 182 302 90.75 94.6 87.39 7.2

10 0065-Cherpu 1702 856 846 438 182 256 87.51 92.1 83.27 8.87

11 0066-Mat hilakam 1650 827 823 315 137 178 91.92 94.2 89.75 4.44

12 0067-Kodungallur 783 394 389 157 61 96 90.94 94.5 87.61 6.87

13 0068-Mala 8583 4231 4352 2002 806 1196 88.35 92.2 84.87 7.37

14 0069-Parakkadavu (Part) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

15 0070-Irinjalakuda 7510 3750 3760 1614 650 964 89.32 92.8 86.1 6.7

16 0071-Kodakara 12704 6342 6362 2950 1181 1769 88.31 92.8 84.28 8.48

17 0072-Vellangallur 6017 2984 3033 1323 551 772 89.51 92.9 86.41 6.49

18 0073-Chalakudy (Part ) 9994 5014 4980 2591 988 1603 86.66 91.5 82.26 9.25

T otal 95867 48098 47769 25972 10517 15455 86.39 90.7 82.43 8.28

The number of SC literates and illiterates and the percentage of SC literates by sex and the gap in
SC male/female literacy rate are given for the rural areas of the district and the CD blocks.
The SC rural literacy rate in the district is 86.39 per cent with a break-up of 90.71 per cent for males
and 82.43 per cent for females. The SC rural literacy rate is above 90 per cent and is less than the total rural
literacy rate of the district (93.68 per cent). As is the trend in general literacy rate, the SC rural male literacy
rate is higher than the SC rural female literacy rate. It is also seen that the SC rural female literacy rate is
even less than 80 per cent in some CD blocks.
Among the seventeen CD blocks, except in Chowannur (91.52 per cent), Chavakkad (91.67 per
cent), Talikkulam (93.97 per cent), Anthicad (90.75 per cent), Mathilakam (91.92 per cent) and Kodungallur
(90.94 per cent) CD blocks, in all the fifteen CD blocks, the SC rural literacy rate is below 90 per cent. It is as
high as 93.97 per cent in Talikkulam CD block and as low as 81.06 per cent in Pazhayannur CD block.
As regards SC rural male literacy rate, in all the CD blocks, it exceeds the total SC rural literacy rate.
In three CD blocks viz. Wadakkanchery (87.93 per cent), Pazhayannur (86.35 per cent) and Ollukkara (89.67
per cent), the SC rural male literacy rate is even below 90 per cent.
The SC rural female literacy rate is reported below 80 per cent in two CD blocks whereas in the
remaining fifteen CD blocks, the corresponding percentage is above 80 per cent. The CD blocks with SC
rural female literacy rate below 80 per cent are Wadakkanchery (79.01 per cent) and Pazhayannur (76.16
per cent). The gap in rural SC male-female literacy rate is 8.28 per cent. It is above 10 per cent in Pazhayannur
(10.19) CD block.

112
Table 25: Distribution of villages by literacy rate range for scheduled castes population (rural), 2011
Range of literacy rate for Number of inhabited Percentage Scheduled castes Percentage
villages villages having distribution of population distribution of
Scheduled castes villages population
1 2 3 4 5
0 0 0.00 0 0.00
1 - 10 0 0.00 0 0.00
10 - 20 0 0.00 0 0.00
21 - 30 0 0.00 0 0.00
31 - 40 0 0.00 0 0.00
41 - 50 0 0.00 0 0.00
51 - 60 0 0.00 0 0.00
61 - 70 0 0.00 0 0.00
71 - 80 11 11.22 13878 11.39
81 - 90 60 61.22 81472 66.87
91 - 99 27 27.55 26489 21.74
100 0 0.00 0 0.00
T ot al 98 100.00 121839 100.00
Dist rict Scheduled cast es Lit eracy 86.39
rat e:

The villages having SC population are distributed in twelve SC literacy ranges based on the SC
literacy rate in the villages. For each SC literacy range, the number and the percentage of villages, the
related SC rural population and their percentage to total SC rural population are given. For the district rural,
the total number of villages having SC population and the total SC rural population are also shown.

The SC rural literacy rate for the district is 86.39 per cent. None of the villages in the district have SC
rural literacy rate below 70 per cent. The majority of the villages (60) constituting 61.22 per cent of the
villages in the district and covering 66.87 per cent of the SC rural population have SC rural literacy rate
between 81 and 90 per cent. 11 villages each have SC rural literacy rate between 71 and 80 per cent. About
27.55 per cent of the villages have SC rural literacy rate between 91 and 99 per cent.

Table 26: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011
Sr. Name of Town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 5519 2695 2824 900 390 510 93.62 96.39 91.13 5.26

2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) 1701 849 852 743 295 448 77.46 83.73 72.08 11.65
3 627757-Cherut hurut hi (CT ) 1070 555 515 306 119 187 86.99 92.04 82.14 9.9
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) 915 461 454 281 116 165 83.79 88.65 79.37 9.28
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) 695 368 327 253 106 147 81 86.79 75.35 11.44
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) 2069 1052 1017 417 183 234 92.04 95.46 88.74 6.72
7 627761-Katt akampal (CT ) 1867 877 990 311 124 187 95.35 98.54 92.7 5.84

113
Table 26: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of Town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) 1437 727 710 253 101 152 94.42 97.32 91.61 5.71
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) 1356 687 669 342 141 201 88.69 91.84 85.66 6.18
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) 1081 539 542 282 115 167 87.6 91.05 84.42 6.63
11 627765-Kott appuram (CT ) 679 336 343 170 63 107 87.84 93.33 83.05 10.28
12 627766-Chitt anda (CT ) 668 336 332 228 99 129 83.5 88.89 78.67 10.22
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) 993 499 494 277 92 185 84.94 90.89 79.68 11.21
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) 320 152 168 92 31 61 84.21 89.94 79.62 10.32
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) 1252 642 610 317 135 182 88.42 92.91 84.14 8.77
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) 1239 636 603 324 143 181 87.62 92.44 83.06 9.38
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) 759 384 375 212 82 130 85.86 89.93 82.06 7.87
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) 746 374 372 160 69 91 91.53 93.73 89.42 4.31
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) 798 433 365 166 71 95 90.78 94.34 86.9 7.44
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) 804 389 415 176 90 86 90.13 91.75 88.68 3.07
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) 929 462 467 184 82 102 90.55 92.77 88.45 4.32
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) 1169 568 601 229 94 135 92.12 94.98 89.57 5.41
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) 660 336 324 138 59 79 92.7 96.83 88.77 8.06
24 627778-Velur (CT ) 1233 608 625 274 125 149 90.07 92.68 87.66 5.02
25 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) 872 431 441 238 102 136 88.53 91.51 85.8 5.71
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) 466 226 240 136 57 79 83.81 86.26 81.63 4.63
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) 419 199 220 103 46 57 88.58 90.45 86.96 3.49
28 627782-Eranellur (CT ) 799 397 402 158 68 90 91.63 94.98 88.55 6.43
29 627783-Alur (CT ) 685 347 338 124 50 74 92.94 96.93 89.18 7.75
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) 829 401 428 196 87 109 89.52 92.82 86.64 6.18
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) 380 174 206 58 21 37 96.2 96.67 95.81 0.86
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) 673 327 346 152 65 87 92.07 95.89 88.72 7.17
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) 1035 528 507 268 111 157 88.16 92.96 83.66 9.3
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) 613 321 292 175 72 103 87.82 92.51 83.19 9.32
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) 396 197 199 48 14 34 95.65 97.52 93.87 3.65
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) 875 455 420 179 71 108 91.24 94.79 87.68 7.11
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) 1071 547 524 216 77 139 91.7 96.47 87.19 9.28
38 627797-Vylathur (CT ) 616 301 315 131 71 60 91.53 93.48 89.74 3.74
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) 401 206 195 83 36 47 91.76 94.93 88.64 6.29
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) 532 269 263 109 48 61 92.52 95.73 89.46 6.27
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) 562 281 281 102 45 57 93.05 94.61 91.53 3.08
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) 1035 500 535 182 70 112 95.13 98.23 92.4 5.83
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) 117 56 61 22 12 10 92.86 94.92 91.04 3.88
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) 134 67 67 19 8 11 98.53 98.53 98.53 0
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) 463 238 225 99 37 62 92.05 96.75 87.55 9.2

114
Table 26: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of Town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) 682 330 352 135 61 74 92.29 95.1 89.8 5.3
47 627806-Pavaratt y (CT ) 426 208 218 95 41 54 91.61 92.86 90.46 2.4
48 627807-Venmanad (CT) 209 95 114 39 19 20 93.72 95.96 91.94 4.02
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) 1188 596 592 220 86 134 90.96 95.21 87.06 8.15
50 627809-Venkit angu (CT ) 1088 533 555 215 89 126 91.81 94.17 89.66 4.51
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) 687 331 356 115 59 56 93.6 95.11 92.23 2.88
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) 1018 493 525 229 104 125 91.14 93.9 88.68 5.22
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 20386 10050 10336 3824 1559 2265 91.66 94.73 88.86 5.87
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) 1565 767 798 343 141 202 89.63 92.52 87.02 5.5
55 627826-T hangalur (CT ) 763 374 389 168 75 93 91.49 94.92 88.41 6.51
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) 909 461 448 267 116 151 86.32 89.69 83.12 6.57
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) 789 396 393 173 70 103 89.97 93.62 86.56 7.06
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) 497 254 243 110 44 66 89.55 92.7 86.48 6.22
59 627830-T holur (CT ) 854 423 431 248 83 165 86.44 92.76 81.02 11.74
60 627831-Edakkalat hur (CT ) 879 431 448 215 93 122 89.42 92.89 86.32 6.57
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) 933 467 466 132 58 74 93.58 95.5 91.73 3.77
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) 397 210 187 90 38 52 88.22 92.51 83.86 8.65
63 627834-Pott ore (CT ) 631 313 318 146 65 81 90.66 95.14 86.65 8.49
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) 560 287 273 114 45 69 91.65 95.99 87.5 8.49
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) 209 114 95 36 17 19 92.48 94.21 90.48 3.73
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT ) 312 157 155 55 27 28 95.12 96.91 93.37 3.54
67 627838-Kutt oor (CT ) 745 373 372 140 49 91 91.08 95.4 87.12 8.28
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT) 797 390 407 184 78 106 88.46 92.64 84.79 7.85
69 627840-Puranatt ukara (CT ) 1180 573 607 207 83 124 92.04 94.24 90.06 4.18
70 627841-Chitt ilappilly (CT ) 508 255 253 106 48 58 89.91 92.73 87.24 5.49
71 627842-Adat (CT ) 821 401 420 176 68 108 90.82 94.8 87.32 7.48
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) 571 276 295 146 59 87 89.36 93.24 86.01 7.23
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) 689 351 338 205 78 127 84.96 90.93 79.53 11.4
74 627845-Nadathara (CT ) 579 279 300 104 36 68 92.94 96.88 89.55 7.33
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) 983 494 489 219 89 130 89.77 93.38 86.4 6.98
76 627847-Karamuck (CT ) 1483 706 777 223 108 115 95.37 96.05 94.76 1.29
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) 2004 991 1013 355 138 217 93.69 96.31 91.26 5.05
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) 435 219 216 97 49 48 91.58 94.4 88.89 5.51
79 627850-Velut hur (CT ) 1127 560 567 275 118 157 90.09 92.87 87.5 5.37
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) 525 259 266 95 37 58 94.59 97 92.36 4.64
81 627852-Marathakkara (CT ) 1197 603 594 290 127 163 89.2 93.34 85.34 8
82 627853-Puthur (CT ) 1503 779 724 389 162 227 87.33 91.43 83.31 8.12
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) 888 432 456 148 68 80 93.97 95.58 92.49 3.09

115
Table 26: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of Town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) 365 193 172 77 29 48 91.02 95.07 86.87 8.2
85 627856-Venginissery (CT ) 518 251 267 91 40 51 94.35 96.54 92.39 4.15
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) 776 366 410 175 85 90 88.89 91.27 86.86 4.41
87 627858-Anthicad (CT ) 1043 530 513 192 69 123 91.41 94.98 87.99 6.99
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) 957 480 477 172 65 107 92.02 95.81 88.5 7.31
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) 1119 548 571 199 101 98 93.09 94.48 91.8 2.68
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) 572 285 287 115 51 64 91.23 94.37 88.31 6.06
91 627862-Cherpu (CT ) 930 477 453 297 123 174 84.78 87.68 81.92 5.76
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) 1198 603 595 290 114 176 88.61 93.06 84.52 8.54
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) 1741 820 921 294 119 175 93.05 95.24 91.19 4.05
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) 1122 568 554 222 97 125 91.44 94.67 88.36 6.31
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) 1474 781 693 383 155 228 86.76 91.03 82.4 8.63
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) 1664 838 826 344 151 193 91.13 92.9 89.39 3.51
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) 828 410 418 141 64 77 93.03 96.7 89.7 7
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) 1321 666 655 222 95 127 93.49 96.24 90.85 5.39
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) 4003 1998 2005 695 288 407 92.88 96.01 89.95 6.06
100 627873-Edat hiruthy (CT ) 2370 1156 1214 378 164 214 94.2 96.01 92.53 3.48
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) 1757 876 881 351 172 179 93.11 94.09 92.15 1.94
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) 2857 1408 1449 557 265 292 91.92 93 90.9 2.1
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) 2331 1112 1219 383 181 202 93.28 94.56 92.14 2.42
104 627877-Pappinivatt om (CT ) 1698 855 843 307 135 172 93.3 96.28 90.45 5.83
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) 1616 815 801 330 144 186 90.63 93.04 88.31 4.73
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) 1082 530 552 212 71 141 91 93.81 88.46 5.35
107 627880-Ala (CT ) 1185 597 588 244 105 139 91.01 94.02 88.16 5.86
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) 514 255 259 108 38 70 89.39 94.1 85.2 8.9
109 627882-Methala (CT ) 2022 1018 1004 316 133 183 94.57 97.04 92.19 4.85
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) 1066 509 557 200 64 136 91.11 95.86 87.17 8.69
111 627884-Madat humpady (CT ) 471 244 227 97 45 52 90.75 94.94 86.64 8.3
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) 2444 1204 1240 390 152 238 93.57 96.4 90.98 5.42
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) 2815 1397 1418 586 232 354 90.54 94.52 86.94 7.58
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) 610 321 289 195 79 116 81.99 86.99 77.07 9.92
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) 1602 811 791 336 128 208 90.71 95.52 86.26 9.26
116 627921-Amballur (CT ) 1776 893 883 392 173 219 89.38 92.25 86.65 5.6
117 627922-Puthukkad (CT ) 1337 673 664 368 139 229 84.73 89.49 80.39 9.1
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) 1501 798 703 312 129 183 90.8 94.44 87 7.44

116
Table 26: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of Town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate
Gap in
No. male-
Number of literates Number of illiterates
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
119 627924-Katt ur (CT ) 2255 1124 1131 420 165 255 91.74 94.85 88.85 6

120 627925-Porathissery (CT ) 1901 936 965 355 161 194 92.15 94.07 90.36 3.71
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) 1368 674 694 252 110 142 93.06 95.33 90.96 4.37
122 627927-Kallet tumkara (CT ) 838 434 404 200 75 125 87.2 92.54 82.11 10.43
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) 1796 897 899 350 127 223 90.89 94.22 87.79 6.43
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) 969 475 494 202 84 118 91.76 95.96 88.06 7.9
125 627930-Edat hirinji (CT ) 794 388 406 143 62 81 92.54 96.28 89.23 7.05
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) 1487 731 756 363 156 207 89.42 93.12 86.1 7.02
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) 888 451 437 189 80 109 90.24 92.8 87.75 5.05
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) 1765 842 923 323 137 186 93.19 96.12 90.67 5.45
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) 1216 592 624 201 94 107 94.34 96.42 92.44 3.98
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) 1279 677 602 350 130 220 85.78 91.36 80.27 11.09
131 627936-Muringur 223 112 111 52 25 27 90.65 95.73 86.05 9.68
Vadakkummuri (CT )
132 627937-Koratt y (CT ) 1600 800 800 325 115 210 90.45 94.9 86.39 8.51
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri 2285 1166 1119 580 220 360 87.18 91.67 82.95 8.72
(CT )
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) 1049 521 528 206 70 136 89.51 94.9 84.75 10.15
135 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri 1251 613 638 270 98 172 89.87 94.31 85.98 8.33
(CT )
Dist rict : T hrissur (594) 167598 83383 84215 34913 14482 20431 90.79 94.07 87.76 6.31

The number of SC literates and illiterates and the SC literacy rate by sex and the gap in SC male-
female literacy rate are given for the district urban and the towns.
The district urban literacy rate for Scheduled Castes is 90.79 per cent with a break-up of 94.07 per
cent for males and 87.76 per cent for females. The SC male urban literacy rate is above 90 per cent while SC
female urban literacy rate is below 90 per cent.
Among the towns, except Kaniyarkode census town (77.46 per cent), in all the other towns, the SC
urban literacy rate is above 80 per cent. However in eighty eight census towns, this rate is even above 90
per cent. As regards the SC male literacy rate, even though the district average is 90.79 per cent, in 11 towns
viz. Kaniyarkode, Nedumpura, Desamangalam, Chittanda, Chelakkara, Kariyannur, Peringandoor, Avanur,
Cherpu, Trikkur and Puthukkad, this ratio is below 90 per cent. The SC female urban literacy rate is below
80 per cent in eight towns where SC male urban literacy rate is above 80 per cent.
The gap in SC male-female urban literacy rate is 6.31 per cent. In 11 towns, this literacy gap is above
10 per cent. These towns are Kaniyarkode, Desamangalam, Kottappuram, Chittanda, Kumaranellur,
Chelakkara, Tholur, Kainoor, Kallettumkara, Thekkumkara and Vadama census towns.

117
Table 27: Number and percentage of scheduled tribes literates and illiterates by sex in CD Blocks, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Block Number of literat es and illiterates Lit eracy rat e Gap in male-
No. female literacy
Number of literat es Number of illiterat es
rat e
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 0056-Chowwannur 34 15 19 2 0 2 100 100 100 0

2 0057-Wadakkanchery 147 70 77 49 22 27 87.5 89.74 85.56 4.18

3 0058-Pazhayannur 274 145 129 190 78 112 67.99 74.36 62.02 12.34

4 0059-Chavakkad 12 3 9 4 3 1 92.31 100 90 10

5 0060-T alikkulam 101 45 56 16 7 9 97.12 100 94.92 5.08

6 0061-Mullassery 41 24 17 8 3 5 93.18 96 89.47 6.53

7 0062-Puzhakkal 23 11 12 4 2 2 95.83 100 92.31 7.69

8 0063-Ollukkara 1150 573 577 454 189 265 80.59 85.52 76.22 9.3

9 0064-Ant hicad 9 4 5 0 0 0 100 100 100 0

10 0065-Cherpu 11 6 5 1 1 0 100 100 100 0

11 0066-Mat hilakam 46 24 22 10 5 5 93.88 92.31 95.65 -3.34

12 0067-Kodungallur 21 9 12 7 2 5 91.3 100 85.71 14.29

13 0068-Mala 61 28 33 14 9 5 91.04 87.5 94.29 -6.79

14 0069-Parakkadavu (Part ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

15 0070-Irinjalakuda 99 48 51 16 6 10 94.29 97.96 91.07 6.89

16 0071-Kodakara 676 341 335 372 148 224 73.72 78.94 69.07 9.87

17 0072-Vellangallur 56 26 30 8 5 3 96.55 92.86 100 -7.14

18 0073-Chalakudy (Part) 1237 578 659 706 288 418 73.02 77.07 69.81 7.26

T otal 3998 1950 2048 1861 768 1093 77.63 82 73.88 8.12

In this table, the number of ST literates and illiterates and the ST literacy rate by sex and the gap in
ST male-female literacy rates are given for the rural areas of the district and the CD blocks.

The ST rural literacy rate of the district is 77.63 per cent with a break-up of 82 per cent for males and
73.88 per cent for females. The ST rural literacy rate is less than the total rural literacy rate and the SC rural
literacy rate.

Among the CD blocks, in Anthicad CD block, the number of ST literates is very negligible. This CD
block have reported cent per cent ST literacy rate. The CD blocks having reasonable number of ST literates
are Ollukkara (1150), Kodakara (676), and Chalakudy (Part) (1237) where the ST rural literacy rate is 80.59
per cent, 73.72 per cent and 73.02 per cent respectively.

118
There are seven CD blocks having cent per cent ST male rural literacy rate as against four CD blocks
with cent per cent ST female rural literacy rate. The gap in male-female literacy rate of rural ST in the
district is 8.12. In Mathilakam, Mala and Vellangallur CD blocks, the gap in ST male-female literacy rates is
negative.

Table 28: Distribution of villages by literacy rate range for scheduled tribes population (rural), 2011
Range of literacy Number of inhabited Percentage distribution Scheduled tribes Percentage distribution
rate for villages villages having of villages population of population
Scheduled tribes

1 2 3 4 5
0 1 1.14 1 0.02

1 - 10 0 0.00 0 0.00

11 - 20 0 0.00 0 0.00

21 - 30 0 0.00 0 0.00

31 - 40 0 0.00 0 0.00

41 - 50 2 2.27 67 1.14

51 - 60 2 2.27 82 1.40

61 - 70 6 6.82 1789 30.53

71 - 80 8 9.09 2038 34.78

81 - 90 13 14.77 726 12.39

91 - 99 16 18.18 793 13.53

100 40 45.45 363 6.20

Dist rict : 88 100.00 5859 100.00


T hrissur(594)

Literacy rate for 77.63


Dist rict :

In this table, all the villages having ST population are distributed in twelve ST literacy ranges based
on the ST literacy rate in the villages. For each ST literacy range, the number and the percentage of villages,
the related ST rural population and their percentage to total ST rural population are given. For the district
rural, the total number of villages having ST population and the total ST rural population are also shown.
The ST rural literacy rate of the district is 77.63 per cent. There are 10 villages in the district having
no ST population. In the remaining 88 villages, in one village, the ST literacy rate is below one per cent. In
40 Villages, the Scheduled Tribe population have cent per cent literacy rate covering 6.20 per cent of the
rural Scheduled Tribe population . In 16 Villages, cover 13.53 per cent of Scheduled Tribe rural population
have literacy rate between 91 and 99 per cent.

119
Table 29: Number and percentage of scheduled tribe literates and illiterates by sex in towns, 2011
Sr. Name of town Number of Literates and Illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. male-
Number of literates Number of illiterates female
literacy
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 68 30 38 9 3 6 91.89 93.75 90.48 3.27
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) 6 2 4 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
3 627757-Cherut hurut hi (CT ) 6 3 3 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) 6 4 2 2 1 1 85.71 80 100 -20
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) 7 4 3 2 1 1 87.5 80 100 -20
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) 20 10 10 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
7 627761-Katt akampal (CT ) 20 10 10 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) 12 5 7 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) 10 6 4 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) 2 1 1 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
11 627765-Kott appuram (CT ) 2 0 2 0 0 0 100 0 100 -100
12 627766-Chit tanda (CT ) 1 1 0 0 0 0 100 100 0 100
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) 2 2 0 1 0 1 100 100 0 100
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) 2 1 1 4 0 4 50 100 33.33 66.67
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) 7 2 5 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) 3 1 2 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) 4 1 3 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) 17 7 10 3 1 2 100 100 100 0
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) 1 0 1 0 0 0 100 0 100 -100
21 627776-Choondal (CT ) 14 7 7 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
22 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) 15 9 6 3 2 1 93.75 100 85.71 14.29
23 627778-Velur (CT ) 12 8 4 4 3 1 85.71 88.89 80 8.89
24 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) 15 5 10 3 2 1 93.75 83.33 100 -16.67
25 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) 6 3 3 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
26 627781-Minalur (CT ) 12 6 6 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
27 627782-Eranellur (CT ) 6 4 2 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
28 627783-Alur (CT ) 25 4 21 4 1 3 92.59 100 91.3 8.7
29 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) 6 2 4 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
30 803278-Guruvayoor (M) 48 28 20 4 3 1 96 96.55 95.24 1.31
31 803279-Chavakkad (M) 46 19 27 12 8 4 82.14 76 87.1 -11.1
32 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) 20 7 13 8 2 6 90.91 100 86.67 13.33
33 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) 18 8 10 4 1 3 100 100 100 0
34 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) 7 3 4 2 0 2 87.5 100 80 20
35 627795-Punnayur (CT ) 28 14 14 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
36 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) 29 11 18 8 3 5 85.29 84.62 85.71 -1.09
37 627797-Vylathur (CT ) 1 1 0 13 10 3 12.5 20 0 20
38 627798-Pookode (CT ) 8 3 5 3 1 2 80 100 71.43 28.57

120
Table 29: Number and percentage of scheduled tribe literates and illiterates by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Number of Literates and Illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. male-
Number of literates Number of illiterates female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
39 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) 12 6 6 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
40 627800-Perakam (CT ) 9 3 6 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
41 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) 26 12 14 4 0 4 96.3 100 93.33 6.67
42 627802-Paluvai (CT ) 23 11 12 9 5 4 88.46 91.67 85.71 5.96
43 627803-T haikkad (CT ) 12 3 9 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
44 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) 12 8 4 2 1 1 92.31 88.89 100 -11.11
45 627805-Elavally (CT) 15 7 8 1 0 1 93.75 100 88.89 11.11
46 627806-Pavarat ty (CT ) 11 3 8 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
47 627807-Venmanad (CT ) 10 5 5 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
48 627808-Mullassery (CT ) 4 2 2 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
49 627809-Venkitangu (CT ) 36 10 26 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
50 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) 10 5 5 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
51 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) 22 12 10 8 5 3 81.48 80 83.33 -3.33
52 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 523 264 259 82 37 45 95.61 97.06 94.18 2.88
53 627825-Killannur (CT ) 28 15 13 5 3 2 96.55 100 92.86 7.14
54 627826-T hangalur (CT ) 7 2 5 4 2 2 87.5 100 83.33 16.67
55 627827-Avanur (CT ) 7 2 5 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
56 627828-Anjur (CT ) 6 1 5 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
57 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) 3 2 1 8 3 5 30 50 16.67 33.33
58 627830-T holur (CT ) 3 1 2 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
59 627831-Edakkalat hur (CT ) 3 2 1 3 2 1 60 66.67 50 16.67
60 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) 7 1 6 3 1 2 70 50 75 -25
61 627833-Choolissery (CT ) 6 6 0 9 9 0 40 40 0 40
62 627834-Pott ore (CT ) 4 2 2 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
63 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) 37 20 17 2 0 2 97.37 100 94.44 5.56
64 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) 1 0 1 0 0 0 100 0 100 -100
65 627837-Vellanikkara (CT ) 5 4 1 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
66 627838-Kutt oor (CT ) 13 8 5 3 1 2 92.86 88.89 100 -11.11
67 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) 16 3 13 1 0 1 94.12 100 92.86 7.14
68 627840-Puranat tukara (CT ) 43 24 19 5 1 4 100 100 100 0
69 627841-Chit tilappilly (CT ) 8 4 4 2 1 1 80 80 80 0
70 627842-Adat (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0 0 100 100 0 100
71 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) 58 32 26 9 5 4 96.67 100 92.86 7.14
72 627844-Kainoor (CT) 19 6 13 3 3 0 95 85.71 100 -14.29
73 627845-Nadat hara (CT ) 17 7 10 2 1 1 94.44 100 90.91 9.09
74 627846-Parakkad (CT ) 13 9 4 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
75 627847-Karamuck (CT ) 17 7 10 2 0 2 100 100 100 0
76 627848-Manalur (CT) 5 2 3 1 0 1 100 100 100 0

121
Table 29: Number and percentage of scheduled tribe literates and illiterates by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)

Sr. Name of town Number of Literates and Illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. Number of literates Number of illiterates male-
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
77 627850-Veluthur (CT ) 8 5 3 3 1 2 88.89 100 75 25
78 627851-Manakkody (CT ) 2 1 1 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
79 627852-Marathakkara (CT ) 28 14 14 6 4 2 93.33 93.33 93.33 0
80 627853-Puthur (CT ) 84 39 45 24 13 11 85.71 84.78 86.54 -1.76
81 627854-Avinissery (CT ) 26 14 12 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
82 627855-Palissery (CT ) 5 2 3 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
83 627856-Venginissery (CT ) 11 3 8 2 1 1 100 100 100 0
84 627857-Kodannur (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0 0 100 100 0 100
85 627858-Anthicad (CT ) 18 10 8 1 0 1 94.74 100 88.89 11.11
86 627859-Padiyam (CT ) 33 16 17 3 0 3 97.06 100 94.44 5.56
87 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) 6 3 3 4 3 1 100 100 100 0
88 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) 8 5 3 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
89 627862-Cherpu (CT ) 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
90 627863-Paralam (CT ) 24 13 11 4 3 1 96 92.86 100 -7.14
91 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) 111 7 104 5 0 5 99.11 100 99.05 0.95
92 627865-Vallachira (CT ) 6 2 4 4 2 2 60 50 66.67 -16.67
93 627866-Oorakam (CT ) 12 4 8 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
94 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) 19 9 10 5 1 4 82.61 90 76.92 13.08
95 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) 3 1 2 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
96 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) 11 4 7 0 0 0 100 100 100 0
97 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) 68 30 38 16 9 7 94.44 96.77 92.68 4.09
98 627873-Edat hiruthy (CT ) 52 19 33 4 0 4 98.11 100 97.06 2.94
99 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) 19 9 10 6 2 4 90.48 100 83.33 16.67
100 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) 70 40 30 12 5 7 94.59 93.02 96.77 -3.75
101 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) 69 28 41 6 4 2 98.57 96.55 100 -3.45
102 627877-Pappinivatt om (CT ) 32 16 16 9 4 5 94.12 94.12 94.12 0
103 627878-Panangad (CT ) 6 3 3 4 1 3 66.67 75 60 15
104 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) 49 22 27 19 11 8 83.05 84.62 81.82 2.8
105 627880-Ala (CT ) 6 3 3 2 0 2 85.71 100 75 25
106 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) 2 0 2 2 1 1 66.67 0 66.67 -66.67
107 627882-Methala (CT ) 95 44 51 22 13 9 92.23 91.67 92.73 -1.06
108 627883-Poyya (CT ) 19 7 12 2 1 1 100 100 100 0
109 627884-Madat humpady (CT ) 14 7 7 1 0 1 100 100 100 0
110 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) 40 17 23 6 3 3 97.56 100 95.83 4.17
111 803283-Chalakudy (M) 65 34 31 12 6 6 92.86 97.14 88.57 8.57
112 627919-T rikkur (CT ) 24 9 15 1 1 0 100 100 100 0
113 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) 28 17 11 9 6 3 82.35 80.95 84.62 -3.67

122
Table 29: Number and percentage of scheduled tribe literates and illiterates by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)

Sr. Name of town Number of Literates and Illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. male-
Number of literates Number of illiterates
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

114 627921-Amballur (CT ) 80 37 43 16 8 8 91.95 90.24 93.48 -3.24

115 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) 7 4 3 0 0 0 100 100 100 0

116 627924-Katt ur (CT ) 21 8 13 1 1 0 100 100 100 0

117 627925-Porathissery (CT ) 15 8 7 2 2 0 100 100 100 0

118 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) 14 3 11 8 0 8 100 100 100 0

119 627927-Kallett umkara (CT ) 26 14 12 0 0 0 100 100 100 0

120 627928-Pullur (CT ) 9 4 5 3 1 2 100 100 100 0

121 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) 1 0 1 1 1 0 100 0 100 -100

122 627930-Edat hirinji (CT ) 18 10 8 12 5 7 69.23 71.43 66.67 4.76

123 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) 29 13 16 17 9 8 65.91 61.9 69.57 -7.67

124 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) 12 7 5 2 1 1 85.71 87.5 83.33 4.17

125 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) 2 0 2 1 1 0 100 0 100 -100

126 627934-Padiyur (CT ) 17 7 10 3 0 3 100 100 100 0

127 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) 26 12 14 2 0 2 96.3 100 93.33 6.67

128 627936-Muringur 2 1 1 1 0 1 100 100 100 0


Vadakkummuri (CT )
129 627937-Koratt y (CT ) 36 19 17 3 2 1 100 100 100 0
130 627938-Kallur 34 19 15 9 3 6 94.44 95 93.75 1.25
Vadakkummuri (CT )
131 627939-Vadama (CT ) 12 4 8 4 2 2 92.31 100 88.89 11.11

132 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri 15 7 8 2 1 1 93.75 100 88.89 11.11


(CT )
Dist rict (Urban): 3016 1381 1635 555 263 292 93 93.37 92.69 0.68
T hrissur(594)

The number of ST literates and illiterates and the ST literacy rate by sex and the gap in ST male-
female literacy rates are given for the district urban and the towns.

The ST urban literacy rate of the district is 93 per cent with a break-up of 93.37 per cent for males
and 92.69 per cent for females. Of the 135 towns in the district, the ST population is not reported only in 3
towns viz., Porkulam (CT), Eravu (CT) and Puthukkad (CT). The highest number of ST literates is in Thrissur
Municipal Corporation (3016). In sixty seven towns, the number of ST literates range between 10 and 50.
There are two towns viz., Chelakkara (CT) and Cherpu (CT) have no ST literates. In sixty five towns having
negligible number of ST literates, cent per cent ST literacy rate is reported. The gap in ST male-female
urban literacy rate of the district urban is 0.68. The gap in ST male-female urban literacy rate is negative in
twenty five towns.

123
Table 30: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in Taluk, 2011
Sr. Name of Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers Non workers
No. Taluk Males/ population (main and
Females marginal workers)
Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
age age age age
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 05652- Persons 632086 189601 30.00 32807 5.19 222408 35.19 409678 64.81
T alappilly
Males 301050 144504 48.00 16826 5.59 161330 53.59 139720 46.41

Females 331036 45097 13.62 15981 4.83 61078 18.45 269958 81.55

2 05653- Persons 470898 115885 24.61 19303 4.10 135188 28.71 335710 71.29
Chavakkad
Males 215864 91958 42.60 10195 4.72 102153 47.32 113711 52.68

Females 255034 23927 9.38 9108 3.57 33035 12.95 221999 87.05

3 05654- Persons 874615 283414 32.40 39874 4.56 323288 36.96 551327 63.04
T hrissur
Males 421259 210788 50.04 19609 4.65 230397 54.69 190862 45.31

Females 453356 72626 16.02 20265 4.47 92891 20.49 360465 79.51

4 05655- Persons 312238 83542 26.76 22368 7.16 105910 33.92 206328 66.08
Kodungallur
Males 145998 66348 45.44 10548 7.22 76896 52.67 69102 47.33

Females 166240 17194 10.34 11820 7.11 29014 17.45 137226 82.55

5 05656- Persons 831363 257064 30.92 51869 6.24 308933 37.16 522430 62.84
Mukundapuram
Males 396592 192679 48.58 26056 6.57 218735 55.15 177857 44.85

Females 434771 64385 14.81 25813 5.94 90198 20.75 344573 79.25

Dist rict : Persons 3121200 929506 29.78 166221 5.33 1095727 35.11 2025473 64.89
T hrissur (594)
Males 1480763 706277 47.70 83234 5.62 789511 53.32 691252 46.68

Females 1640437 223229 13.61 82987 5.06 306216 18.67 1334221 81.33

In this table, the number and the percentage of main workers, marginal workers and non-workers
by sex are given for the district and the taluks.
The percentage of total workers in the district is 35.11. Of the total workers, 29.78 are main workers
and 5.33 are marginal workers. It means that for every 6 workers, there are 5 main workers and 1 marginal
worker. The percentage of male main workers (47.70 per cent) and male marginal workers (5.62 per cent)
are higher than the percentage of female main workers (13.61 per cent) and the female marginal workers
(5.06 per cent). In the case of non-workers, there is higher percentage of females (81.33 per cent) than
males (46.68 per cent).
Among the taluks, the percentage of workers is the highest in Mukundapuram taluk (37.16 per
cent) and the lowest in Chavakkad taluk (28.71 per cent). In three taluks viz. Talappilly (35.19 per cent),
Thrissur (36.96 per cent) and Mukundapuram (37.16 per cent), the percentage of total workers is higher
than the district average for total workers (35.11 per cent). The percentage of male workers is higher than
the percentage of female workers in all the taluks. In all the taluks, more than 25 per cent of the population
are workers.
The highest percentage of main workers is reported in Thrissur taluk (32.40 per cent) and the
lowest is seen in Chavakkad taluk (24.61 per cent). In Talappilly (30.0 per cent), Thrissur (32.40 per cent) and

124
Mukundapuram (30.92 per cent) taluks, the percentage of main workers is higher than the district average
for main workers (29.78 per cent).
As regards the marginal workers, the highest percentage is reported in Kodungallur taluk (7.16 per
cent) and the lowest in Chavakkad taluk (4.10 per cent). In Kodungallur (7.16 per cent) and Mukundapuram
(6.24 per cent) taluks, the percentage of marginal workers is higher than the district average for marginal
workers (5.33 per cent).
In the case of non-workers, the percentage is the highest in Chavakkad taluk (71.29 per cent) and
the lowest in Mukundapuram taluk (62.84 per cent). In all the taluks, the percentage of female non-
workers is higher than that of male non-workers.

Table 31: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers and non-workers by Sex in CD Blocks, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers Non workers
No. Block Males/ population (main and marginal
Females workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 0056- Persons 30575 8837 28.90 1354 4.43 10191 33.33 20384 66.67
Chowwannur
Males 14326 6795 47.43 743 5.19 7538 52.62 6788 47.38
Females 16249 2042 12.57 611 3.76 2653 16.33 13596 83.67
2 0057- Persons 125557 36604 29.15 8419 6.71 45023 35.86 80534 64.14
Wadakkanchery
Males 60294 28394 47.09 4490 7.45 32884 54.54 27410 45.46
Females 65263 8210 12.58 3929 6.02 12139 18.60 53124 81.40
3 0058- Persons 135913 44327 32.61 8520 6.27 52847 38.88 83066 61.12
Pazhayannur
Males 65362 32796 50.18 4010 6.14 36806 56.31 28556 43.69
Females 70551 11531 16.34 4510 6.39 16041 22.74 54510 77.26
4 0059- Persons 22929 5346 23.32 592 2.58 5938 25.90 16991 74.10
Chavakkad
Males 10517 4644 44.16 282 2.68 4926 46.84 5591 53.16
Females 12412 702 5.66 310 2.50 1012 8.15 11400 91.85
5 0060- Persons 77753 20126 25.88 3809 4.90 23935 30.78 53818 69.22
T alikkulam
Males 35513 15386 43.32 1785 5.03 17171 48.35 18342 51.65
Females 42240 4740 11.22 2024 4.79 6764 16.01 35476 83.99
6 0061- Persons 23294 5989 25.71 1184 5.08 7173 30.79 16121 69.21
Mullassery
Males 10684 4538 42.47 626 5.86 5164 48.33 5520 51.67
Females 12610 1451 11.51 558 4.43 2009 15.93 10601 84.07
7 0062-Puzhakkal Persons 7513 2488 33.12 223 2.97 2711 36.08 4802 63.92
Males 3635 1781 49.00 122 3.36 1903 52.35 1732 47.65
Females 3878 707 18.23 101 2.60 808 20.84 3070 79.16
8 0063-Ollukkara Persons 80971 28628 35.36 5282 6.52 33910 41.88 47061 58.12
Males 39659 20904 52.71 2422 6.11 23326 58.82 16333 41.18
Females 41312 7724 18.70 2860 6.92 10584 25.62 30728 74.38
9 0064-Ant hicad Persons 14812 3645 24.61 1435 9.69 5080 34.30 9732 65.70
Males 6737 2707 40.18 731 10.85 3438 51.03 3299 48.97
Females 8075 938 11.62 704 8.72 1642 20.33 6433 79.67

125
Table 31: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers and non-workers by Sex in CD Blocks, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of CD Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers Non workers
No. Block Males/ population (main and marginal
Females workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
10 0065-Cherpu Persons 9713 3168 32.62 728 7.50 3896 40.11 5817 59.89
Males 4638 2348 50.63 352 7.59 2700 58.21 1938 41.79
Females 5075 820 16.16 376 7.41 1196 23.57 3879 76.43
11 0066- Persons 24333 5723 23.52 2717 11.17 8440 34.69 15893 65.31
Mat hilakam
Males 11199 4561 40.73 1315 11.74 5876 52.47 5323 47.53
Females 13134 1162 8.85 1402 10.67 2564 19.52 10570 80.48
12 0067- Persons 19935 5662 28.40 1233 6.19 6895 34.59 13040 65.41
Kodungallur
Males 9535 4743 49.74 494 5.18 5237 54.92 4298 45.08
Females 10400 919 8.84 739 7.11 1658 15.94 8742 84.06
13 0068-Mala Persons 91783 28653 31.22 6784 7.39 35437 38.61 56346 61.39
Males 43739 21439 49.02 3099 7.09 24538 56.10 19201 43.90
Females 48044 7214 15.02 3685 7.67 10899 22.69 37145 77.31
14 0069- Persons 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Parakkadavu
Males 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
(Part)
Females 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
15 0070- Persons 51631 16441 31.84 3141 6.08 19582 37.93 32049 62.07
Irinjalakuda
Males 24432 12045 49.30 1583 6.48 13628 55.78 10804 44.22
Females 27199 4396 16.16 1558 5.73 5954 21.89 21245 78.11
16 0071-Kodakara Persons 150541 46830 31.11 11100 7.37 57930 38.48 92611 61.52
Males 72568 35637 49.11 5608 7.73 41245 56.84 31323 43.16
Females 77973 11193 14.35 5492 7.04 16685 21.40 61288 78.60
17 0072- Persons 53885 14680 27.24 3135 5.82 17815 33.06 36070 66.94
Vellangallur
Males 25039 11459 45.76 1719 6.87 13178 52.63 11861 47.37
Females 28846 3221 11.17 1416 4.91 4637 16.08 24209 83.92
18 0073-Chalakudy Persons 103656 35808 34.55 6588 6.36 42396 40.90 61260 59.10
(Part)
Males 50426 25821 51.21 3135 6.22 28956 57.42 21470 42.58
Females 53230 9987 18.76 3453 6.49 13440 25.25 39790 74.75
T ot al Persons 1024794 312955 30.54 66244 6.46 379199 37.00 645595 63.00
Males 488303 235998 48.33 32516 6.66 268514 54.99 219789 45.01
Females 536491 76957 14.34 33728 6.29 110685 20.63 425806 79.37

The number and the percentage of total workers, main workers, marginal workers and non-workers
by sex are given for the rural areas of the district and the CD blocks.
The percentage of total workers in the district rural is 37.00. Of this, 30.54 per cent are main workers
and 6.46 per cent are marginal workers. It means that for every 6 workers in rural area, there are 5 main
workers and 1 marginal worker. The percentage of rural male main workers (48.33 per cent) and marginal
workers (6.66 per cent) are higher than the percentage of rural female main workers (14.34 per cent) and

126
female marginal workers (6.29 per cent). In the case of rural non-workers, there is higher percentage of
females (79.37 per cent) than males (45.01 per cent).
Among the 17 CD blocks, the highest percentage of total workers is in Ollukkara CD block (41.88 per
cent) and the lowest is in Chavakkad CD block (25.90 per cent). In seven CD blocks, namely, Pazhayannur
(38.88 per cent), Ollukkara (41.88 per cent), Cherpu (40.11 per cent), Mala (38.61 per cent), Irinjalakuda
(37.93 per cent), Kodakara (38.48 per cent) and Chalakudy (Part) (40.90 per cent), the percentage of total
workers is higher than the district average for rural areas (37.00 per cent). Except Chavakkad (25.90 per
cent) CD block, in all other CD blocks even more than 30 per cent of the population are workers.
The percentage of main workers ranges from 23.32 per cent in Chavakkad CD block to 35.36 per cent
in Ollukkara CD block. In eight CD blocks, namely, Pazhayannur (32.61 per cent), Puzhakkal (33.12 per cent),
Ollukkara (35.36 per cent), Cherpu (32.62 per cent), Mala (31.22 per cent), Irinjalakuda (31.84 per cent),
Kodakara (31.11 per cent) and Chalakudy (Part) (34.55 per cent), the percentage of main workers are higher
than the district average for main workers in rural areas (30.54 per cent).
In the case of marginal workers, the highest percentage is seen in Mathilakam CD block (11.17 per
cent) and the lowest in Chavakkad CD block (2.58 per cent). In seven CD blocks viz. Wadakkanchery (6.71 per
cent), Ollukkara (6.52 per cent), Anthicad (9.69 per cent), Cherpu (7.50 per cent), Mathilakam (11.17 per
cent), Mala (7.39 per cent) and Kodakara (7.37 per cent), the percentage of marginal workers is above the
district average for marginal workers in rural areas (6.46 per cent).
As regards the non-workers, the percentage is the highest in Chavakkad CD block (74.10 per cent)
and the lowest in Ollukkara CD block (58.12 per cent). In all the CD blocks, more than 50 per cent of the
population are non-workers and the percentage of female non-workers are higher than that of males.
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers
Total workers Non workers
No. Males/ population (main and
Females marginal
workers)
Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
age age age age
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 803277-Kunnamkulam Persons 54071 16127 29.83 2044 3.78 18171 33.61 35900 66.39
(M) Males 25392 12214 48.10 1214 4.78 13428 52.88 11964 47.12
Females 28679 3913 13.64 830 2.89 4743 16.54 23936 83.46
2 627756-Kaniyarkode Persons 13236 5151 38.92 611 4.62 5762 43.53 7474 56.47
(CT ) Males 6455 3613 55.97 268 4.15 3881 60.12 2574 39.88
Females 6781 1538 22.68 343 5.06 1881 27.74 4900 72.26
3 627757-Cherut hurut hi Persons 13828 3486 25.21 507 3.67 3993 28.88 9835 71.12
(CT ) Males 6588 2840 43.11 336 5.10 3176 48.21 3412 51.79
Females 7240 646 8.92 171 2.36 817 11.28 6423 88.72
4 627758-Nedumpura Persons 12399 2895 23.35 888 7.16 3783 30.51 8616 69.49
(CT ) Males 5929 2384 40.21 619 10.44 3003 50.65 2926 49.35
Females 6470 511 7.90 269 4.16 780 12.06 5690 87.94
5 627759- Persons 8355 1944 23.27 555 6.64 2499 29.91 5856 70.09
Desamangalam (CT ) Males 4026 1632 40.54 328 8.15 1960 48.68 2066 51.32
Females 4329 312 7.21 227 5.24 539 12.45 3790 87.55
6 627760-Kadavallur Persons 12912 3792 29.37 440 3.41 4232 32.78 8680 67.22
(CT ) Males 6091 2985 49.01 186 3.05 3171 52.06 2920 47.94
Females 6821 807 11.83 254 3.72 1061 15.55 5760 84.45

127
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
7 627761- Persons 11836 3406 28.78 331 2.80 3737 31.57 8099 68.43
Katt akampal (CT ) Males 5419 2609 48.15 188 3.47 2797 51.61 2622 48.39
Females 6417 797 12.42 143 2.23 940 14.65 5477 85.35
8 627762-Pazhanji Persons 14067 4118 29.27 428 3.04 4546 32.32 9521 67.68
(CT ) Males 6646 3267 49.16 184 2.77 3451 51.93 3195 48.07
Females 7421 851 11.47 244 3.29 1095 14.76 6326 85.24
9 627763-Karikkad Persons 13656 3589 26.28 417 3.05 4006 29.34 9650 70.66
(CT ) Males 6498 2913 44.83 218 3.35 3131 48.18 3367 51.82
Females 7158 676 9.44 199 2.78 875 12.22 6283 87.78
10 627764-Nelluwaya Persons 5994 2136 35.64 298 4.97 2434 40.61 3560 59.39
(CT ) Males 2849 1543 54.16 99 3.47 1642 57.63 1207 42.37
Females 3145 593 18.86 199 6.33 792 25.18 2353 74.82
11 627765- Persons 6727 2143 31.86 463 6.88 2606 38.74 4121 61.26
Kott appuram (CT ) Males 3258 1677 51.47 168 5.16 1845 56.63 1413 43.37
Females 3469 466 13.43 295 8.50 761 21.94 2708 78.06
12 627766-Chitt anda Persons 5936 1866 31.44 429 7.23 2295 38.66 3641 61.34
(CT ) Males 2821 1387 49.17 190 6.74 1577 55.90 1244 44.10
Females 3115 479 15.38 239 7.67 718 23.05 2397 76.95
13 627767- Persons 7553 2118 28.04 489 6.47 2607 34.52 4946 65.48
Kumaranellur (CT ) Males 3627 1626 44.83 264 7.28 1890 52.11 1737 47.89
Females 3926 492 12.53 225 5.73 717 18.26 3209 81.74
14 627768- Persons 7528 2186 29.04 291 3.87 2477 32.90 5051 67.10
Chelakkara (CT ) Males 3535 1737 49.14 152 4.30 1889 53.44 1646 46.56
Females 3993 449 11.24 139 3.48 588 14.73 3405 85.27
15 627769-Enkakkad Persons 9584 2722 28.40 448 4.67 3170 33.08 6414 66.92
(CT ) Males 4530 2089 46.11 237 5.23 2326 51.35 2204 48.65
Females 5054 633 12.52 211 4.17 844 16.70 4210 83.30
16 627770- Persons 15674 4974 31.73 695 4.43 5669 36.17 10005 63.83
Wadakkanchery Males 7547 3766 49.90 293 3.88 4059 53.78 3488 46.22
(CT )
Females 8127 1208 14.86 402 4.95 1610 19.81 6517 80.19
17 627771- Persons 6363 2024 31.81 266 4.18 2290 35.99 4073 64.01
Kariyannur (CT ) Males 3065 1520 49.59 89 2.90 1609 52.50 1456 47.50
Females 3298 504 15.28 177 5.37 681 20.65 2617 79.35
18 627772-Eyyal Persons 6727 1981 29.45 436 6.48 2417 35.93 4310 64.07
(CT ) Males 3097 1500 48.43 222 7.17 1722 55.60 1375 44.40
Females 3630 481 13.25 214 5.90 695 19.15 2935 80.85
19 627773- Persons 11060 3156 28.54 394 3.56 3550 32.10 7510 67.90
Chiramanangad Males 5293 2565 48.46 140 2.65 2705 51.11 2588 48.89
(CT )
Females 5767 591 10.25 254 4.40 845 14.65 4922 85.35

128
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
20 627774- Persons 5847 1636 27.98 356 6.09 1992 34.07 3855 65.93
Akathiyoor (CT ) Males 2763 1268 45.89 214 7.75 1482 53.64 1281 46.36
Females 3084 368 11.93 142 4.60 510 16.54 2574 83.46
21 627775-Porkulam Persons 6503 1903 29.26 330 5.07 2233 34.34 4270 65.66
(CT ) Males 3123 1468 47.01 185 5.92 1653 52.93 1470 47.07
Females 3380 435 12.87 145 4.29 580 17.16 2800 82.84
22 627776-Choondal Persons 12502 3637 29.09 590 4.72 4227 33.81 8275 66.19
(CT ) Males 5866 2695 45.94 338 5.76 3033 51.70 2833 48.30
Females 6636 942 14.20 252 3.80 1194 17.99 5442 82.01
23 627777- Persons 9789 2543 25.98 303 3.10 2846 29.07 6943 70.93
Chiranellur (CT ) Males 4608 2058 44.66 134 2.91 2192 47.57 2416 52.43
Females 5181 485 9.36 169 3.26 654 12.62 4527 87.38
24 627778-Velur Persons 13928 3925 28.18 711 5.10 4636 33.29 9292 66.71
(CT ) Males 6675 3057 45.80 431 6.46 3488 52.25 3187 47.75
Females 7253 868 11.97 280 3.86 1148 15.83 6105 84.17
25 627779- Persons 7672 2338 30.47 429 5.59 2767 36.07 4905 63.93
Mundat hikode Males 3700 1745 47.16 179 4.84 1924 52.00 1776 48.00
(CT )
Females 3972 593 14.93 250 6.29 843 21.22 3129 78.78
26 627780- Persons 5577 2004 35.93 239 4.29 2243 40.22 3334 59.78
Peringandoor (CT) Males 2646 1308 49.43 91 3.44 1399 52.87 1247 47.13
Females 2931 696 23.75 148 5.05 844 28.80 2087 71.20
27 627781-Minalur Persons 6120 2190 35.78 141 2.30 2331 38.09 3789 61.91
(CT ) Males 2949 1610 54.59 60 2.03 1670 56.63 1279 43.37
Females 3171 580 18.29 81 2.55 661 20.85 2510 79.15
28 627782-Eranellur Persons 10145 2771 27.31 258 2.54 3029 29.86 7116 70.14
(CT ) Males 4735 2143 45.26 153 3.23 2296 48.49 2439 51.51
Females 5410 628 11.61 105 1.94 733 13.55 4677 86.45
29 627783-Alur (CT ) Persons 9807 3102 31.63 245 2.50 3347 34.13 6460 65.87
Males 4610 2253 48.87 124 2.69 2377 51.56 2233 48.44
Females 5197 849 16.34 121 2.33 970 18.66 4227 81.34
30 627784- Persons 14645 3970 27.11 482 3.29 4452 30.40 10193 69.60
Kandanassery Males 6727 3047 45.30 279 4.15 3326 49.44 3401 50.56
(CT )
Females 7918 923 11.66 203 2.56 1126 14.22 6792 85.78
31 803278- Persons 20510 5450 26.57 755 3.68 6205 30.25 14305 69.75
Guruvayoor (M) Males 9614 4113 42.78 502 5.22 4615 48.00 4999 52.00
Females 10896 1337 12.27 253 2.32 1590 14.59 9306 85.41
32 803279- Persons 39098 9300 23.79 1145 2.93 10445 26.71 28653 73.29
Chavakkad (M) Males 17762 7528 42.38 698 3.93 8226 46.31 9536 53.69
Females 21336 1772 8.31 447 2.10 2219 10.40 19117 89.60

129
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
33 627792-Kadikkad Persons 19147 4344 22.69 718 3.75 5062 26.44 14085 73.56
(CT ) Males 8734 3651 41.80 445 5.10 4096 46.90 4638 53.10
Females 10413 693 6.66 273 2.62 966 9.28 9447 90.72
34 627793- Persons 14221 2884 20.28 422 2.97 3306 23.25 10915 76.75
Punnayurkulam Males 6440 2429 37.72 237 3.68 2666 41.40 3774 58.60
(CT )
Females 7781 455 5.85 185 2.38 640 8.23 7141 91.77
35 627794- Persons 15811 2926 18.51 1149 7.27 4075 25.77 11736 74.23
Vadakkekad (CT ) Males 7127 2407 33.77 708 9.93 3115 43.71 4012 56.29
Females 8684 519 5.98 441 5.08 960 11.05 7724 88.95
36 627795-Punnayur Persons 19387 4533 23.38 627 3.23 5160 26.62 14227 73.38
(CT ) Males 9108 3955 43.42 307 3.37 4262 46.79 4846 53.21
Females 10279 578 5.62 320 3.11 898 8.74 9381 91.26
37 627796- Persons 17335 3989 23.01 527 3.04 4516 26.05 12819 73.95
Edakkazhiyur Males 8093 3475 42.94 280 3.46 3755 46.40 4338 53.60
(CT )
Females 9242 514 5.56 247 2.67 761 8.23 8481 91.77
38 627797-Vylathur Persons 10298 2666 25.89 512 4.97 3178 30.86 7120 69.14
(CT ) Males 4773 2028 42.49 244 5.11 2272 47.60 2501 52.40
Females 5525 638 11.55 268 4.85 906 16.40 4619 83.60
39 627798-Pookode Persons 9366 2185 23.33 263 2.81 2448 26.14 6918 73.86
(CT ) Males 4242 1796 42.34 162 3.82 1958 46.16 2284 53.84
Females 5124 389 7.59 101 1.97 490 9.56 4634 90.44
40 627799- Persons 12343 3381 27.39 503 4.08 3884 31.47 8459 68.53
Iringaprom (CT ) Males 5768 2559 44.37 301 5.22 2860 49.58 2908 50.42
Females 6575 822 12.50 202 3.07 1024 15.57 5551 84.43
41 627800-Perakam Persons 12072 3277 27.15 330 2.73 3607 29.88 8465 70.12
(CT ) Males 5588 2559 45.79 201 3.60 2760 49.39 2828 50.61
Females 6484 718 11.07 129 1.99 847 13.06 5637 86.94
42 627801- Persons 14064 2884 20.51 490 3.48 3374 23.99 10690 76.01
Orumanayur (CT ) Males 6243 2286 36.62 293 4.69 2579 41.31 3664 58.69
Females 7821 598 7.65 197 2.52 795 10.16 7026 89.84
43 627802-Paluvai Persons 9127 2332 25.55 295 3.23 2627 28.78 6500 71.22
(CT ) Males 4183 1817 43.44 121 2.89 1938 46.33 2245 53.67
Females 4944 515 10.42 174 3.52 689 13.94 4255 86.06
44 627803-T haikkad Persons 6594 1655 25.10 276 4.19 1931 29.28 4663 70.72
(CT ) Males 3055 1303 42.65 119 3.90 1422 46.55 1633 53.45
Females 3539 352 9.95 157 4.44 509 14.38 3030 85.62
45 627804- Persons 14390 4371 30.38 200 1.39 4571 31.77 9819 68.23
Brahmakulam Males 6747 3335 49.43 94 1.39 3429 50.82 3318 49.18
(CT )
Females 7643 1036 13.55 106 1.39 1142 14.94 6501 85.06

130
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011 (Contd..)

Sr. Name of town Persons Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. / populat and marginal
Males/ ion workers)
Females Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
46 627805-Elavally Persons 12819 3509 27.37 699 5.45 4208 32.83 8611 67.17
(CT ) Males 5969 2736 45.84 329 5.51 3065 51.35 2904 48.65
Females 6850 773 11.28 370 5.40 1143 16.69 5707 83.31
47 627806-Pavarat ty Persons 12299 2854 23.21 551 4.48 3405 27.69 8894 72.31
(CT ) Males 5570 2230 40.04 318 5.71 2548 45.75 3022 54.25
Females 6729 624 9.27 233 3.46 857 12.74 5872 87.26
48 627807-Venmanad Persons 8377 2035 24.29 257 3.07 2292 27.36 6085 72.64
(CT ) Males 3901 1667 42.73 135 3.46 1802 46.19 2099 53.81
Females 4476 368 8.22 122 2.73 490 10.95 3986 89.05
49 627808-Mullassery Persons 12165 3341 27.46 386 3.17 3727 30.64 8438 69.36
(CT ) Males 5551 2540 45.76 195 3.51 2735 49.27 2816 50.73
Females 6614 801 12.11 191 2.89 992 15.00 5622 85.00
50 627809-Venkitangu Persons 11335 2832 24.98 569 5.02 3401 30.00 7934 70.00
(CT ) Males 5204 2192 42.12 307 5.90 2499 48.02 2705 51.98
Females 6131 640 10.44 262 4.27 902 14.71 5229 85.29
51 627810- Persons 30657 7559 24.66 1462 4.77 9021 29.43 21636 70.57
Vadanappally (CT) Males 13966 6026 43.15 697 4.99 6723 48.14 7243 51.86
Females 16691 1533 9.18 765 4.58 2298 13.77 14393 86.23
52 627811- Persons 25507 6117 23.98 1582 6.20 7699 30.18 17808 69.82
Talikkulam (CT) Males 11512 4758 41.33 809 7.03 5567 48.36 5945 51.64
Females 13995 1359 9.71 773 5.52 2132 15.23 11863 84.77
53 803280-T hrissur Persons 315957 104484 33.07 8621 2.73 113105 35.80 202852 64.20
(M Corp.) Males 152296 77028 50.58 4486 2.95 81514 53.52 70782 46.48
Females 163661 27456 16.78 4135 2.53 31591 19.30 132070 80.70
54 627825-Killannur Persons 20339 7122 35.02 1080 5.31 8202 40.33 12137 59.67
(CT ) Males 9910 5214 52.61 463 4.67 5677 57.29 4233 42.71
Females 10429 1908 18.30 617 5.92 2525 24.21 7904 75.79
55 627826-T hangalur Persons 4587 1549 33.77 98 2.14 1647 35.91 2940 64.09
(CT ) Males 2248 1083 48.18 36 1.60 1119 49.78 1129 50.22
Females 2339 466 19.92 62 2.65 528 22.57 1811 77.43
56 627827-Avanur Persons 7879 2850 36.17 214 2.72 3064 38.89 4815 61.11
(CT ) Males 3815 2058 53.94 92 2.41 2150 56.36 1665 43.64
Females 4064 792 19.49 122 3.00 914 22.49 3150 77.51
57 627828-Anjur (CT) Persons 10860 3603 33.18 299 2.75 3902 35.93 6958 64.07
Males 5232 2668 50.99 153 2.92 2821 53.92 2411 46.08
Females 5628 935 16.61 146 2.59 1081 19.21 4547 80.79
58 627829- Persons 7179 2205 30.71 441 6.14 2646 36.86 4533 63.14
Kaiparamba (CT )
Males 3514 1710 48.66 262 7.46 1972 56.12 1542 43.88

Females 3665 495 13.51 179 4.88 674 18.39 2991 81.61

131
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
59 627830-T holur Persons 7454 2590 34.75 229 3.07 2819 37.82 4635 62.18
(CT ) Males 3543 1885 53.20 73 2.06 1958 55.26 1585 44.74
Females 3911 705 18.03 156 3.99 861 22.01 3050 77.99
60 627831- Persons 8039 2428 30.20 605 7.53 3033 37.73 5006 62.27
Edakkalat hur (CT ) Males 3799 1868 49.17 277 7.29 2145 56.46 1654 43.54
Females 4240 560 13.21 328 7.74 888 20.94 3352 79.06
61 627832- Persons 13260 4556 34.36 655 4.94 5211 39.30 8049 60.70
Peramangalam Males 6457 3260 50.49 332 5.14 3592 55.63 2865 44.37
(CT )
Females 6803 1296 19.05 323 4.75 1619 23.80 5184 76.20
62 627833- Persons 5441 2022 37.16 237 4.36 2259 41.52 3182 58.48
Choolissery (CT ) Males 2736 1522 55.63 121 4.42 1643 60.05 1093 39.95
Females 2705 500 18.48 116 4.29 616 22.77 2089 77.23
63 627834-Pott ore Persons 7848 2534 32.29 312 3.98 2846 36.26 5002 63.74
(CT ) Males 3837 1920 50.04 120 3.13 2040 53.17 1797 46.83
Females 4011 614 15.31 192 4.79 806 20.09 3205 79.91
64 627835-Kolazhy Persons 11540 3782 32.77 477 4.13 4259 36.91 7281 63.09
(CT ) Males 5603 2696 48.12 258 4.60 2954 52.72 2649 47.28
Females 5937 1086 18.29 219 3.69 1305 21.98 4632 78.02
65 627836- Persons 4081 1476 36.17 149 3.65 1625 39.82 2456 60.18
Kurichikkara (CT ) Males 1993 1086 54.49 46 2.31 1132 56.80 861 43.20
Females 2088 390 18.68 103 4.93 493 23.61 1595 76.39
66 627837- Persons 6167 2129 34.52 310 5.03 2439 39.55 3728 60.45
Vellanikkara (CT ) Males 2997 1473 49.15 148 4.94 1621 54.09 1376 45.91
Females 3170 656 20.69 162 5.11 818 25.80 2352 74.20
67 627838-Kutt oor Persons 12179 4217 34.63 575 4.72 4792 39.35 7387 60.65
(CT ) Males 5957 3144 52.78 250 4.20 3394 56.97 2563 43.03
Females 6222 1073 17.25 325 5.22 1398 22.47 4824 77.53
68 627839-Puzhakkal Persons 8609 3023 35.11 403 4.68 3426 39.80 5183 60.20
(CT ) Males 4078 2034 49.88 225 5.52 2259 55.39 1819 44.61
Females 4531 989 21.83 178 3.93 1167 25.76 3364 74.24
69 627840- Persons 10655 3322 31.18 422 3.96 3744 35.14 6911 64.86
Puranat tukara Males 5092 2475 48.61 214 4.20 2689 52.81 2403 47.19
(CT )
Females 5563 847 15.23 208 3.74 1055 18.96 4508 81.04
70 627841- Persons 6988 2370 33.92 299 4.28 2669 38.19 4319 61.81
Chit tilappilly (CT ) Males 3340 1697 50.81 112 3.35 1809 54.16 1531 45.84
Females 3648 673 18.45 187 5.13 860 23.57 2788 76.43
71 627842-Adat (CT ) Persons 5721 2248 39.29 244 4.26 2492 43.56 3229 56.44
Males 2862 1635 57.13 116 4.05 1751 61.18 1111 38.82
Females 2859 613 21.44 128 4.48 741 25.92 2118 74.08

132
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
72 627843- Persons 9918 3545 35.74 558 5.63 4103 41.37 5815 58.63
Kozhukkully (CT ) Males 4868 2680 55.05 247 5.07 2927 60.13 1941 39.87
Females 5050 865 17.13 311 6.16 1176 23.29 3874 76.71
73 627844-Kainoor Persons 7344 2459 33.48 771 10.50 3230 43.98 4114 56.02
(CT ) Males 3666 1784 48.66 424 11.57 2208 60.23 1458 39.77
Females 3678 675 18.35 347 9.43 1022 27.79 2656 72.21
74 627845-Nadathara Persons 11969 4284 35.79 380 3.17 4664 38.97 7305 61.03
(CT ) Males 5848 3158 54.00 159 2.72 3317 56.72 2531 43.28
Females 6121 1126 18.40 221 3.61 1347 22.01 4774 77.99
75 627846-Parakkad Persons 9093 2775 30.52 557 6.13 3332 36.64 5761 63.36
(CT ) Males 4422 2109 47.69 317 7.17 2426 54.86 1996 45.14
Females 4671 666 14.26 240 5.14 906 19.40 3765 80.60
76 627847-Karamuck Persons 15129 4235 27.99 837 5.53 5072 33.53 10057 66.47
(CT ) Males 7055 3249 46.05 374 5.30 3623 51.35 3432 48.65
Females 8074 986 12.21 463 5.73 1449 17.95 6625 82.05
77 627848-Manalur Persons 17757 5554 31.28 1067 6.01 6621 37.29 11136 62.71
(CT ) Males 8442 4163 49.31 471 5.58 4634 54.89 3808 45.11
Females 9315 1391 14.93 596 6.40 1987 21.33 7328 78.67
78 627849-Eravu Persons 4447 1409 31.68 138 3.10 1547 34.79 2900 65.21
(CT ) Males 2089 1030 49.31 67 3.21 1097 52.51 992 47.49
Females 2358 379 16.07 71 3.01 450 19.08 1908 80.92
79 627850-Veluthur Persons 11602 3453 29.76 701 6.04 4154 35.80 7448 64.20
(CT ) Males 5636 2694 47.80 364 6.46 3058 54.26 2578 45.74
Females 5966 759 12.72 337 5.65 1096 18.37 4870 81.63
80 627851- Persons 7150 1781 24.91 539 7.54 2320 32.45 4830 67.55
Manakkody (CT ) Males 3484 1429 41.02 337 9.67 1766 50.69 1718 49.31
Females 3666 352 9.60 202 5.51 554 15.11 3112 84.89
81 627852- Persons 15817 5169 32.68 583 3.69 5752 36.37 10065 63.63
Marat hakkara Males 7852 4031 51.34 284 3.62 4315 54.95 3537 45.05
(CT )
Females 7965 1138 14.29 299 3.75 1437 18.04 6528 81.96
82 627853-Puthur Persons 17430 6272 35.98 1273 7.30 7545 43.29 9885 56.71
(CT ) Males 8605 4673 54.31 515 5.98 5188 60.29 3417 39.71
Females 8825 1599 18.12 758 8.59 2357 26.71 6468 73.29
83 627854- Persons 13983 4291 30.69 794 5.68 5085 36.37 8898 63.63
Avinissery (CT ) Males 6833 3281 48.02 452 6.61 3733 54.63 3100 45.37
Females 7150 1010 14.13 342 4.78 1352 18.91 5798 81.09
84 627855-Palissery Persons 7724 2528 32.73 418 5.41 2946 38.14 4778 61.86
(CT ) Males 3741 1945 51.99 185 4.95 2130 56.94 1611 43.06
Females 3983 583 14.64 233 5.85 816 20.49 3167 79.51

133
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
85 627856- Persons 5533 1879 33.96 196 3.54 2075 37.50 3458 62.50
Venginissery (CT ) Males 2656 1448 54.52 89 3.35 1537 57.87 1119 42.13
Females 2877 431 14.98 107 3.72 538 18.70 2339 81.30
86 627857-Kodannur Persons 7655 2463 32.18 408 5.33 2871 37.50 4784 62.50
(CT ) Males 3707 1914 51.63 224 6.04 2138 57.67 1569 42.33
Females 3948 549 13.91 184 4.66 733 18.57 3215 81.43
87 627858-Anthicad Persons 9826 2669 27.16 997 10.15 3666 37.31 6160 62.69
(CT ) Males 4637 1977 42.64 451 9.73 2428 52.36 2209 47.64
Females 5189 692 13.34 546 10.52 1238 23.86 3951 76.14
88 627859-Padiyam Persons 11623 3155 27.14 664 5.71 3819 32.86 7804 67.14
(CT ) Males 5339 2428 45.48 268 5.02 2696 50.50 2643 49.50
Females 6284 727 11.57 396 6.30 1123 17.87 5161 82.13
89 627860- Persons 9585 2325 24.26 506 5.28 2831 29.54 6754 70.46
Vadakkummuri Males 4280 1782 41.64 240 5.61 2022 47.24 2258 52.76
(CT )
Females 5305 543 10.24 266 5.01 809 15.25 4496 84.75
90 627861- Persons 4635 1233 26.60 431 9.30 1664 35.90 2971 64.10
Kizhakkummuri Males 2155 903 41.90 206 9.56 1109 51.46 1046 48.54
(CT )
Females 2480 330 13.31 225 9.07 555 22.38 1925 77.62
91 627862-Cherpu Persons 7864 1916 24.36 688 8.75 2604 33.11 5260 66.89
(CT ) Males 3691 1565 42.40 336 9.10 1901 51.50 1790 48.50
Females 4173 351 8.41 352 8.44 703 16.85 3470 83.15
92 627863-Paralam Persons 9187 3162 34.42 337 3.67 3499 38.09 5688 61.91
(CT ) Males 4498 2413 53.65 171 3.80 2584 57.45 1914 42.55
Females 4689 749 15.97 166 3.54 915 19.51 3774 80.49
93 627864-Chevvoor Persons 16086 5073 31.54 930 5.78 6003 37.32 10083 62.68
(CT ) Males 7691 3973 51.66 421 5.47 4394 57.13 3297 42.87
Females 8395 1100 13.10 509 6.06 1609 19.17 6786 80.83
94 627865-Vallachira Persons 12970 3891 30.00 745 5.74 4636 35.74 8334 64.26
(CT ) Males 6356 3137 49.35 448 7.05 3585 56.40 2771 43.60
Females 6614 754 11.40 297 4.49 1051 15.89 5563 84.11
95 627866-Oorakam Persons 13149 3970 30.19 502 3.82 4472 34.01 8677 65.99
(CT ) Males 6229 3027 48.60 270 4.33 3297 52.93 2932 47.07
Females 6920 943 13.63 232 3.35 1175 16.98 5745 83.02
96 627867- Persons 14329 4112 28.70 678 4.73 4790 33.43 9539 66.57
Kurumpilavu (CT ) Males 6692 3132 46.80 353 5.27 3485 52.08 3207 47.92
Females 7637 980 12.83 325 4.26 1305 17.09 6332 82.91
97 627868- Persons 5275 1141 21.63 290 5.50 1431 27.13 3844 72.87
Kizhuppillikkara Males 2379 902 37.92 171 7.19 1073 45.10 1306 54.90
(CT )
Females 2896 239 8.25 119 4.11 358 12.36 2538 87.64

134
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
98 627869- Persons 9743 2231 22.90 548 5.62 2779 28.52 6964 71.48
T hanniyam (CT ) Males 4430 1765 39.84 354 7.99 2119 47.83 2311 52.17
Females 5313 466 8.77 194 3.65 660 12.42 4653 87.58
99 803281- Persons 60190 17839 29.64 3866 6.42 21705 36.06 38485 63.94
Kodungallur (M + Males 28452 14274 50.17 1647 5.79 15921 55.96 12531 44.04
OG)
Females 31738 3565 11.23 2219 6.99 5784 18.22 25954 81.78
100 627873- Persons 12921 2906 22.49 984 7.62 3890 30.11 9031 69.89
Edat hiruthy (CT ) Males 5782 2210 38.22 566 9.79 2776 48.01 3006 51.99
Females 7139 696 9.75 418 5.86 1114 15.60 6025 84.40
101 627874- Persons 16404 3411 20.79 912 5.56 4323 26.35 12081 73.65
Chendrappini (CT ) Males 7422 2659 35.83 544 7.33 3203 43.16 4219 56.84
Females 8982 752 8.37 368 4.10 1120 12.47 7862 87.53
102 627875- Persons 35626 8362 23.47 1811 5.08 10173 28.55 25453 71.45
Kaipamangalam Males 16290 6898 42.34 871 5.35 7769 47.69 8521 52.31
(CT )
Females 19336 1464 7.57 940 4.86 2404 12.43 16932 87.57
103 627876- Persons 21012 5074 24.15 1818 8.65 6892 32.80 14120 67.20
Perinjanam (CT ) Males 9666 3901 40.36 933 9.65 4834 50.01 4832 49.99
Females 11346 1173 10.34 885 7.80 2058 18.14 9288 81.86
104 627877- Persons 15336 3571 23.29 885 5.77 4456 29.06 10880 70.94
Pappinivatt om Males 6909 2770 40.09 506 7.32 3276 47.42 3633 52.58
(CT )
Females 8427 801 9.51 379 4.50 1180 14.00 7247 86.00
105 627878-Panangad Persons 15630 3642 23.30 1911 12.23 5553 35.53 10077 64.47
(CT ) Males 7392 2928 39.61 1001 13.54 3929 53.15 3463 46.85
Females 8238 714 8.67 910 11.05 1624 19.71 6614 80.29
106 627879- Persons 20363 5636 27.68 1731 8.50 7367 36.18 12996 63.82
Edavilangu (CT ) Males 9510 4528 47.61 722 7.59 5250 55.21 4260 44.79
Females 10853 1108 10.21 1009 9.30 2117 19.51 8736 80.49
107 627880-Ala (CT ) Persons 10493 2905 27.69 732 6.98 3637 34.66 6856 65.34
Males 4962 2358 47.52 320 6.45 2678 53.97 2284 46.03
Females 5531 547 9.89 412 7.45 959 17.34 4572 82.66
108 627881- Persons 7718 2577 33.39 327 4.24 2904 37.63 4814 62.37
Pallippuram (CT ) Males 3790 1963 51.79 129 3.40 2092 55.20 1698 44.80
Females 3928 614 15.63 198 5.04 812 20.67 3116 79.33
109 627882-Methala Persons 37505 11918 31.78 2325 6.20 14243 37.98 23262 62.02
(CT ) Males 17973 9167 51.00 974 5.42 10141 56.42 7832 43.58
Females 19532 2751 14.08 1351 6.92 4102 21.00 15430 79.00
110 627883-Poyya Persons 10478 3179 30.34 691 6.59 3870 36.93 6608 63.07
(CT ) Males 5003 2487 49.71 265 5.30 2752 55.01 2251 44.99
Females 5475 692 12.64 426 7.78 1118 20.42 4357 79.58

135
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Males/ popul and marginal
Females ation workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
111 627884- Persons 4294 1137 26.48 425 9.90 1562 36.38 2732 63.62
Madat humpady Males 2113 901 42.64 261 12.35 1162 54.99 951 45.01
(CT )
Females 2181 236 10.82 164 7.52 400 18.34 1781 81.66
112 803282- Persons 28741 8156 28.38 878 3.05 9034 31.43 19707 68.57
Irinjalakuda (M) Males 13425 5929 44.16 530 3.95 6459 48.11 6966 51.89
Females 15316 2227 14.54 348 2.27 2575 16.81 12741 83.19
113 803283-Chalakudy Persons 49525 15670 31.64 1918 3.87 17588 35.51 31937 64.49
(M) Males 23744 11771 49.57 1026 4.32 12797 53.90 10947 46.10
Females 25781 3899 15.12 892 3.46 4791 18.58 20990 81.42
114 627919-T rikkur Persons 13093 4118 31.45 582 4.45 4700 35.90 8393 64.10
(CT ) Males 6465 3244 50.18 292 4.52 3536 54.69 2929 45.31
Females 6628 874 13.19 290 4.38 1164 17.56 5464 82.44
115 627920- Persons 18067 6272 34.72 906 5.01 7178 39.73 10889 60.27
Nenmenikkara Males 8891 4724 53.13 469 5.27 5193 58.41 3698 41.59
(CT )
Females 9176 1548 16.87 437 4.76 1985 21.63 7191 78.37
116 627921-Amballur Persons 29341 10025 34.17 1507 5.14 11532 39.30 17809 60.70
(CT ) Males 14308 7404 51.75 739 5.16 8143 56.91 6165 43.09
Females 15033 2621 17.43 768 5.11 3389 22.54 11644 77.46
117 627922- Persons 12615 3554 28.17 1180 9.35 4734 37.53 7881 62.47
Puthukkad (CT ) Males 6094 2658 43.62 649 10.65 3307 54.27 2787 45.73
Females 6521 896 13.74 531 8.14 1427 21.88 5094 78.12
118 627923- Persons 11893 3639 30.60 1052 8.85 4691 39.44 7202 60.56
Parappukkara Males 5703 2672 46.85 516 9.05 3188 55.90 2515 44.10
(CT )
Females 6190 967 15.62 536 8.66 1503 24.28 4687 75.72
119 627924-Katt ur Persons 18017 5194 28.83 825 4.58 6019 33.41 11998 66.59
(CT ) Males 8315 3921 47.16 380 4.57 4301 51.73 4014 48.27
Females 9702 1273 13.12 445 4.59 1718 17.71 7984 82.29
120 627925- Persons 16768 5433 32.40 712 4.25 6145 36.65 10623 63.35
Porathissery (CT ) Males 7829 3963 50.62 312 3.99 4275 54.60 3554 45.40
Females 8939 1470 16.44 400 4.47 1870 20.92 7069 79.08
121 627926- Persons 14155 4348 30.72 752 5.31 5100 36.03 9055 63.97
Madayikonam Males 6622 3280 49.53 407 6.15 3687 55.68 2935 44.32
(CT )
Females 7533 1068 14.18 345 4.58 1413 18.76 6120 81.24
122 627927- Persons 7097 2291 32.28 180 2.54 2471 34.82 4626 65.18
Kallet tumkara Males 3402 1733 50.94 56 1.65 1789 52.59 1613 47.41
(CT )
Females 3695 558 15.10 124 3.36 682 18.46 3013 81.54
123 627928-Pullur Persons 12656 3952 31.23 399 3.15 4351 34.38 8305 65.62
(CT ) Males 5923 2979 50.30 223 3.76 3202 54.06 2721 45.94
Females 6733 973 14.45 176 2.61 1149 17.07 5584 82.93

136
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
(Contd..)
Sr. Name of Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers Non workers
No. town Males/ populati (main and marginal
Females on workers)
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
124 627929- Persons 7364 2039 27.69 522 7.09 2561 34.78 4803 65.22
Manavalassery Males 3355 1529 45.57 255 7.60 1784 53.17 1571 46.83
(CT )
Females 4009 510 12.72 267 6.66 777 19.38 3232 80.62
125 627930- Persons 9849 2619 26.59 826 8.39 3445 34.98 6404 65.02
Edathirinji Males 4568 2038 44.61 387 8.47 2425 53.09 2143 46.91
(CT )
Females 5281 581 11.00 439 8.31 1020 19.31 4261 80.69
126 627931- Persons 8146 2510 30.81 590 7.24 3100 38.06 5046 61.94
Vellookkara Males 3697 1833 49.58 256 6.92 2089 56.51 1608 43.49
(CT )
Females 4449 677 15.22 334 7.51 1011 22.72 3438 77.28
127 627932- Persons 10407 2723 26.17 524 5.04 3247 31.20 7160 68.80
Vadakkumkara Males 4862 2217 45.60 274 5.64 2491 51.23 2371 48.77
(CT )
Females 5545 506 9.13 250 4.51 756 13.63 4789 86.37
128 627933- Persons 11141 2859 25.66 1151 10.33 4010 35.99 7131 64.01
Poomangalam Males 5086 2113 41.55 562 11.05 2675 52.60 2411 47.40
(CT )
Females 6055 746 12.32 589 9.73 1335 22.05 4720 77.95
129 627934- Persons 8823 2063 23.38 1102 12.49 3165 35.87 5658 64.13
Padiyur (CT ) Males 4115 1645 39.98 543 13.20 2188 53.17 1927 46.83
Females 4708 418 8.88 559 11.87 977 20.75 3731 79.25
130 627935- Persons 15258 3390 22.22 1446 9.48 4836 31.69 10422 68.31
Thekkumkara Males 7110 2807 39.48 949 13.35 3756 52.83 3354 47.17
(CT )
Females 8148 583 7.16 497 6.10 1080 13.25 7068 86.75
131 627936- Persons 4981 1715 34.43 147 2.95 1862 37.38 3119 62.62
Muringur Males 2281 1163 50.99 81 3.55 1244 54.54 1037 45.46
Vadakkummuri
(CT ) Females 2700 552 20.44 66 2.44 618 22.89 2082 77.11
132 627937- Persons 17618 5517 31.31 913 5.18 6430 36.50 11188 63.50
Korat ty (CT ) Males 8593 4190 48.76 479 5.57 4669 54.33 3924 45.67
Females 9025 1327 14.70 434 4.81 1761 19.51 7264 80.49
133 627938-Kallur Persons 25259 8011 31.72 1760 6.97 9771 38.68 15488 61.32
Vadakkummuri Males 12166 5919 48.65 816 6.71 6735 55.36 5431 44.64
(CT )
Females 13093 2092 15.98 944 7.21 3036 23.19 10057 76.81
134 627939- Persons 11573 3186 27.53 486 4.20 3672 31.73 7901 68.27
Vadama (CT ) Males 5433 2410 44.36 321 5.91 2731 50.27 2702 49.73
Females 6140 776 12.64 165 2.69 941 15.33 5199 84.67
135 627940-Kallur Persons 17480 5368 30.71 763 4.36 6131 35.07 11349 64.93
Thekkummuri Males 8401 4136 49.23 390 4.64 4526 53.87 3875 46.13
(CT )
Females 9079 1232 13.57 373 4.11 1605 17.68 7474 82.32

Dist rict (Urban): Persons 2096406 616551 29.41 99977 4.77 716528 34.18 1379878 65.82
T hrissur(594)
Males 992460 470279 47.39 50718 5.11 520997 52.50 471463 47.50

Females 1103946 146272 13.25 49259 4.46 195531 17.71 908415 82.29

137
In this table, the number and the percentage of total workers, main workers, marginal workers and
non-workers by sex are given for the district urban.
The percentage of total workers in the district urban is 34.18. Of the total workers, 29.41 per cent
are main workers and 3.7 per cent are marginal workers. The percentage of urban male main workers (47.39
per cent) and urban male marginal workers (5.11 per cent) exceed the percentage of urban female main
workers (13.25 per cent) and urban female marginal workers (4.46 per cent). Among urban non-workers,
there is higher percentage of females (82.29 per cent) than males (47.50 per cent).
Among the towns, the highest percentage of total workers is in Kainoor CT (43.98 per cent) and the
lowest is in Punnayurkulam CT (23.25 per cent). In all the towns, the percentage of male workers is higher
than the percentage of female workers. There are seventy six towns have higher percentage of workers
than the district average for total workers in urban area (34.18 per cent).
As regards the main workers, the highest percentage is reported in Adat CT (39.29 per cent) and the
lowest in Vadakkekad CT (18.51 per cent). In all the towns, the percentage of male main workers is higher
than the percentage of female main workers.
In the case of marginal workers, the highest percentage is in Padiyur CT (12.49 per cent) and the
lowest is in Brahmakulam CT (1.39 per cent). There are sixty seven towns have higher percentage of
marginal workers than the district average for marginal workers in urban area (4.77 per cent).
In all the towns, more than fifty five percentage of the population are non-workers. The highest
percentage of non-workers is reported in Punnayurkulam CT (76.75 per cent) and the lowest in Kainoor CT
(56.02 per cent).
Table 33: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Taluk, 2011
Sr. Name of Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Taluk Males/ populati workers
Females on (main + Cultivators Agricultural
Household Other workers
marginal labourers industry
workers) workers
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 05652- Persons 632086 222408 10168 4.57 26228 11.79 6108 2.75 179904 80.89
T alappilly Males 301050 161330 8225 5.10 14583 9.04 3984 2.47 134538 83.39
Females 331036 61078 1943 3.18 11645 19.07 2124 3.48 45366 74.28
2 05653- Persons 470898 135188 2176 1.61 5134 3.80 3096 2.29 124782 92.30
Chavakkad Males 215864 102153 1794 1.76 3447 3.37 1934 1.89 94978 92.98
Females 255034 33035 382 1.16 1687 5.11 1162 3.52 29804 90.22
3 05654- Persons 874615 323288 8469 2.62 15251 4.72 8818 2.73 290750 89.94
T hrissur Males 421259 230397 6590 2.86 9274 4.03 6169 2.68 208364 90.44
Females 453356 92891 1879 2.02 5977 6.43 2649 2.85 82386 88.69
4 05655- Persons 312238 105910 1354 1.28 2767 2.61 2866 2.71 98923 93.40
Kodungallur Males 145998 76896 1009 1.31 1960 2.55 1407 1.83 72520 94.31
Females 166240 29014 345 1.19 807 2.78 1459 5.03 26403 91.00
5 05656- Persons 831363 308933 19619 6.35 24561 7.95 6995 2.26 257758 83.43
Mukundapuram Males 396592 218735 14999 6.86 16058 7.34 4589 2.10 183089 83.70
Females 434771 90198 4620 5.12 8503 9.43 2406 2.67 74669 82.78
Dist rict : Persons 3121200 1095727 41786 3.81 73941 6.75 27883 2.54 952117 86.89
T hrissur (594) Males 1480763 789511 32617 4.13 45322 5.74 18083 2.29 693489 87.84
Females 1640437 306216 9169 2.99 28619 9.35 9800 3.20 258628 84.46

138
In this table, the total population, the total workers and their four categories with percentage to
total workers are given by sex for the district and the taluks.

In the district, among the four categories of workers, Other Workers constitute the highest
percentage of the workers (86.89 per cent). The next category in which the highest percentage of workers
are engaged is Agricultural Labourers with 6.75 per cent, followed by Cultivators (3.81 per cent) and
Household Industry Workers (2.54 per cent). In cultivation and other activities, there is higher percentage
of male workers than female workers. Agricultural Labour and Household Industry are the two categories
in which female workers are predominant.

Among the five taluks, Other Workers predominate in all the taluks viz. Talappilly (80.89 per cent),
Chavakkad (92.30 per cent), Thrissur (89.94 per cent), Kodungallur (93.40 per cent) and Mukundapuram
(83.43 per cent). Agricultural Labourers constitute the second category of workers with the highest
percentage of workers in Talappilly (11.79 per cent) taluk and the lowest in Kodungallur (2.61 per cent)
taluk. The highest percentage of Household Industry Workers is in Talappilly (2.75 per cent) taluk and
lowest in Mukundapuram (2.26 per cent) taluk. In all the taluks, male Cultivators and male Other Workers
predominate. But Female Agricultural Labourers and female Household Industry Workers predominate in
all the taluks.

Table 34: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in CD blocks, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Persons/ Total Total Category of Workers
No. Block Males/ populati workers
Cultivators AgriculturalHousehold Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 0056-Chowwannur Persons 30575 10191 463 4.54 658 6.46 225 2.21 8845 86.79
Males 14326 7538 368 4.88 414 5.49 155 2.06 6601 87.57
Females 16249 2653 95 3.58 244 9.20 70 2.64 2244 84.58
2 0057- Persons 125557 45023 2779 6.17 5476 12.16 958 2.13 35810 79.54
Wadakkanchery Males 60294 32884 2261 6.88 3296 10.02 590 1.79 26737 81.31
Females 65263 12139 518 4.27 2180 17.96 368 3.03 9073 74.74
3 0058-Pazhayannur Persons 135913 52847 3613 6.84 11568 21.89 1092 2.07 36574 69.21
Males 65362 36806 2930 7.96 5756 15.64 731 1.99 27389 74.41
Females 70551 16041 683 4.26 5812 36.23 361 2.25 9185 57.26
4 0059-Chavakkad Persons 22929 5938 56 0.94 57 0.96 41 0.69 5784 97.41
Males 10517 4926 32 0.65 31 0.63 15 0.30 4848 98.42
Females 12412 1012 24 2.37 26 2.57 26 2.57 936 92.49
5 0060-T alikkulam Persons 77753 23935 807 3.37 971 4.06 479 2.00 21678 90.57
Males 35513 17171 640 3.73 666 3.88 304 1.77 15561 90.62
Females 42240 6764 167 2.47 305 4.51 175 2.59 6117 90.43
6 0061-Mullassery Persons 23294 7173 282 3.93 841 11.72 214 2.98 5836 81.36
Males 10684 5164 233 4.51 499 9.66 163 3.16 4269 82.67
Females 12610 2009 49 2.44 342 17.02 51 2.54 1567 78.00
7 0062-Puzhakkal Persons 7513 2711 112 4.13 140 5.16 39 1.44 2420 89.27
Males 3635 1903 103 5.41 71 3.73 26 1.37 1703 89.49
Females 3878 808 9 1.11 69 8.54 13 1.61 717 88.74

139
Table 34: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in CD blocks, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of CD Persons/ Total Total Category of Workers
No. Block Males/ populati workers Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main + labourers industry
marginal workers
workers) Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
8 0063-Ollukkara Persons 80971 33910 3387 9.99 4077 12.02 685 2.02 25761 75.97
Males 39659 23326 2719 11.66 2601 11.15 402 1.72 17604 75.47
Females 41312 10584 668 6.31 1476 13.95 283 2.67 8157 77.07
9 0064-Anthicad Persons 14812 5080 317 6.24 650 12.80 211 4.15 3902 76.81
Males 6737 3438 240 6.98 344 10.01 162 4.71 2692 78.30
Females 8075 1642 77 4.69 306 18.64 49 2.98 1210 73.69
10 0065-Cherpu Persons 9713 3896 144 3.70 370 9.50 168 4.31 3214 82.49
Males 4638 2700 111 4.11 237 8.78 122 4.52 2230 82.59
Females 5075 1196 33 2.76 133 11.12 46 3.85 984 82.27
11 0066-Mat hilakam Persons 24333 8440 186 2.20 358 4.24 326 3.86 7570 89.69
Males 11199 5876 148 2.52 234 3.98 103 1.75 5391 91.75
Females 13134 2564 38 1.48 124 4.84 223 8.70 2179 84.98
12 0067-Kodungallur Persons 19935 6895 112 1.62 95 1.38 243 3.52 6445 93.47
Males 9535 5237 61 1.16 58 1.11 135 2.58 4983 95.15
Females 10400 1658 51 3.08 37 2.23 108 6.51 1462 88.18
13 0068-Mala Persons 91783 35437 3703 10.45 3620 10.22 766 2.16 27348 77.17
Males 43739 24538 2679 10.92 2284 9.31 474 1.93 19101 77.84
Females 48044 10899 1024 9.40 1336 12.26 292 2.68 8247 75.67
14 0069-Parakkadavu Persons 0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
(Part ) Males 0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Females 0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
15 0070-Irinjalakuda Persons 51631 19582 1644 8.40 1861 9.50 460 2.35 15617 79.75
Males 24432 13628 1190 8.73 1230 9.03 322 2.36 10886 79.88
Females 27199 5954 454 7.63 631 10.60 138 2.32 4731 79.46
16 0071-Kodakara Persons 150541 57930 4490 7.75 5267 9.09 1472 2.54 46701 80.62
Males 72568 41245 3448 8.36 3456 8.38 947 2.30 33394 80.96
Females 77973 16685 1042 6.25 1811 10.85 525 3.15 13307 79.75
17 0072-Vellangallur Persons 53885 17815 1381 7.75 1535 8.62 331 1.86 14568 81.77
Males 25039 13178 1140 8.65 1097 8.32 224 1.70 10717 81.32
Females 28846 4637 241 5.20 438 9.45 107 2.31 3851 83.05
18 0073-Chalakudy Persons 103656 42396 3512 8.28 5662 13.36 798 1.88 32424 76.48
(Part ) Males 50426 28956 2698 9.32 3547 12.25 497 1.72 22214 76.72
Females 53230 13440 814 6.06 2115 15.74 301 2.24 10210 75.97
T otal Persons 1E+06 379199 26988 7.12 43206 11.39 8508 2.24 300497 79.25
Males 488303 268514 21001 7.82 25821 9.62 5372 2.00 216320 80.56
Females 536491 110685 5987 5.41 17385 15.71 3136 2.83 84177 76.05

140
The total rural population, the total rural workers and their four categories with percentage to total
rural workers are given by sex for the rural areas of the district and the CD blocks.
In the district rural, Other Workers (79.25 per cent) constitute the highest percentage of total
workers. The second category constituting the highest percentage of workers is Agricultural Labour (11.39
per cent). Cultivators and Household Industry Workers constitute 7.12 per cent and 2.24 per cent respectively.
There is higher percentage of male Cultivators (7.82 per cent) and male Other Workers (80.56 per cent)
among the workers than female Cultivators and female Other Workers.
Other Workers constitute the highest percentage of workers in all the CD blocks. The next category
in which the highest percentage of workers are engaged is Agricultural Labour in sixteen CD blocks except
Kodungallur and Mala CD blocks where Household Industry Workers constitute the second predominant
category. Mala CD block is reported to have the highest percentage of Cultivators (10.45 per cent) and
lowest is in Chavakkad CD block (0.94 per cent).
In the case of Agricultural Labourers, Pazhayannur CD block is at the top with 21.89 per cent and the
lowest is seen in Chavakkad CD block (0.96 per cent). Among Household Industry Workers, the highest
percentage is observed in Cherpu CD block (4.31 per cent) and the lowest is in ChavakkadCD block (0.69 per
cent). Ollukkara (9.99 per cent), Mala (10.45 per cent), Irinjalakuda (8.40 per cent), Kodakara (7.75 per
cent), Vellangallur (7.75 per cent) and Chalakudy (Part) (8.28 per cent) CD blocks have higher percentage of
Cultivators than the district average for rural areas (7.12 per cent).
In Wadakkanchery (12.16 per cent), Pazhayannur (21.89 per cent), Mullassery (11.72 per cent),
Ollukkara (12.02 per cent), Anthicad (12.80 per cent) and Chalakudy (Part) (13.36 per cent) CD blocks, there
is higher percentage of Agricultural Labourers than the corresponding average for district rural (11.39 per
cent). Mullassery (2.98 per cent), Anthicad (4.15 per cent), Cherpu (4.31 per cent), Mathilakam (3.86 per
cent), Kodungallur (3.52 per cent), Irinjalakuda (2.35 per cent) and Kodakara (2.54 per cent) CD blocks have
higher percentage of Household Industry Workers than the corresponding average for the district rural
(2.24 per cent). Chowannur (86.79 per cent), Wadakkanchery (79.54 per cent), Chavakkad (97.41 per cent),
Talikulam (90.57 per cent), Mullassery (81.36 per cent), Puzhakkal (89.27 per cent), Cherpu (82.49 per
cent), Mathilakam (89.69 per cent), Kodungallur (93.47 per cent), Irinjalakuda (79.75 per cent), Kodakara
(80.62 per cent) and Vellangallur (81.77 per cent) CD blocks have higher percentage of Other Workers than
the district rural average for Other Workers (79.25 per cent).

Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main + labourers industry
marginal workers
workers) Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 803277- Persons 54071 18171 308 1.70 959 5.28 664 3.65 16240 89.37
Kunnamkulam Males 25392 13428 264 1.97 606 4.51 485 3.61 12073 89.91
(M)
Females 28679 4743 44 0.93 353 7.44 179 3.77 4167 87.86
2 627756- Persons 13236 5762 261 4.53 786 13.64 962 16.70 3753 65.13
Kaniyarkode Males 6455 3881 197 5.08 381 9.82 576 14.84 2727 70.27
(CT )
Females 6781 1881 64 3.40 405 21.53 386 20.52 1026 54.55
3 627757- Persons 13828 3993 28 0.70 261 6.54 109 2.73 3595 90.03
Cheruthuruthi Males 6588 3176 25 0.79 190 5.98 81 2.55 2880 90.68
(CT )
Females 7240 817 3 0.37 71 8.69 28 3.43 715 87.52

141
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main + labourers industry
marginal workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
4 627758- Persons 12399 3783 157 4.15 493 13.03 94 2.48 3039 80.33
Nedumpura (CT ) Males 5929 3003 112 3.73 299 9.96 61 2.03 2531 84.28
Females 6470 780 45 5.77 194 24.87 33 4.23 508 65.13
5 627759- Persons 8355 2499 70 2.80 327 13.09 75 3.00 2027 81.11
Desamangalam Males 4026 1960 56 2.86 238 12.14 52 2.65 1614 82.35
(CT )
Females 4329 539 14 2.60 89 16.51 23 4.27 413 76.62
6 627760- Persons 12912 4232 117 2.76 373 8.81 117 2.76 3625 85.66
Kadavallur (CT ) Males 6091 3171 103 3.25 220 6.94 72 2.27 2776 87.54
Females 6821 1061 14 1.32 153 14.42 45 4.24 849 80.02
7 627761- Persons 11836 3737 135 3.61 194 5.19 45 1.20 3363 89.99
Katt akampal Males 5419 2797 122 4.36 117 4.18 33 1.18 2525 90.28
(CT )
Females 6417 940 13 1.38 77 8.19 12 1.28 838 89.15
8 627762- Persons 14067 4546 142 3.12 353 7.77 70 1.54 3981 87.57
Pazhanji (CT ) Males 6646 3451 130 3.77 175 5.07 51 1.48 3095 89.68
Females 7421 1095 12 1.10 178 16.26 19 1.74 886 80.91
9 627763- Persons 13656 4006 119 2.97 519 12.96 119 2.97 3249 81.10
Karikkad (CT ) Males 6498 3131 110 3.51 355 11.34 88 2.81 2578 82.34
Females 7158 875 9 1.03 164 18.74 31 3.54 671 76.69
10 627764- Persons 5994 2434 75 3.08 139 5.71 105 4.31 2115 86.89
Nelluwaya (CT ) Males 2849 1642 60 3.65 59 3.59 50 3.05 1473 89.71
Females 3145 792 15 1.89 80 10.10 55 6.94 642 81.06
11 627765- Persons 6727 2606 147 5.64 196 7.52 47 1.80 2216 85.03
Kot tappuram Males 3258 1845 110 5.96 102 5.53 24 1.30 1609 87.21
(CT )
Females 3469 761 37 4.86 94 12.35 23 3.02 607 79.76
12 627766- Persons 5936 2295 66 2.88 113 4.92 48 2.09 2068 90.11
Chit tanda (CT ) Males 2821 1577 47 2.98 54 3.42 30 1.90 1446 91.69
Females 3115 718 19 2.65 59 8.22 18 2.51 622 86.63
13 627767- Persons 7553 2607 34 1.30 55 2.11 104 3.99 2414 92.60
Kumaranellur Males 3627 1890 32 1.69 41 2.17 61 3.23 1756 92.91
(CT )
Females 3926 717 2 0.28 14 1.95 43 6.00 658 91.77
14 627768- Persons 7528 2477 91 3.67 315 12.72 37 1.49 2034 82.12
Chelakkara (CT ) Males 3535 1889 81 4.29 185 9.79 25 1.32 1598 84.60
Females 3993 588 10 1.70 130 22.11 12 2.04 436 74.15
15 627769- Persons 9584 3170 97 3.06 241 7.60 36 1.14 2796 88.20
Enkakkad (CT ) Males 4530 2326 67 2.88 135 5.80 22 0.95 2102 90.37
Females 5054 844 30 3.55 106 12.56 14 1.66 694 82.23

142
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers
Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
16 627770- Persons 15674 5669 92 1.62 220 3.88 169 2.98 5188 91.52
Wadakkanchery Males 7547 4059 79 1.95 134 3.30 112 2.76 3734 91.99
(CT )
Females 8127 1610 13 0.81 86 5.34 57 3.54 1454 90.31
17 627771- Persons 6363 2290 91 3.97 76 3.32 43 1.88 2080 90.83
Kariyannur (CT ) Males 3065 1609 78 4.85 46 2.86 23 1.43 1462 90.86
Females 3298 681 13 1.91 30 4.41 20 2.94 618 90.75
18 627772-Eyyal Persons 6727 2417 163 6.74 133 5.50 42 1.74 2079 86.02
(CT ) Males 3097 1722 128 7.43 77 4.47 27 1.57 1490 86.53
Females 3630 695 35 5.04 56 8.06 15 2.16 589 84.75
19 627773- Persons 11060 3550 117 3.30 429 12.08 147 4.14 2857 80.48
Chiramanangad Males 5293 2705 91 3.36 228 8.43 104 3.84 2282 84.36
(CT )
Females 5767 845 26 3.08 201 23.79 43 5.09 575 68.05
20 627774- Persons 5847 1992 28 1.41 171 8.58 35 1.76 1758 88.25
Akathiyoor Males 2763 1482 26 1.75 100 6.75 32 2.16 1324 89.34
(CT )
Females 3084 510 2 0.39 71 13.92 3 0.59 434 85.10
21 627775- Persons 6503 2233 52 2.33 57 2.55 40 1.79 2084 93.33
Porkulam (CT ) Males 3123 1653 46 2.78 27 1.63 30 1.81 1550 93.77
Females 3380 580 6 1.03 30 5.17 10 1.72 534 92.07
22 627776- Persons 12502 4227 77 1.82 519 12.28 105 2.48 3526 83.42
Choondal (CT ) Males 5866 3033 65 2.14 349 11.51 71 2.34 2548 84.01
Females 6636 1194 12 1.01 170 14.24 34 2.85 978 81.91
23 627777- Persons 9789 2846 101 3.55 209 7.34 45 1.58 2491 87.53
Chiranellur (CT ) Males 4608 2192 87 3.97 139 6.34 33 1.51 1933 88.18
Females 5181 654 14 2.14 70 10.70 12 1.83 558 85.32
24 627778-Velur Persons 13928 4636 184 3.97 321 6.92 77 1.66 4054 87.45
(CT ) Males 6675 3488 149 4.27 195 5.59 47 1.35 3097 88.79
Females 7253 1148 35 3.05 126 10.98 30 2.61 957 83.36
25 627779- Persons 7672 2767 86 3.11 259 9.36 115 4.16 2307 83.38
Mundat hikode Males 3700 1924 65 3.38 166 8.63 51 2.65 1642 85.34
(CT )
Females 3972 843 21 2.49 93 11.03 64 7.59 665 78.88
26 627780- Persons 5577 2243 146 6.51 116 5.17 47 2.10 1934 86.22
Peringandoor Males 2646 1399 64 4.57 47 3.36 31 2.22 1257 89.85
(CT )
Females 2931 844 82 9.72 69 8.18 16 1.90 677 80.21
27 627781-Minalur Persons 6120 2331 73 3.13 124 5.32 57 2.45 2077 89.10
(CT ) Males 2949 1670 55 3.29 60 3.59 40 2.40 1515 90.72
Females 3171 661 18 2.72 64 9.68 17 2.57 562 85.02

143
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers
Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

28 627782- Persons 10145 3029 79 2.61 375 12.38 89 2.94 2486 82.07
Eranellur (CT ) Males 4735 2296 67 2.92 256 11.15 68 2.96 1905 82.97
Females 5410 733 12 1.64 119 16.23 21 2.86 581 79.26
29 627783-Alur Persons 9807 3347 103 3.08 117 3.50 76 2.27 3051 91.16
(CT ) Males 4610 2377 79 3.32 76 3.20 57 2.40 2165 91.08
Females 5197 970 24 2.47 41 4.23 19 1.96 886 91.34
30 627784- Persons 14645 4452 74 1.66 76 1.71 114 2.56 4188 94.07
Kandanassery Males 6727 3326 71 2.13 60 1.80 71 2.13 3124 93.93
(CT )
Females 7918 1126 3 0.27 16 1.42 43 3.82 1064 94.49
31 803278- Persons 20510 6205 28 0.45 65 1.05 138 2.22 5974 96.28
Guruvayoor (M) Males 9614 4615 21 0.46 43 0.93 100 2.17 4451 96.45
Females 10896 1590 7 0.44 22 1.38 38 2.39 1523 95.79
32 803279- Persons 39098 10445 33 0.32 87 0.83 370 3.54 9955 95.31
Chavakkad (M) Males 17762 8226 28 0.34 66 0.80 141 1.71 7991 97.14
Females 21336 2219 5 0.23 21 0.95 229 10.32 1964 88.51
33 627792- Persons 19147 5062 50 0.99 229 4.52 104 2.05 4679 92.43
Kadikkad (CT ) Males 8734 4096 47 1.15 146 3.56 83 2.03 3820 93.26
Females 10413 966 3 0.31 83 8.59 21 2.17 859 88.92
34 627793- Persons 14221 3306 67 2.03 194 5.87 69 2.09 2976 90.02
Punnayurkulam Males 6440 2666 58 2.18 129 4.84 60 2.25 2419 90.74
(CT )
Females 7781 640 9 1.41 65 10.16 9 1.41 557 87.03
35 627794- Persons 15811 4075 26 0.64 77 1.89 96 2.36 3876 95.12
Vadakkekad Males 7127 3115 24 0.77 52 1.67 65 2.09 2974 95.47
(CT )
Females 8684 960 2 0.21 25 2.60 31 3.23 902 93.96
36 627795- Persons 19387 5160 82 1.59 304 5.89 89 1.72 4685 90.79
Punnayur (CT ) Males 9108 4262 62 1.45 180 4.22 67 1.57 3953 92.75
Females 10279 898 20 2.23 124 13.81 22 2.45 732 81.51
37 627796- Persons 17335 4516 29 0.64 99 2.19 87 1.93 4301 95.24
Edakkazhiyur Males 8093 3755 26 0.69 72 1.92 65 1.73 3592 95.66
(CT )
Females 9242 761 3 0.39 27 3.55 22 2.89 709 93.17
38 627797- Persons 10298 3178 28 0.88 67 2.11 76 2.39 3007 94.62
Vylathur (CT ) Males 4773 2272 21 0.92 54 2.38 57 2.51 2140 94.19
Females 5525 906 7 0.77 13 1.43 19 2.10 867 95.70
39 627798- Persons 9366 2448 30 1.23 52 2.12 39 1.59 2327 95.06
Pookode (CT ) Males 4242 1958 28 1.43 43 2.20 24 1.23 1863 95.15
Females 5124 490 2 0.41 9 1.84 15 3.06 464 94.69

144
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main + labourers industry
marginal workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
40 627799- Persons 12343 3884 8 0.21 63 1.62 119 3.06 3694 95.11
Iringaprom (CT ) Males 5768 2860 5 0.17 55 1.92 67 2.34 2733 95.56
Females 6575 1024 3 0.29 8 0.78 52 5.08 961 93.85
41 627800- Persons 12072 3607 30 0.83 67 1.86 171 4.74 3339 92.57
Perakam (CT ) Males 5588 2760 26 0.94 57 2.07 117 4.24 2560 92.75
Females 6484 847 4 0.47 10 1.18 54 6.38 779 91.97
42 627801- Persons 14064 3374 22 0.65 162 4.80 54 1.60 3136 92.95
Orumanayur Males 6243 2579 19 0.74 131 5.08 32 1.24 2397 92.94
(CT )
Females 7821 795 3 0.38 31 3.90 22 2.77 739 92.96
43 627802-Paluvai Persons 9127 2627 8 0.30 50 1.90 47 1.79 2522 96.00
(CT ) Males 4183 1938 7 0.36 37 1.91 31 1.60 1863 96.13
Females 4944 689 1 0.15 13 1.89 16 2.32 659 95.65
44 627803- Persons 6594 1931 9 0.47 43 2.23 76 3.94 1803 93.37
T haikkad (CT ) Males 3055 1422 9 0.63 35 2.46 43 3.02 1335 93.88
Females 3539 509 0 0.00 8 1.57 33 6.48 468 91.94
45 627804- Persons 14390 4571 38 0.83 118 2.58 90 1.97 4325 94.62
Brahmakulam Males 6747 3429 28 0.82 95 2.77 54 1.57 3252 94.84
(CT )
Females 7643 1142 10 0.88 23 2.01 36 3.15 1073 93.96
46 627805-Elavally Persons 12819 4208 162 3.85 382 9.08 69 1.64 3595 85.43
(CT ) Males 5969 3065 136 4.44 267 8.71 35 1.14 2627 85.71
Females 6850 1143 26 2.27 115 10.06 34 2.97 968 84.69
47 627806- Persons 12299 3405 16 0.47 61 1.79 44 1.29 3284 96.45
Pavarat ty (CT ) Males 5570 2548 15 0.59 60 2.35 30 1.18 2443 95.88
Females 6729 857 1 0.12 1 0.12 14 1.63 841 98.13
48 627807- Persons 8377 2292 27 1.18 51 2.23 85 3.71 2129 92.89
Venmanad (CT ) Males 3901 1802 20 1.11 39 2.16 70 3.88 1673 92.84
Females 4476 490 7 1.43 12 2.45 15 3.06 456 93.06
49 627808- Persons 12165 3727 56 1.50 263 7.06 82 2.20 3326 89.24
Mullassery (CT ) Males 5551 2735 54 1.97 140 5.12 60 2.19 2481 90.71
Females 6614 992 2 0.20 123 12.40 22 2.22 845 85.18
50 627809- Persons 11335 3401 80 2.35 168 4.94 76 2.23 3077 90.47
Venkitangu (CT ) Males 5204 2499 78 3.12 105 4.20 49 1.96 2267 90.72
Females 6131 902 2 0.22 63 6.98 27 2.99 810 89.80
51 627810- Persons 30657 9021 115 1.27 380 4.21 200 2.22 8326 92.30
Vadanappally Males 13966 6723 105 1.56 277 4.12 93 1.38 6248 92.93
(CT )
Females 16691 2298 10 0.44 103 4.48 107 4.66 2078 90.43

145
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers
Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
52 627811- Persons 25507 7699 87 1.13 283 3.68 181 2.35 7148 92.84
T alikkulam Males 11512 5567 72 1.29 168 3.02 109 1.96 5218 93.73
(CT )
Females 13995 2132 15 0.70 115 5.39 72 3.38 1930 90.53
53 803280-T hrissur Persons 315957 113105 596 0.53 1555 1.37 2741 2.42 108213 95.67
(M Corp.) Males 152296 81514 440 0.54 1090 1.34 1920 2.36 78064 95.77
Females 163661 31591 156 0.49 465 1.47 821 2.60 30149 95.44
54 627825- Persons 20339 8202 144 1.76 376 4.58 195 2.38 7487 91.28
Killannur (CT ) Males 9910 5677 132 2.33 205 3.61 132 2.33 5208 91.74
Females 10429 2525 12 0.48 171 6.77 63 2.50 2279 90.26
55 627826- Persons 4587 1647 49 2.98 131 7.95 10 0.61 1457 88.46
T hangalur (CT ) Males 2248 1119 45 4.02 61 5.45 6 0.54 1007 89.99
Females 2339 528 4 0.76 70 13.26 4 0.76 450 85.23
56 627827-Avanur Persons 7879 3064 53 1.73 86 2.81 57 1.86 2868 93.60
(CT ) Males 3815 2150 41 1.91 52 2.42 31 1.44 2026 94.23
Females 4064 914 12 1.31 34 3.72 26 2.84 842 92.12
57 627828-Anjur Persons 10860 3902 56 1.44 134 3.43 79 2.02 3633 93.11
(CT ) Males 5232 2821 48 1.70 75 2.66 54 1.91 2644 93.73
Females 5628 1081 8 0.74 59 5.46 25 2.31 989 91.49
58 627829- Persons 7179 2646 94 3.55 154 5.82 118 4.46 2280 86.17
Kaiparamba Males 3514 1972 85 4.31 95 4.82 94 4.77 1698 86.11
(CT )
Females 3665 674 9 1.34 59 8.75 24 3.56 582 86.35
59 627830-T holur Persons 7454 2819 99 3.51 129 4.58 28 0.99 2563 90.92
(CT ) Males 3543 1958 88 4.49 66 3.37 21 1.07 1783 91.06
Females 3911 861 11 1.28 63 7.32 7 0.81 780 90.59
60 627831- Persons 8039 3033 63 2.08 264 8.70 75 2.47 2631 86.75
Edakkalat hur Males 3799 2145 59 2.75 139 6.48 51 2.38 1896 88.39
(CT )
Females 4240 888 4 0.45 125 14.08 24 2.70 735 82.77
61 627832- Persons 13260 5211 150 2.88 90 1.73 101 1.94 4870 93.46
Peramangalam Males 6457 3592 102 2.84 54 1.50 51 1.42 3385 94.24
(CT )
Females 6803 1619 48 2.96 36 2.22 50 3.09 1485 91.72
62 627833- Persons 5441 2259 55 2.43 119 5.27 38 1.68 2047 90.62
Choolissery Males 2736 1643 41 2.50 66 4.02 22 1.34 1514 92.15
(CT )
Females 2705 616 14 2.27 53 8.60 16 2.60 533 86.53
63 627834-Pott ore Persons 7848 2846 80 2.81 41 1.44 88 3.09 2637 92.66
(CT ) Males 3837 2040 51 2.50 15 0.74 67 3.28 1907 93.48
Females 4011 806 29 3.60 26 3.23 21 2.61 730 90.57

146
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers
Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
64 627835- Persons 11540 4259 59 1.39 177 4.16 114 2.68 3909 91.78
Kolazhy (CT ) Males 5603 2954 50 1.69 137 4.64 62 2.10 2705 91.57
Females 5937 1305 9 0.69 40 3.07 52 3.98 1204 92.26
65 627836- Persons 4081 1625 47 2.89 56 3.45 21 1.29 1501 92.37
Kurichikkara Males 1993 1132 38 3.36 23 2.03 11 0.97 1060 93.64
(CT )
Females 2088 493 9 1.83 33 6.69 10 2.03 441 89.45
66 627837- Persons 6167 2439 50 2.05 143 5.86 64 2.62 2182 89.46
Vellanikkara Males 2997 1621 33 2.04 64 3.95 33 2.04 1491 91.98
(CT )
Females 3170 818 17 2.08 79 9.66 31 3.79 691 84.47
67 627838-Kutt oor Persons 12179 4792 121 2.53 156 3.26 120 2.50 4395 91.72
(CT ) Males 5957 3394 72 2.12 85 2.50 92 2.71 3145 92.66
Females 6222 1398 49 3.51 71 5.08 28 2.00 1250 89.41
68 627839- Persons 8609 3426 96 2.80 199 5.81 33 0.96 3098 90.43
Puzhakkal (CT ) Males 4078 2259 71 3.14 92 4.07 26 1.15 2070 91.63
Females 4531 1167 25 2.14 107 9.17 7 0.60 1028 88.09
69 627840- Persons 10655 3744 46 1.23 86 2.30 37 0.99 3575 95.49
Puranat tukara Males 5092 2689 40 1.49 48 1.79 27 1.00 2574 95.72
(CT )
Females 5563 1055 6 0.57 38 3.60 10 0.95 1001 94.88
70 627841- Persons 6988 2669 111 4.16 138 5.17 84 3.15 2336 87.52
Chit tilappilly Males 3340 1809 72 3.98 88 4.86 58 3.21 1591 87.95
(CT )
Females 3648 860 39 4.53 50 5.81 26 3.02 745 86.63
71 627842-Adat Persons 5721 2492 87 3.49 101 4.05 53 2.13 2251 90.33
(CT ) Males 2862 1751 65 3.71 51 2.91 30 1.71 1605 91.66
Females 2859 741 22 2.97 50 6.75 23 3.10 646 87.18
72 627843- Persons 9918 4103 66 1.61 131 3.19 74 1.80 3832 93.40
Kozhukkully Males 4868 2927 48 1.64 80 2.73 38 1.30 2761 94.33
(CT )
Females 5050 1176 18 1.53 51 4.34 36 3.06 1071 91.07
73 627844-Kainoor Persons 7344 3230 288 8.92 325 10.06 163 5.05 2454 75.98
(CT ) Males 3666 2208 194 8.79 203 9.19 107 4.85 1704 77.17
Females 3678 1022 94 9.20 122 11.94 56 5.48 750 73.39
74 627845- Persons 11969 4664 48 1.03 49 1.05 84 1.80 4483 96.12
Nadat hara (CT ) Males 5848 3317 34 1.03 28 0.84 56 1.69 3199 96.44
Females 6121 1347 14 1.04 21 1.56 28 2.08 1284 95.32
75 627846- Persons 9093 3332 39 1.17 263 7.89 55 1.65 2975 89.29
Parakkad (CT ) Males 4422 2426 32 1.32 157 6.47 39 1.61 2198 90.60
Females 4671 906 7 0.77 106 11.70 16 1.77 777 85.76

147
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers
Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
76 627847- Persons 15129 5072 69 1.36 337 6.64 90 1.77 4576 90.22
Karamuck (CT ) Males 7055 3623 54 1.49 197 5.44 51 1.41 3321 91.66
Females 8074 1449 15 1.04 140 9.66 39 2.69 1255 86.61
77 627848-Manalur Persons 17757 6621 170 2.57 240 3.62 192 2.90 6019 90.91
(CT ) Males 8442 4634 133 2.87 128 2.76 117 2.52 4256 91.84
Females 9315 1987 37 1.86 112 5.64 75 3.77 1763 88.73
78 627849-Eravu Persons 4447 1547 31 2.00 77 4.98 32 2.07 1407 90.95
(CT ) Males 2089 1097 25 2.28 29 2.64 28 2.55 1015 92.53
Females 2358 450 6 1.33 48 10.67 4 0.89 392 87.11
79 627850- Persons 11602 4154 70 1.69 233 5.61 57 1.37 3794 91.33
Veluthur (CT ) Males 5636 3058 64 2.09 121 3.96 37 1.21 2836 92.74
Females 5966 1096 6 0.55 112 10.22 20 1.82 958 87.41
80 627851- Persons 7150 2320 38 1.64 80 3.45 25 1.08 2177 93.84
Manakkody Males 3484 1766 35 1.98 53 3.00 21 1.19 1657 93.83
(CT )
Females 3666 554 3 0.54 27 4.87 4 0.72 520 93.86
81 627852- Persons 15817 5752 62 1.08 197 3.42 261 4.54 5232 90.96
Marat hakkara Males 7852 4315 46 1.07 143 3.31 179 4.15 3947 91.47
(CT )
Females 7965 1437 16 1.11 54 3.76 82 5.71 1285 89.42
82 627853-Puthur Persons 17430 7545 341 4.52 754 9.99 271 3.59 6179 81.90
(CT ) Males 8605 5188 218 4.20 503 9.70 173 3.33 4294 82.77
Females 8825 2357 123 5.22 251 10.65 98 4.16 1885 79.97
83 627854- Persons 13983 5085 85 1.67 119 2.34 267 5.25 4614 90.74
Avinissery (CT ) Males 6833 3733 61 1.63 75 2.01 193 5.17 3404 91.19
Females 7150 1352 24 1.78 44 3.25 74 5.47 1210 89.50
84 627855- Persons 7724 2946 53 1.80 77 2.61 178 6.04 2638 89.55
Palissery (CT ) Males 3741 2130 35 1.64 59 2.77 155 7.28 1881 88.31
Females 3983 816 18 2.21 18 2.21 23 2.82 757 92.77
85 627856- Persons 5533 2075 70 3.37 118 5.69 90 4.34 1797 86.60
Venginissery Males 2656 1537 45 2.93 57 3.71 70 4.55 1365 88.81
(CT )
Females 2877 538 25 4.65 61 11.34 20 3.72 432 80.30
86 627857- Persons 7655 2871 114 3.97 160 5.57 190 6.62 2407 83.84
Kodannur (CT ) Males 3707 2138 92 4.30 113 5.29 160 7.48 1773 82.93
Females 3948 733 22 3.00 47 6.41 30 4.09 634 86.49
87 627858- Persons 9826 3666 179 4.88 312 8.51 56 1.53 3119 85.08
Ant hicad (CT ) Males 4637 2428 90 3.71 128 5.27 26 1.07 2184 89.95
Females 5189 1238 89 7.19 184 14.86 30 2.42 935 75.53

148
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers
Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
88 627859- Persons 11623 3819 61 1.60 101 2.64 131 3.43 3526 92.33
Padiyam (CT ) Males 5339 2696 54 2.00 50 1.85 81 3.00 2511 93.14
Females 6284 1123 7 0.62 51 4.54 50 4.45 1015 90.38
89 627860- Persons 9585 2831 48 1.70 130 4.59 82 2.90 2571 90.82
Vadakkummuri Males 4280 2022 42 2.08 70 3.46 49 2.42 1861 92.04
(CT )
Females 5305 809 6 0.74 60 7.42 33 4.08 710 87.76
90 627861- Persons 4635 1664 14 0.84 96 5.77 37 2.22 1517 91.17
Kizhakkummuri Males 2155 1109 13 1.17 47 4.24 22 1.98 1027 92.61
(CT )
Females 2480 555 1 0.18 49 8.83 15 2.70 490 88.29
91 627862-Cherpu Persons 7864 2604 58 2.23 281 10.79 93 3.57 2172 83.41
(CT ) Males 3691 1901 49 2.58 129 6.79 80 4.21 1643 86.43
Females 4173 703 9 1.28 152 21.62 13 1.85 529 75.25
92 627863-Paralam Persons 9187 3499 109 3.12 328 9.37 85 2.43 2977 85.08
(CT ) Males 4498 2584 96 3.72 193 7.47 73 2.83 2222 85.99
Females 4689 915 13 1.42 135 14.75 12 1.31 755 82.51
93 627864- Persons 16086 6003 96 1.60 245 4.08 657 10.94 5005 83.37
Chevvoor (CT ) Males 7691 4394 71 1.62 165 3.76 567 12.90 3591 81.73
Females 8395 1609 25 1.55 80 4.97 90 5.59 1414 87.88
94 627865- Persons 12970 4636 59 1.27 79 1.70 76 1.64 4422 95.38
Vallachira (CT ) Males 6356 3585 53 1.48 56 1.56 60 1.67 3416 95.29
Females 6614 1051 6 0.57 23 2.19 16 1.52 1006 95.72
95 627866- Persons 13149 4472 112 2.50 438 9.79 134 3.00 3788 84.70
Oorakam (CT ) Males 6229 3297 99 3.00 266 8.07 101 3.06 2831 85.87
Females 6920 1175 13 1.11 172 14.64 33 2.81 957 81.45
96 627867- Persons 14329 4790 89 1.86 405 8.46 182 3.80 4114 85.89
Kurumpilavu Males 6692 3485 82 2.35 263 7.55 112 3.21 3028 86.89
(CT )
Females 7637 1305 7 0.54 142 10.88 70 5.36 1086 83.22
97 627868- Persons 5275 1431 68 4.75 111 7.76 34 2.38 1218 85.12
Kizhuppillikkara Males 2379 1073 63 5.87 73 6.80 24 2.24 913 85.09
(CT )
Females 2896 358 5 1.40 38 10.61 10 2.79 305 85.20
98 627869- Persons 9743 2779 16 0.58 193 6.94 63 2.27 2507 90.21
T hanniyam Males 4430 2119 16 0.76 129 6.09 50 2.36 1924 90.80
(CT )
Females 5313 660 0 0.00 64 9.70 13 1.97 583 88.33
99 803281- Persons 60190 21705 214 0.99 364 1.68 562 2.59 20565 94.75
Kodungallur (M Males 28452 15921 151 0.95 285 1.79 286 1.80 15199 95.47
+ OG)
Females 31738 5784 63 1.09 79 1.37 276 4.77 5366 92.77

149
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main + labourers industry
marginal workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
100 627873- Persons 12921 3890 69 1.77 116 2.98 73 1.88 3632 93.37
Edat hirut hy Males 5782 2776 60 2.16 85 3.06 52 1.87 2579 92.90
(CT )
Females 7139 1114 9 0.81 31 2.78 21 1.89 1053 94.52
101 627874- Persons 16404 4323 24 0.56 74 1.71 135 3.12 4090 94.61
Chendrappini Males 7422 3203 20 0.62 52 1.62 87 2.72 3044 95.04
(CT )
Females 8982 1120 4 0.36 22 1.96 48 4.29 1046 93.39
102 627875- Persons 35626 10173 66 0.65 250 2.46 278 2.73 9579 94.16
Kaipamangalam Males 16290 7769 53 0.68 203 2.61 132 1.70 7381 95.01
(CT )
Females 19336 2404 13 0.54 47 1.96 146 6.07 2198 91.43
103 627876- Persons 21012 6892 79 1.15 163 2.37 210 3.05 6440 93.44
Perinjanam Males 9666 4834 66 1.37 114 2.36 63 1.30 4591 94.97
(CT )
Females 11346 2058 13 0.63 49 2.38 147 7.14 1849 89.84
104 627877- Persons 15336 4456 151 3.39 251 5.63 74 1.66 3980 89.32
Pappinivat tom Males 6909 3276 92 2.81 175 5.34 39 1.19 2970 90.66
(CT )
Females 8427 1180 59 5.00 76 6.44 35 2.97 1010 85.59
105 627878- Persons 15630 5553 91 1.64 204 3.67 238 4.29 5020 90.40
Panangad (CT ) Males 7392 3929 83 2.11 139 3.54 108 2.75 3599 91.60
Females 8238 1624 8 0.49 65 4.00 130 8.00 1421 87.50
106 627879- Persons 20363 7367 72 0.98 167 2.27 129 1.75 6999 95.00
Edavilangu (CT ) Males 9510 5250 56 1.07 101 1.92 68 1.30 5025 95.71
Females 10853 2117 16 0.76 66 3.12 61 2.88 1974 93.25
107 627880-Ala Persons 10493 3637 29 0.80 60 1.65 67 1.84 3481 95.71
(CT ) Males 4962 2678 24 0.90 35 1.31 41 1.53 2578 96.27
Females 5531 959 5 0.52 25 2.61 26 2.71 903 94.16
108 627881- Persons 7718 2904 86 2.96 56 1.93 33 1.14 2729 93.97
Pallippuram Males 3790 2092 67 3.20 33 1.58 21 1.00 1971 94.22
(CT )
Females 3928 812 19 2.34 23 2.83 12 1.48 758 93.35
109 627882-Methala Persons 37505 14243 60 0.42 230 1.61 377 2.65 13576 95.32
(CT ) Males 17973 10141 36 0.35 165 1.63 207 2.04 9733 95.98
Females 19532 4102 24 0.59 65 1.58 170 4.14 3843 93.69
110 627883-Poyya Persons 10478 3870 84 2.17 90 2.33 80 2.07 3616 93.44
(CT ) Males 5003 2752 66 2.40 66 2.40 39 1.42 2581 93.79
Females 5475 1118 18 1.61 24 2.15 41 3.67 1035 92.58
111 627884- Persons 4294 1562 31 1.98 289 18.50 41 2.62 1201 76.89
Madat humpady Males 2113 1162 26 2.24 215 18.50 26 2.24 895 77.02
(CT )
Females 2181 400 5 1.25 74 18.50 15 3.75 306 76.50

150
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers
Cultivators Agricultural Household Other workers
Females on (main +
labourers industry
marginal
workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
112 803282- Persons 28741 9034 59 0.65 108 1.20 189 2.09 8678 96.06
Irinjalakuda (M) Males 13425 6459 51 0.79 88 1.36 132 2.04 6188 95.80
Females 15316 2575 8 0.31 20 0.78 57 2.21 2490 96.70
113 803283- Persons 49525 17588 708 4.03 348 1.98 424 2.41 16108 91.59
Chalakudy (M) Males 23744 12797 545 4.26 233 1.82 305 2.38 11714 91.54
Females 25781 4791 163 3.40 115 2.40 119 2.48 4394 91.71
114 627919-T rikkur Persons 13093 4700 118 2.51 198 4.21 86 1.83 4298 91.45
(CT ) Males 6465 3536 102 2.88 142 4.02 64 1.81 3228 91.29
Females 6628 1164 16 1.37 56 4.81 22 1.89 1070 91.92
115 627920- Persons 18067 7178 148 2.06 265 3.69 245 3.41 6520 90.83
Nenmenikkara Males 8891 5193 121 2.33 198 3.81 192 3.70 4682 90.16
(CT )
Females 9176 1985 27 1.36 67 3.38 53 2.67 1838 92.59
116 627921- Persons 29341 11532 726 6.30 822 7.13 277 2.40 9707 84.17
Amballur (CT ) Males 14308 8143 536 6.58 502 6.16 162 1.99 6943 85.26
Females 15033 3389 190 5.61 320 9.44 115 3.39 2764 81.56
117 627922- Persons 12615 4734 112 2.37 239 5.05 136 2.87 4247 89.71
Puthukkad (CT ) Males 6094 3307 81 2.45 162 4.90 74 2.24 2990 90.41
Females 6521 1427 31 2.17 77 5.40 62 4.34 1257 88.09
118 627923- Persons 11893 4691 149 3.18 283 6.03 145 3.09 4114 87.70
Parappukkara Males 5703 3188 119 3.73 201 6.30 82 2.57 2786 87.39
(CT )
Females 6190 1503 30 2.00 82 5.46 63 4.19 1328 88.36
119 627924-Katt ur Persons 18017 6019 117 1.94 225 3.74 123 2.04 5554 92.27
(CT ) Males 8315 4301 97 2.26 149 3.46 85 1.98 3970 92.30
Females 9702 1718 20 1.16 76 4.42 38 2.21 1584 92.20
120 627925- Persons 16768 6145 270 4.39 399 6.49 137 2.23 5339 86.88
Porat hissery Males 7829 4275 203 4.75 239 5.59 71 1.66 3762 88.00
(CT )
Females 8939 1870 67 3.58 160 8.56 66 3.53 1577 84.33
121 627926- Persons 14155 5100 130 2.55 196 3.84 188 3.69 4586 89.92
Madayikonam Males 6622 3687 102 2.77 131 3.55 146 3.96 3308 89.72
(CT )
Females 7533 1413 28 1.98 65 4.60 42 2.97 1278 90.45
122 627927- Persons 7097 2471 207 8.38 162 6.56 18 0.73 2084 84.34
Kallet tumkara Males 3402 1789 187 10.45 107 5.98 13 0.73 1482 82.84
(CT )
Females 3695 682 20 2.93 55 8.06 5 0.73 602 88.27
123 627928-Pullur Persons 12656 4351 169 3.88 298 6.85 88 2.02 3796 87.24
(CT ) Males 5923 3202 123 3.84 193 6.03 53 1.66 2833 88.48
Females 6733 1149 46 4.00 105 9.14 35 3.05 963 83.81

151
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No. Males/ populati workers Cultivators AgriculturalHousehold Other workers
Females on (main + labourers industry
marginal workers
workers)
Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen Number Percen
tage tage tage tage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
124 627929- Persons 7364 2561 64 2.50 147 5.74 73 2.85 2277 88.91
Manavalassery Males 3355 1784 49 2.75 88 4.93 57 3.20 1590 89.13
(CT )
Females 4009 777 15 1.93 59 7.59 16 2.06 687 88.42
125 627930- Persons 9849 3445 93 2.70 136 3.95 94 2.73 3122 90.62
Edat hirinji (CT ) Males 4568 2425 70 2.89 92 3.79 54 2.23 2209 91.09
Females 5281 1020 23 2.25 44 4.31 40 3.92 913 89.51
126 627931- Persons 8146 3100 150 4.84 195 6.29 86 2.77 2669 86.10
Vellookkara Males 3697 2089 101 4.83 140 6.70 50 2.39 1798 86.07
(CT )
Females 4449 1011 49 4.85 55 5.44 36 3.56 871 86.15
127 627932- Persons 10407 3247 92 2.83 148 4.56 51 1.57 2956 91.04
Vadakkumkara Males 4862 2491 81 3.25 110 4.42 33 1.32 2267 91.01
(CT )
Females 5545 756 11 1.46 38 5.03 18 2.38 689 91.14
128 627933- Persons 11141 4010 190 4.74 284 7.08 114 2.84 3422 85.34
Poomangalam Males 5086 2675 115 4.30 166 6.21 71 2.65 2323 86.84
(CT )
Females 6055 1335 75 5.62 118 8.84 43 3.22 1099 82.32
129 627934-Padiyur Persons 8823 3165 84 2.65 159 5.02 94 2.97 2828 89.35
(CT ) Males 4115 2188 68 3.11 103 4.71 57 2.61 1960 89.58
Females 4708 977 16 1.64 56 5.73 37 3.79 868 88.84
130 627935- Persons 15258 4836 78 1.61 225 4.65 106 2.19 4427 91.54
T hekkumkara Males 7110 3756 62 1.65 191 5.09 83 2.21 3420 91.05
(CT )
Females 8148 1080 16 1.48 34 3.15 23 2.13 1007 93.24
131 627936- Persons 4981 1862 43 2.31 44 2.36 20 1.07 1755 94.25
Muringur Males 2281 1244 40 3.22 38 3.05 14 1.13 1152 92.60
Vadakkummuri
Females 2700 618 3 0.49 6 0.97 6 0.97 603 97.57
(CT )
132 627937-Koratt y Persons 17618 6430 224 3.48 469 7.29 138 2.15 5599 87.08
(CT ) Males 8593 4669 187 4.01 313 6.70 97 2.08 4072 87.21
Females 9025 1761 37 2.10 156 8.86 41 2.33 1527 86.71
133 627938-Kallur Persons 25259 9771 471 4.82 613 6.27 147 1.50 8540 87.40
Vadakkummuri Males 12166 6735 370 5.49 392 5.82 87 1.29 5886 87.39
(CT )
Females 13093 3036 101 3.33 221 7.28 60 1.98 2654 87.42
134 627939-Vadama Persons 11573 3672 174 4.74 102 2.78 36 0.98 3360 91.50
(CT ) Males 5433 2731 161 5.90 77 2.82 24 0.88 2469 90.41
Females 6140 941 13 1.38 25 2.66 12 1.28 891 94.69
135 627940-Kallur Persons 17480 6131 313 5.11 551 8.99 153 2.50 5114 83.41
T hekkummuri Males 8401 4526 273 6.03 389 8.59 119 2.63 3745 82.74
(CT )
Females 9079 1605 40 2.49 162 10.09 34 2.12 1369 85.30
Dist rict (Urban): Persons 2096406 716528 14798 2.07 30735 4.29 19375 2.70 651620 90.94
T hrissur(594) Males 992460 520997 11616 2.23 19501 3.74 12711 2.44 477169 91.59
Females 1103946 195531 3182 1.63 11234 5.75 6664 3.41 174451 89.22

152
The total urban population, the total urban workers and their four categories with proportion to
total urban workers are given by sex for the district urban.
In the district urban, Other Workers (90.94 per cent) constitute the highest percentage of total
workers. The next category constituting the highest percentage of workers is Agricultural Labourers (4.29
per cent) followed by Household Industry Workers (2.70 per cent) and Cultivators (2.07 per cent). Among
Agricultural Labourers and Household Industry Workers, there is higher percentage of females than males.
In all the towns, the percentage of Other Workers is above 70 per cent except in Kaniyarkode CT
(65.13 per cent). Pavaratty CT tops with the highest percentage of Other Workers (96.45 per cent) and the
lowest is Kaniyarkode CT (65.13 per cent). Kaniyarkode CT (16.70 per cent) is recorded as the highest
percentage of Household Industry Workers and the lowest is in Thangalur (CT)(0.61 per cent). Madathumpady
CT (18.50 per cent) has the highest percentage of Agricultural Labourers and the lowest is in Chavakkad (M)
(0.83 per cent). The highest percentage of Cultivators occurred in Kainoor CT (8.92 per cent) and lowest is
in Iringaprom CT (0.21 per cent).
Among all the towns in the district, 70 towns have higher percentage of Cultivators than the
corresponding average for the district urban (2.07 per cent). 74 towns have higher percentage of Agricultural
Labourers than the corresponding average for the district urban (4.29 per cent). Among Household Industry
Workers, 47 towns have higher percentage than the corresponding district average (2.70 per cent). Also 59
towns have higher percentage of Other Workers than the corresponding average for the district urban
(90.94 per cent).
vi) BRIEF ANALYSIS OF VILLAGE DIRECTORY AND TOWN DIRECTORY DATA BASED ON INSET TABLES
36 TO 45
Table 36: Distribution of villages according to availability of different amenities, 2011

Sr. Name of Number Type of amenity available


No. Taluk of Educati Medi Drinking Post Telepho Transpor Banks @ Agricult Approa Power
inhabit on* cal^ water office # ne ** t ural ch by supply
ed communi credit pucca
villages $ societies road
cations
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 05652- 42 41 42 42 42 42 42 31 21 42 42
T alappilly (97.62) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (73.81) (50) (100) (100)
2 05653- 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 6 7 7
Chavakkad (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (85.71) (100) (100)
3 05654-T hrissur 13 12 13 13 12 13 13 12 8 13 13
(92.31) (100) (100) (92.31) (100) (100) (92.31) (61.54) (100) (100)
4 05655- 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Kodungallur (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100)
5 05656- 33 33 33 33 32 33 33 32 30 33 33
Mukundapuram (100) (100) (100) (96.97) (100) (100) (96.97) (90.91) (100) (100)
T otal 98 96 98 98 96 98 98 85 68 98 98
(97.96 (100) (100) (97.96) (100) (100) (86.73) (69.39) (100) (100)
Not e:- )
* Educat ion includes all educat ion facilities.
^ Medical includes all medical facilit ies.
# Post office includes post office, telegraph office and Post and telegraph office.
$ T ransport communicat ion includes bus service, rail facilit y and navigable wat erways.
@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperative Bank.
** T elephone includes T elephone,PCO and Mobile.

153
In this table, the inhabited villages of the district are distributed according to the availability of
different amenities. In the district rural, there is cent per cent specified amenities such as medical, drinking
water, telephone, transport and communications, approach by pucca road and power supply. In more than
95 per cent of villages, educational and post office amenities are available. Banking facility is available in
more than 85 per cent villages whereas the facility of agricultural credit societies is available in 69.39 per
cent of the villages of the district.
Medical, drinking water, telephone, transport and communications, approach by pucca road and
power supply are available in cent per cent villages of all the taluks. In cent per cent villages of Chavakkad
and Kodungallur taluks, education and post office facilities are also available. Talappilly taluk is having the
least facility of banks (73.81 per cent) and agricultural credit societies (50 per cent).
Table 37: Number and percentage of rural population served by different amenities, 2011
Sr. Name of Total Type of amenity available
No. Taluk populati
Educati Medical Drinkin Post Telepho Transp Banks Agricul Approa Power
on of # @
on* ^ g water office ne ** ort tural ch by supply
inhabite
commu credit pucca
d
nication societi road
villages $
s es

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 05652- 292045 289032 292045 292045 292045 292045 292045 244005 176014 292045 292045
Talappilly (98.97) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (83.55) (60.27) (100) (100)

2 05653- 123976 123976 123976 123976 123976 123976 123976 123976 101038 123976 123976
Chavakkad (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (81.5) (100) (100)

3 05654- 113009 109668 113009 113009 110559 113009 113009 111813 95747 113009 113009
Thrissur (97.04) (100) (100) (97.83) (100) (100) (98.94) (84.73) (100) (100)

4 05655- 44268 44268 44268 44268 44268 44268 44268 44268 44268 44268 44268
Kodungallur (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (100)

5 05656- 451496 451496 451496 451496 448628 451496 451496 436591 412996 451496 451496
Mukundapuram (100) (100) (100) (99.36) (100) (100) (96.7) (91.47) (100) (100)

Tot al 1024794 1018440 1024794 1024794 1019476 1024794 1024794 960653 830063 1024794 1024794
(99.38) (100) (100) (99.48) (100) (100) (93.74) (81) (100) (100)

Not e:-
* Educat ion includes all educat ion facilities.
^ Medical includes all medical facilit ies.
# Post office includes post office, t elegraph office and Post and t elegraph office.
$ T ransport communicat ion includes bus service, rail facilit y and navigable waterways.
@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperative Bank.
** T elephone includes T elephone,PCO and Mobile.

154
This table gives the number and the percentage of rural population served by different amenities.
Cent per cent rural population is served by the amenities of medical, drinking water, telephone, transport
and communications, approach by pucca road and power supply. This is true in all the taluks. In education
and post office, cent per cent rural population of Chavakkad and Kodungallur taluks are also covered.

Table 38: Distribution of villages not having certain amenities, arranged by distance ranges from the places where
these are available, 2011
Village not having the amenity of Distance range of place from the villages where the amenity is available
Less than 5 5-10 kilometres 10+ kilometres Total (Col. 2-4)
kilometres
1 2 3 4 5
1. Educat ion:-

(a) Primary school 7 0 0 7

(b) Middle school 20 3 0 23

(c) Degree college 30 32 25 87

2. Medical:-

(a) Hospital 4 23 63 90

(b) PHC 32 27 2 61

3. Post office- 2 0 0 2

4. T elephone 0 0 0 0

5. Bus service 0 0 0 0

6. Bank:-

(a) Commercial Bank 37 10 2 49

(b) Cooprative bank 15 0 3 18

7. Agricultural credit societies 18 9 3 30

Degree college includes Art,Engineering and Medicine

Hospital includes Allopathic & Alt ernat ive Medicine

Post office includes post office, t elegraph office and post & telegraph office

T elephone includes T elephone,PCO and mobiles

Bus includes privat e and public

The distribution of villages not having certain amenities are given here indicating the distance
from where such amenities are available. There are five types of amenities lacking within the Villages but
available at various specified distance ranges. Under education, there are 117 Villages with a break-up of
7 Villages lacking primary schools, 23 Villages lacking middle schools and 87 Villages lacking degree
colleges. In the case of primary schools and middle schools, the facility is available in Village within less
than 10 kms. whereas, the most of the Villages lacking degree colleges have the same available only
beyond five km. The medical facility is also lacking in as many as 151 Villages. Most of the Villages have this
facility available beyond five km. . In the District as a whole, 2 Villages does not have post office. This
facility is available within less than five km. Most of the Villages with no banking facility have the same
available within less than five km.

155
Table 39: Distribution of villages according to the distance from the nearest statutory town and availability of
different amenities, 2011
Distance Number/ Number of Type of amenity available
Range Percentage Inhabited Educati Medica Post Telepho Transpor Banks @ Agricultu Approach
from the Villages in on* l^ Office# ne ** t ral Credit by Pucca
nearest Each Communi Societies Road
Statutory Range cations $
Town (In
Kilometres
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Less t han 5 Number 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4
Percentage 100 100 75 100 100 100 75 100
5 - 15 Number 63 62 63 62 63 63 58 46 63
Percentage 98.41 100 98.41 100 100 92.06 73.02 100
16- 50 Number 30 29 30 30 30 30 22 19 30
Percentage 96.67 100 100 100 100 73.33 63.33 100
51+ Number 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Percentage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Unspecified Number 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1
Percentage 100 100 100 100 100 100 0 100
T ot al Number 98 96 98 96 98 98 85 68 98
Percentage 97.96 100 97.96 100 100 86.73 69.39 100

Not e:-
* Educat ion includes all educat ion facilities.
^ Medical includes all medical facilit ies.
# Post office includes post office, t elegraph office and Post and t elegraph office.
$ T ransport communicat ion includes bus service, railway facilit y and navigable wat erways.
@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperative Bank.
** T elephone includes T elephone,PCO and Mobile.

Here in this table, the villages are distributed according to distance from the nearest statutory
town and the availability of different amenities. There are 4 villages lying at a distance of less than 5 km.
from the nearest statutory town. In these villages, cent per cent specified amenities are available except
the facility of post office and agricultural credit societies. As regards villages lying at a distance of 5-15 and
16-50 km., cent per cent facility such as medical, telephone, transport and communications and approach
by pucca road are available.
Table 40: Distribution of villages according to population range and amenities available, 2011
Population Number/ Number Type of amenity available
range Percentage of Educ Medi Drinkin Post Telep Trans Banks Agricul Approa Power
inhabit ation cal^ g water # hone port @ tural ch by supply
office
ed * ** comm credit pucca
villages unicat societie road
in each $ s
ions
range
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1-499 Number 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Percent age 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
500-999 Number 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Percent age 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

156
Table 40: Distribution of villages according to population range and amenities available, 2011 (Contd..)
Population Number\ Number Type of amenity available
range Percentage of Educ Medi Drinkin Post Telep Trans Banks Agricul Approa Power
inhabit ation cal^ g water # hone port @ tural ch by supply
office
ed * ** comm credit pucca
villages unicat societie road
in each $ s
ions
range
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1000 - 1999 Number 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1
Percent age 100 100 100 100 100 100 0 0 100 100
2000 - 4999 Number 25 23 25 25 23 25 25 16 10 25 25
Percent age 92 100 100 92 100 100 64 40 100 100
5000 - 9999 Number 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 33 26 35 35
Percent age 100 100 100 100 100 100 94.29 74.29 100 100
10000 + Number 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 36 32 37 37
Percent age 100 100 100 100 100 100 97.3 86.49 100 100
Dist rict T otal Number 98 96 98 98 96 98 98 85 68 98 98
Percent age 98 100 100 98 100 100 86.73 69.39 100 100

Not e:-
* Educat ion includes all educat ion facilities.
^ Medical includes all medical facilit ies.
# Post office includes post office, t elegraph office and Post and t elegraph office.
$ T ransport communication includes bus service, railway facility and navigable waterways.
@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperat ive Bank.
** T elephone includes T elephone,PCO and Mobile.

The distribution of villages by population range and amenities available are given in this table.
There are no villages in the population range of 1-499 and 500-999. The most of the villages (73.47 per cent)
fall in the population size class of 5000-9999 and 10,000+. There is only one village in the population size
class of 1000-1999 which is having cent per cent specified amenities other than banks and agricultural
credit societies. Medical, Improved drinking water, telephone, transport and communications, approach
by pucca road and power supply are available in all the villages irrespective of population size class. The
facility of post office is also available in cent per cent villages falling in 10,000+.

Table 41: Distribution of villages according to land use, 2011


Sr. Name of Taluk Number of Total area (in Hectares) Percentage of Percentage of
No. inhabited villages cultivable area to irrigated area to total
total area cultivable area

1 2 3 4 5 6
1 05652-Talappilly 42 42823.00 59.43 38.79

2 05653-Chavakkad 7 7267.00 82.80 20.90

3 05654-Thrissur 13 25566.00 32.51 78.55

4 05655-Kodungallur 3 2011.00 95.38 63.91

5 05656-Mukundapuram 33 108091.00 27.14 68.41

T ot al 98 185758.00 38.24 54.84

Not e:- Culativable area= irrigat ed area + unirrigat ed area

157
Of the total rural area, 38.24 per cent is cultivable and of the total cultivable area, 54.84 per cent is
irrigated area. In all the taluks, except Thrissur and Mukundapuram taluks, the percentage of cultivable
area to total rural area is above 50 per cent. It is as high as 95.38 per cent in Kodungallur taluk. The percentage
of irrigated area to total cultivable area is the least in Chavakkad taluk (20.90 per cent).

Table 42: Schools/ Colleges per 10,000 population in towns, 2011


Sr. Name of the town Type of educational institution (Approx. numbers)
No. Primary Middle Secondary / Senior College*
matriculation secondary
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 5 2 2 1 0
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) 2 2 1 1 0
3 627757-Cherut huruthi (CT ) 4 2 1 1 0
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) 4 1 1 1 0
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) 3 3 2 1 0
7 627761-Kat takampal (CT ) 3 1 1 0 0
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) 3 1 1 1 1
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) 2 1 1 1 0
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) 2 0 0 0 0
11 627765-Kott appuram (CT ) 3 0 0 0 0
12 627766-Chitt anda (CT ) 7 3 0 0 0
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) 3 0 0 0 0
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) 5 3 3 1 0
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT) 4 2 1 1 0
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) 3 3 2 2 0
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) 6 1 1 0 0
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) 4 3 2 0 0
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) 2 2 0 0 2
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) 2 2 0 0 2
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) 3 2 2 1 0
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) 4 1 1 0 0
24 627778-Velur (CT ) 3 1 1 1 1
25 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) 3 3 3 3 0
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) 3 2 2 0 0
28 627782-Eranellur (CT ) 5 4 4 0 0
29 627783-Alur (CT ) 5 3 2 0 0
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) 1 1 1 0 1
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) 6 2 1 1 1
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) 5 3 1 1 0
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) 3 2 1 1 0
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) 4 1 1 1 0
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) 8 2 1 1 1
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) 3 1 0 1 0

158
Table 42: Schools/ Colleges per 10,000 population in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of the town Type of educational institution (Approx. numbers)
No. Primary Middle Secondary / Senior College*
matriculation secondary
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) 3 1 1 1 0
38 627797-Vylat hur (CT ) 7 2 1 0 0
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) 7 3 2 2 1
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) 3 1 1 1 0
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) 5 2 0 0 0
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) 5 4 3 3 0
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) 2 1 0 0 0
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) 8 5 3 2 0
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) 3 2 1 1 0
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) 2 2 1 0 0
47 627806-Pavaratt y (CT ) 7 2 2 1 0
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) 5 2 1 2 0
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) 6 3 1 1 0
50 627809-Venkit angu (CT ) 6 2 1 0 1
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) 4 3 1 1 0
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) 4 4 4 2 0
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 1 1 1 1 0
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) 1 1 1 0 0
55 627826-T hangalur (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) 1 1 1 1 0
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) 3 1 1 0 0
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) 3 1 0 0 0
59 627830-T holur (CT ) 1 1 1 0 0
60 627831-Edakkalathur (CT ) 4 2 0 0 0
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) 7 2 2 2 0
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) 4 0 0 0 0
63 627834-Pot tore (CT ) 3 1 1 1 0
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) 2 2 2 2 1
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT) 6 3 2 2 0
67 627838-Kut toor (CT ) 3 2 1 1 0
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) 3 2 0 0 0
69 627840-Puranatt ukara (CT ) 4 4 3 3 1
70 627841-Chitt ilappilly (CT ) 9 0 0 0 0
71 627842-Adat (CT ) 2 0 0 0 0
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) 4 1 1 0 0
74 627845-Nadathara (CT ) 3 2 2 2 0
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) 5 4 2 2 0
76 627847-Karamuck (CT ) 3 3 3 1 0

159
Table 42: Schools/ Colleges per 10,000 population in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of the town Type of educational institution (Approx. numbers)
No.
Primary Middle Secondary / Senior College*
matriculation secondary
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) 4 3 1 2 0
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) 2 0 0 0 0
79 627850-Velut hur (CT ) 1 0 0 0 0
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) 1 1 1 1 0
81 627852-Marathakkara (CT ) 1 1 0 0 0
82 627853-Put hur (CT ) 1 1 1 0 0
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) 2 1 1 0 0
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) 3 1 0 0 0
85 627856-Venginissery (CT ) 2 2 2 0 0
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) 3 1 0 0 0
87 627858-Anthicad (CT ) 3 2 2 0 0
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) 2 2 0 0 0
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) 2 1 1 0 0
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) 2 2 2 2 0
91 627862-Cherpu (CT ) 4 5 0 0 3
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) 3 1 1 1 0
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) 4 4 3 2 1
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) 3 2 2 2 0
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) 5 0 0 0 0
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) 2 3 3 1 0
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) 4 2 2 0 0
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) 2 1 1 1 0
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) 2 2 1 0 0
100 627873-Edat hiruthy (CT ) 5 1 0 1 0
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) 3 2 1 1 0
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) 4 1 0 0 0
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) 4 4 0 0 0
104 627877-Pappinivatt om (CT ) 6 4 2 1 0
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) 4 4 1 1 0
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) 1 0 0 0 0
107 627880-Ala (CT ) 6 3 0 0 0
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) 1 1 0 0 0
109 627882-Methala (CT ) 4 2 1 1 1
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) 5 2 1 1 0
111 627884-Madat humpady (CT ) 2 0 0 0 0
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) 2 2 3 3 3
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) 3 2 2 1 0
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) 2 2 2 2 0
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) 3 1 0 0 0
116 627921-Amballur (CT ) 6 1 1 0 0

160
Table 42: Schools/ Colleges per 10,000 population in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. Name of the town Type of educational institution (Approx. numbers)
No.
Primary Middle Secondary / Senior College*
matriculation secondary
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
117 627922-Put hukkad (CT ) 3 3 2 2 1
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) 5 3 3 1 0
119 627924-Kat tur (CT ) 2 2 2 1 0
120 627925-Porathissery (CT) 2 2 1 1 0
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) 3 2 1 0 0
122 627927-Kallett umkara (CT ) 3 3 1 0 0
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) 2 0 0 0 0
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) 1 1 1 0 0
125 627930-Edathirinji (CT ) 11 2 1 1 0
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) 5 4 4 4 0
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) 2 1 0 0 0
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) 4 3 2 0 0
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) 3 2 1 1 0
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) 3 2 1 1 0
131 627936-Muringur Vadakkummuri (CT ) 2 2 2 2 0
132 627937-Koratt y (CT ) 3 2 2 1 0
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri (CT) 2 1 1 0 0
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) 5 3 3 3 3
135 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri (CT ) 2 2 1 1 0
District: T hrissur (594) 3 2 1 1 0
Not e- * College includes
Arts/ Science/ Commerce College (Degree Level and above)

While analyzing the data, it has been seen that in all the towns, the number of primary schools per
10000 population is at the top among the various types of educational institutions. There is seen a decreasing
trend in the number of educational institutions per 10000 population as we move from primary school to
college.
Table 43: Number of beds in medical institutions in towns, 2011
Sr. No. Name of the town Number of beds in medical institutions per 10,000
population (Approx. numbers)
1 2 3
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 35
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) 0
3 627757-Cherut hurut hi (CT ) 1
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) 0
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) 4
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) 0
7 627761-Katt akampal (CT ) 0
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) 0
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) 0
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT) 0

161
Table 43: Number of beds in medical institutions in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. No. Name of the town Number of beds in medical institutions per 10,000
population (Approx. numbers)
1 2 3
11 627765-Kottappuram (CT ) 0
12 627766-Chitt anda (CT ) 0
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) 13
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) 69
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) 0
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) 78
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) 0
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) 0
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) 0
20 627774-Akat hiyoor (CT ) 0
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) 0
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) 0
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) 0
24 627778-Velur (CT ) 0
25 627779-Mundathikode (CT ) 534
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) 90
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) 0
28 627782-Eranellur (CT) 0
29 627783-Alur (CT ) 12
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) 0
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) 25
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) 38
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT ) 0
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) 0
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) 0
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) 0
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) 0
38 627797-Vylat hur (CT ) 0
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) 0
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) 0
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) 0
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) 0
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) 0
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) 0
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) 0
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) 0
47 627806-Pavaratt y (CT ) 8
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) 0
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) 0
50 627809-Venkit angu (CT ) 9
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) 0

162
Table 43: Number of beds in medical institutions in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. No. Name of the town Number of beds in medical institutions per 10,000
population (Approx. numbers)
1 2 3
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) 16
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 98
54 627825-Killannur (CT ) 0
55 627826-T hangalur (CT) 0
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) 751
57 627828-Anjur (CT ) 0
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) 0
59 627830-T holur (CT ) 0
60 627831-Edakkalat hur (CT ) 0
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) 0
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) 0
63 627834-Pott ore (CT ) 0
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) 0
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) 0
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT ) 16
67 627838-Kutt oor (CT ) 0
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) 0
69 627840-Puranat tukara (CT ) 0
70 627841-Chit tilappilly (CT ) 0
71 627842-Adat (CT) 0
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) 0
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) 0
74 627845-Nadathara (CT) 0
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) 26
76 627847-Karamuck (CT) 17
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) 0
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) 0
79 627850-Veluthur (CT ) 0
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) 0
81 627852-Marat hakkara (CT ) 0
82 627853-Puthur (CT ) 0
83 627854-Avinissery (CT ) 18
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) 0
85 627856-Venginissery (CT ) 0
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) 0
87 627858-Anthicad (CT ) 63
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) 0
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) 0
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) 0
91 627862-Cherpu (CT ) 0
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) 5
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) 0
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) 19

163
Table 43: Number of beds in medical institutions in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. No. Name of the town Number of beds in medical institutions per 10,000
population (Approx. numbers)

1 2 3
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) 0
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT) 0
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) 0
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) 41
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) 41
100 627873-Edathirut hy (CT ) 0
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) 0
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) 0
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) 0
104 627877-Pappinivat tom (CT ) 0
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) 0
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) 0
107 627880-Ala (CT ) 0
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) 31
109 627882-Methala (CT ) 0
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) 0
111 627884-Madathumpady (CT ) 0
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) 86
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) 121
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) 0
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT ) 0
116 627921-Amballur (CT) 0
117 627922-Put hukkad (CT ) 0
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) 0
119 627924-Kat tur (CT ) 33
120 627925-Porat hissery (CT ) 1
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) 0
122 627927-Kallett umkara (CT ) 0
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) 0
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT ) 0
125 627930-Edathirinji (CT ) 0
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) 0
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT ) 0
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) 18
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) 0
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) 0
131 627936-Muringur Vadakkummuri (CT ) 0
132 627937-Koratt y (CT ) 375
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri (CT ) 8
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) 0
135 627940-Kallur Thekkummuri (CT ) 0
District: T hrissur (594) 33

164
The number of beds in Medical Institutions per 10,000 population is given for the District (urban)
and all the Towns.
There are 33 beds per 10,000 population in the urban areas of the District. Among 135 towns, 14
towns have higher number of beds per 10,000 population than the corresponding District average (33).

Table 44: Proportion of slum population in towns, 2011


Sr.No. Name of the town having Total population Slum population Percentage of slum population
slum to total population
1 2 3 4 5
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) 54071 1371 2.54
2 803279-Chavakkad (M) 39098 535 1.37
3 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) 315957 11464 3.63
4 803283-Chalakudy (M) 49525 6355 12.83
T otal 458651 19725 4.30

In the district, the slum population is reported only in four statutory towns. The percentage of slum
population to total urban population is 4.30. Chalakudy municipality is reported to have 12.83 per cent
population living in slums. The lowest per cent of slum population is reported in Chavakkad municipality
(1.37 per cent).

Table 45: Most important commodity manufactured in towns, 2011


Sr. No. Name of the town Name of three most important commodities
manufactured
1 2 3
1 803277-Kunnamkulam (M) Iron Product s, Books, T oys
2 627756-Kaniyarkode (CT ) T ext iles Handloom, Candle, Mat ch Boxes
3 627757-Cheruthuruthi (CT ) Coconut Oil
4 627758-Nedumpura (CT ) Coconut Oil
5 627759-Desamangalam (CT ) Country Bricks
6 627760-Kadavallur (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
7 627761-Kat takampal (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
8 627762-Pazhanji (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
9 627763-Karikkad (CT ) Plast ic Goods
10 627764-Nelluwaya (CT ) Rice
11 627765-Kot tappuram (CT ) Steel Furniture, Wooden Furnit ure
12 627766-Chitt anda (CT ) Furniture
13 627767-Kumaranellur (CT ) Rice, Copra
14 627768-Chelakkara (CT ) Pvc Pipe, Pickles
15 627769-Enkakkad (CT ) Rice, Arecanut, Coconut Oil
16 627770-Wadakkanchery (CT ) Rice, Rubber Products
17 627771-Kariyannur (CT ) Rice
18 627772-Eyyal (CT ) Plast ic House Hold It ems, Building Materials
19 627773-Chiramanangad (CT ) Building Mat erials, Rice, Rubber Product s
20 627774-Akathiyoor (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
21 627775-Porkulam (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil

165
Table 45: Most important commodity manufactured in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. No. Name of the town Name of three most important commodities
manufactured
1 2 3
22 627776-Choondal (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil, Count ry Bricks
23 627777-Chiranellur (CT ) Household It ems, Building Mat erials, Steel Almirahs
24 627778-Velur (CT ) Steel Products, Pvc Pipe, Water T ank
25 627779-Mundat hikode (CT ) Plast ic Products
26 627780-Peringandoor (CT ) Handloom Cloths, T iles
27 627781-Minalur (CT ) Aeroplane Parts, T rain Parts, Mat ch Box
28 627782-Eranellur (CT ) T oy Balls, Country Bricks
29 627783-Alur (CT ) T iles
30 627784-Kandanassery (CT ) Ujala Liquid, Copra
31 803278-Guruvayoor (M) Rubber Products, Beedi
32 803279-Chavakkad (M) Beedi, Copra
33 627792-Kadikkad (CT) Wooden Furnit ure, Pappad, Coconut Oil
34 627793-Punnayurkulam (CT ) Wooden Furnit ure, Coconut Oil, Pappad
35 627794-Vadakkekad (CT ) Beedi, Copra, T oot h Powder
36 627795-Punnayur (CT ) Copra, Coconut Oil, Limestone
37 627796-Edakkazhiyur (CT ) Beedi, Coir Fiber, Coconut Oil
38 627797-Vylat hur (CT ) Coconut Oil, Copra, Beedi
39 627798-Pookode (CT ) Coconut Oil, Food Product s, Pappad
40 627799-Iringaprom (CT ) Beedi, Concrete Products, Copra
41 627800-Perakam (CT ) Food Products, Pappad, Copra
42 627801-Orumanayur (CT ) Beedi, Copra, Fish Product s
43 627802-Paluvai (CT ) Copra, Coconut Oil, Beedi
44 627803-T haikkad (CT ) Copra, Coconut Oil, Beedi
45 627804-Brahmakulam (CT ) Beedi, Cement Hollow Bricks, Mineral Wat er And Water Soda
46 627805-Elavally (CT ) Beedi, Nut rimix, Coconut Oil
47 627806-Pavaratt y (CT ) Copra, Coir, Plast ic Goods
48 627807-Venmanad (CT ) Coconut Oil, Coir, Copra
49 627808-Mullassery (CT ) Coir, Beedi, Brick Stone
50 627809-Venkitangu (CT ) Coir, Beedi, Coconut Oil
51 627810-Vadanappally (CT ) Coconut Oil, Copra, Coir Furniture
52 627811-T alikkulam (CT ) Coconut Oil, Copra, Coir Products
T iles And Bricks, General Engineering Machine T ools , Moulds,
53 803280-T hrissur (M Corp.) Food Products
54 627825-Killannur (CT) Asbestos Sheet, Plastic Prducts, M Sand
55 627826-T hangalur (CT ) Rubber Products, Wooden Furnit ure, Flour
56 627827-Avanur (CT ) Cable Wire, Plastic Bot tle, Bricks
T ile And Clay Products, Book And Paper, Rubber And Plast ic
57 627828-Anjur (CT) Products
58 627829-Kaiparamba (CT ) Diamond Ornament s, Fan, Wooden Furniture
59 627830-T holur (CT ) Furniture, Flour Mill Product s, Hollow Bricks
60 627831-Edakkalathur (CT ) Rice

166
Table 45: Most important commodity manufactured in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. No. Name of the town Name of three most important commodities
manufactured
1 2 3
61 627832-Peramangalam (CT ) Clay Files And Other Clay Product s, Biscuit s, Chips
62 627833-Choolissery (CT ) T ile, Pipe, Wooden Furnit ure
63 627834-Pot tore (CT ) Wood Product s, St eel, T iles
64 627835-Kolazhy (CT ) Hollow Bricks, Plast ic Cont ainer, T hermist er
65 627836-Kurichikkara (CT ) T extiles
66 627837-Vellanikkara (CT ) Coconut Oil, Paddy
67 627838-Kut toor (CT ) Processed Food, Electric Cable, Holobricks And T iles
68 627839-Puzhakkal (CT ) Powerloom Clot h, Hollow Bricks, Pot tery Clay
69 627840-Puranatt ukara (CT ) Powerloom, Sweet s, Hollowbricks
70 627841-Chitt ilappilly (CT ) Induct ion Cooker, Industrial Machinery, Rice
71 627842-Adat (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
Ornaments And Garments, Bags Making T hread Rubber, Brick,
72 627843-Kozhukkully (CT ) Concret e Windows, Door Frame Etc.
73 627844-Kainoor (CT ) Bag And Suit Case, Machine Bricks, T reat ed Rubber
74 627845-Nadathara (CT ) Pot tary Making, Bags And Suit Case, Ornaments And Garments
75 627846-Parakkad (CT ) Ayurveda Medicine, Fan And Grinder, Plast ic Products And Rice
76 627847-Karamuck (CT ) Coconut Oil, Chilly Poder
77 627848-Manalur (CT ) Coconut Oil, Rice And Chilly Powder, Coir
78 627849-Eravu (CT ) Rice, Wooden Furniture, Concret e Frames
79 627850-Velut hur (CT ) Rice
80 627851-Manakkody (CT ) Rice
81 627852-Marathakkara (CT ) T ile, Bricks, Wood Gold Covering
82 627853-Put hur (CT ) Concret e Bricks, Foot Wears, Rubber Product s
83 627854-Avinissery (CT) Gold Ornaments, Wooden Furnit ure, T iles
84 627855-Palissery (CT ) Gold Ornaments, Wooden Furnit ure
85 627856-Venginissery (CT ) Gold Ornaments, Wooden Furnit ure, Bricks
86 627857-Kodannur (CT ) Rice, Cashew Nut
87 627858-Anthicad (CT ) Copra, Rice
88 627859-Padiyam (CT ) Coir
89 627860-Vadakkummuri (CT ) Coconut Oil, Rice
90 627861-Kizhakkummuri (CT ) Coconut Oil, Rice
91 627862-Cherpu (CT ) Wooden Furnit ure, Gold Ornament s, Bricks
92 627863-Paralam (CT ) Gold Ornaments, Furnit ure, Rice
93 627864-Chevvoor (CT ) Wooden Furnit ure, Gold Ornament s, T iles
94 627865-Vallachira (CT ) Gold Ornaments, Wooden Furnit ure
95 627866-Oorakam (CT ) Gold Ornaments, Wooden Furnit ure, Bricks
96 627867-Kurumpilavu (CT ) Hollo Bricks, Bio Fert ilizer, Coconut Oil
97 627868-Kizhuppillikkara (CT ) Wood Product s, Copra
98 627869-T hanniyam (CT ) Coconut Oil, Rice, Areacanut
99 803281-Kodungallur (M + OG) Coir Product s, Dry Coconut Powder, Foam Bed
100 627873-Edathiruthy (CT ) V St abiliser

167
Table 45: Most important commodity manufactured in towns, 2011 (Contd..)
Sr. No. Name of the town Name of three most important commodities
manufactured
1 2 3
101 627874-Chendrappini (CT ) Coconut Oil
102 627875-Kaipamangalam (CT ) Coir Mat ress
103 627876-Perinjanam (CT ) Mat
104 627877-Pappinivat tom (CT ) Coconut Products, Mat
105 627878-Panangad (CT ) Halwa, Coir, Copra
106 627879-Edavilangu (CT ) T hazhappaya
107 627880-Ala (CT ) Polythene, T hazhappaya
108 627881-Pallippuram (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
109 627882-Methala (CT ) T hazhappaya, Electronic Equipments, Hollow Bricks
110 627883-Poyya (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
111 627884-Madathumpady (CT ) Rice, Coconut Oil
112 803282-Irinjalakuda (M) Coconut Oil, Catt le Feed, Soap
113 803283-Chalakudy (M) T iles, Bricks, Ayruvedic Medicine
114 627919-T rikkur (CT ) Clay Product, Cement Bricks, Copra
115 627920-Nenmenikkara (CT) T ile
116 627921-Amballur (CT ) Cloth, T iles, Ayurvedic Product
117 627922-Put hukkad (CT ) T ile, Candle
118 627923-Parappukkara (CT ) T ile, Foot Care, Sanit ary It ems
119 627924-Kat tur (CT ) Rubber Products, Electronic It ems
120 627925-Porat hissery (CT ) Paper Cart an, Polymers Pvc Pumps, Furnit ure
121 627926-Madayikonam (CT ) Clay T iles, Wooden Furnit ure, Concrete Items
122 627927-Kallett umkara (CT ) Cat tle Feed, Coconut Oil, Electrical It ems
123 627928-Pullur (CT ) Coconut Oil
124 627929-Manavalassery (CT) T oilet Soap, Coconut Oil
125 627930-Edathirinji (CT ) Coir, Concrete T ile, Hollow Bricks
126 627931-Vellookkara (CT ) Bell Met al
127 627932-Vadakkumkara (CT) Ayurveda Medicines, Inverter, Fibre Products
128 627933-Poomangalam (CT ) Fire Product s, Coconut Oil, Rice
129 627934-Padiyur (CT ) Coconut Oil, Bricks, Coir
130 627935-T hekkumkara (CT ) Rubber Products, Coconut Oil, St eel Nail
131 627936-Muringur Vadakkummuri (CT ) Beverages, Milk Products, T iles
132 627937-Korat ty (CT ) T hread, Paper, Catt le Feed
133 627938-Kallur Vadakkummuri (CT ) T ile, Bricks, Furniture
134 627939-Vadama (CT ) T iles, Furnit ure
135 627940-Kallur T hekkummuri (CT ) Ayurvedic Medicine, Mat ch Box, Invert er

Rice, Coconut oil, Beedi, Rubber products, Wooden furnitures, Coir, Bricks, Tiles, Gold ornaments,
Arecanut etc., are the most important items manufactured in the district.

168
(vii) MAJOR SOCIAL AND CULTURAL EVENTS, NATURAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE DEVELOPMENTS AND
SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES DURING THE DECADE

Art and Culture

Thrissur is celebrated as the cultural capital of Kerala. The cultural tradition of the district goes back
to very early days. There were great centres of learning and culture in the district in the ancient and
medieval periods. In the early centuries of Christian era, Mathilakam was a great centre of learning and
culture. Buddhist and Jain scholars of repute are said to have lived here and engaged themselves in teaching.
Under the Kulasekhara of the second Chera Empire, there were great centres of learning and culture.
Mahodayapuram became famous as a great seat of learning and culture.

The greatest literary figure in the district was Mahakavi Vallathole Narayana Menon. Though born
in Malabar region Vallathole made Cheruthuruthy his Head Quarters. He established Kerala Kalamandalam.
Cheruthuruthy is the seat of Kerala Kalamandalam, renowned the world over for its Kathakali Training
Centre. Training in classical art forms of Kerala like Kathakali, Ottamthullal, Mohiniyattam and other art
forms is imparted at Kalamandalam. Cultural programs are also arranged.

Kerala Sahitya Academy is situated at Thrissur. There is a good library attached to the Academy
consisting of two sections the General Section and the Research Section. The Academy works in
cooperation with the Kendra Sahitya Academy.

Kerala Sangeetha Nataka Academy, located at Thrissur town, aims at fostering and developing
drama and music and promotes the cultural unity of Kerala. It works in close collaboration with the Kendra
Sangeetha Nataka Academy.

The Kerala Lalithakala Academy is also situated in Thrissur. The aim of the academy is to promote
sculpture, painting and visual arts.

The School of Drama of Calicut University located at Arnattukara in Thrissur district conducts a three
year course in Bachelor of Theatre Arts Direction, Acting, Childrens Theatre, etc.

The Institute of Fine Arts located here imparts training in Arts, Painting, Sculpture, Engraving etc.

The Unnayi Warier Smaraka Kalanilayam is located at Irinjalakuda. As the name denotes, this is
memorial to the great Kathakali composer Unnayi Warier, established in 1953. Kalanilayam offers training
in Kathakali vesham, Kathakali music, Chenda, Maddalam, Chutti and Koppu pani.

Thrissur Brahmaswam Madam is an institution imparting Rig Vedic education to newly initiated
Namboodiri youths.

There is an archaeological museum and a picture gallery housed in the annexe of Thrissur zoo.

Festivals

Thrissur district is conventionally famous for its fairs and religious festivals which used to attract a
large number of people from all over Kerala.

169
Pooram at the Vadakkumnathan Temple

Thrissur district is world famous for its Pooram festival. Vadakkumnathan temple is the venue of
Pooram festival. The temple is located in the heart of Thrissur town. It is one of the largest and the best
endowed ancient temples of Kerala. The temple is built in the characteristic of Kerala style of architecture.
The most colourful festival of Kerala, Thrissur pooram attracts large masses of devotees and spectators
from all parts of the state and even outside. Celebrated in Medam (April-May) it consists of processions of
richly caparisoned elephants from various neighbouring temples to the Vadakkumnathan temple. The
most impressive processions are those from Krishna temple at Thiruvambadi and the Devi temple at
Paramekkavu which is quite a significant event for its devotees. This festival was introduced by Sakthan
Thampuram, the Maharaja of the erstwhile Kochi state. Perhaps, there is no festival in Kerala that draws
such an unbelievable number of people to a single event. However, Vadakkumnathan is a mere spectator
at this festival, lending its premises and grounds for the great event. The pooram festival is also well
known for the magnificent display of fire works. Fire works start in the early hours and the dazzling display
last three to four hours. The pooram festival is celebrated by two rival groups representing the two divisions
of Thrissur Paramekkavu and Thiruvambadi vying with each other in making the display of fire works
grandeur and more colourful. Each group is allowed to display a maximum of fifteen elephants and all
efforts are made by each party to secure the best elephants in South India and the most artistic parasols,
several kinds of which are raised on the elephants during the display. Commencing in the early hours of the
morning, the celebrations last till the break of dawn next day. The procession of the Thiruvambadi pooram
to the grounds of Vadakkumnathan temple and back is not only important but also quite enlivening. The
marvellous as well as magical effect of the Panchavadyam, a combination of five percussion and wind
instruments is to be felt and enjoyed.

170
Utsavam in Guruvayur temple

Guruvayur temple is the most outstanding Vaishnavite pilgrim centre in Kerala. Poojas and religious
ceremonies are observed here strictly in accordance with Hindu Vedic rights as laid down by Adi Sankara.
The important religious festivals celebrated in this temple are (1) Ashtami-Rohini in Chingaom (August-
September) (2) Suklapaksha Ekadasi in Vrischigom (November-December) (3) Kuchela day in Dhanu (De-
cember-January), the day on which Kuchela visited Sree Krishna with beaten rice (4) Dwaja Prathishta day
(erection of flag staff in the temple) on Makayiram asterism in Makaram (January-February) (5)Vishu Kani
in Medom (April-May) and (6) the 10 days Utsavam commencing from pooyam asterism in Kumbhom (Feb-
ruary-March). Of these Ekadasi draws the largest crowd. Ekadasi is held as an important day, for according to
the Hindu mythology. It was on this day that Sree Krishna made Geethopadosa to Arjun. It was again on this
day that Lord asked Sree Sankara to formulate a system of rituals and ceremonies in the temple. Also,
Melpathur Bhattathiri had obtained the vision of the Lord on this day.
Bharani Utsavam in Kodungallur

171
Bharani utsavam is celebrated with religious fervour and devotion, in the month of Meenam every
year. The Bharani utsavam commences with the hoisting of the temple flag on Bharani day in Kumbhom,
the day on which Bhadrakali is supposed to have challenged Darika for combat. Early morning on Bharani
day, special nivedya prepared with a fine variety of rice known as Variyarippayasa nivedyam will be offered
to Devi. Even before the day dawns, the deity would be ceremoniously taken out of the Sreekovil and
placed on raised pedestal for public worship. Simultaneously, the temple flag will be hoisted at the eastern
side of the lamp post about the northern entrance to the temple. It signifies the victory of Devi over Darika.
Following Bharani day, the temple doors will remain closed for six days. On the 7th day, all the flags hoisted
earlier will be lowered down marking the end of the utsavam. An important feature of this festival is the
recitation of a series of obscene and vulgar ballads known as Poorappatu by pilgrims all along the way
combined with drunk revelry.
Pooram Festival of Arattupuzha

Pooram festival is celebrated in the month of Medam (April-May). Idols from 41 temples in the
neighbourhood of the village including Arattpuzha temple and Ammathiruvadi temple Cherpu are brought
in procession to this village on rows of gaily caparisoned elephants to the accompaniment of music trumpets,
tom-tom, illuminations and display of fireworks. As many as 50 to 60 elephants take part in the colourful
festival. Even the name of place Arattupuzha seems to have been derived from Arat (Holy immersion) of
the deities in the waters of the Arattupuzha river. Thousands of people attend this magnificent and colourful
function.
Pulikali(kavakali)

172
It is performed by trained artists to entertain people on the occasion of Onam. Literal meaning of Pulikali
is the play of the tigers hence the performance revolve around the theme of tiger hunting.
Aanayoottu (feeding of elephants)

It is the world largest elephant feeding ceremony held in Vadakkunnathan Temple in the City
annually. The ceremony is conducted on the first day of the Malayalam month of Karkidakam. It involves a
number of unadorned elephants being positioned amid a multitude of people for being worshipped and
fed. A large number of people throng the temple to feed the elephants.Every year of Aanayoottu, gaja
pooja, is conducted. It is believed that offering poojas and delicious feed to the elephants is a way to
satisfy Lord Ganeshathe god of wealth and of the fulfillment of wishes. The Vadakkunnathan temple
which is considered to be one of the oldest Shiva temples in southern India, has hosted the
Aanayoottuevent for the past few years.

Feasts and Fairs at the Palayur Church

The famous ancient Romo-Syrian Church at Palayur is located about one kilometre from Chavakkad
on the road to Enamakkal. This church is said to have been founded by St. Thomas in 52 A.D. The St.
Sebastain Perunal conducted in February every year is the main festival and attracts thousands of devotees
from the length and breadth of Kerala. Many pilgrims from different parts of India, even those who come
to Guruvayur temple (about a mile away from Palayur) visit Palayur because of its historical importance.

Utsavam in Koodalmanickam Temple

Koodalmanickam temple is one of the ancient temples of Kerala and is dedicated to Bharatha. The
festival in this temple is held annually for 11 days in Medom (April-May) from Uthram to Thiruvonam
asterisms, the flag hoisting being conducted on the Uthram day. A mammoth crowd estimated to be ranging
from five to seven thousands normally participate in this festival. Kathakali, Ottamthullal, Panchavadyam
and proecessions led by caparisoned elephants are the special features of the festival. Neyyuvilakku,
Palpayasam and Neyyappam are the main offerings to this temple.

173
Koratty Perunnal

The ancient Catholic Church of Koratty, St. Marys Forane Church was established in 1381.It is
situated at about 6 kms. to the south of Chalakudy and is locally known as Koratty Muthys church. The most
important festival of Koratty church is the Koratty Muthys festival celebrated during the second week of
October every year. It is celebrated on Saturday and Sunday after the 10th of October and Christians from far
and near, flock to the place to give their offerings to their Beloved Mother. The statue of Koratty Muthy is
taken out in a procession from the church. Hundreds of non-Catholic pilgrims also assemble in the church
to make their offerings. Important offering is bunch of Plantain. A great annual fair is held in connection
with the festival.
Feast in the St. Sebastians Roman Catholic Church
This Church is situated in the village Chapallipuram in the taluk of Chavakkad. The feast in honour
of St. Sebastain is celebrated in the last two days of January every year. Though the festival begins five days
ahead of the last day of January, the peak celebrations are by the evening of the 30th and the fully day of
31st. The whole feast is embellished by the usual attraction of music, fireworks etc. More than 20,000
devotees attend this feast.
Thriprayar Ekadasi in Thriprayar Temple

174
Thriprayar Temple dedicated to Sree Ramachandra is situated 23 kms. south-west of Thrissur. The
Thriprayar Ekadasi is the main festival of this temple. It is held for 3 days in Vrischikam (November-
December). The festival attracts large number of devotees.
Ekadasi at Thiruvilwamala

Thiruvilwamala temple is situated on the left bank of the Bharathapuzha about 2 km. to the south
of Lakkidi Railway station. The annual Ekadasi festival held here in February-March attracts thousands of
people.
Feast in the St. Josephs Church, Pavaratty
This church is situated in the village of pavaratty in Chavakkad taluk. The feast in the church which
stands in the name of St. Joseph is celebrated on a grand scale on May 4th and 5th every year. In 1937 a new
celebration of a feast called Budanazcha Thirunal was commenced in the church. A large number of devotees
take part in the above celebration.
Mandala Thalapoli in Olarikkara Temple
Olarikkara Bhagavathi Temple is in Ayyanthole village hardly 3 km. to the west of Thrissur Railway
station, on the main bus route to Kanjani. The deity of the temple is Vanadurga. The annual festival of this
temple is Mandala Thalapoli celebrated on the 10th day of the Malayalam month Dhanu (December-January).
Thousands of people participate in this festival. Ceremonious procession headed by five or seven elephants
and splendid Panchavadyam performance are the highlights of this festival.
Feast in the Marthoma Pontifical Shrine, Kodungallur
This shrine is situated in Malankara sacred soil where St. Thomas the Apostle is said to have set
afoot in India. The main feast of the Church is celebrated on the 21st November every year, on the day on
which St. Thomas is supposed to have landed at Kodungallur (formerly called Muziris).
Thottotsavam in the Kovilakath Dharma Sabha Temple
The temple is situated in the village of Edavilangu in Kodungallur taluk, 18 kilometres away from
Irinjalakuda Railway station. Thottotsavam is celebrated for 7 days from the 5th to the 11th in Makaram
(January-February) every year. Large number of people attend this utsavam and the fair conducted along
with it.

175
Utsavam in the Choorakot Temple
The temple is situated in the villge of Padiyam in Thrissur taluk. Of all the festivals celebrated in
this temple, the most important is the Bharani utsavam in Makaram (January-February) lasting from Bharani
to Karthika asterisms. In the afternoon on Bharani day, the Nairs will bring their vela. This will be continued
till day break on Karthika day. Then the pooram of Vettuvans will commence. This will be followed by
Kathakali and other performances. Besides these, Panchvadyam, Pandimelam, Pacharimelam and
Thayambaka would also help to increase the tempo of the utsavam.
Feast in the St.Josephs Church, Kaveed
The St.Josephs Roman Catholic Church, Kaveed is situated in the Perakam village, Chavakkad taluk
about 30 km. away from Thrissur Railway station. The main feast of the church, the St. Josephs feast, is
celebrated for 2 days on second day after the Easter and the preceding Saturday.
Feast in Kunnamkulam Simhasana Church

This church is situated at Kunnamkulam town in Talappilly taluk. The festival in this church is
celebrated every year on Sunday nearest of March 19, the date of passing away of the late Mar Osthatheous
Sleeba Metropolitan.
Pooram in Bhagavathy temple, Varakkara
The temple is situated on the borders of Amballur and Varandarapilly villages in Mukundapuram
taluk. The utsavam is held in this temple on Dhanu 30 (December-January) every year. The highlight of the
utsavam of this temple in which around 30,000 people take part are Kathakali, Kathaprasangam, Ottamthullal,
Kalakettu, Kuthirakettu and ceremonious procession led by richly ornamented elephants.
Feast in the St. Johns Church, Parappukkara
The church is situated in the village of Parappukkara in Mukundapuram taluk. This church has her
patron Saint, St. John Napunzianus, a martyr of the 14th century. The feast of St. Johns Napunzianus is on
May 16, every year. People from different parts of Kerala throng to pay their homage to their beloved
patron and to take part in the holy services conducted in his honour.
Feast in the St. Marys Church, Kalparamba
This church is situated 5 km. south-west of Irinjalakuda. The annual festival of St. Sebastian is the
main function in this church.

176
Feast in the St. Sebastians Church
This church is situated in the village of Thazhekkad in Mukundapuram taluk. The festival of the
church begins on the 31st of March every year.
Feast in the Little Flower Church, Thirumudikkunnu

This church founded in the year 1939, is located on Machampally hills 5 kilometres east of Koratty
Railway station. The church is dedicated to the Little Flower (St. Theresa of Child Jesus). Festivals are
celebrated in this church in September and February.

Festival in Thiruvanchikulam Siva temple

177
The temple is situated in the historical site of Chera Emperors of ancient Kerala. The annual festival
in this temple attracts thousands of people from far and near.
Uthralikkavu Pooram
Uthralikkavu Pooram is a festival held at Shri Rudhiramahakalikav temple situated at Wadackanchery
in Thalappilly taluk of Thrissur district . The temple is famed for its Pooram festival held during February /
March every year.

Kodakarashashti

178
(viii) BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF OF PLACES OF RELIGIOUS, HISTORICAL OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND TOURIST
IMPORTANCE IN VILLAGES AND PLACES OF TOURIST INTEREST IN THE TOWNS OF THE DISTRICT
(i) Places of religious importance
Vadakkumnathan Temple

Vadakkumnathan temple is one of the oldest temples in the state. This temple is a classical example
of the Kerala style of architecture and has many decorative murals and works of art. The temple contains
the sacred shrines of Parama Shiva, Parvathy, Sankaranarayana, Ganapathy, Sri Rama and Sri Krishna. The
central shrines and Koothambalam exhibit exquisite vignettes carved in wood. Legend goes that this
temple was founded by Parasurama. This is the venue of the world famous Pooram festival celebrated
annually in April-May. The fireworks at the Pooram is a spectacular sight. Non-Hindus are not allowed entry
into the temple.
Guruvayoor

179
Guruvayoor, 32 km. north-west of Thrissur, is known for the famous Sree Krishna temple. It is
among Indias most important pilgrimage centres and is also known as the Dwaraka of the south. Sree
Krishna Swamy Temple, which attracts thousands of pilgrims is said to date prior to the 16th century. The
history of the temple is shrouded in mystery. According to belief, the temple was created by Guru- the
preceptor of the gods and Vayu- the god of winds. The idol of Gurvayoor temple is unique because it is
carved out of Pathal anjana sila and is therefore considered extremely sacred. The idol was once
worshipped by Mahavishnu in Vaikunda and later handed over to the sacred hands of Brahma, Sutapas,
Kasyapa and finally to Vasudeva, the father of Lord Krishna. It is at this temple that Melpathur Naryana
Bhattathiri composed his well-known Sanskrit devotional poem Narayaneeyam. The Melpathur Auditorium
dedicated to the memory of the great poet Melpathur Bhattathiri is now the venue for the annual Chembai
Sangeethotsav. Only Hindus are allowed entry inside the temple.
Thiruvambadi Sri Krishna Temple
It is one of the largest Sree Krishna temples in Kerala.. The temple is one of the two rival groups
participating in Thrissur Pooram, which is the biggest local festival inKerala.

Paramekkavu Bagavathi Temple


It is one of the largest Bagavathi temples in Kerala is situated in the city. It is one of the two rival
groups participating in Thrissur Pooram, which is the biggest festival in South India and Kerala.

180
Arattupuzha

Arattupuzha situated 12 km. to the south of Thrissur town is widely known for the annual pooram
festival held in April-May every year. Arattupuzha pooram is one of the most colourful temple festivals of
Kerala drawing thousands of people from different parts of the district and the state. This pooram festival
features a ceremonial pageant of over 60 tuskers carrying the image of the deities of 41 neighbouring
temples.
Kunnamkulam

Kunnamkulam the main centre of Jacobite Syrian Christians is situated 22 km. north of Thrissur. One
of the oldest Syrian Church at Arthat is 3 km. south of Kunnamkulam.
Cheraman Juma Masjid, Kodungallur

181
The Cheraman Juma Masjid constructed in 629 A.D is considered as the first mosque erected in
India and second in world where Juma prayers were started. All the Muslims of the locality congregate in
the mosque for celebration of Idul-Fitr (Ramzan) and Idul Azha (Bakrid) festivals.
Nalambalam
1) Thriprayar Sree Rama Swami Temple

Thriprayar is located 23 km. west of Thrissur. It is famous for its Sree Rama temple. This temple features
architecture similar to the Vadakkumnathan temple. The annual festival, the Thriprayar Ekadasi attracts a
large number of pilgrims.
2) Irinjalakuda Koodal Manikyam Temple

182
Irinjalakuda is located about 21 km. south of Thrissur. The town is famous for its Koodal Manikyam
temple which is dedicated to Bharathan. This ancient temple is perhaps the only one in India dedicated to
Bharatha, the brother of Sree Rama. The temple has several inscriptions dating back to the year of Emperor
Sthanu Ravi of which the engraved granite slab in the inner Prakara of the temple to the north of Sreekovil
is important. The eleven day annual festival featuring a pageant of thirteen caparisoned elephants (held in
AprilMay) marks the end of the festival season in Kerala.
3) Thirumoozhikkulam Lakshmana Perumal Temple

Thirumoozhikkulam temple is located in between Mala in Thrissur district and Angamaly in


Ernakulam district. Thirumoozhikkulam is one among the 32 Brahmin gramams in Kerala. This is the place
where Hareetha muni ,the son of Vishwamithra worshipped Vishnu.
4) Payammal

183
The Payammal Sathrughna Swami temple, 6 km from Vellankallur along the Irinjalakuda-Kodungallur
route, is one of the few Shathrughna shrines in the State. The Payammal temple is about seven kilometers
from Iringalakuda Koodalmanikya temple in the Iringalakuda Mathilakam route. Shathrukhna is considered
to be the reincarnation of the Sudarsana Chakra(disc) in the hands of Mahavishnu. This is the smallest
temple among Nalambalams. Of the four idols retrieved from the sea by the fishermen this idol is the
smallest. All the other three temples have circular sreekovils but here sreekovil is in rectangular shape.
Ariyannoor Temple, Kandanisserry
This temple has a carved entrance gable which has been compared to the sculptures of American
artist Louise Nevelson. The Sree Krishna temple at Thirukulasekharapuram as well as the Siva temple at
Thiruvanchikulam are believed to be monuments from the 9th century.
Thiruvilwamala

Thiruvilwamala is situated at a distance of about 51 km. north east of Thrissur. This place is famous for
the temple built on the top of an extensive rocky hill dedicated to Sri Rama and Lakshmana. The Rakshappara
near here is believed to be the place where Sree Rama and Lakshmana slained the Rakshasas (demons)
during their vanavasa.
Mammiyoor Mahadeva temple

184
Mammiyoor temple or famously known as Mammiyur Mahadeva Kshetram is a Shiva temple
situated in Guruvayoor, Thrissur district .Every devotee who goes to Guruvayur Temple is supposed to go
to Mammiyoor also, as the ritual goes. Only Hindus are allowed inside the temple premises. The temple is
a part of the 108 famous Shiva temples in Kerala and one among the five Shiva temples around Guruvayoor.
The main deity is Lord Shiva and he is facing east and is in rowdra bhava. Later, an idol of Lord Vishnu was
also installed to reduce the anger of Lord Shiva. Here, the Lord is a family man, with Goddess Parvati on his
lap, and Lords Ganesha, Subrahmanya and Ayyappa beside. Nagas, Bhadrakali and Brahmarakshass are also
installed in the temple. This temple is managed by Malabar Devaswom Board. Daily three poojas are
conducted. Puzhakkara Chennas Mana is the hereditary Thanthri of this temple too. Shivaratri and Ashtami
Rohini are the major festivals.
Nelluvai
Nelluvai is situated north of Wadakkanchery. There is a temple dedicated to Dhanwanthiri which is
very famous. The Nelluvai Ekadasi in this temple is an important festival.
Pazhayannur
Pazhayannur situated 45 km. north east of Thrissur is famous for its Bhagavathy temple. The
Cheerakuzhy regulator across the Pulazipuzha is on the eastern boundary of Pazhayannur village.
Perumanam
Perumanam is situated about 10 km. south of Thrissur. There is a renowned temple in this place
dedicated to Lord Siva. The temple has some mural paintings on the Sreekovil belonged to the 17th and the
18th centuries. Till 1763 the temple was administered by Yagathirippad who was elected by the Namboodiri
Yogams of the area. Sakthan Thampuram put an end to this system and the temple was taken over by the
government. Though some dispute existed in the management after the cessation of Parur in 1764 it was
finally settled in 1882 and at last the temple came under the control of Cochin.
Mathilakam
Mathilakam is situated 9 km. north of Kodungallur and 35 km. South-west of Thrissur. Trippakkulam
Siva Temple is situated here. This temple is believed to have been consecrated by Lord Parasurama.
Trikkur
Trikkur is situated 16 km. south of Thrissur. It is famous for its rock cut temple dedicated to Lord
Sankaranarayana on a granite hill.
Saint Thomas Memorial, Kodungallur

185
St. Thomas, the apostle of Jesus Christ is believed to have landed in Kodungallur in 52 A.D. The St.
Thomas Church, the first church in the state established by him houses ancient relics.
Pambummekkattu Mana (Illam) Serpant Temple
Pambummekkattu Mana is the most famous Serpent worship centre in Kerala. The
Pambummekkattu lllam (also known as Mana) stands in Vadama village, a part of Mukundapuram Taluk in
Thrissur District, Kerala. The nearest railway station is 10 km away at Chalakudy. Devotees can reach here
by road from any part of Kerala.
The Pambu Mekkattu (serving of snake) is spread over six acres of land with five Serpant Kavus
(Kavu is sacred garden). The Pambummekkattu land is kept in its virgin style with huge trees and thick
vegetation. Thousands of bats are dwelling on these trees. Only on rare occasions the devotees are allowed
to enter into the Pambummekkattu Temple for worship.

(ii) Places of Historical or Archaeological Importance


Chelakkara
Chelakkara, situated 35 km. north-east of Thrissur is a historical place where a fierce battle was
fought between Zamorin and combined force of Travancore and Cochin states in 1772. It was the seat of
powerful Pisharoti chief Tottasseri Thalachennavar, who was deprived of his estates in 1767 for submission
to Zamorin.
Chalakudy
Chalakudy, located 30 km. south of the district headquarters is a place of historical importance as it
was the base of Tippu Sultan during the attack on the Travancore lines. This place is the centre of
communication with the eastern uplands. A few miles away from Chalakudy is the Chalakudy Irrigation
Project and 26 miles east of the town is the Peringalkutha Hydroelectric Project.
The Sholayur dam is constructed across the Chalakudy river and it is 65 km. east of Chalakudy town.
Kodungallur
Kodungallur is situated 50 km. south-west of Thrissur. Kodungallur was a great emporium of trade
even before the dawn of Christian era. It was the centre of trade and commerce with foreigners like Jews,
Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans and Arabs. From here ivory, sandalwood, peacock feathers and cinnamon
were exported to foreign countries. The Roman colonists are said to have founded here a temple in honour
of Augustus. Early Tamil poets called it as Muchiri. Jews, Christians and Muhammedans all claim it was the

186
place of their first settlement in India. The port and its suburbs figure prominently in early Chera
history.According to some scholars Thiruvanchikulam was the capital of the Chera kings of the Sangam age.
There are temples, churches and mosques in Kodungallur which are of historical importance. The
temples of Thiruvanchikulam and Kurumba Bhagavathi are noted for their antiquity. Kurumba Bhagavathi
temple is believed to have been founded by the mythical Chera emperor Senguttuvan, the hero of the
Chilappathikaram. The first church in the state founded by St. Thomas, the Apostle, and the first mosque
in India are situated here.
Porkulam
Porkulam is situated 3 km. of Kunnamkulam. This place is historically important, as it has figured in
the wars between the Zamorin of Calicut and the rulers of Cochin. It has great cultural importance also.
Porkulam is also called Vedakkad (meaning the forest of vedas) because here many dialogues were held
by famous poets like Uddanda Sastri and Kakkasseri Bhattathiri. An image of a seated Buddha, kept and
worshipped over a heap of burial stones in a corner of the temple, also testifies to the antiquity of the
place.
Mala
Mala was a colony of Jews in early times. Ambalakad Convent, one of the largest Monasteries in the
district is situated near Mala. Near to the Monastery the remains of the once famous seminary of Chombalur
(St. Pauls William) founded by Jesuit priests in the sixteenth century are seen. One of the first printing
presses in the country was established in this seminary and the first Malayalam book was printed here. The
Pambummekkattu mana, a serpent grove under the control of Pambummekkattu Namboodiri is situated
a mile away from Mala.
Adur
This place is famous for Annamanada temple. Annamanada was the venue of two historic meetings
between the rulers of Travancore and Cochin in the latter part of the 18th century. The famous Nedumkotta
or Travancore lines built by Dharma Raja of Travancore to meet the menace of the Mysore invasion passes
through Adur.
Chettuvai
Chettuvai or Manappuram is located 11 km. north-west of Thrissur. In 1714 the Dutch took possession
of the territory and thereafter its control changed several times between the Zamorin and the Dutch. The
Dutch erected a fort of Chettuvai and named it Fort William. The island and the fort were the scene of
several fierce encounters between the Dutch and the Mysore rulers (Haider Ali and Tippu Sultan) for about
50 years till Colonel Martley finally cleared Chettuvai of the Mysorians in 1790.
Chavakkad
Chavakkad is situated about 31 km. north-west of Thrissur. The mausoleum of Hydros Kutee, Haider
Alis Lieutenant is situated at the Manathala desam near Chavakkad. Disgusted with his masters oppression
Hydro Kutee is said to have revolted and died in the battle. Another site near the mosque was the scene of
his death and both places are regarded as sacred centres by the local Muslim population. Because of its
association with Hydros Kutee, Chavakkad is also sometimes called Kuttungal.
Mullurkkara

Mullurkkara was the seat of Manakot Nair, the chief of Ayirinad who was dispossessed of his
estates around 1740 for accepting the Zamorins suzerainty. The estate then came into the possession of
Paliath Achan. Trace of a fort built by the Achan to protect the religion from the Zamorins forces can be
seen here.

187
(iii) Places of Tourist Importance
Cheruthuruthy (Vallathole Nagar)

Cheruthuruthy is the seat of the Kerala Kalamandalam, renowned the world over for its Kathakali
training centre, founded by the poet Vallathole Narayana Menon. It is in this academy that the best of
Keralas Kathakali performers get their rigorous training. The institution also offers training in music,
drama and other dance forms including Mohiniyattam, Koodiyattam and Ottamthullal. Cultural programmes
are also arranged. The Kerala Kalamandalam is functioning at Vallathole Nagar. The Samadhi (tomb) of the
poet Vallathole, the founder of this famous institution is at the premises of old Kalamandalam.
The Indian Institute of Panchakarma under the Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Sidha
is situated at Vallathole Nagar.
Athirappally

188
This place is famous for a beautiful 80 feet high waterfall at the entrance to the Sholayar ranges.
This waterfalls joins the Chalakudy river. This is about 32 km. east of Chalakudy which attracts a large
number of tourists. As a part of tourism promotion a wayside Amenity Unit (Vazhiyora Vishram Kendra) has
been constructed here.
Vazhachal

Vazhachal waterfall lies east of Chalakudy, near the entrance to the Sholayar forest ranges. This
picturesque waterfall is close to dense green forests and is a part of the Chalakudy river. Athirappally and
Vazhachal are the most famous waterfalls of Kerala which attract tourists in plenty. These two waterfalls
are 5 km. apart.

Zoo

Zoo is at a distance of about 2 km. from Thrissur town. Within 13.5 acres of the compound live a
variety of fauna like lion railed macaque, sloth bear, species of birds and deer. The snake park has a
reptilian collection of King Cobras, Kraits, Vipers and Rat Snakes.

Art Museum

Art Museum is located in the Zoo compound. This small Art Museum has a good collection of wood
carvings, metal sculptures, kathakali figures and ancient jewellery. There is also a wonderful collection of
traditional Kerala caps.

Peechi Dam

Situated 20 km. east of Thrissur, Peechi is known for the irrigation dam constructed across the
Manali river. It has developed into one of the main tourist centres of the district. This picnic spot offers
boating facilities. The extensive botanical garden and park with attractive fountains and the swimming
pool are the main attractions of this dam.

189
Punnathoor Kotta

Punnathoor Kotta the place where the temple elephants (numbering over 40) are taken care of, is
situated 2 km. away from Guruvayoor temple. This unique elephant sanctuary is the only one of its kind in
the world.

Anakkayam

190
Anakkayam is roughly 20 km. from Chalakudy on the Sholayur-Peringalkuthu route, famous for its
lake with cool and placid waters. The place got its name from a herd of elephants which used to visit the
place quite often and the legend goes that the place got its name because some elephants had been
drowned in this lake. The place is breathtakingly beautiful with its rusting waters, chiselled rocks and
silent streams.
Town Hall
An imposing building with an art gallery or Chitralayam where mural painting from all parts of
Kerala are displayed.
Thrissur
Thrissur, the headquarters of district is built around Vadakkumnathan temple. The Swaraj Round
which is a ring road around the temple shooting of 15 roads in different direction gives the town a unique
look.
There are a number of institutions and locations in and around Thrissur worth mentioning. The
Aquatic Complex, the Indoor Stadium, the Zoo, the Archaeological Museum, the All India Radio Station,
the Doordarshan Relay Station at Ayyanthole, the Accountant Generals Office, the Paramekkavu and
Thrivambadi temples, the Lourde Church etc. are some of them.
Shakthan Thampuram Palace

Also known as the Palace Thoppu, the campus covers an area of 6 acres. Here one can see three
tombs including the tomb of Shakthan Thampuran, the greatest ruler of the Cochin dynasty.
Christian Divine Retreat Centres
They are located at Muringur and Potta near Chalakudy on the Kochi-Thrissur route. It is also
accessible by rail from Divine Nagar Railway Station, specially constructed for the tourists, to the Divine
Centres.

191
Vilangankunnu

Vilangankunnu is about 7 km. from Thrissur. The Childrens park on this beautiful hillside picnic
spot offers amusement rides
Chimmini Wildlife Sanctuary

The Sanctuary lies in the western valley of Nelliyampathy in the Mukundapuram taluk of Thrissur
district. Part of it is adjacent to the Peechi-Vazhani Sanctuary and the rest to the Parambikulam Sanctuary.
An artificial lake has been formed here by the dam across the Chimmini River. The Sanctuary, which was
established in 1984, occupies the watershed areas of the Kunumali and the Mupliyam rivers and is encircled
by hills.

192
Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary

Established in 1958, this sanctuary is about 20 km. east of Thrissur, in the catchment area of the
Peechi and Vazhani dams with headquarters at Peechi, 15 km. away. The Sanctuary is part of the
Palappilli-Nelliyampathy forests and forms the northern boundary of the Chimmony sanctuary.

Snehatheeram Beach

Snehatheeram Beach or Love Shore is beach ,located 25 km from Thrissur.Thalikulam Snehatheeram


Beach is a perfect picnic spot to spend the day or evening. Visitors can enjoy the sandy shore, the beach
park and lovely sunset.The beach was selected as the best beach tourism destination by the Department of
Tourism (Kerala) during the year 2010. The beach is maintained by the Department of Tourism (Kerala).
There is childrens park located near to the beach with all facilities.

193
(ix) MAJOR CHARECTERISTICS OF THE DISTRICT, CONTRIBUTION OF THE DISTRICT IN THE FORM OF ANY
HISTORICAL FIGURE ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISTRICT.
The scope of this publication is limited in this regard. The details of only a few of the prominent
personalities are given. This list is not exhaustive.
Melpathoor Narayana Bhattathiri

Narayana Bhattathiri of Melpathoor, the celebrated poet who flourished during the second half of
the 16th century and the first half of the 17th century A.D is associated with Thrissur district. He wrote the
famous Narayaneeyam while he was spending his days in prayer in Guruvayur temple to get himself cured
of this painful rheumatism. The work is said to have been finished in 100 days. Narayaneeyam is in the form
of a colloquy to Lord Krishna, the presiding deity in the temple of Guruvayur. In addition to the Narayaneeyam,
Narayana Bhattathiri wrote in sixty days the Prakriya Sarvasa which is a commentary on the Panini Sutras. He
also wrote Manameyodaya an important work on the Mimasa system of the Kumarila school. Another
excellent work of Melpathoor is the Karyakrama which deals with the domestic rituals of the Brahmins
belonging to the Asavalayana branch of Rig Vedins. Narayana Bhattathiri also wrote a large number of
Champu kavyas known as Prabandhas for the use of the Chakiyars for Kooth in the temples.
Poonthanam (1547-1640)

Poonthanam was a great devotee of Lord Krishna of Guruvayur. His great Malayalam works
Gnanappana, Sri Krishna Karnamrutham and Santanagopalam have won for him immortal renown as one of
the greatest poets of the Bhakti cult. His place in Malayalam literature has been compared to that of Surdas
in Hindi.

194
Unnayi Warrier (18th century)

Unnayi Warrier was one of the most distinguished literary figure which Thrissur district has pro-
duced in the 18 th century. He was a native of Irinjalakuda, but he spent greater part of his life at
Thiruvananthapuram as a court poet. His Malayalam work Nalacharitam has won for him immortal renown
as the greatest Kathakali poet of Kerala. The Unnayi Warrier Smaraka Kalanilayam located at Irinjalakuda is
a memorial to this great Kathakali composer established in 1953.

Kunjikuttan Thampuram (1865-1913)

Kunjikuttan Thampuram is known as Kerala Vyasa. His translation of the Mahabharata into Malayalam
is indeed a classic. He was also a pioneer in the field of short poems.

195
Vallathol Narayana Menon

Though born in the Malabar region of Kerala, Vallathol made Cheruthuruthy in the northern most
extremity of Thrissur district as his headquarters. He translated the Valmeeki Ramayana and the Rig Veda
into Malayalam. Vallathols greatness as a poet lay in the exquisite lyrical pieces which he composed. His
important works are Anirudhan, Badhiravilapam, Oru Kathu, Ganapathy, Sishyanum Makanum, Magdalana
Mariam, Kochusita, Indiayude Karachil etc. His shorter lyrics have been collected in the Sahityamanjari. He
was not only a great poet but also a distinguished patron of the arts of Kerala, particularly Kathakali. He
founded the Kerala Kala Mandalam at Cheruthuruthy to disseminate the art and culture of Kerala and thus
rendered invaluable help in popularising Kathakali in and outside the country.

C. Achyutha Menon (1862-1987)

C. Achyutha Menon, the learned author of the Cochin state Manual was a famous literary critic and
a prose writer in Malayalam.

196
Panditaraja K.Rama Pisharoti (1867-1946)
Panditaraja K. Rama Pisharoti, a noted Sanskrit scholar was a member of the Kallenkara Pisharom in
Irinjalakuda. In colloboration with Parikshit Thampuram of Cochin he wrote a commentary on Kalidasas
Sakuntala. He had also written commentaries on the Malavikagnimitra, the Sukasandesa and the second
part of the Narayaneeyam.
Rama Varma Appan Thampuran (1875-1941)
Rama Varma Appan Thampuran was famous as literary critic and prose writer. He was the editor of
the Rasikarajini, a Malayalam magazine published from Thrissur and also the founder of Mangalodayam
Press.
Chathukutty Mannadiar (1857-1904)
Chathukutty Mannadiar though born in Chittur, lived all his life and wrote his best works in Thrissur.
His translations of Uthararamacharitham are a work of great literary merit.
Evuprasiamma(Marth Euphrasia Eluvathingal (1877-1952)

She was born as Rosa Eluvathingal on October 17, 1877 in Kattoor, Thrissur. She was canonized
as Saint by Pope Francis on November 23, 2014 in Vatican City.
John Mathai (1886-1959)

197
John Mathai was an economist who served as Indias first Railway Minister and subsequently as
Indias Finance Minister,taking office shortly after the presentation of Indias first Budget, in 1948. He pre-
sented two Budgets, but resigned following the 1950 Budget in protest at the increasing power of
the Planning Commission and P. C. Mahalanobis. He was the first Chairman of the State Bank of India when
it was set up in 1955. He was the founding President of the Governing Body of NCAER, the National Council
of Applied Economic Research in New Delhi, Indias first independent economic policy institute estab-
lished in 1956. He served as the Vice Chancellor of the University of Mumbai from 1955 till 1957 and then as
the first Vice Chancellor of the University of Kerala from 1957 to 1959. John Mathai was appointed a Com-
panion of the Order of the Indian Empire (CIE) in 1934, and was awarded the Padma Vibhushan in 1959.
Prof.Joseph Mundassery (1903 1977)

Prof.Joseph Mundassery was a renowned literary critic and Indian politician from Kerala state. He
was born at Kandassankadavu, Thrissur. He was one among the towering literary critics in the Malayalam
language and literature. Prof. Joseph Mundasserys fame as an educationalist rests partly to the reforms
that he partially succeeded in bringing about in the educational sector in Kerala when he was the Education
Minister In Kerala politics, he is famously remembered as the Education Minister who is the mastermind
behind the drafting of the controversial Education Bill of the first EMS communist ministry of 1957. He was
the President of the Kerala Sahithya Parishad 1965-67, executive (and founding) member of the Kerala
Sahithya Academy. He was also instrumental in establishing the Kerala Sangeetha Nataka Academy and was
a member of the Kendra Sahithya Academy.
Panampilly Govinda Menon (1906 1970)

198
Panampilly Govinda Menon was an Indianpolitician, freedom fighter, and lawyer.He was born in a
village Kakkad/ Kathikkudam near Chalakudy.Later in the 1930s he became prominent in the politics of
the Kingdom of Cochin and served briefly as the Prime minister of Cochin state in 1947.After the union
of Travancore and Cochin, he served as minister for education and minister for finance. He was the Chief
Minister of Travancore-Cochin in 19551956.He became Union Minister for Law and Railways (19691970
and Minister of state for Food and Agriculture.
Nalapat Balamani Amma (1909 2004)

Balamani Amma was born on 19 July 1909 to Chittanjoor Kunhunni Raja and Nalapat Kochukuttiamma
at Nalappat, her ancestral home in Punnayurkulam of Thrissur district in Kerala. She was a prolific writer in
malyalam and was known as the Poetess of Motherhood.Though she received no formal education, the
tutelage under her maternal uncle and the poet Nalapat Narayana Menon and his collection of books helped
her become a poet. She was influenced by Nalapat Narayana Menon and poet Vallathol Narayana Menon.
Balamani Amma was the mother of the renowned writer Kamala Das who has translated one of her mothers
poems, The Pen, which describes the loneliness of a mother. Mohandas, Shyam Sunder, and Sulochana
Nalapat are her other children. Balamani Amma died on 29 September 2004 after having suffered
from Alzheimers disease for nearly five years.Amma, Muthassi , and Mazhuvinte Katha were some of her
well known works. She was a recipient of many awards and honours, including Padma Bhushan,Saraswati
Samman, Sahitya Academi Award, and Ezhuthachan Award.
Kovilan (V. V. Ayyappan)(1923-2010)

199
Kovilan,Malayalam writer, was born in Guruvayoor. He won the Kerala Sahitya Academi Award in
1972 and 1977 and the Kendra Sahitya Academi Award in 1998. He was also a recipient of the Kerala state
governments highest literary honour Ezhuthachan Puraskaram in recognition of his outstanding contribu-
tion to Malayalam literature. He had been a Fellow of the Kerala Sahitya Academi since 1997 and Sahitya
Academi since 2005. and realities in a linear mode. But Kovilan received the highest critical appreciation for
his later work Thattakam, a powerful and poignant portrayal of generations of people in his ancestral
hamlet.
K.N.Raj( 1924 2010)

Kakkadan Nandanath Raj was born in Thrissur District of Kerala. He is popularly known as K. N. Raj,
an Indian economist who played an important role in Indias planned development, drafting sections of
Indias first Five Year Plan, specifically the introductory chapter when he was only 26 years old. He was a
veteran economist in the Planning Commission. He worked out a plan to raise Indias rate of savings in the
post-Second World War period when the country was in need of foreign aid. He computed Indias Balance of
Payments for the first time for the Reserve Bank of India. Raj was an advisor to several prime ministers
from Jawaharlal Nehru to P.V. Narasimha Rao. Dr. Raj was a Keynesian Economist. He studied the application
of Keynesian Monetary Theory in Indian context.
P.Bhaskaran (1924 2007)

200
Pulloottupadathu Bhaskara Menon , better known as P. Bhaskaran, was a famous Malayalam poet
and lyricist of Malayalam film songs. He penned more than 3000 songs for about 250 films. He also directed
44 Malayalam feature films and 3 documentaries, produced 6 feature films and acted in several movies. For
his overall contributions to Malayalam cinema, he was awarded J.C.Daniel Lifetime Achievement Award by
the Government of Kerala.He was also a journalist and an All India Radio employee before becoming active
in the film industry. He was well known for simple but beautiful use of the language in his songs and poems.
Kunjunni Mash(1927-2006)

Kunjunni, popularly known as Kunjunni Mash [English Kunjunni Master] . He was considered as a
childrens poet and his poems were short like him. He always led a humble life.Kunjunni was born in the
village of Valapad . Kunjunni started his career as a teacher.

C. V. Sreeraman (1931 - 2007)

C. V. Sreeraman was an Indian writer who wrote short stories and novels in Malayalam. He was the
Vice Chairman of Kerala Sahitya Akademi. C. V. Sreeramans stories stand foremost core to the theme, as
exemplified by his Anayasena Maranam (Dying an Easy Death) and Railway Palangal (The Rails). He has won

201
the prestigious Kendra Sahitya Academy Award in 1999 for his collection of short stories Sreeramante
Kadhakal and Kerala Sahitya Academy Award for the collection Vasthuhara.
V.K.N. (1932 2004)

Vadakke Koottala Narayanankutty Nair, commonly known as V.K.N, was a famous Malayalam writer,
noted mainly for his high-brow satire. He wrote novels, short stories and political commentaries. His works
are noted for their multi-layered humour, trenchant criticism of the socio-political classes and ability to
twist the meanings of words contextually and lend a touch of magic to his language. A native of Kerala in
South India, V.K.N. was born on 6 April 1932 in Thiruvilwamala in Thrissur district.
Kamala Surayya (Madhavi kutty) (1934-2009)

Kamala Surayya/Kamala Das/ Madhavikutty was born at Punnayurkulam, Thrissur. She was a major
Indian English poet and literature. She is well known for her short stories and autobiography. Her oeuvre in
English, written under the name Kamala Das. Like her mother, Balamani Amma, Kamala Das also excelled in
writing. Her love of poetry began at an early age through the influence of her great uncle, Nalappatt

202
Narayana Menon, a prominent writer.She won Ezhuthachchan Puraskaram,Vayalar Award, Sahitya Akademi
Award, Asan World Prize, Asian Poetry Prize, Kent Award.

Kalamandalam Hyderali (1946 2006)

Hyderali was a native of Ottupara in Wadakkanchery of Thrissur district.He was one of the best
Kathakali singers of his generation, and the first non-Hindu artiste to make a mark in the four-century-old
classical dance-drama fromKerala in South India.

Bharathan (1946 1998)

Bharathan was an Indian film director, artist, lyricist, music director, sculptor, poster designer, edi-
tor and art director. He was born at Engakkadu near Wadakkancherry, in present day Thrissur district.
Bharathan is noted for being the founder of a new school of film making in Malayalam cinema, along
with Padmarajan, in the 1980s, which created films that were widely received while also being critically
acclaimed.

203
K. Sachidanandan

K. Sachidanandan is an Indian poet and critic writing in Malayalam and English. A pioneer of modern
poetry in Malayalam, a bilingual critic , playwright, editor, literary columnist and translator, he is the former
Editor of Indian Literature journal and the former Secretary of Sahitya Academi.He is also a public intellec-
tual of repute upholding secular democratic views, supporting causes like environment, human rights and
free software and a well known speaker on issues concerning contemporary Indian literature.
I.M.Vijayan

Inivalappil Mani Vijayan is a former professional Indian football player. Vijayan was crowned Indian
Player of the Year in 1993, 1997 and 1999, the first player to win the award multiple times. He was also
awarded the Arjuna award in 2003.
(x) SCOPE OF VILLAGE DIRECTORY AND TOWN DIRECTORY
The Village Directory and Town Directory Statements presented in Part-A of this volume are useful
sources of data for planners and researchers. It can provide accurate and reliable data on important rural/
urban characteristics. The Village Directory Data is considered to be the Great Indian Rural Data-base.
Unlike most other States where each Village is wholly included in one Development Block, in Kerala

204
several Villages fall under more than one Development Block. The Village Directory Data are available for
the whole village and not for parts. So it has been decided to present the Village Directory Taluk-wise as
was done in previous censuses. The non-census data given in the Village Directory and Town Directory
Statements are supplied by the concerned Tahsildars or Municipal Secretaries and the data was later
updated/corrected in consultation with the concerned Departments.
The amenities available in the rural areas of the districts are presented in the Village Directory.
The Village Directory consists of Statements of villages in each taluk and for each village, area, population,
number of households, availability of amenities such as educational, medical, drinking water, post, telegraph
and telephone, communication facilities, power supply, approach to village and land use pattern are
provided. Some new item of information such as number of banks, credit societies, number of recreational
and cultural facilities in the village, etc., have been added in the present volume as compared to 2001.
There are appendices also showing Abstracts/ Summaries of information given in Village Directory.
The Town Directory Data are presented in seven Statements. The Town Directory furnishes data in
respect of status of town (i.e. Municipal Corporation, Municipality / Cantonment, Township, Census Town);
grow